Cutting The Line To Get Ahead | Job Search Radio

Ep 245 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a strategy for you to get ahead once you have your next job.

Summary

So many people believe in making incremental job changes and doing the slow, working your way up the ladder thing. That may work for some people but a lot of you can be doing much more.

I want to remind you, using Barack Obama as an example, there is someone who is in assemblyman who became US Senator and immediately began running for president. Maybe you sat in the Senate for less than a year before she went out campaigning. He wound up working the system in a way that served him many of you believe it serve the country and if you don't. This is not about politics. However, I am to look at him from a career perspective as being someone who made quick enormous jumps that allowed him to advance.

This is an easy work and it certainly wasn't for him. Certainly it would be for anyone is able to take advantage of this.

If you're out of work trying to find something, this isn't a strategy for you. However, if you or someone who has something right now, this is the time to start looking for that next big leap so that you're not changing jobs incrementally for the $2000 raise, the $5000 raise. You are going for the big jumps. You're going for the big moves... And you have the experience to back it up.

In politics, is pretty common for presidents to be younger than senators or congressmen , but in business. We look at our progression as being one slow step up the ladder to another, until, eventually, we are supposed to hit the top. It doesn't work that way, doesn't it?

Let's not kid ourselves. You are not going to incrementally work your way up the ladder. You may need to start a business. You may need to take advantage of your connections and keep building networks after you have landed in order to take this big leap. However, you do it, you just gotta do in order to get that to the top faster, rather than on that slow boat.

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

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If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Don’t Forget . . . No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2016/12/23/dont-forget

Ep 601 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not forget to think about your retirement planning.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the criteria that fewer individuals are using when they evaluate job offers.

It's important to consider the money. It's important to consider the benefits. I want to point this one out because it was a mistake I made early in my career; I just want to make sure that you avoid it in yours. That is, look at retirement planning.

You may be 22. at this point and retirement may be 100 years from now. But, the fact of the matter remains, it can be free money that, when compounded over the course of your career, can be money that you can use and will need. And, trust me when I say this, I wish I had done it differently myself.

With that being the case, there's another thing that people need to evaluate when you evaluate offers-- career pathing. When a firm talks with you about a job offer, you have interviewed about the job they have available today and you need to also ask, "2 or 3 years from now, where am I going to be? What kind of options might exist for me. If I do a great job? What is this firm normally do to rotate people in the organization?"

This is important because, think about it for a second, if you were to do the same job for the next 5 years of your life, 15 years of your life, 40 years of your life, I think you might want to put a bullet in your head. I know from my experience as a recruiter, you kind of do the same thing over and over again. One of the reasons I do this podcasts is to keep myself fresh because, all day long, I am staring at resumes, I'm talking with people, I am doing business development to open up new accounts, I am responding to customer inquiries,, negotiating salaries and people… All the same tasks.

What I set out to do is to create a little bit of freshness. So I started to write books, do videos, do podcasts, do a whole host of things to make my work more interesting to me Because the job of recruiter is extremely repetitive.

Do you want to be in a position where you are doing the same job for 40 years? No change whatsoever? I don't think so.

So, asked him about career pathing. Asked him about where you can go a few years from now. No guarantees, obviously. But what is the pattern of rotating people into newer opportunities.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Career Mistakes: Not Being Clear About What You Want.


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Another one of those stupid career mistakes too many people make that cost them PLENTY!

Summary

I debated whether to make this into a "stupid interview mistakes," or a "stupid career mistake." I eventually decide is about a person in their career and how they viewed it, rather than just simply an interview mistakes. The mistake I'm going to address today is not being clear about what you want and where you are going.

Think about for second. If you are driving from New York to Boston or from Chicago to Kansas City or from Kansas City to Los Angeles and you didn't have a roadmap or GPS and were not very clear about where you wanted to get to if you just got into your car and drove, how would you know if you got the right place? Often, people going to their job search and view their career kind of like the leaf in the movie, "Forrest Gump" that floats around from place to place, eventually landing somewhere. Is that really how you want to manage were unmanage your career?

I think most people want to have a clear idea w they are aiming for. Instead of letting corporations make that decision for them. To be clear, if you are not qualified, you have to develop the qualifications to get there. After all, no one year person is going to make the C suite in their 2nd year unless it is their own company. When job hunters look at their career and decide they want to look for job, that is as far as they really think about it. They start looking for a job. I don't care if you are a junior person or a senior individual that is how people conduct themselves more times than not. It's foolish. It's self-destructive.

If you are not sure, you need to spend time talking with people and getting advice. Maybe, coaching for the picture. Here, I'm not to sell myself to you. I am available and there are many people you can talk with who can help you sort it out and point you in the right direction.

The mistake here is not really being clear about it. As a result, you want going to interviews and firms try to persuade you that their job is wonderful and you forget the benchmark against your own aspirations. You are not evaluated against your own needs except for money, location . . Concrete stuff but not the bigger picture. The bigger picture is what you want to do with your professional life and how does this role fit into it?

Thus, whether you're interviewing or looking at your career in general, it winds up being a huge mistake that many people make.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Companion Mistakes People Make in Their Resume | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses mirrors mistakes people make with your resume.

Summary

The 1st mistake is being way too vague. In being vague, it's almost like you don't think you have enough to say so you use large fonts, flowery language... Vagueness to describe what you did and how you went about doing it. I remember being in high school and had assignment for school; I did read a lot of literature but I knew a little bit of the Bible and use terms like, "thee," and, "thine" that I thought were signs of intelligence and sophistication. Of course, all I did was show. I was foolish.

Sometimes, job hunters get very vague and what they describe and the impact is you can't demonstrate that you fit the role by being vague. All you do is obscure your knowledge.

The other thing that people do is the exact opposite-- they get too complex and almost "micro describe" every little bit of minutia that they have been involved with. The result winds up being people's eyes glaze over. You just want to go to sleep when you read these things. Not only that, they go to small font-- 8 point fonts and sometimes 7 point, font! You can't read these things. Maybe the applicant tracking system can but, even there, some can't.

You have to balance this out. 10 point. 11 point. 12 point tops! Those of the right font sizes to use (12 is a more common size). If you use a 10 point font, that gives you a little bit of play.

Be direct as you talk about what you have done and how you went about doing it your resume.. Anything else will waste your time and theirs.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What Do Recruiters Look For When They Interview Someone? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 852 This question was originally asked about IT positions however, I believe the answer can be applied to any type of interviews.

Summary

I was asked a terrific question by someone.  The simple way to ask it is, "What do recruiters look for when they interview someone?"  It was originally asked about IT recruiters, but I think the answer is pretty universal to all recruiters.

You have to start by understanding that people don't just simply interview individuals for the heck of it.  They are trying to fill a position. . They are not trying to create "inventory" as though, at the right time, they're going to go to the shelf and pluck a book off of it.  It doesn't work that way.

Time is precious. They are trying to fill jobs.  So what are they looking for?

The 1st thing is competence.  Is your background match up with the position that they are trying to fill or other positions they are trying to fill? . There was obviously something that elicited interest on their part, and they are trying to figure out whether you actually have that experience.

But I want to call out something that is obvious to me who is done this for a long time and may be less obvious to you.  Competence is not the only variable that firms look for. . Sometimes what they do is consider, "He's not quite perfect in this . But what she can do is this other thing so they may use a weight or a measure to evaluate you. We all have seen people who are not competent who have been hired so we know that is not the only criteria when they hire.

Here's what else they look for:

Self-confidence.  Do you inspire confidence that you are the solution to a need?  If they brought you into a room with an absolute stranger, would you be able to convince them that they could trust you?
Character. . Do you have character? Are you a character?  Some jobs require a big personality and that sort of role, whether it is in sales or in other areas is important in some jobs and not in others.  Character is 1 of those funny variables.
Chemistry. . This is a funny one for me to talk about because I think firms are wrong for looking at this one, but they do.  The notion of chemistry is how you will fit into an organization. How you will fit into his apartment. How you will fit into a company.  To me, this is where bias shows up in interviews because you are on good behavior, they are on good behavior. You weren't showing who you really are and neither are they. . So, how do you will evaluate for fit?  They aren't administering industrial psychology questions, are they? . They haven't given their own staff such questions.  . How do you really measure for fit?  In their subconscious, the notion of chemistry comes down to who you remind them off. . It's a reality for now that I hope changes in the future.
Charisma. . This is the big one.  Charismatic people always do better than non-charismatic ones.  Some jobs don't require charismatic people. But, overall, companies and their managers are enamored with charismatic people, the ones with that magnetic personality that makes them lovable, delightful, believable. It's like how we elect presidents (let's put aside the current election.  As I release this, it is November, 2016) , and instead look back in time.  The United States tends to elect people who are engaging, and enormously charismatic and didn't know much.  I'm not going to identify who I'm thinking of, but all 3 that I am, at the time of their election, didn't know squat about being president.  Ronald Reagan, an actor who became a governor.  Bill Clinton, governor of 1 of the smallest states in the country with a poor education system.  Barack Obama, a US Senator who pondered his election rarely went to the Senate to do work and instead went out campaigning.  These were men who grew into the job.  America was engaged with them, even though from a policy perspective, they were very different from one another.  They were all completely different.  Reagan was the model conservative; today, Bill Clinton would be seen as a moderate (even then, he campaigned this 1, even though he didn't govern that way); Barack Obama campaigned as a moderate but, revealed with time that he had more progressive underpinnings.America has grown with each of them and loved each of them.
It's not about knowledge per se. It's what I call sometimes, "the squeeze bottle effect." When you interview, you can't simply show how qualified you are. You have to address the emotional side.

As I spoke about in the video recently, when you have a brownie with ice cream at home, I'm sure it is very very good. When you go to a restaurant, there is one thing that is different about that brownie and ice cream – – they have decorated it with a squeeze bottle with chocolate syrup and may decorate the plate with other things. You eat with your eyes as much as with your mouth, right?

It's the same in interviewing. If you are hired solely on your knowledge, they can give you a test and make a decision whether or not to hire you. Based upon the results. Other things come into play.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What Is Your Greatest Success?


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers one of those classic interview questions and teaches a formula for doing so.

Summary

Today, I have an answer to 1 of those tough interview questions that are designed to make you squirm. This 1 is a real simple one because it's a posting question-- Tell me about your greatest achievement. Tell me about your greatest success. It's all the same question.

Here's the formula for answering. In previous videos and podcasts you may have heard me talk about how stories are so delightful for organizations to listen to and understand the circumstances and experience. I had someone rejected for job. He was on a final interview and they complained that he only talked about what he did and he didn't tell us any stories in answering your question. Ridiculous. But that is what firms like it is our obligation to give it to them. Here's the formula for doing.

You talk about the situation you are assigned and the task that you have to do in order to accomplish it. That leads to your accomplishments and what the result was. For example,, if I were talking about myself, "The client approached me about a particular search. They needed 37 positions filled within a particular period of time. " That's the situation I was asked to step into.

What was the test that I did? "I mobilize the team of individuals who are focused purely on doing that search with me coordinating them. I interviewed 25 people a day for 30 days until such time as the client was exhausted by resources. I presented people to them and they start to interview them. The client was absolutely delighted because I was able to get the long way before their required need. They were concerned that they need these 37 people on within 3 months and be too difficult a task to do. I got them on board with 2 1/2 weeks to spare. The e result was great client satisfaction, more opportunities to work on, revenue generated…" And I would give the milestones for what I accomplished.

The situation, the task I undertook, the accomplishments that you had and the results that you had.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why Do Recruiters Ask You About Things They Can Find Out in Your Resume | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


There are 2 reasons why recruiters ask questions about things that they can already find out in your resume. Here, I lay them out simply for you.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why do recruiters ask about things they can already find out in my resume?"

This may be a shock to you and if it is, I apologize to you for sharking you.However, I always have to answer with "no BS." for why they do this.

The 1st reason is that people lie.They don't tell the truth. Thus, when you put them on the spot during an interview,, sometimes they give you information than what's on the resume.

Assuming that you are a "truth teller," and your 1st reaction was to groan about people lying, another thing that we are trying to do (Although I don't do recruiting anymore, I did for more than 40 years and have a good idea of the my thought process when I was doing this),I wanted to see if I want to hear how you tell the story Of what you did and how you went about doing it So that I would get a sense of how you interviewed.

For me, if I stumbled into someone who is trying to con me, that was a "bonus point."I am assuming that everyone is telling me the truth in the resume.In telling me the truth in the resume I'm moving onto the next thing, which is if I'm going to invest my time and energy in representing someone, how are they going to perform on an interview? Do I have a chance of earning a fee? If not, (buzzer sound) I delete the resume because it is a waste of my time, no matter how good you think you are. My client won't wind up hiring you. Do you understand?

We don't do things to "find you a job." You are paying nothing. What recruiters do is fill a position with a client and the client pays us.As a result, you are the person who will allow us to earn the fee… Or not and we are trying to figure that out.

In telling us what you've done and how you went about doing it, You are helping us to discern between different people because we can't submit everyone. We are not paid to submit resumes as though they are a burger at a fast food restaurant.What recruiters are paid to do is to deliver someone who the client has determined that they need because the person has a particular background and a particular personality type who will do the job and has particular skills that they have specified.

If you cannot interview well, if you can't interview well with the recruiter, (buzzer sound) they will hit the delete key because they have no chance of hurting a fee.

So take it seriously. Don't just simply question why they're asking you these questions and wasting your time because they aren't. You are wasting their time if you don't deliver wellAnd demonstrate that you have the required skills that their client is looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Simplest Résumé Hack (VIDEO)

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple advice for writing a great resume using this hack.

Summary

I will give you some no BS job search advice in the form of a resume hack. This is going to be a simple way to write resumes.

When most people write a resume, then write his master resume and they prune out everything that is not going to be relevant and then mail out the same resume to every job that they apply to. Like the broken watch that is right twice a day, it works sometimes but no where near often enough.

Here's the solution to the issue. It requires that you take the time to think of everything that you've done professionally.

What I want to do is to write this 1 grand master resume. It has everything in it that you have done – – role, responsibilities, accomplishments, if you are in IT, the technology that you have utilized. It also includes the revenue that is been generated by your work and/or the resume saved by your work.

Once you have that master, and it could be 10 pages long for all I care, but it's most important for you to start with your most recent job, work backward, and then create this master document.

Then, as you apply to things, as you submit your resume to friends who tell you about opportunities, I want you to prune out irrelevant things and call attention to the major things that you've done that relate to that specific job.

Some of you are going to say, "Gee! That sounds like a lot of work!" In fact, it isn't a lot of work. It is a lot more work to edit all the time than if you have a master document for which you are pruning each time into something useful for an employer.

After all, when you buy a personal computer (if you still buy them), it was a big deal when plug and play technology was introduced. What's that? All the devices could be plugged into any computer and you could create something customized based upon the need of the individual buyer.

If the manufacturer was deciding everything that you needed, you would wind up with a lot of unnecessary things and a lot of unnecessary cost in your device. By creating plug and play, you got a customized system based upon your unique needs.

The same is true with a resume. You need to, deliver a customized product for every single job that you apply to. If you think that's a lot of work. Let me ask you a question. Is a lot of work from your vantage point. To do this and "risk" getting a $15,000 or $20,000 raise or $25,000 or, for you veteran people, $50,000 or $75,000 increase? I don't think so. When all is said and done, it is not a big deal.

Write the master. Create this enormous document. Call attention to every little bit of substance that you have done. Then, each time that you are submitting your resume, take the relevant parts of it per employer, pull it into a separate resume and submitted to that firm. That's what you do. That's the simplest hack I can give you for resume writing because what you are doing up until this point isn't working, is it?

Try my way. It does work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Second Interview Mistakes: Being Too Casual


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http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here’s a dopey mistake people make on second interviews, third interviews and final interviews.

Summary

I wanted to talk with you about 1 of the stupid interview mistakes that happens more on 2nd and 3rd interviews than it would on a 1st interview. The nature of the mistake is acting too casually with the interviewer. You gotten comfortable; you've gotten involved with the conversation with this firm, the 1st time through. You met 2 or 3 people; they invited you back and now you're feeling really good. You started to feel like you belong and gotten comfortable.

So you some of the people you met last time and you stop selling. You stopped paying attention to what you said the 1st time through and started to tell different stories. You stop thinking that this is a situation where you have to sell yourself and start acting too casually. The result winds up being that you shoot yourself in the foot.

Again, this tends to happen more on 2nd and 3rd interviews that it would on a 1st interview because people know better than doing that on a 1st interview , . . unless they are an arrogant SOB. Then, you just so cocky and full of yourself; most people aren't that way. People know how to behave the 1st time through. It is generally the 2nd time through the people lower their guard, are more revealing and make this dumb mistake . They left their unprofessional nature come out and cause them opportunities.

Remember, don't act too casually. You are there to sell yourself and persuade them that you are the right person for this role, you are not there talking to your best friend . They are not your ally. They are there to evaluate and assess you until they get to the offer phase

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: You Are Shrunk to the Size of a Nickel

EP 851 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with an answer to this old time Google interview question

Summary

I want to do another tough interview. 1 of those brainteasers. I think you'll find it fun... Like most brainteasers it really isn't all that tough..

You are shrunk to the height of the nickel and your masses proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blender will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?

Ready for the answer?

You jump.

You see, the key is in the density. Once you are at your original density, you have the strength to be able to job. Thus, you have the ability to jump out of the blender and beat the crap out of the interviewer who put you in there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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