Career Mistakes Too Many People Make (VIDEO)


Here I speak about a few of the mistakes people make in how they view their career.

Summary

I'm not sure that these are specifically career mistakes; I think some of them could go into business category as well. I'm going to try to cover both and start off with the big one.

1. You made a mistake. You are going to make more mistakes.. The real question is how you will respond to the mistake. Do you beat yourself up? Do you punish yourself? You spent hours or days or weeks fixating on the mistake or do try to learn your lessons and move on?

I wrestle with this 1 myself. I'm a guy who spent a lot of time searching for perfection and not spending in time, accepting excellence. Maybe you are the same way, too. I think there's a chance to learn and be kinder to oneself because there's a chance that you are going to make mistakes and more mistakes! It happens.

What can you learn from the experience? What can you do to learn and move forward from it?

2. If you are interested in being happy in your work, it is probably going to take time. Especially when someone is junior, what tends to happen is you get what is called, "grunt work." It tends to be the foundation for how people learn the fundamentals of the craft.

For example, in IT, someone starts off by being a coder. Although the technology will change over the course of time, they will use it as the baseline for how they learn and grow to manage people, how to lead organizations and such. Certainly being a kind coder doesn't guarantee that you will be a good manager, but understanding the fundamentals of your craft and not taking shortcuts will help a lot.

That's the important thing – – learning the fundamentals of your craft and not taking shortcuts. What are the fundamentals? You ask for help and advice? I'm not talking about asking your manager, but from other people? That is what's going to help guide you and help you progress.

3. Another thing is about being patient with yourself. It takes time to be successful. As I said before, the secret to success without hard work is still a secret. What can you do to lay the foundation? If you think you can figure it out by yourself, you are going to make it a lot harder than what you need to do.

4. Always be networking and always be asking other people for advice. Save the information. Collate it. Start creating spreadsheets or data categories that kind of fit with one another so that you can learn what's being told to you constantly and see whether it meets with your experience. Adapt and change.

5. The last thing going to talk with you about is the fact that so many people separate the work from the personal life. It's hard of these days, but I remember an old story from the original owner of the New York Jets. He was trying to figure out whether or not to promote someone into particular role and one person over another. The reason he made the particular choice he made as he tell the loser in the situation, that for the loser this was a job with all the template of being a job. This contrasted with the other person who loved what he did.

Your goal is to find work that you love. I don't presume to know what it is and there are a million ways to find it and figure it out. Think of your career as being a longer race than just today, even if you are in your 60s, and start laying the foundation, working at it and finding work that you really love.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Big Career Management Lessons from The Shawshank Redemption (VIDEO)


In this video, I look at 3 characters from the movie, The Shawshank Redemption, and use it to speak about a career mistake. They too many people make.

Summary

If you've never seen the movie, "The Shawshank Redemption," you are missing a gem. It is based upon the story by Stephen King. It is a wonderful, wonderful American movie focusing on Andy Dufresne, Red , and a minor character that shows up named Brooks. Between the 3 of them . I think there person terrific lessons for employees who work for firms. Brooks is someone who works in the prison library, my thoughts about this came together for me this morning.

Brooks is released from prison and not long after he is out and doing the work that is expected of him on the outside, he comes to realize that he can't really function on the outside and commit suicide. Red is released and checks into her room and seeing his car into the beam are the words, "Brooks Was Here." Red has been bagging groceries in a supermarket, working hard, asking for permission to do things like he did in prison. Red comes to realize that he is on the same path that Brooks was on.

Then, there is Andy Dufresne. He is the embezzler, the bank robber, the guy who embezzled money from his bank and no one has ever found it. He makes a path for himself in prison the hard way. It is a very hard path, let's not kid ourselves. If you seen this movie, you'll know what I'm talking about.

Andy refuses to become institutionalized like Brooks was and read discovers he was in a very different way. Red is a little bit of a con man, the one you can get cigarettes from from the outside. If there's something special that you want, he will arrange for it. Yet, he has worked in that system and doesn't really know how to function in the real world.

For many of you job hunters, for many of you who worked in one organization for a long time, you have become as institutionalized as Brooks. You've learned to believe the BS that you been told by your employer about what you're capable of and what you are incapable of. When you finally get to the outside, you'll learn that you're capable of a lot more.

And there is a risk because you may discover that it is scary out there. I'll let you in on a secret – – it is. When you step into an environment outside of your comfort zone, it feels a little scary. But doing so is going to be the way that you will survive and eventually thrive by getting out of the places that put these deadening rules on you that cause you to conform and behave and do things that you really don't want to be doing.

It starts with courage. It starts with the courage to realize that there's more to your life and more to your work life than just doing this. That's the lesson from Andy Dufresne., Andy looks like someone who is becoming a part of the system and she isn't. He is willing to take risks-- calculated risks.

Eventually, he winds up making it to the outside and living.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Career Mistakes: Not Paying Attention to The Tea Leaves (VIDEO)

 

Sometimes we make dumb mistakes when managing your career. In this video I discussed one that I headed off someone from making.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

9 Things to Do to Avoid Career Disaster (VIDEO)

Here are things you can do to avoid career disasters.

Summary

Although the US economy is chugging along fueled by low interest rates that have punished savers, the world as a whole is struggling. Whereas in 2008, the US was hemorrhaging jobs, there has been mediocre but consistent job creation occurring. It is nowhere near pre-collapse levels but nonetheless jobs are being created.

Where once job boards were the primary way that people were looking for work, now positioning on LinkedIn is as important if not more so, as well as quality of your professional network.

As one of my guests said in an interview for “Job Search Radio,” 70% of all jobs are found through networking and 70% of those (or 49% of all jobs) are found based upon a relationship that didn’t exist at the beginning of your job search.

When I released my first book, “Get Yourself Hired NOW!” in 2006, branding was an alien concept to job hunters (and to some of you it may still be one) but it is incredibly easy to do given the technology tools that are now available that didn’t exist 10 years ago.

One thing remains true today as it did in 2006. If you’re like most people, you think job hunting is hard, something about as pleasant as going to the dentist or a visit from the Internal Revenue Service. But if I told you that you could earn at least $50,000 or more than you do now over the next five years, would I get your attention (Statistically, it would be easier to earn more than $70000 following a simple strategy)?

In 1972, when I was looking for my first job, I applied for a position at an employment agency. I almost didn’t apply because the ad said, “Management Trainee: Inexperienced Preferred.” In fact, I had no experience and thus was not qualified for anything else. On that day, I stumbled into the field of job hunting and have spent the subsequent years learning how the job hunting system works . . . and doesn’t work.

Since April of 1972, I have spoken to hundreds of thousands of people that I was able to document (more likely, much more), learning from their experiences, successes, and mistakes, and have successfully coached people to use these different strategies to find their next job.

After all, the next recession is on the way. Usually after blow out growth, 7 years is an extremely long period for a recovery. We have passed that threshold and are living on borrowed time.

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Here are several things to do in anticipation of a need or desire to look for work.

Write a resume update. When a good opportunity presents itself to you, you can’t wait a week to update yours and then send it to the search firm. By then, they will have gone on to other potential submissions and lock you out of the competition. Every 3-4 months update it. Write a paragraph reviewing your accomplishments during that period. In this way, updating your resume will take no more than 90 minutes instead of scratching your head to remember things.
Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. Resumes are for when you are hunting for an opportunity. LinkedIn is for when you are being hunted. The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. People who get ahead are the ones who remain alert to opportunity.
Cultivate your network. Networking is the most effective way of job hunting. As I said, 49% of positions are filled as a result of introductions to people you did not know at the beginning of your search and 70% all told are filled through networking, out positioning by more than 2-1 to job boards and recruiters. A network, whether in-person or online is cultivated through regular care and feeding. Start reaching out to people you know at least twice a year.
Build a “success brand.” The ability to brand is probably the biggest change that has occurred since I released my first book. There are more places to speak and write to demonstrate your subject matter expertise to audiences locally and worldwide. They require very little time and have a huge potential return.
Read the tea leaves. Every day, there is another story about workers being laid off from major and small companies throughout the world. It is stunning to me that so many of these people were surprised by job cuts. Didn’t they notice no one walking in their store, buying their employer’s products or services or were they just “wishing and hoping” that it might not happen to them?
Practice interviewing regularly. No matter how experienced someone is, interviewing is an acquired skill. The most senior people in the world make stupid mistakes on their interviews saying dumb things that prove costly. Don’t be an amateur. Practice proactively.
Make sure your wardrobe is appropriate for the position you are interviewing for and fits properly. Although this may be a bigger issue with men, both men and women arrive at interviews wearing clothes that are ill-fitting and 2-3 generations old in style, even when wearing “classic styles.” Even the classics go out of style. Even the classics don’t fit properly when you gain weight and stop doing any exercise.
Look out for yourself. Trust me. Your employer really doesn’t care if you live or die. You are hired to be “a team player.” In fact, you are disposable. One of the most accurate statements of this is in the comedy movie, “Back to School.” The last line of the movie is said by Rodney Dangerfield playing the part of the obnoxious but lovable millionaire, Thornton Mellon. He says, “It’s a jungle out there! You gotta look out for number one! Just don’t step in number 2!”
Hire a coach to help you. A relationship with a coach with whom you can sort things out, can help you succeed professionally. Great athletes and entertainers have coaches that bring out their talents and help them succeed. Why do you think you don’t need one? Don’t be a fool and think you have all the answers. Many of you don’t even have the right questions, let alone the right answers.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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