Working With Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


On this show, Jeff speaks about working with recruiters and what you can expect.

NOTE: This show was recorded in 2011 and was among the first recordings for No BS Job Search Advice Radio. Do you notice any progress?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

More About Working With Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011) Please disregard any jobs mentioned on the show. I no longer do recruiting and the positions were filled years ago.

On this show, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks about working with recruiters, their attitudes and how to work with them.

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Your Expectations of Recruiters Are Out of Whack | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011). PLEASE NOTE I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. ANY JOBS MENTIONED DURING THE SHOW ARE LONG GONE. PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT A RESUME.

Maybe you are playing a part in why recruiters are not calling you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Does It Mean When A Recruiter Calls And Asks If You Are Available for Feedback? (VIDEO)


Here’s a question from someone that proves that recruiters can’t win.

Summary

"What does it mean when a recruiter asks if you are available for a call to give you feedback?" Boy! This is a tough question!

You know, recruiters just can't do it right. Here, they want to know if you're available for a phone call to give you feedback. Job hunters also agonize over the fact that they don't get phone calls to receive feedback! So, what does it mean? Hmmm. It means that they want to know if you're available for a call so that they can give you feedback, dummy! I'm being obnoxious about it because it's a stupid question. They just want to know; it doesn't mean anything good. It doesn't mean anything bad.

The one thing out of the literal words that you might add on to them is that this is a courteous organization, particularly if they are telling you if you have been rejected. How many people complain (and this is third-party, and corporate recruiters) that they never get feedback??? Everyone goes through this experience! Everyone goes through that hell of no word back.

I know third-party recruiters go through with their clients, eventually, they get tired of saying, "We haven't heard anything back yet. I will let you know when I hear." Then, we never hear anything! We interpret that as being, "No interest." You interpreter lack of calling as being rudeness.

Well, I'll tell you, here we have a situation where firm is trying to be courteous, good or bad. Good – – they obviously want to move on to the next step, whatever that is. Bad – – they're going to tell you, mano a mano, mano a femo, femo a mano, femo a femo, whatever it is, they are going to tell you what their clients decision is! Maybe you can elicit "why." Please don't argue. If they tell you why you might ask some follow-up questions. If you are talking to a recruiter, there were really no more than what they are prepared to tell you and, if they do, this is what they believe they are sanctioned to say or else they have aggravation or they give their hiring manager aggravation. If they do that, they get in trouble.

Think back during the interview if you get a rejection and see whether the your experience correlates with what you are being told if this is a rejection. If it isn't a rejection, hey! You're on to the next step! If this was your 1st interview, you are on the your 2nd interview. If this was the 2nd interview, you are on to the 3rd. It could be that they are ready to make an offer. At least you know what the decision is and what their feedback is.

"What does it mean when a recruiter asks if you are available for a call to give you feedback?" Boy! This is a tough question!

You know, recruiters just can't do it right. Here, they want to know if you're available for a phone call to give you feedback. Job hunters also agonize over the fact that they don't get phone calls to receive feedback! So, what does it mean? Hmmm. It means that they want to know if you're available for a call so that they can give you feedback, dummy! I'm being obnoxious about it because it's a stupid question. They just want to know; it doesn't mean anything good. It doesn't mean anything bad.

The one thing out of the literal words that you might add on to them is that this is a courteous organization, particularly if they are telling you if you have been rejected. How many people complain (and this is third-party, and corporate recruiters) that they never get feedback??? Everyone goes through this experience! Everyone goes through that hell of no word back.

I know third-party recruiters go through with their clients, eventually, they get tired of saying, "We haven't heard anything back yet. I will let you know when I hear." Then, we never hear anything! We interpret that as being, "No interest." You interpreter lack of calling as being rudeness.

Well, I'll tell you, here we have a situation where firm is trying to be courteous, good or bad. Good – – they obviously want to move on to the next step, whatever that is. Bad – – they're going to tell you, mano a mano, mano a femo, femo a mano, femo a femo, whatever it is, they are going to tell you what their clients decision is! Maybe you can elicit "why." Please don't argue. If they tell you why you might ask some follow-up questions. If you are talking to a recruiter, there were really no more than what they are prepared to tell you and, if they do, this is what they believe they are sanctioned to say or else they have aggravation or they give their hiring manager aggravation. If they do that, they get in trouble.

Think back during the interview if you get a rejection and see whether the your experience correlates with what you are being told if this is a rejection. If it isn't a rejection, hey! You're on to the next step! If this was your 1st interview, you are on the your 2nd interview. If this was the 2nd interview, you are on to the 3rd. It could be that they are ready to make an offer. At least you know what the decision is and what their feedback is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Two Months of Looking. No Interviews. Just Criticism. (VIDEO)


As of today, I have been unemployed for 2 months. Day in and day out, I am searching for jobs through various job boards, hitting the pavement with resumes in hand, cold calling companies and trying to arrange interviews. I have been working with 8 different recruiters to assist me in my job search and not one has sent me on an interview. Instead, I’ve had numerous agencies rip me to shreds in regards to my last job, compensation and reasoning for termination, not return my phone calls nor my emails and just make disparaging remarks. For some, this may put a damper on their spirit but not for me. I am more determined, driven and motivated now than I ever have been.

Summary

There is an interesting message that someone left that I thought would make for a great show.

"As of today, I have been unemployed for 2 months. Day in and day out, I'm searching for jobs through various job boards hitting the pavement with resumes in hand, cold calling companies and trying to arrange interviews I have been working with 8 different recruiters to assist me with my job search and not one has sent me on an interview. Instead, I've had numerous agencies rip me to shreds with regard to my last job, compensation and reasoning for termination., Not returning my calls or my emails and just making disparaging remarks. For some reason this may put a damper on their spirit but not for me. I am more determined, driven and motivated now than I have ever been."

When I read this, I want to address the recruiters for second and just say that recruiters are unable to create interviews for people. Employers tell them about jobs open, skills required, the salary they are willing to pay for someone. Those 8 different recruiters representing 8 different recruiting firms that you've reached out to, they don't have anything for you. Their job is not to respond to your emails or to your phone calls for the heck of it because you want them to check in with you. They are there to deliver for their client who is PAYING THEM. These recruiters don't have a job for you. They are not out there pounding the pavement as you are because they are hired by corporations to fill jobs, not by individuals to work for free.

I'm glad your spirits haven't been dampened yet , but I must also say that you haven't been learning the lesson from the recruiter behavior. The lesson MAY BE (I have to said as "msy be" ) that perhaps your skills and perhaps are interviewing and the impact of the decision that you made (you say termination. I'll consider it as resignation) to resign your job may not suggest to them that you are a superior candidate.

You may be asking for too much money. You may be interviewing poorly. Your decision as to why you quit your last job may indicate immaturity. Or, if you were terminated, it's a story that suggests that you really weren't good at your job and that your employer fired you for cause.

What I want to encourage you to do is to take a little bit of time to reflect on the message. If they are wrong, if you have done a check as to the value that you bring to the job market and it's in line, not necessarily with the high range, but within the range in some way shape or form, but you just keep going out there and applying for jobs, pounding the pavement in doing what you're always doing.

I must also say that you're looking for job boards and recruiters and that those 2 together, statistically, fill approximately 30% of positions. The rest of filter networking. That's not what I'm reading that you're doing. When I'm reading that you're doing is spending time with a little bit less than one third of how jobs are filled and not mentioning all the networking that you are doing. As a result, I suspect you're not doing much.

Start doing some networking. Start to create relationships that allow you to present yourself to former colleagues, people that you know, people who attended the same university as you, and see if they can help you. If they can't help you, then you definitely have to adapt. But, recognize today, that it is important for you to (1) reevaluate to see whether or not the recruiters might be right. You can do that in a variety of ways. And (2) if they are not right, start adding networking to your repertoire. As a matter of fact, start adding networking via repertoire, whether they're right or not. This way, you have access to more positions than you're getting access to now

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How Do I Know A Headhunter and Their Opportunities Are Legitimate? (VIDEO)


The motivations that many recruiters have are frequently questioned by job hunters. In this video, I’m asked to address 1 of the basic questions that job hunters have. Is the opportunity being presented to me real?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Recruiters Know That You Don’t | Job Search Radio


The Job Jungle. Like any skill, those with more knowledge and experience have an advantage over those who don’t. In this case, recruiters have that advantage because they are in the job jungle minute to minute while you enter every few months or every few years.

On this show, two bull elephants, Jeff Altman and Steve Levy, meet and bump heads over ideas and tactics that we know from our experience in recruiting. It makes for great listening.

On the show, Steve mentions a Chrome extension called “Prophet.”

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Should I Call Recruiters Directly to Find Me a Job or Wait for Them to Call Me? (VIDEO)

Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job, or wait for them to call me?

Summary

The question for today is, "Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job or wait for them to call me?"

I'm not sure what you think recruiters do...When you are calling them up, are you paying them anything for this? And you expect them to "find you a job?" Seriously, when you say, "find you a job," you have the equation all wrong.

The equation for a recruiter, headhunter, any professional that is in the employment business is they are there to fill jobs and get paid for their efforts. They are not there to "find you a job" except coincidentally in that process. So, in terms of waiting for them to call you, (1) See if you can identify people who work in your field. Seriously. Don't just call recruiters up at random; see if you can find people who work in your field.

(1a) See if they have any jobs open that fit your background. They are not there to find the job for you. They are there to fill a job with you or someone like you. I say it that way because if you act like a jerk, There is someone there who is not going to act like a jerk who they are going to work with To fill this position with because they don't want to get embarrassed in front of their client. That's because the client is going to stop calling them If there are too many people that they refer who act stupid.

So, you always want to be in the position where recruiters are contacting you. That's because it is clear that they have a role open that might fit you. You can always look at job ads on job boards for local newspapers, websites and a whole host of other places to find individual recruiters who have positions open that fit your background. Again, I want to be clear – – "that fit your background." Don't spam your resume and send it like so much garbage. They don't have time for this. If you do that you are Being like the people who spam them with Viagra ads that landed in their inbox all the time. It is just a colossal waste of time! To call them up and simply say, "Hey! I'm looking for a job,," It is no different than spam.

However, I don't want you to be passive. If you are in a professional field, what I want you to do Is have a quality LinkedIn profile that is keyword optimized So that you attract recruiters who have positions open for someone like you. You want to have your resume on a job born because that can ask you pretty wide net to people who are looking for people like you. You want to have your resume on Indeed, SimplyHired and Other sites in order to draw people to you who have positions open AND you want to be setting up search agents on different job boards so that they notify you When positions get listed. You want to be out there networking.

If you're not in a professional field, networking can take a different form. For example, if you are a recent grad you can go on LinkedIn, go across the ribbon on the top and see alumni from your school who may be a year or 2 ahead of you and you network with them. In blue-collar work, you can network with people you have worked with previouslyAnd see if they know about a position.

However, to call up a recruiter out of the blue To find a job for you? You are just kidding yourself.

Also say that you need my help. If you think this is the way it works, I want to encourage you to join JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. I have curated information that will help you find work, PLUS You can ask me questions that will help streamline your process and make your search go faster.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Working With a Recruiter | Job Search Radio

People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

recruiter-sticking-tongue-out

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, “I’m going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job.”  Or, “ I’m going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job.

Wrong.

That’s not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

But they need me for this!

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you’re the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, “Hey, what do you think?

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, “Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me.”  Andy, they don’t want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I’m supposed to do this.

“Because we will build a relationship!“‘  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I’ll never hear from you again.  That’s my experience. And I’ve only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren’t Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, “Okay, I’m going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them,” or STOP and say to ourselves, “This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her.

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you’re contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone’s time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don’t deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn’t you?  Most people don’t, let’s not kid ourselves.  You probably didn’t do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn’t mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don’t have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn’t fit what they’re looking for, wondering why you don’t get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter’s Shoes Sometime

If you think I’m wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren’t even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn’t apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn’t the recruiter.  It’s you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don’t want to hear it, but I’m here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

No! No! No! It’s the Recruiter Who Lied!


Too often, people fall for stuff that recruiters say to them and blame employers. In this video, I illustrate one of those classic examples of recruiter BS.

Summary

People sometimes believe that they have relationships with recruiters. They have known them for a while. They trust them. The person seems honest. Let me point something out to you.

I was coaching someone recently who told me about a job he was submitted to buy a recruiter. He likes the guy and thinks he’s competent; the job hunter is not quick to give out praise to people.

The job hunter is looking for director role and goes on an interview for a position reporting to a manager. That tells you right away it is not a director role. He is interviewed by a staff person who reports to the manager; he queries a him about something that he knows little about and is wrong in his opinion, gets into an argument with the job hunter who, later, sent him a link to a Wikipedia article proving that he (the job hunter) was right.

“I was told this was a senior role by the recruiter. It’s reporting to a manager. Why did they change things?”

Let me let you in on a secret. They didn’t change anything; you were lied to by the recruiter.

If a firm changes a position from a director level to one reporting to a manager, this is not something they conveniently forget to tell the search firms about. Certainly, they will speak to the recruiter and tell them “You have this director coming in. We revise the position to one reporting to a manager (a senior architect, for example). Make sure the person will be okay with that.”

I’ve never seen a situation where firm didn’t tell me that when they revise the position so I can go back to the job hunter and not waste everyone’s time.

I had to stop in his tracks and tell him, “It’s not the firm. It’s the recruiter who lie to you!”

Recruiters take advantage of the relationship because they hoped that, if you go in the door, like the money, the job, or the company, maybe you will accept the job offer and they’ll earn a big fee. They believe that they have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

I have to challenge you about working with recruiters. There are a lot of very very good ones. After all I’ve done search from many many years and do more coaching now but still think of myself as a search professional. In the work that I’ve done I’ve always been forthright with job hunters I know a lot of people who are the same way.

Then there are the others. You don’t really know the difference when they tell you it’s a senior position. It’s a senior what? Senior manager? Senior director? Senior VP? What kind of senior are you talking about? In this case it became senior architect.

So get explicit with them because there is a seduction going on where search firms are individual recruiters play on the relationship to have you do things you really shouldn’t be doing because they are a colossal waste of your time.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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