Who Should You Network With to Find a Job?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Strung Along? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 813 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a simple but elegant tactic for moving things along.

Summary

This 1 is a classic situation the job hunters run into. It's the one we keep going back for interview after interview after interview after interview... And it seems like there is no end in sight. What do you do?

I reminded of this because of the situation I had years ago with someone who I had interviewing with 1 of the investment banks. 19 interviews. I made a mistake in how I handled it. 19 people interview this guy over at least 7 or 8 occasions. Here's what I should've done and what I didn't do.

Somewhere along the 3rd or 4th interview I should've asked this question, "how much longer do you think this process is going to go on?"

"Gee. We don't really know. There are a lot of people who want to meet him that are represented by different constituencies within the firm. They all need to sign off."

I should've then continued by saying, "Well, he has other things going on and is going to be making a decision in the next 2 weeks. Do you think you can get things together in 2 weeks time. Otherwise, I'm sure he will withdraw his candidacy."

What that would've done is set a timeline for action. If they would have responded with, "Gee, I don't know," that would have basically indicated that they would have been shopping and shopping and shopping... And you never really know what the target is because they don't really know what it is.

I just want to encourage you that if you are in a situation where you going on lots and lots of interviews (I'm not talking about 2 or 3. I'm talking about, you are at number 4 or number 5 and nothing is really moving and they are not really indicating when things are going to be over), reach out to them after that interview and tell them,"C could you give me an idea how much longer this process is going to go on." Then, sit there quietly and listen to the answer.

If it is appropriate, then you turn and say, "I have a few other things in the hopper right now that are pretty close to fruition. I expect to have an offer on the next 2 weeks. Do you think you could be done in that amount of time or should we just pull the plug on this, which one another well and move on."

It's very graceful because you are giving them a timeline. You are not saying it in a demanding way with an ultimatum. You are just very politely saying, "I have my life to live. You have yours. We each have decisions to make and I am going to be doing minor the next 2 weeks. Do you think you can do yours in the amount of time."

If they don't like it, that basically indicates that this could go on forever.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why Do Recruiters Ask You About Things They Can Find Out in Your Resume | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 812 There are 2 reasons why recruiters ask questions about things that they can already find out in your resume.  Here, I lay them out simply for you.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why do recruiters ask about things they can already find out in my resume?"

This may be a shock to you and if it is, I apologize to you for sharking you.However, I always have to answer with "no BS." for why they do this.

The 1st reason is that people lie.They don't tell the truth. Thus, when you put them on the spot during an interview,, sometimes they give you information than what's on the resume.

Assuming that you are a "truth teller," and your 1st reaction was to groan about people lying, another thing that we are trying to do (Although I don't do recruiting anymore, I did for more than 40 years and have a good idea of the my thought process when I was doing this),I wanted to see if I want to hear how you tell the story Of what you did and how you went about doing it So that I would get a sense of how you interviewed.

For me, if I stumbled into someone who is trying to con me, that was a "bonus point."I am assuming that everyone is telling me the truth in the resume.In telling me the truth in the resume I'm moving onto the next thing, which is if I'm going to invest my time and energy in representing someone, how are they going to perform on an interview? Do I have a chance of earning a fee? If not, (buzzer sound) I delete the resume because it is a waste of my time, no matter how good you think you are. My client won't wind up hiring you. Do you understand?

We don't do things to "find you a job." You are paying nothing. What recruiters do is fill a position with a client and the client pays us.As a result, you are the person who will allow us to earn the fee… Or not and we are trying to figure that out.

In telling us what you've done and how you went about doing it, You are helping us to discern between different people because we can't submit everyone. We are not paid to submit resumes as though they are a burger at a fast food restaurant.What recruiters are paid to do is to deliver someone who the client has determined that they need because the person has a particular background and a particular personality type who will do the job and has particular skills that they have specified.

If you cannot interview well, if you can't interview well with the recruiter, (buzzer sound) they will hit the delete key because they have no chance of hurting a fee.

So take it seriously. Don't just simply question why they're asking you these questions and wasting your time because they aren't. You are wasting their time if you don't deliver wellAnd demonstrate that you have the required skills that their client is looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.  Him

Don’t Forget . . . | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 610 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not forget to ask about your retirement planning.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the criteria that fewer individuals are using when they evaluate job offers.

It's important to consider the money. It's important to consider the benefits. I want to point this one out because it was a mistake I made early in my career; I just want to make sure that you avoid it in yours. That is, look at retirement planning.

You may be 22. at this point and retirement may be 100 years from now. But, the fact of the matter remains, it can be free money that, when compounded over the course of your career, can be money that you can use and will need. And, trust me when I say this, I wish I had done it differently myself.

With that being the case, there's another thing that people need to evaluate when you evaluate offers-- career pathing. When a firm talks with you about a job offer, you have interviewed about the job they have available today and you need to also ask, "2 or 3 years from now, where am I going to be? What kind of options might exist for me. If I do a great job? What is this firm normally do to rotate people in the organization?"

This is important because, think about it for a second, if you were to do the same job for the next 5 years of your life, 15 years of your life, 40 years of your life, I think you might want to put a bullet in your head. I know from my experience as a recruiter, you kind of do the same thing over and over again. One of the reasons I do this podcasts is to keep myself fresh because, all day long, I am staring at resumes, I'm talking with people, I am doing business development to open up new accounts, I am responding to customer inquiries,, negotiating salaries and people… All the same tasks.

What I set out to do is to create a little bit of freshness. So I started to write books, do videos, do podcasts, do a whole host of things to make my work more interesting to me Because the job of recruiter is extremely repetitive.

Do you want to be in a position where you are doing the same job for 40 years? No change whatsoever? I don't think so.

So, asked him about career pathing. Asked him about where you can go a few years from now. No guarantees, obviously. But what is the pattern of rotating people into newer opportunities.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Final Interview Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 811 I outline a few stupid final interview mistakes that too many people make.

Summary

I'm back today with what I call stupid final interview mistakes. To be clear, these are the kind of mistakes that are little bit different than the ones that I have pointed out previously because these are the ones to just killed it off at that moment when the opportunity could be yours. Where you are competing on a final interview, and you just do something dumb. Let me just point out some of the things that people can do that will just shoot themselves in the foot and send the candidacy down the drain. They are in no particular order.

1. You arrive late.

2. You just barely or inappropriately for the interview. I'm looking to tell you how to dress because you may be listening to this at a time when styles are different. I simply say the dressing inappropriately for this audience . . . I use an example from a hedge fund the used to recruit for... They used to hate people who wore ties. If you suddenly were talking to an interview, they got turned off. They used to think of ties is something to catch food on if you are sloppy eater.

3. You start feeling arrogant because you think the job is yours. That attitude starts to leak out. You get too cocky and forget that you might be competing with someone and act like the job is yours. In fact, you are competing. You are competing against another person or people or your competing against, "Let's go back and see if there's someone else." Never treat this as though it is a formality.

I remember one time I was a relatively junior person, 1 of my colleagues had someone on interviews with someone in Westchester New York. The person was there from 8 AM until 5 PM. His final interview is with the head of the function he will be working for. What happens is is that the head of the function asks why he is looking for a job. It's hard to imagine someone delivering a racist moment like this. But he did. The candidate says, "I work with a bunch of slobs and Indians."

How do you expect someone to respond to this? Do you expect is can act like a best friend? No! Suffice to say, he didn't get the job offer, thank goodness. Recognize that you can shoot yourself in the foot by thinking that the job is yours and your arrogance comes out.

4. Your answers to questions are incongruent with things you said previously. As a result, people start to compare notes and go, "He said this. But is now saying this? Something doesn't add up." He makes them hesitate. When firms hesitate, they reject. They know they can trust you.

5. They ask stupid questions of the interview. How many weeks of vacation do I get? Immature stuff that seems ridiculous.

6. They arrived unprepared. MINIMALLY you look at the LinkedIn profile the person you will be meeting with to get an idea of your background. See what they look like if there's a photo there. Do a Google search to see if there's any new news about the organization to see if this is a subject that you want to ask questions about.

7. You start making new demands. This is part of that arrogance thing that people sometimes do. New demands make firm scratched her head and wonder, "What's with this person? I don't get it. We've been talking about this all along and now they bring this up? They ask for $20,000 more? No explanation? They just up the price?"

8. They are too casual and forget that there still competing. I mentioned this on a video and is the notion . . . It came from the story where represented someone for position, the firm flew him out and he is talking with his future boss. She asked him a question, everything had been going so well for so long in this interview for such a hard to find skill and experience. He is 1 of the few people in the world who have this background. His response to 1 of her questions was to say, "I'll talk with you about that when I come on board." She thought this was ridiculous and rejected him. Rightly so.

Recognize that you are always competing. You're always doing something to sell yourself into the role or cause you to be rejected. Don't get lazy. Don't get arrogant. Don't become casual and never EVER think that the job is in the bag.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Answering “The Hypothetical Question” | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 808  Hypothetical questions are a rat hole leading you into a trap. Here, I explain how to handle them.

Summary

Imagine that you are on an interview, you are talking with someone who is there to evaluate you, and they say to you those magic words, "What would you do if . . . "Then they paint some sort of scenario.

You and I both know that there was a lot more that they haven't told you that they can drop in your head like a bomb later once you've answered the question based upon what limited information they have given you. How do you not feel at this question?

I think the answer comes down to talking about the process. Start by saying, "I'm sure there is a lot more texture than what you have told me so far. As a result, I think what might be most effective is how it might go about evaluating how to figure out the solution rather than offer you an actual solution. As a result, what I want to talk with you about is (1) identifying the constituencies will be affected by this; (2) then go through the process of evaluation.

They may say, "No, it is as simple as what we've asked." Okay, and as you start to answer, and they start throwing in more grenades into the situation, you pause for a second and say, "This is why it is so important to engage in the process because I would need to flush up additional things that can surface in the course of discovery. "

"I know I've had people come to me who are on my staff and were complaining about someone else and they wanted me to resolve it. Or, I have a user that I support who is having a problem with someone on my staff and they want me to fix them because they are not doing their job. But what I have to do is understand what it is that is wrong and go into some detail and speak with that person and going to some detail and, then, from there, your perspective on from everyone side, including some of the ones who have been affected by the blows who are affected by the different parties involved so that in this way I can actually solve it."

"Answering 2 lines of 'what would you do if' doesn't really give me any texture; talking to everyone does. Talking to not just simply the ones that they recommend but some of the others will."

So that's how I would go about answering it. That's how I recommend you do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

One Thing to Get Before Your Second or Final Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 810 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses something you need to get before your second or final interview.

Summary

I'm back with more advice for you for your 2nd or final interview. I have a number of videos about 2nd interviews and I believe there is even a playlist. See you want to watch the playlist of you have already see my other videos about this. I think will be a huge help for you in your preparation. Here's another point I want you to prepare for on your 2nd or final interview.

The point is get the feedback that is been offered so far about your performance. Most people think that if they been invited back, everything is great! I'll tell you a story. When I was working with an agency in New York some years ago, a colleague of mine was scheduling a candidate I was representing on 1st, 2nd, and ultimately final interviews with 1 of her clients. That was all going well. She told me everyone love the guy… bullshit. bullshit. bullshit . . .

It got to a point where the person was turned down. Then she told me what the reluctance had been all along. I was furious. It is all things that he could've addressed very easily on the interview if only he knew.

Here's my point for you. It's really useful to get the feedback from the HR person or from the hiring manager before you need to head of the function. If you're working with a third-party recruiter, get the feedback through them. If the third-party recruiter goes, "EVERYTHING IS GREAT!" Ask them, "could you go back and just say, 'Are there any areas of concern? Any reservations? What do you like? Are there any hesitations?'" Ask questions. The flush up any of the problem areas because there was one thing I learned in my 40+ years of doing search, small problems become BIG PROBLEMS unless they are addressed.

You are always best if you address them in the meeting, are prepared to address them in the meeting , and are proactive in addressing what their hesitation or concern might be... But you need to know what they are. You cannot assume it.

If you cannot get anything or find out something, I want you to think back to your 1st interview or previous interviews and see where the dead spots were, where the uncomfortable things were, where your background doesn't necessarily match up perfectly with the job and how you handled it then and whether you seem to have a receptive audience. Go back and review and that becomes the best that you can do to compensate if you cannot get feedback elsewhere.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Hedge Fund Brainteaser: The Number of “T’s”

EP 809 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you another deflection brainteaser involving the number of “T’s.”

Summary

I've got a brainteaser for you! As I've said in previous videos,, I happen to enjoy deflection brainteasers and today I have one as a deflection twist to it. Here is the scenario.

Tommy Tucker took 2 strings and tied 2 turtles to 2 tall trees. How many "t's" are in that?

The 1st sentence is completely irrelevant. It is a deflection. It's the one that says, "Look at that hand, but don't look at the other hand." That's what a deflection brainteasers does. You see, the real question is, "How many "t's" are in that?"

The answer is two. There are 2 "t's" in that. That's how you answer the question.

Because of the set up for the question, there is a set up for a joke, the set up. Here the set up is the sentence about Tommy Tucker. All they care about are how many "t's are in that.

They are not using the word. They are just asking how many "t's are in that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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Brag Books | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 807 | Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a novel way to use your LinkedIn references as part of a brag book.

Summary

I want to give you an idea I want to do with those LinkedIn testimonials and endorsements that you receive in the course of your career.

You may have heard of the idea of a brag book. A brag book is something that you can leave behind at the end of your interview. It includes paper copies of your references, a resume, summaries of the work that you've done (the situation, the task that you performed, the action that you took as a result). The whole bunch of things that allow you to demonstrate to the interviewer how effective you were in your last role. I want to be clear that you're not can be reading from this book to your interview. Although all help to construct the framework for you and your preparation.

It's something that will allow you to leave something to the effect of, "I would like to leave this with you as a reminder of our meeting." Have it bound; don't just simply can't a few sheets of paper to the interviewer. It can be in a folder type of construct. The idea is to leave something tangible behind that demonstrates your experience.

For you individual professions, it has got to be visually attractive. For you and administrative rules and others, again, it needs to be visually attractive and carry lots of testimonials, your references ... You can copy and paste your material from your LinkedIn profile which, again, is 1 of the reasons why I encourage you to reach out to people who know your work and have the right testimonials, not just simply the checkoff box that lets people know that you are endorsed by 247 different individuals for such and such.

If you need to, you do that. What you really want to be doing is going to the written remarks that people made about you and your work and include those.

Again, it is nicknamed a brag book,. Your LinkedIn endorsements and testimonials going there. Your resume. Your list of references. A few pages that will discuss assignments that you had, the situation you stepped into, the task you had, the action you took with the result.

Construct a brag about; leave it behind. This is not for executives or directors, not for senior managers or managers. This is ideal for staff level roles, particularly for administrative or visual professions.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

An Underutilized Interview Tool for Job Hunters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a resource that more job hunters should be using.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about an underutilized tool in interviewing. Few people can use it as well as they could. It really isn't that difficult to pull this out but there is a bias than most job hunters have… Let me just explain.

Most people going to interviews prepared to talk about what they've done, how they went about doing it, maybe know your metrics (how much money you helped your firm make or save as a result of your efforts).  Maybe fall into those categories.  Unfortunately, the one thing most people don't access, they are not really prepared to reveal is the personality.  You see, their personality attributes that can really make you appear extraordinary.  It will really help you stand out from your competition in interviewing.

If all you do is recite facts and figures… What you did, how you went about doing it, technology utilized… All this kind of stuff, you are like everyone else.  Your job is to stand out in a positive way.

If you can take a minute or 2 before you walk into the interview accessing who you are in all your glory, putting a big smile on your face, sincerely, I'm not talking about a pasted on smile that has no meaning, but one that shows that you are feeling great, then, I can assure you you will stand out from others and firms will like you that much more.

You see, the one thing firms look for beyond skills, competence is the ability to inspire confidence that they are the solution to the problem being sought.  You can't inspire confidence. Unless you are confident.  You can't be, confident, unless you feel confident.  You can't turn that on and off like a spigot.

Again, go out there.  Connect with that part of yourself that is great.  Show it to the and if they don't like it, it is their loss.  You will find an organization that will.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

If you want to improve your interview skills, order “Winning Interviews.” You will receive “Winning Interviews,” “Winning Phone Interviews,” “Winning In-Person Interviews,” “The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview” and more.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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