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Is It A Good Sign That I Got an Interview Within 24 Hours? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I sent in my application and got an interview within 24 hours! That’s a good sign, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Apply Through Email or LinkedIn?


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | Job Search Radio

“Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I”m almost 60 and the options are slim?”

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of No BS Job Search Advice  and Job Search Radio” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search

Should I Respond to a 3rd Party Recruiter or Apply for a Job Directly? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Should I respond to a 3 party recruiter for a job that their client or apply directly at the company’s job page. If I don’t like working with pushy recruiters?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I had a great question asked that I paraphrased in the title: “Should I respond to a 3 party recruiter at their client or apply directly at the company’s job page. If I don’t like working with ‘pushy recruiters?'” Ooooh! Pushy recruiters!
1st of all, we don’t know what makes you think THIS RECRUITER is pushy. As someone who used to work in the search (and I no longer do so I don’t have skin in the game), a lot of people think a recruiters pushy because they reached out to them to talk with you about the job or because they wanted to talk with you about the job. That is not a pushy recruiter. That is someone who is doing what the company hires them to do– locate talent to fill So if you think this definition of pushy is pushy you are mistaken.
If you think someone is pushy because they are yelling, arguing and abusive, I suspect you gotten nowhere near that point you. That’s because this is a person who’s done a cold call or reached out to you through LinkedIn for advice. This is not being pushy. Again, this is what firms hire them to do.
Next is whether you should apply directly. Hmmm. You mean, go through the black hole. Go through the computer system that is designed to filter people out. One in a million years would you want to put yourself in that position? Why would you ever apply for job in that manner? Let me go one level deeper. Why would you ever be a thief and still proprietary information and use it to your advantage?
To me, this is no different than stealing software. This is no different than being a thief. That’s because you are taking information. It is not known to you at the beginning and using it to your own advantage, taking away the ability of someone to earn a living from it. Bad karma, folks, the stated very clearly. It is a very bad move on your part. You are just being a thief.
Should you respond to the recruiter? Yes. If they decide not to submit you, find out why. . From there, if the reason is cogent, accepted. If not, then apply directly. The probability is that they are not there to filter people out; they are there to screen people in because they are not paid to reject people. They desperately want to refer people who are qualified. If they tell you you are not qualified, you probably aren’t… Unless you done a bad job of presenting yourself, of course.
Go through the recruiter who told you about the opportunity and then, from there, if you are not presented to their client, then apply for the role.

Should I Apply Through Email or LinkedIn? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Should I Apply Through Email or LinkedIn? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/29/should-i-apply-through-email-or-linkedin/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

What Happens to My Resume After It Is Submitted to a Job Posting? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here’s how the sausage is made.

Summary

The question I received was, "What happens to my resume after it is received for a job post?" This is like the sausage and how it is made. It is really an ugly process.

Once you've submitted it to a job posting, there are now 2 possibilities. One is when you've submitted through an applicant tracking system; the other one is when it asked to the email a resume. Smaller firms might not have the systems in place and you are emailing a resume.

The applicant tracking system is a filter. It parses your resume and inputs data into their system and may or may not, depending upon the system, score your resume based upon your use of keywords to determine whether or not you are a POSSIBLE FIT. I want to be clear. POSSIBLE FIT.

It is not perfect, obviously, and depending upon the scoring system and how it has been set up, and how the dictionary of terms has been created to evaluate, you may or may not be passed on to THE FIRST HUMAN BEING. Often in corporations and with the search firm that person is representing that business area or that hiring manager who is attempting to fill the position. They are doing a visual scan. Again, if you came in through an applicant tracking system, some systems will never let you get that far because if they are seeing you doing "serial applying" as 1 of my guests on Job Search Radio described or you are applying to lots of different disparate jobs, they are just going to block you and never let that resume get through even if you might be qualified because they have identified that behavior as being reflective of (please excuse my language) bullshit artists.

Assuming that that is not you and you're getting to the 1st level human being who is there to check, with some organizations that could be the hiring manager. Most of the time, it is HR. With smaller firms, it is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes. That's the reality to it. It is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes because the owner was busy. "You look at the resumes and show me the ones of the people who think fit." That person makes a determination and passes it to the hiring manager or, if it is a search firm or an HR person, they are going to do the 1st screen.

Ultimately, systems are there to save time and, obviously, they are not perfect. They do a lot better as a time-saver then you as a job hunter would prefer that they do. You are applying to jobs because you think they are right.

Now, in some organizations, HR is not even going to interview you on till the hiring manager says to do so. "I want to talk to that person." You are dealing with the ladies all the time, because your resume is going from the applicant tracking system to HR to a hiring manager for home hiring is only 1 of their priorities; they have a job to do. As a result, they are not there sitting by their computer instantly giving responses. They are looking when they have some time. Sometimes that is on their commute. Sometimes it is when they need to take a break. Sometimes it is when they schedule something on your calendar to review resumes. They are trying to work it into their day when they have time that they can take away from their "real job." That is the way they think about. Taking time away from their "real job."

Your resume is an interruption. They may wait for the weekend to review a bunch of resumes. They may wait so the evening. They may wait for their commute. Whatever it is, they are not instantly looking at your resume.

That is what goes on behind the scenes from a process perspective. Some systems may send you questionnaires; some recruiters, both HR and agency recruiters, may send questionnaires to clarify particular parts of your background because your resume wasn't clear enough to them answer those questions because you are not going to get to the interview otherwise.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Should I Follow Up After I Submit My Resume? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here’s a question from someone about whether or not to follow up on their resume after it is submitted through the applicant tracking system.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Preferred Application Process | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone about the preferred application process

Summary

There was a question on Quora today., "When applying to jobs, do you prefer filling out forms, one click solutions like on LinkedIn where you can apply using your LinkedIn profile, or a simple career specific email address?"

Let me start by saying that the question has a flaw to it. The flaw is whether you prefer the ease of doing something and you're looking at the question from the job hunter perspective. From the job hunter perspective, everyone wants the one click solution because it involves no effort. But there was a flaw.

The flaw is what gets results? Frankly, one click solutions where they are just sending off your LinkedIn profile, fail more often than not. Because the profile is not tailored to demonstrate what you can do for the organization. It is a generic thing... The same resume sent to job after job. The result is that you are focused on ease of submission; I'm thinking of demonstrating the fit. Employers are thinking of you demonstrating the fit, too.

If your profile happens to do it, great! Unfortunately, most don't. Don't take the lazy way out of here. Submit a resume (or actually contact the hiring manager, finding them using LinkedIn, see if you have a friend who can introduce you) and going in that root, rather than just simply sitting back and saying to yourself, "I would rather just sit back and let someone or something else to all the work... That they don't do.

At the end of the day, the even recruiters want to see something that vaguely looks like what they are trying to find for their clients. Again, don't get lazy about this because you will reap the consequences of that laziness.

Now, you might have the most wonderful skills on the planet but, eventually, it is going to shift and they are not good be quite so dominant. Trust me. There were a lot of Java developers out there who one day ago were heroes and now are ordinary as their skills became commoditized. That is going to happen to you, too,oh, Ruby professional, oh php developer, oh startup maven.. You may be ruling the roost now and hopefully will never need a job again. Your firm may wind up cashing out and you will become a gazillionaire.

However, the question is, what do you prefer? The answer should be, "I prefer a submission that is going to get the best result. One click apply does not do it..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Apply to Jobs Through My LinkedIn Profile or My Resume? (VIDEO)


Which is the better way to apply for jobs on LinkedIn?  Here is my opinion.

Summary

I was asked the question that translates into, "Show. I applying for jobs with my LinkedIn profile or submit a resume?"

When I spoke about how the job market works these days, what I have spoken about in the past applies here as well. Resumes are for when you are hunting and LinkedIn profiles for when you are the hunted. I want to explain why which I normally don't go into.

The reason is that your profile is going to be pretty static if the role, if you submit your profile with a few tweaks for every job, by the time someone gets the your profile, it may be different than what you submitted to them because you are tweaking it for each submission. LinkedIn will deliver the most current iteration of your profile.

The problem comes down to the fact that you have one profile, you are not necessarily addressing that which the hiring firm is interested. It becomes like having a standard resume and submitting it everywhere. The broken watch is right twice a day, right? Well, your LinkedIn profile is going to be right. some of the time, but more can go into it.

For example, when you look at your profile, there are things that relate to your background that might be highlighted in PowerPoints that you link to, a video or an article that you connect to that someone is not necessarily going to see because they might look at the standard resume kind of stuff, right?

The real issue comes down to the resume is a document that can be tweaked, as a result, you can tailor it to demonstrate more of how you fit then your profile can.

So I would encourage you that instead of submitting your profile, submit a tailored resume, not the same generic resume because if you do that,, you might as well submit your profile. Submitting a profile isn't ideal from the employer's perspective on either because it doesn't offer information about how to contact you. When people send their profiles you have to reply back to the LinkedIn system an offer that takes too much time. I want to call people and get going with things and not act like a clerk and sending stuff to the government,, you know what I mean?

To me, if you are applying, that is you being active. For you, if you are active, you are better off using a resume and a LinkedIn profile. That's because you can tailor it to what a firm is looking for, Rather than submitting the same LinkedIn profile over and over again.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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