Should I Follow Up After I Submit My Resume? (VIDEO)


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Here’s a question from someone about whether or not to follow up on their resume after it is submitted through the applicant tracking system.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Preferred Application Process | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone about the preferred application process

Summary

There was a question on Quora today., "When applying to jobs, do you prefer filling out forms, one click solutions like on LinkedIn where you can apply using your LinkedIn profile, or a simple career specific email address?"

Let me start by saying that the question has a flaw to it. The flaw is whether you prefer the ease of doing something and you're looking at the question from the job hunter perspective. From the job hunter perspective, everyone wants the one click solution because it involves no effort. But there was a flaw.

The flaw is what gets results? Frankly, one click solutions where they are just sending off your LinkedIn profile, fail more often than not. Because the profile is not tailored to demonstrate what you can do for the organization. It is a generic thing... The same resume sent to job after job. The result is that you are focused on ease of submission; I'm thinking of demonstrating the fit. Employers are thinking of you demonstrating the fit, too.

If your profile happens to do it, great! Unfortunately, most don't. Don't take the lazy way out of here. Submit a resume (or actually contact the hiring manager, finding them using LinkedIn, see if you have a friend who can introduce you) and going in that root, rather than just simply sitting back and saying to yourself, "I would rather just sit back and let someone or something else to all the work... That they don't do.

At the end of the day, the even recruiters want to see something that vaguely looks like what they are trying to find for their clients. Again, don't get lazy about this because you will reap the consequences of that laziness.

Now, you might have the most wonderful skills on the planet but, eventually, it is going to shift and they are not good be quite so dominant. Trust me. There were a lot of Java developers out there who one day ago were heroes and now are ordinary as their skills became commoditized. That is going to happen to you, too,oh, Ruby professional, oh php developer, oh startup maven.. You may be ruling the roost now and hopefully will never need a job again. Your firm may wind up cashing out and you will become a gazillionaire.

However, the question is, what do you prefer? The answer should be, "I prefer a submission that is going to get the best result. One click apply does not do it..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Apply to Jobs Through My LinkedIn Profile or My Resume? (VIDEO)


Which is the better way to apply for jobs on LinkedIn?  Here is my opinion.

Summary

I was asked the question that translates into, "Show. I applying for jobs with my LinkedIn profile or submit a resume?"

When I spoke about how the job market works these days, what I have spoken about in the past applies here as well. Resumes are for when you are hunting and LinkedIn profiles for when you are the hunted. I want to explain why which I normally don't go into.

The reason is that your profile is going to be pretty static if the role, if you submit your profile with a few tweaks for every job, by the time someone gets the your profile, it may be different than what you submitted to them because you are tweaking it for each submission. LinkedIn will deliver the most current iteration of your profile.

The problem comes down to the fact that you have one profile, you are not necessarily addressing that which the hiring firm is interested. It becomes like having a standard resume and submitting it everywhere. The broken watch is right twice a day, right? Well, your LinkedIn profile is going to be right. some of the time, but more can go into it.

For example, when you look at your profile, there are things that relate to your background that might be highlighted in PowerPoints that you link to, a video or an article that you connect to that someone is not necessarily going to see because they might look at the standard resume kind of stuff, right?

The real issue comes down to the resume is a document that can be tweaked, as a result, you can tailor it to demonstrate more of how you fit then your profile can.

So I would encourage you that instead of submitting your profile, submit a tailored resume, not the same generic resume because if you do that,, you might as well submit your profile. Submitting a profile isn't ideal from the employer's perspective on either because it doesn't offer information about how to contact you. When people send their profiles you have to reply back to the LinkedIn system an offer that takes too much time. I want to call people and get going with things and not act like a clerk and sending stuff to the government,, you know what I mean?

To me, if you are applying, that is you being active. For you, if you are active, you are better off using a resume and a LinkedIn profile. That's because you can tailor it to what a firm is looking for, Rather than submitting the same LinkedIn profile over and over again.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Does HR Share Applications? (VIDEO)


Do HR professionals cross reference the applications they receive with other job openings they have? Since these positions might have skills in common, does HR cross reference applicants with the openings to see if someone who applied for a role would also be a fit for some other role?

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do Recruiters Go Through Online Applications? (VIDEO)


Sometimes I don’t want to fill in the optional blanks like the high school information professional experiences, cover letters etc. however I’m really concerned it will influence the results. So how do recruiters go through online applications. Will they use resumes or just the application pages?

Summary

The question for today is:

“How do recruiters go through an online job application?”

I want to read the rest of the question.  “Sometimes, I don’t want to fill in the optional blanks, all the professional experiences, cover letters, etc..  However, I am really concerned as to how will affect the results.  How do recruiters go through online applications?  Will they see your resume or just the online application pages?”

1st of all, you have to understand that when firms deploy an applicant tracking system, they are just trying to fill certain types of jobs.  They have government reporting requirements that cause them to need to fill all kinds of jobs, some of which will involve people who might only need to have a high school diploma.  Only including college ignores these people and their needs.  If you are a college grad and they are asking about high school, if you or someone with a Masters, do not worry about high school.

What’s more interesting is the fact that you upload a resume and it searches the resume to populate certain fields so it will take data from your resume(Name, address, phone numbers, , minimally, a city state and ZIP Code. Minimally, a city state and ZIP Code) for their data, because, think about it, how will they ever find you? 

Seriously. Do you think the area code of the phone number works anymore? It doesn’t because people have mobile phones and move from place to place. Minimally, you have to give them city, state and ZIP Code.

The applicant tracking system should be able to parse the data from your resume when you uploaded, including your college degree, where you went to school, if you referenced your GPA, it should be able to pull that out.

It should be able to recognize all the individual jobs on your resume. I want to caution that if you are a consultant, I want you to go back manually and make sure that it is obvious that you are a consultant that these organizations so that they don’t reject you because you have given them the appearance and impression that you are a job hopper.

Will they actually see your resume once you have actually uploaded it and once you have filled in all the stuff? A lot of it gets weaned by the system to give them preferences.

You have to understand that when employer receives resumes, most of them are absolute spam to them. The Purdue chicken plucker applying for the software engineering job is 1 of the examples I always give because that has actually happened to me.There systems will rate your resume and lower and make it less of a priority for them to look at if it doesn’t really demonstrate a fit for the role according to the system.

Ultimately, what they are not doing is looking at these fields, except that they are trying to reach you at a future date. What they are looking at is your actual resume and discerning from that if you actually fit the job.

They may never get to it unless your resume demonstrates unfit and the system recognizes it as a fit. So always review your application and make sure that you have done enough to show that you fit the specific requirements of the job and don’t just simply upload a resume.

By the way, one last thing, I think it’s important that you hear this.

Never ever apply for jobs to applicant tracking system. What you should be doing is finding out who the hiring manager is and contacting them directly. Do not apply to HR. Do not apply for jobs through the ATS. Only contact hiring managers and submit your resume to them

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Do I Put in the Subject of an Email When I Apply for a Job? (VIDEO)


What should I put in the subject of an email when I applied for a job? There are so many possibilities!

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Summary

The question for today is:

What should I put in the subject of an email when I applied for a job?

For most of you, you are seeing something on walling or seeing an ad of some sort, you are seeing something that the company or the recruiting firm has cast the net for and you are applying for positions that way.  The subject line might read something like the title of the position so that in this way the reader is clear about the job you are applying for before opening your resume file.

If the company is asking you to include a job code or some other indicator that helps them specify which job this is, include that as well.  For example, it might refer to job 2714 accountant and mentioned a line of business.

Thus, you are making it clear to the reader why you are sending them an email because, after all, you have to remember their inbox.  You are thinking of one email that you are sending. They are receiving a lot of them in the course of the day.  You are helping them do triage on their inbox so they can go, “Oh!  It is a resume for that job.”

There is the 2nd condition when people apply for job.  That is when you are referred by someone.  In that instance, the subject line says that you are referred by so-and-so.  Thus, they know that you’re not just a stranger submitting a resume for a job; you are someone who has an introduction to them.

Then, in both cases you use the body of the email to stake out why it is you are qualified to do this job.  It isn’t a hardliner but what you are trying to do is make it clear to the reader why you are there and why you are emailing.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should You Try to Bypass Recruiters and Apply for a Job Directly? (VIDEO)


The question isn’t as clear as it seems.

 

Summary

I was asked a question by someone:

“Should you trying to bypass recruiters and apply for job directly?”

As clear as the question may seem, I want to show you how ambiguous and confusing the question is before it started answering it.

First, what kind of recruiters?  Corporate or agency? 

Bypass the recruiter? If this is an agency recruiter, did they speak with you about the job? Did they identify who the firm is?  If this is a corporate recruiter, did you find out about the job on your own and want to apply directly?

Then, there is the language of, “apply for job.”  Are you going to be emailing your resume? Applying for job through an applicant tracking system?  What are you doing here?

Let me start breaking things down for you.

The 1st thing is, “bypass recruiters.”  You don’t have to work with agency recruiters.  If you have contacted a number of them, if you are spoken with 1 of them about this job, and particularly if they have spoken with you about who their client is, do not go around them.  What you are doing then is stealing.  I don’t want to steal information for your own advantage.  What you do then is an attempt to work with our recruiter to get the interview.

If no one has spoken with you about the job, feel free to contact that firm.  Don’t apply for a job.  Don’t go through an applicant tracking system.  Don’t go through corporate HR.  Find the hiring manager.

How do you do that?

You call the firm and ask who’s responsible for that function in the organization.  Thus, in this situation, I am encouraging you to bypass the corporate recruiter, not the agency recruiter.  Again, if you spoke with the agency recruiter about this job, you are using their information and it would be stealing from them, costing them tens of thousands of dollars that can affect their family, affect their business. You are being a thief.

What are you getting out of it anyway?

They’re going to do all the legwork for you. They probably have a relationship with this firm where they can, if you have the right skills, actually get you the interview. What’s in it for you anyway?

I do believe you should bypass corporate recruiters, particularly if the 1st point of entry is the applicant tracking system.

I want to repeat something I say all the time.  Never EVER apply for a job or make it a 1st point of contact through an applicant tracking system.

Number repeat that.

Never EVER apply for a job or make it a 1st point of contact through an applicant tracking system.

Instead, find the hiring manager. Get introduced to the hiring manager by someone you know or someone you are connected with.  It is better to do a pre-interview with someone you know who knows this hiring manager and can walk your resume over to them.  They can tell the manager, “This person contacted me. I think they have a terrific background. Go for it.

On the off chance that you are a lunatic they will walk directly to the firm, drive to the firm, take the subway to the firm to walk in the door and demanded to be interviewed, don’t.Don’t do that, please.

Some will disagree with me and say, “It shows how eager and motivated. You are.

Look at it from the employer side.  1st of all, particularly if you are in an urban area, most buildings have security and you will get past them.You will not get past security.  The 2nd thing is that what you are expecting someone to do is, without any preparation or forewarning, interrupt what they are doing at that moment and talk to you.

Think about it. Is that how you want to be treated?  Do you want to be interrupted all the time and have to contend with someone who, I must and will honestly tell you, almost all the time when people have tried to do this with me, it has been a waste of my time.  All I would do is a security to send a resume to me.

After all, I have had a Purdue chicken plucker apply for a software engineering position.

Don’t apply for jobs that you are not qualified for.  Seriously, all you doing is wasting your time and theirs.  It is going to be more of your time, but they’re going to take one look at your resume and think you are an idiot.  

Don’t show up at someone’s doorstep, expecting to be interviewed.  It is annoying.

But back to the original question.  Should you bypass recruiters and apply for job directly?  Corporate recruiters? Yes.

Agency recruiters?  If you are working with one who will introduce you to this firm, no.

If you want to network you way to that firm, you have to go to an agency. Screw it!  Just go directly to the firm and go directly to the hiring manager.

You can call up on the phone and ask, “Who’s the manager who is responsible for such and such?” If they tried to direct you to HR, simply say, “No!  No!  No!  I’m not looking for HR.  I’m looking for the manager that is responsible for that function.

If they sound unsure, go to the head of the function and work your way down.  In technology, it could be the CIO or CTO.  It is an accounting, it might be the CFO or controller… Just work your way down from the top and reach out to them.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You Have to Disclose a Conviction | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game  Hunter discusses telling the truth about a conviction on an employment application when you apply for a job.

conviction-sentencing

 

Summary

I want to have a candid conversation with you. If you are someone who has a criminal record, dealt with the rest and talk with you about how to complete applications.  I’m reminded of this by recent story from someone who represented for job who told me about a conviction he had years ago and the recent arrest or he accepted a plea deal even though he said he wasn’t involved with what was done, but got caught up in the events and his attorney advised him to accept the plea and know that within 6 months to be expunged from his record.

Now, he’s up for job and has to complete an application and is asked the question, “Have you been involved with a dishonesty that has not been expunged from your record yet?”  My advice to him was to disclose it.  Write a lengthy explanation for what occurred. Don’t line.

Why?  It’s very simple.  This is a firm that, like many, does background check and, in doing a background check, if they for the inconsistency with what you told that, namely, you have been involved in such an episode, the reality is that America hire you.  If they find that out after you’ve been hired there going to fire you.

I’ve been involved with way too many circumstances where companies have found the outpost employment than a reference, a college degree, a whole host of things are falsified.  The criminal stuff is always the most egregious to employer.

Imagine for 2nd you were hired for job and they find out a few weeks after you join that you were involved with some version of crime.  They let you stay on board and while you are a stockbroker, for example, you still grandma’s life savings or trade them down to nothing.  A lawyer get someone from the firm on the stand and goes, “You knew he was a lawyer and this is what happened!  You tolerated.”  Your insurance company won’t pay. There out the money.  They just can’t accept the fact that someone who lied to them is on board.

In other words, you don’t want to be greeted by security at your desk, holding a box for you have all your stuff and escorted out the door.  How do you explain that to your family?  How do you explain that you kids or the friends or the parents that you got fired because you lied on an application?

Don’t do it.

If they’re not going to hire you, better off not to get fired after 2, 4 or 6 weeks and have the same result that you’re out of work.  Except, that’s worse.  After all, how do you explain that to the next employer.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Do Recruiters Care When I Email Them?

It’s currently 2 a.m. and I got an email for a software engineering position earlier this afternoon. Do the recruiters take the time sent of the email into consideration before looking at the candidates resume?

2-am

Summary

“Do recruiters care when I emailed them?”  

When I 1st read the question. I interpreted it as do they mind that I send them an email.  As I read further, I understood that what the person really wanted to know was about whether it matters at what time, I emailed them.  Let me read the complete original question.

Do recruiters care when I emailed them?  It is 2 AM, and I received an email about a software engineering position earlier this afternoon.  Do recruiters take the time sent of the email into consideration before looking at the candidate’s resume?

The short answer is, “No.”  It doesn’t matter.  Why?  You may think it indicates that you are excited/anxious… Things along those lines.  Remember, with “Delay Send,” in Microsoft, Outlook and other email clients, you can set up your email so that it is sent at any time of the day or night.  They do not actually know if you have sent it at 2 AM. All they know is that it is date and time stamp for them at 2 AM but you can set it up to send it at 7 PM.

It also doesn’t mean anything if your background does not fit.  After all, the most important variable for every recruiter is, “Does your background fit the job?”

Usually, this question comes from a less experienced person who may be stretching in order to try to get themselves considered.  After all, if you have the background, if you have the experience, there is no question that they will be in contact, right? If you don’t have the experience, you start to look at all these tangential things as being important.

What time you sent your resume is small stuff.  The most important thing you can do is demonstrate how your background fits the job.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What’s the Best Way to Apply for a Job When I Don’t Know Anyone in the Company? (VIDEO)


In this video, I provide three different ways to find out who the hiring managers before conceding and applying through HR and the applicant tracking system.

Summary

The question I received was, “What’s the best way to apply for a job when you don’t know someone who works at the firm?”

This goes back to the mistake many job hunters made of only thinking that if I know someone who works at the firm, they will refer me and my network has its limitations and yada yada yada. As a result, people look at their network as only the person I know and obviously people you. So you have to remember that that person that you know can introduce you to some and that’s really the key to it.

Now professionally, you can do it very simply; you have a LinkedIn network (You do a LinkedIn network, right?) and you’re looking for the second level connections that you have to see whether or not there are people who you know who can introduce you to someone who already works there.

Barring that, what you do is you can use Google custom search tool that I developed, it’s a simple one LI-USA.info is the web address. What you do with it is use Boolean search and start searching for people using the tool. The idea is (number one) this is searching all public profiles on LinkedIn. Understand if they have a public profile, you can find it.

Number two is you are looking for people who might be in the role or someone who works at the firm who might work in the department who can give you a heads up, tell you who the right person is and give you a sense of what their like so you can reach out to them.

Why would they help me?

I assume if you’re asking the question, you’re willing to go the extra mile; if you not willing to go the extra mile, just apply to the applicant tracking system; but I think that’s the lazy approach.

The smart approach, the effective one is getting an introduction from someone who already works for the firm, who knows the hiring manager. So you can say to them, “look I understand that your firm is trying to hire someone. I don’t know who the hiring manager is. Would you point me to the right individual? I’ll keep your name out of it and reach out to them.”

Or you can say, “I understand firm or perhaps your department is looking for someone and I would love an introduction to the individual but, I know you don’t know me is you might not want to go out on a limb. Is there something that would help you feel more comfortable in referring me to this individual because I don’t want to go through the applicant tracking system or HR. What I want to do is just talk to the hiring manager.”

By doing this repeatedly, talking to different individuals at firms, you can eventually circle back to the applicant tracking system if you really need to. But by shortcutting the filter (the ATS, the HR individual) and trying to get to the manager. Whether you use LI-USA.info, whether you have an enormous LinkedIn network and can get to this individual, however, you do it…

By the way, there is the that the old school way I almost forgot to tell you the old school way. That is you get up, get on the phone and talk to the reception and ask for the person who’s responsible for (then describe the function that’s involved). Then allow yourself to get bounced around to different people who will eventually get you closer and closer and closer to the hiring manager until you actually find them. Sometimes if you call and ask about who’s the person who’s hiring for such and such, then you’re going to get HR and that’s what you are trying to avoid.

You allow yourself to get bounced from person to person. If they have no clue as to where to start, you might try something like investor relations or public relations and ask them. What you’re looking for something that is related but not necessarily the specific area. After all, they might have access to data that can point you to the right person.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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