The “Not One Single Person Gets Off” Brainteaser (VIDEO)


There is a bus traveling to the Hay River full of people and no one gets off the bus throughout the journey.

Summary

I have another brainteaser in a long long time. I thought I would do want today and see if you would get the answer. Here's the question:

There is a bus traveling to the Hay River full of people and no one gets off the bus throughout the journey. When the bus gets to the Hay River, not a single person is left on the bus. How is this possible?

The trick in most brainteasers is that there is a keyword or phrase you have to listen to and catch before it sneaks by you. That is the key to answering the problem.

Were you able to spot the keyword in there?

The keyword in the question is "single." As in, "not a single person got off the bus."

The answer is it is because all of them were married.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Active Interviewing | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/15/active-interviewing-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 836 Hiring is broken. We know it’s broken because surveys of hiring managers done after a person comes on board reveals how few managers would actually rehire the person they hired.

Hiring is the only game in town. How do you present yourself effectively and demonstrate your knowledge and skill effectively and powerfully.

Eric Kramer, author of “Active Interviewing” and owner of www.interviewbest.com offers ideas about what you can do . . . and they are really good.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Should I Follow Up After I Submit My Resume? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here’s a question from someone about whether or not to follow up on their resume after it is submitted through the applicant tracking system.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do Employers Really Check References? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Jeff answers a question for someone about whether employers really check references.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I received the question from someone more junior than I normally do 1:1 coaching with that I want to speak to. The question is, “Do employers really check references?” References take a variety of different forms.

Yes, a lot of employers call up your former employer to check a reference. If they go the HR route, ofte what they will try to do is try to verify dates and salary. Behind the scenes, someone may be calling former manager to talk with them about your work.

Why do they do this? It’s really simple. This may be a shock to you but people lie. You may be a liar.

I know when I worked in recruiting, there were any number of circumstances where people had lied on applications for jobs that I had referred them to. They went to work; they were fired within a week when the truth came out.

I remember two awful situations where I warned someone before hand that a firm would do a copious background check. The person held to their lie and wound up being fired at the end of the 1st week. I will tell you some firms don’t; most firms do. They don’t want to be found in a situation where they’ve hired someone who is a liar, has lied about the credentials, you lied about the dates of employment . . . is just a problem
individual and is trying to cover it up.

There are signals that people send out that they could be, shall we say, “exaggerating the truth.” One signal is there is no managerial reference that is offered. Instead, it’s a peer level reference at the most recent employer or maybe one employer back.

Often they’ll only check the reference of the current employer after you’ve gone. So just recognize that it’s not just simply the most recent job; it can be a few jobs back so when you’re only offering peer level references, there’s a signal there.

Yes, employers really check references. They do it if they’re smart because there’s a lot that’s revealed through what is said and what isn’t said in the course of the reference that they can explore by sharp questioning that will help them determine whether or not you were a problem person at your previous pos and whether you have been lying to them.

How Do I Get a New Job When My Manager is Giving Bad Reference? (VIDEO)


A job hunter who is learning that references matter asks what s/he can do When his manager is getting a bad reference.

Summary

The question for today is, "How do I get a new job. When my manager is giving up that references about me?"

Before I answer the question, I want you to learn a lesson- -Don't put yourself in that position. You discovered how difficult it is to find work when the best person to evaluate you is not in your corner.  They are not your ally.

Whether the issue is around bad behavior in the office, whether the issue is around poor performance or excessive lateness is, this all comes back to bite you in the butt.  This person is not an ally or willing to lie for you, they are not going to stick to a story.  You are going to need to find someone else to do it for you.  Maybe a former coworker will (the key word in that is former); maybe a former manager -- someone who predates your current manager who can attest to your work.

Let's assume that you were fired for poor performance.  Why would your firm give out a good reference?  After all, they fired you because you did a bad job. Understand that firms will comply with one another about confirming dates of employment.  They're not going to lie about things related to your work with them.

You can go to HR (and I think this would be the smart move) and ask whether the firm has a policy against providing references because, frankly, "Mine will be poor and I don't want to be in a position where I have to sue because the impact of the reference your firm provides is going to keep me from finding work. I don't believe I should be punished for the rest of my life for mistakes I made. I'm sure you don't want to deal with litigation. What I would like to have everyone cautioned about is that it is not company policy to give references out we can confirm dates of employment."  That can get you off the hook.

You still need to get people who will talk about you and say that they are a former colleague, former manager… Stuff along those lines… And talk positively about you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How Do I Successfully Pad My Resume?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Someone wrote to me with the question and this is my way of responding to them and the question is, “How do I successfully pad my resume?”

It seems that this person has a four year gap in the background during which time they took some college classes and dealt with some mental health issues and had been on disability. Actually, it seemed lies they are currently on disability the way it’s written.

So I’ll just start by saying it starts off with your own thoughts about yourself. You describe this period as “padding my resume” versus you had an illness and I’m well enough to return to work and would like to do so.

Now if you think you’ll be able to return at the same level, compensation, and a variety of other variables as existed 4 years ago, there you’re kidding yourself. You will not be able to do that. Firms are not going to suddenly assume that after 4 years you know exactly as much as he did before and you are is capable of you were 4 years ago.

If you did not drive a car for 4 years and got behind the wheel of one, it might feel little awkward . . . and the same id going to apply to you returning to the workforce. From their vantage point, it’s not about padding; it’s talking about what you did the last 4 years “I had an illness. I’m returning to work. It’s really that simple.

Are going to love that? No. Not every firm is going to be excited to interview you for obvious reasons, but the right firm will and that’s the most important thing I can say to you. The right firm is good be interested in your background despite the four year gap.

So stop referring to this this as padding your resume as though you are going to con someone into a job. Instead, think of it is as taking this issue straight on, knowing that some people are going to be pleased with what you explain to them; some firms will never be convinced; and the right firm will.

Think Like a Brand | No BS Coaching Advice Podcast


Listen to the full episode here:
https://anchor.fm/no-bs-coaching-advice

Branding is incredibly important and so few people do it. Here, I encourage you to change your thinking and help yourself.

Getting Known on LinkedIn | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/10/getting-known-on-linkedin/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to become known on LinkedIn as a subject matter expert and explains how to do it.
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”
JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.
Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook
You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”
Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

What Should I Do Before My First Interview For a Job? (VIDEO)


Here are a few ideas if things you can do before your first job interview.

Summary

I was asked the question on Quora today. The question translates into, "What should I do before my 1st job interview?" I think it's a pretty simple question and that most people know the answer to it . But this person is a little frightened and it's understandable.. It's the 1st 1.

1. Lighten up on yourself.. Reduce some of the pressure. There will be other interviews after this. You want to do well. Think of it as great practice. Even with thinking about it is great practice, you want to do a certain amount of preparation.

2. Make sure you have an appropriate wardrobe. You want to be dressed properly for the kind of job you are interviewing for. Obviously, if you are interviewing for training program at an investment bank, you would dress differently than a job in Silicon Valley and differently than you mind if you are interviewing at Whole Foods for job. So dress appropriately for the dictation.

3. Start to do a little research about the job is involved. How do you do that research? In all probability there was a job you that you applied for or you are referred by someone. Look for the job description or talk with your friend who referred you for the job about the position and what is being sought.

4. Start to prepare answers to predictable questions that firms might ask you. Don't notice what some of them are? Go to www.thebiggamehunter.us and visit the blog area. Look for tough interview questions among the tags that I have for the blog. Start the practice answers for tough interview questions. Start with the basics like, "Tell me about yourself," and then go on from there.

It isn't enough to think the answer. You have to hear it come out of your mouth. It is best if not only you hear come out of your mouth but you practice with someone who is able to give you constructive feedback. I'm not talking about feedback like, "That's sucked." You want to get someone who will listen to you speak and say something like, "The way you spoke you sounded a little frightened or scared. " Maybe they say something like, "The way you spoke, you spoke quickly and was hard to follow you." Whatever it is, look for someone who can give you that kind of feedback in order to help you improve.

5. Practice. Practice. Practice.

6. Everyone tells you research the firm. It isn't like it's hard to do that. Go on the web. Go on the website. See what they do. You probably already know it. But, assuming that you don't, find out what they do. Go on LinkedIn and look at the person or people you will be interviewing with. If you aren't connected to them in any way, try a Google search or one using www.li-usa.info. That's a US centric site to look at LinkedIn public profiles of people in the United States. If the person doesn't have a LinkedIn profile, obviously, you're not defined. But it searches all public LinkedIn profiles in the United States. Look at their background; that will let you know if they are it in HR or a hiring manager.

Again, practice, practice, practice. Practice to the point where you seem sincere and believable. After all, when you go to the theater and watch the show or go to a movie, you don't start thinking, "Oh! That's so and so on the screen or on the stage." You start seeing them in character pretty quickly. They have rehearsed to be that simple in their presentation and so believable in the role, you forget that they are human being playing a part. You see them in that part and has that part. That's what you want to be doing. You want to be believable, credible. You want to be a human being who is looking for a job, not just simply an "applicant."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Starting a Negotiation with Yes (VIDEO)


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
.
It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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