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Is It A Good Sign That I Got an Interview Within 24 Hours?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/31/is-it-a-good-sign-that-i-got-an-interview-within-24-hours

EP 821 I sent in my application and got an interview within 24 hours!  That’s a good sign, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Can I Improve My Interview Performance? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/30/how-can-i-improve-my-interview-performance-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 820 How can I get better?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Losing it

I’m on a Phone Interview & Losing It!!! | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/04/18/im-on-a-phone-interview-losing-it

ep 719 Here’s how to handle a situation when you’re feeling flustered or losing the interview.

Summary

I was working with someone yesterday who asked me about how to handle situations where they feel flustered.

Feeling flustered often comes from lack of preparation. Thus, you wind up in situations where you just don't perform. Frankly, I believe for most individuals, if you took more time to rehearse answers to predictable questions, the number of circumstances where you feel flustered were losing the phone interview would decline quickly.

Proper Preparation Prevents ________ Performance. The full sentence is, "Proper preparation prevents piss-poor performance."

Here's what I always suggest that people do. Have you ever been on a call with someone who says, "Hold on 1 second. Someone's interrupting me. Can you bear with me for a moment?" The call goes on hold, they come back and you pick up the conversation. Why not apply the same tactic here?

You're feeling a little bit off. You feel like the interviewee is going south on you. You need to pull yourself back together again and don't want to feel worked up. As soon as you send sense it, you say, "Could you bear with me for just a few seconds? Someone just walked in and I need to handle the situation." You put them on hold or mute the call and what you do is take a few deep breaths, focus on what you have to do . . . Do that for 5 seconds. That's enough time. You can do it in 5 seconds. You can put yourself back together and come back to the call , ready to continue.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

How Important Is Networking When Looking for a New Job? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

 

The facts about networking and finding work.

Summary

The question I received was, "How important is networking. When looking for a new job?" Let me give you the facts; you make the decision.

When you look at the statistics on how jobs are filled, you see some interesting things.

#1 is (I have to say these 1st numbers are not accurate for reasons I will point out to you) 3% of positions are filled as a result of responding to job ads. 20% of positions are filled as a result of recruiters. Now, I have seen statistics a little bit higher in the little bit lower for both of these. The way I look at it is that recruiters sometimes advertise. So I decide to do is combine the 2 numbers and send an almost 30% of positions are filled as a result of recruiting and advertising. The balance are filled as a result of networking. Let's break networking down even further.

It is not just and 70% of positions are filled as a result of networking. 70% of the 70% (or 49%) are filled as a result of introductions to people that you did not know at the beginning of your job search. Almost 50% are filled that way! With almost 3/4 of jobs filled as a result of networking, you have any doubt? Thus, when you only work with recruiters can only respond to job ads, you are taking the least effective route to finding work.

Now, I'm not saying that networking is easy. For most of you, networking is like getting a root canal without anesthesia. I know it is very unpleasant to many of you. So much of life involves confronting things that we find uncomfortable and doing better at them. At the beginning, you will probably be awful at it.

However, this is a skill that you can develop over the course of your career in order to ensure that people reaching out to you about opportunities.

Networking is critical, not just simply in this job search, but in every job search that you have from this point on. That is because if you are networking the right way and not just simply when you are looking for a job, if you doing it consistently so you are building your network, jobs are going to be coming to you, people are going to know about you, and they will be very happy to hear from you.

Always be networking.

Let me repeat that.

Always be networking. It is the key to career advancement and finding new work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Ask The Big Game Hunter: The Middle Manager with Rusty Technical Skills


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/11/07/ask-the-big-game-hunter-the-middle-manager-with-rusty-technical-skills/

What are the best strategies for a laid-off middle-manager to get a job if they have a technical background which has gone rusty?

Summary

The question is really very simple. "What are the best strategies for a laid-off middle manager to get a job if they have a technical background which has gone rusty?"

This a little bit that's unclear about the question, but on their work with one definition of it. The definition, I'm going to work with this 1 that says, "I work in IT, I'm not really technical any longer, I'm not in the Bay area them somewhere the United States. My skills are rusty from a technical standpoint. 1 of the best things I can do?"

The technology standpoint, it's not like to be asked to be a programmer so you want to update your technical skills up to a point. However, if your goal is to become a coder and earn less money than what you do is manager, then, by all means, deep dive in there can be extraordinarily technical. Take classes, work hard and being a technologist and that will be the kind of salary that you earn.

Another approach is to go whole hog into the management side and lightly update your technical skills to make sure that they are not so obsolete so that if you are ask questions from technology standpoint you are going to be blown out of the water.

Ultimately, I want to be clear, the question for you is what you want to be doing? What kind of role do you want to be in? If the role is to be a technologist, you have to get your skills up to date. If the role is to manage technologists, you want to make sure that their current and sufficient enough so that if your staff has an issue you can help them but not so deep that you are want of coding aggressively.

Environments the code aggressively, they tend to be smaller, generally more poorly funded (there are exceptions to that), but if you're living most of America, they are not really essential.

At the end of the day, you will be better off diving and harder into technology project and program management and getting those certifications, rather than getting a C# certification. You're better of demonstrating management attributes and that you manage technologists and that you deliver projects on time and within budget and Formalize training that in going in the other direction.

. . .

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

re-applying for a job

Can I Re-Apply for a Job?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/31/can-i-re-apply-for-a-job/

I answer this great question from Quora.

Summary

I have a question I'm going to answer that was posed on Quora, the question and answer site. The question is a very simple but elegant one. "Can I reapply for a job?"

Of course, you can! However, it begs the question, "What's good be any different than the last time?" We miraculously have new information, new experiences, accomplish more things than what happened the 1st time? If you had a bid resume, what's going to make the employer believe that suddenly your experience is radically different? A note to them is going to cause them to question, "Was this person lazy and just send us a generic resume?"

Thus, excuse my language, is a half-assed way of responding.

Think about it. Someone comes to meet with you and there is nothing that indicates that the background fits which were looking for and they go away. They come back 3 days later and, lo and behold, they had that experience! How did that miracle happen?

Yes, you can reapply but, understand, you screwed up the 1st time. If you have the experience, why didn't you tell them? Why didn't you make it apparent instead of spamming the stupid resume to them. That's because the message that you are giving them is that you believe that good enough is (good enough).

But they are looking for is effort. You didn't show any effort.

Don't expect a different outcome. Yes, you can try again , but the probability of success is really small.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Indicate My Availability in My Resume


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/18/should-i-indicate-my-availability-in-my-resume/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains whether you should indicate your availability in your resume.

Summary

The question reads, "should I include date of availability in my resume?"

This is something that would apply to both students and consultants as well as temporary workers, so I'm going to texture my answer given the circumstances.

For the student, of course, it depends on when you are writing this or sending a resume. If this is November at the time before graduation, you might, in the resume, indicate your expected degree date and when that would be. Let's say it's made or June of the following year, that sends a clear signal to them as to when you're available. If this is March and you have an expected degree date I had, they have an idea as to when you are available, right?

If you are a consultant in the assignment is going to complete in 3 months, what are you sending a resume now? You are way early in the process. I might start to or 2 1/2 months before TOPS. For a consultant, really just send out the resume earlier than that is just a waste of people's time. It's not like they're going to save it and come back to it and say to themselves, "You know that guy who is going to be available in 3 months? Now is the time!" No, it is just going to go to their system and that little bit of data is not going to be remembered or saved. It's a time waster to send it out to early.

For students, the indication of expected degree date is important. If you have an internship that is going on they might allow you to (wink wink) give people the idea that you are working full time, it really depends on when you can start. If the ideas that you be willing to start within those last few months before graduation, that's one layer and I would indicate that I would explain in the cover email. That's in the body of the email to which your resume is attached.

Beyond that, keep it simple. Leave it in the resume as to what your expected degree date is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Do I Need to Use a Cover Letter? | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question asking whether you need to use a cover letter.

Summary

Is important to provide a cover letter well applying for a software engineering position?

I think I think the right answer is, "why wouldn't you use a cover letter?"

It's a sales opportunity. If you think it's just another chance to say, "I am forwarding my resume to you for the position of software engineer with your company. I believe will be an excellent fit for the position, " you are wasting your own time and you are missing the opportunity.

People tend to look a job hunting as to you. In fact, is a chance to sell yourself to an organization that you can perform a cover letter was just such a document. Resumes just such a document. Think of it as an opportunity to present you and your capabilities.

If you are uncertain, if you are frightened, if you are tentative, you are not selling. What you doing you showing that you don't have confidence in your ability to solve the organizations problem that there trying to fill. That is the tip off to them.

However, if you approach it, as I said, like a sales opportunity, to say, in effect, "Hey! Look at me! I can do what you want. This is what I have done along these lines." If you do that, it is a great tool.

Asking the question, just let me know you haven't really figure that out..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Returning to a Former Employer

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the pros and cons of returning to a former employer.

Summary

What are the pros and cons of returning to an old place of employment? The person continues by saying, "I was a small nonprofit for 10 years at a fairly high position. I left with some good and bad feelings. 7 years later, the top dog is leaving and I am being considered to replace him."

Let me just simply say that it depends on your definition of top dog. If you are going to be the head of the agency, you have a pretty blank slate and the only question really comes down to money and how much control you will have with relation to the board. If the board is the same, you may run into problems again. That's can be a tough decision for you. I can't advise you other than to lay out the cards in that way.

If your definition of "top dog" is you are a senior manager and reporting to a director who in turn reports 3 or 4 levels up again, you may run into problems. That's because you don't really have control of the circumstances. You still have some of that you are reporting to.

Again, you can go back and, again, 1 of the issues is always money. I'm not talking about your compensation; I'm talking about income at the nonprofit pedigree to which they are subordinate to government agencies or donations as part of their survival strategy or financial strategy. If income from the agency is problematic, you know what you're stepping into. If that was a problem then, it is probably going to be a problem now , especially if they tell you it's a problem!

You have to investigate the level that you're coming at, who you report to. If you are at the highest level, what your relationship with the board will be like. Is it the same board with whom there were issues before? What's the income stream for money coming in? What are the expectations of you given the money?

Those are a few things that I would consider. The benefit of going back is that often you are the situation where you are stepping in and able to continue building on retirement plans that you had. For example, there is a personally brought back toward the financial institutions years ago who was 7 years into a 10 year vesting for a pension. He was able to finish those 3 years off and thus retire with a pension plus a 401(k) and all because he was able to step in and continue making contributions and continue based upon the former scenario to finish off the pension.

Often, you know how the organization is run. You also then have shortcuts to getting things done because a lot of things really have changed. The advantages that you have is stepping into something familiar; the disadvantage can be what is familiar was a problem.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

I Have The Right Background But I’m Not Getting The Interview


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/04/23/i-have-the-skills-experience-for-the-job-but-not-getting-the-interview

Ep 724 Someone was perplexed that they didn’t get invited in for an interview, even though they had all the skills and experience for the job.  I offer some ideas for why that may be happening.

Summary

The question for today is, "I have all the experience and skills required for the job and I'm not getting the interview. What's wrong?"

There are a few possibilities. I want to start off with an obvious one. You may think you have all the experience and skills needed to do a job but your resume doesn't say that. Thus, they don't know it. You are asserting it doesn't convince them. It's what's in the document that you are submitting to them that is the differentiator. Thus, unless it is in the resume, unless it is sufficient, they don't believe you. That's the 1st reason.

Number 2 is that you don't have enough of the experience. You've done it for 3 months and they are looking for 7 or 8 years. Sorry, you're not qualified so you don't have all the experience and you don't have all the skills.

That brings us to number 3. Your overestimating yourself and your knowledge and that comes across as, "I have one year of experience; they are looking for four. You think you have the skills and experience... But in their mind, you don't." After all, they have to live with the impact of your performance. They have figured out in their mind. What is needed to be successful in the job; you don't have it.

That leads to the last item. You have the experience. Like most job hunters whose resumes I've seen, or have seen, you are overestimating yourself and your capabilities. You may have taken a class in college or someplace else; that doesn't make you qualified. They're looking for someone with X numbers of years of experience doing that which you claim to be able to do.

Those are a few possible reasons for why your background is in getting you the interview.. In other words, you are acting like a job hunter. Overvaluing yourself, overestimating your capability and the company is shooting it down.

Sorry, it's a blunt message but an accurate one. These are the reasons why you might not be getting the interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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