Do I Look Like a Job Hopper?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/14/do-i-look-like-a-job-hopper/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question as to whether someone looks like a job hopper.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The premise is that the person is concerned that the resume makes them look like a job hopper. The question goes like this, “I’m a software developer with a job that I’ve had since college. 1.5 years. 4 years. 2 years. 3.5 years. 2.5 years. I’m a year into my latest gig and started to think about switching industries like from going from finance to tech. How bad does this look?”

Great question. I think there is a more complicated answer to this. Let me start with the premise that I have the idea that some of these might be consulting assignments. Where that is the case, you can aggregate dates into one combined area that shows that you are a consultant during that period. Let’s say the 2 years and the 3 1/2 years were as consultants, aggregate the dates there. The reason I have the idea is your choice of the word “gigs”or, “gig” for that last position . I have the idea from not that you might be a person who is been a consultant. If that’s the case, aggregate some of those dates to demonstrate clearly.

More important than a tactic, is the bigger picture. You are not talking about career progression. You’re talking about how over 10 years as a developer. If my math is right, for 14 1/2 years, you are talking about yourself being purely a developer; do not talking about being a lead. You not talk about being an architect and you’re not talking about being a manager. You talking about being a developer.

That may have been a conscious choice of yours but some employers of the start looking down on you because you haven’t progressed in your career. That may be a bigger issue for you. Why are you still a developer? Why are people not give you the opportunity to get ahead?

If you’ve always wanted to be a developer, that’s going to be a real easy question to deflect. You’re going to have to address in the cover letter.
Again, I don’t see these dates as being intrinsically wrong. I just think the bigger issue is that at some organizations, and organizations that like fast-track individuals, they’re not going to see you as being fast-track. There going to see you on the slow road.

Can I Avoid Becoming Obsolete? | Job Search Radio


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone who wants to know how to avoid becoming obsolete.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone who wants to know how to avoid becoming obsolete.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

I’m Interviewing For a Job and Saw That It Has Been Re-Posted!


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/05/11/im-interviewing-for-a-job-and-saw-that-it-has-been-re-posted

EP 742 Does that mean I don’t have a chance of getting the job?

NOTE: The offer mentioned at the beginning of the show is no longer in effect

Summary

The question for today is, "I'm interviewing for a job and just let it has been re-posted by the company. Does that mean I don't have a chance for getting the job?" Have they been rejected? Do they have no chance?

The answer is, "No!" When he walked through the mechanics of how firms conduct themselves. There are always exceptions to this, but this is the rule in almost all cases.

Some firms have their job postings on a setting called auto re-post. That is, a site (I will use The Ladders as an example) , where if you have not taken the position down, it will be re-posted and refresh to the top of the list after a certain number of days. Many sites offer that feature to employers and they take it gladly because, if the job is still open, they don't have to waste time re-posting it. That's option number 1.

Option number 2 is that you have been rejected and you did a crappy job on your interview and they are not interested. However, the likelihood is that (3) they are going to keep running that had until such time as they have an offer extended and accepted in the person has started. Most firms conduct themselves that way because they have been burned many times by people who say yes to their job offers and don't start, they have been burned by job hunters who lead them on...

As much as people complain about employers, there are a lot of job hunters to create the conditions that everyone lives under.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Should I Stay Underemployed for At Least a Year So I Don’t Damage My Resume? (VIDEO)


The details are sad. The answer isn’t.

Summary

Someone wrote to me with the question. "Should I stay in a job where I am underemployed for at least a year if I don't want to damage my resume?"

Here's the extra detail – – "I am 40 and I am earning $14 an hour in a job as a social media manager for a small company on Long Island. I'm being told I need to stay in his job for at least a year before I start looking for a better job. The position is an unchallenging dead-end with no advancement opportunities. Why should I stay?"

The simple answer is that there is no reason that you should stay. The "however" is I'm wondering whether you have the actual skills and experience yet to command more money. After all, why didn't you get a job paying more than $14 an hour if you have those skills and experiences?

Through question becomes how can you get them? If it is not at your current job, where can you get them? What training can you get? What can you do on the side to beef up your capabilities? To me, it's not about staying there for a year. That's the kind of crap that agencies tell job hunters that no longer applies.

What really matters is why was it necessary to take a $14 an hour job doing this at a firm with a dead-end? Why were you unable to get something better?

Usually, there are 2 reasons. One reason is lack of skills. The 2nd reason is lack of job search skills. That is what JobSearchCoachingHQ.com it is about. You can visit the site and get a sense of how I help people. There, you can get one-on-one coaching so that you're not just simply learning through trial and error and getting stuck. At least, the job-search side of this can be handled.

I can't help you become excellent at what you will careers. I can help you with your job search.

Again, there's no reason to stay. However, there may be reasons why you got stuck in this role then makes sense to look at. There are things that you can do to correct them. To me, it is not about the company; is really about you at this point. There are things you can do to get stronger, both in terms of your career and in terms of your job search skills.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I’m Interviewing at a Company Where Someone I Didn’t Get Along With Works (VIDEO)


How do I handle this?

Summary

I received the question from someone that I thought was very useful. It describes a situation where a person (I'm not going to identify gender) was interviewing with the firm and had already met the president, but then discovered that someone that they fought with regularly, was employed at the firm in a senior sales role. And they handle it?

I'm sorry that this has occurred. Disagreements, sometimes political, sometimes in the course of selling, people butt heads with one another. That is sufficiently difficult for you indicates how vehement the differences were. Let me divide the scenarios into 2. One is big company environment. A few thousand people. This is a lead salesperson. I don't know the role that you're interviewing for. But, given that your writing, I will assume that is also a sales role, perhaps where you might even interact with this person regularly.

At a major corporation, I might let things roll. I might not really address the issue head-on. Again, I'm operating with a limited amount of information so I don't know whether this actually will be someone that you interact with daily or not. If you would interact with them daily. My advice might be more like the next piece of advice I would give. If this is with a big company, I might not call this person because (let me just pick the name of the bank and use it as an example). You are interviewing at Capital One-- there are tens of thousands of people who work for it. What is the likelihood that the president of this firm is going to contact the salesperson in that organization for permission to hire you? Pretty damn small.

So, in the monster firms I wouldn't bother unless you know for fact that this person would be interacting with you. If that were the case, the advice I would give would be also represents smaller companies. In smaller companies and in large firms where you would interact with the person, I would call this person up immediately.

"Hi! I just met with so-and-so. I know we had our differences for years. The fact is I am a different person than I was then. I've learned some things. I'm sure you are different person than you were then. I just wanted you to know that I'm interviewing with your company. I hope you can see that I am different that I was then."

This person may stand in your way. This person may say, "Yeah. It was a tough time then..." Whatever it is, they may say something more appealing in conciliatory, Just as you have said to them. I just believe it's better off to confront his head on with the person that you have the issue with. That's because if you believe they are going to be contacted, then you might as well get it done with so that in this way, if it is going to happen (or as a former colleague of mine once said, "You either blow it in or you blow it out."), It's either going to happen or it isn't. There is no gray here. This persons other than standing your way or they aren't.

If they aren't, great! If they are, get it done with by saying to this person, "I'm a different person than I was then; I hope you can put the past behind us. My goal is not to be rude. I just want to make a living. I hope you can put the past behind you." Then, let it go. That's because obviously there's enough history there that your concern, which suggests that there was a serious problem.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How Do I Crack an Interview Without Preparation? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about how to crack an interview without preparation.

SPOILER ALERT. I USED AND TRANSCRIBED BAD LANGUAGE TOWARD THE END OF THE PODCAST AND THE TRANSCRIPT

Summary

SPOILER ALERT. I USED AND TRANSCRIBED BAD LANGUAGE TOWARD THE END OF THE TRANSCRIPT.

He was 1 of those fun questions I get asked from time to time. Ready? How do I correct in interview without preparation?

I will treat this as a person who is graduating college, rather than a full-time employee already because, if you are in the work world, you already know you don't want to take the lazy way out. Let me just talk to this person very bluntly.

The way you do it is with luck. If you have good karma. If you're fortunate enough that you have studied well and know your subject cold, then you have a shot. Remember, just because you know your subject cold. According to the textbooks doesn't mean that you know an interview with this firm. The fact of the matter is, and I'm going to be this blunt with you, you cannot correct the interview. You cannot hack the interview without, by definition, doing preparation.

At the end of the day. Are you better off, at least spending 45 minutes to an hour looking at the LinkedIn profile of the person you will be speaking with, having a sense of their background, going to the website of the firm, perhaps looking at a few of the profiles of people working in the department that you would be working in to get a sense of what they are doing and what their backgrounds are? Maybe you practice some answers to predictable questions you might be asked?

How tough is this really that you're going to be such a fool that you want to do nothing in order to get a job? It begs the question of why they should want to hire you? Doesn't answering that question requires some amount of preparation?

I'm being blunt with you because someone needs to smack you across the face and wake you up because if you want to be lazy, you are going to get lazy person's results. If you're going to put an effort to try to become a master of something-- 10,000 hours of expertise and you didn't get it in college, 10,000 hours to become a master. I done recruiting for more than 40 years and I know this subject cold.. You cannot do it unless you are lucky.

So get to work and stop bullshitting yourself and do what you need to do otherwise, be prepared for the consequences. Maybe you'll luck out, but you probably won't..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How Do I Attract Recruiters to My LinkedIn Profile without . . . ?


How do I attract recruiters to my LinkedIn profile without my boss thinking I’m job hunting?

Audio on this is not perfect.  The content is. I hope you can tolerate it.

Summary

I was asked the question that I thought was really very good. People sometimes lose track of the importance of doing this so I thought I would do a video about it. The question is, "How do I attract recruiters to my LinkedIn profile without my boss taking them looking for a job?"

The question needs to be answered in 2 parts. I'm going to deal with the 2nd part first-- "without my boss becoming suspicious or thinking I'm looking for a new job. To answer this really starts off with your privacy settings. We start looking at changing your privacy settings, you want to make sure the people are not notified when you make a change to your profile.

You go to your LinkedIn homepage. There is a little picture of yourself for a little icon on the upper part of the page. You go to privacy settings and what you are looking for is dealing with an area where you are sharing profile edits. Next to it, you will see "change," and change it to, "no." This is about choosing whether you network is notified of your profile changes. Assuming your connected with your boss, this will prevent he or she from being notified of any profile changes which is usually a signal that someone is looking to change jobs.

The other part of your question was, "How do you make your profile sufficiently attractive so that recruiters want to contact you?"
That one is also easy.

For the field that you are in and the work that you do, you want to SEO and optimize your profile like you would a resume. Why would someone want to contact you? What skills do you have that would make someone want to reach out to you?

If you're not exactly sure, what I want you to do go to a site like Indeed, a site where job descriptions are aggregated. Search for positions that you might apply for. Look for 20 or 25 of them. Start looking for keywords for these jobs.

I want you to start thinking of patterns. If 15 of the jobs use particular language to describe what is being looked for in 5 don't, include the language that is used in the 15 jobs and then, from there, include some of the language from the other 5. The idea is that if recruiters are searching LinkedIn, they are using keywords to find people with particular skills.

From there, make it easy for recruiters to contact you. You do that by including your email address and phone number in the summary area of your profile. Say something like, "If you would like to reach me, contact me at…"

Again, to summarize my answer the question, use your privacy settings and turn off notifications to changes in your LinkedIn profile and then use keywords for job descriptions to improve your profile to use terms that recruiters are going to be using to find someone like you and then include your email address and phone number in the summary area of your profile.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Do Recruiters Ask You About Things They Can Find Out in Your Resume | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


There are 2 reasons why recruiters ask questions about things that they can already find out in your resume. Here, I lay them out simply for you.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why do recruiters ask about things they can already find out in my resume?"

This may be a shock to you and if it is, I apologize to you for sharking you.However, I always have to answer with "no BS." for why they do this.

The 1st reason is that people lie.They don't tell the truth. Thus, when you put them on the spot during an interview,, sometimes they give you information than what's on the resume.

Assuming that you are a "truth teller," and your 1st reaction was to groan about people lying, another thing that we are trying to do (Although I don't do recruiting anymore, I did for more than 40 years and have a good idea of the my thought process when I was doing this),I wanted to see if I want to hear how you tell the story Of what you did and how you went about doing it So that I would get a sense of how you interviewed.

For me, if I stumbled into someone who is trying to con me, that was a "bonus point."I am assuming that everyone is telling me the truth in the resume.In telling me the truth in the resume I'm moving onto the next thing, which is if I'm going to invest my time and energy in representing someone, how are they going to perform on an interview? Do I have a chance of earning a fee? If not, (buzzer sound) I delete the resume because it is a waste of my time, no matter how good you think you are. My client won't wind up hiring you. Do you understand?

We don't do things to "find you a job." You are paying nothing. What recruiters do is fill a position with a client and the client pays us.As a result, you are the person who will allow us to earn the fee… Or not and we are trying to figure that out.

In telling us what you've done and how you went about doing it, You are helping us to discern between different people because we can't submit everyone. We are not paid to submit resumes as though they are a burger at a fast food restaurant.What recruiters are paid to do is to deliver someone who the client has determined that they need because the person has a particular background and a particular personality type who will do the job and has particular skills that they have specified.

If you cannot interview well, if you can't interview well with the recruiter, (buzzer sound) they will hit the delete key because they have no chance of hurting a fee.

So take it seriously. Don't just simply question why they're asking you these questions and wasting your time because they aren't. You are wasting their time if you don't deliver wellAnd demonstrate that you have the required skills that their client is looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Should I Apply Through Email or LinkedIn? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Can I Ask About Work-Life Balance? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 850 I don’t believe you can ask about work-life balance directly.  I do believe you can get the answer your question indirectly.  Here’s how.

Summary

The question for today is:

Can I ask about work-life balance?

Before I give you a definitive answer, I'd want to define what an interview is used for.  From an employer's perspective, they are trying to evaluate and assess you in order to figure out whether you can do the job they need to have done.  From their standpoint, well, you know you're not supposed to ask about benefits at the 1st interview, right?  You also know that you want them to like you. 1st, in order to get them to want to move forward, right?

So, when you ask about work-life balance, employers hear that as, "What's the minimum amount of work I need to do in order for you to think that I'm doing my job?"  They are not fond of that thinking and that is how they interpret the question. You can get a better idea of what you want to know by asking a different question.

Let me give you a suggestion.  You know when they get to the part of the interview where they ask, "So, do you have any questions for us?"

I've covered a lot of different questions and different videos. I'm not going to repeat those.Here's the way to asked the question she can get the answer that you want.

"Describe a typical day for me from the time I walk in at what time do you expect me to walk in until the time I leave (tell me what time you expect me to leave).  I want to get a clear idea of what I'm going to be doing by working for you. You have given me a good broad brush stroke I what I would be doing.  Let's get into the weeds a little bit."

You'll get a good idea of what you will be expected to do and, notice, you getting a good idea of your arrival time and departure time, too.  If they expect that you will be working late hours, they'll be telling you that in the course of answering this question.  That, I believe, will help you solve the question of work-life balance.

Look, I don't know of many job hunters, I don't know of many American workers or foreign workers who want to do the least amount of work.  I believe that most people want to have some time for the rest of their lives, too.  They want to have a little bit of time for their family, to have a little bit of fun to do other things in their life, too.

I don't believe that you want to beef finding out about this mythical work-life balance thing.  You want to be finding out about what you're going to be doing and how many hours a day, you're going to be doing, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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