What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.

Summary

Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Fired? They Can Find Out. (VIDEO)


Can an employer find out I was fired, not laid off?

Summary

People are invariably worried that they are fired from a job, not laid off, but fired from a job, the next employer is going to find out.

That's true. They can find out.

What happens is that if you sign the form at the time of your application that allows company to check reference or, at the time that you accept their offer if you sign something that allows them to do a background check that includes a reference with a former employer, generally, large firms will release that information. They may say they have a policy against it, but usually in some way, you are at risk of it coming out.

I want to be clear that so far have been talking about large firms. If a small firm is hiring you, the likelihood is that you can provide the references for them to check. It's not like you're going to give the boss as a reference who fired you for incompetence, or you? You can pick up here or someone who is a peer will say they are manager or a legal or whatever to support your candidacy.

Large firms are generally not going to put up with that. They're going to want the okay to contact your former employer. Your only hope there is if your former employer has a policy that says, "We don't release any information."

I recently had something where was coaching someone who is looking for position, having been fired by former boss who, the way he tells the story, just didn't like him or give him a chance. after years of service with the firm, had done a fine job for the company, but they just had out for him. What the truth is, I do not know. At the time he was fired, he was told that they would not say anything adverse about his candidacy. There was a point where he found out that this manager had.

I told him to call up the head of HR and say something to them very simple. The simple statement. I told him to tell them was, "It is come to my attention that your firm has violated an agreement that you made with me. The agreement was not to provide an adverse reference. I know that this is happened. I want to be clear. If it happens again, I will take strong and enforceable action. I'm sure you will not want to have this happen again and will insist that your staff abide by the agreement."

I have another situation where a senior professional was facing an adverse reference. The senior management of his firm promised a good reference. He was coming up and the executive search firm was going to call to do a reference check about his work prior to him meeting with their client. I suggested the call the president of the firm and say, "Hi! I'm just checking in with you to let you know that you will probably be getting a call from someone representing a position that I am up for. I would really appreciate it if you capture agreement and provided a great reference." Which they did.

The point of the stories that I have been telling is that if you have been fired, the goal is to get an agreement out the door that says 1 of the few things.
1. They will provide a great reference and talk about how economic circumstances dictated the dismissal.
2. They state that is an institution, they do not provide references on anyone and they act that way if someone checks a reference.

The latest theory were background checking can become questionable is what dates of employment. What I always tell people is that if you're not sure the date, next to the date on the application, you put the expression, "approx" for "approximately." This signals that you're not absolutely sure of the date.

If you are lying about your dates, that's something that if they check your background, they will find pretty quickly especially if you trying to cover up 6 months here or a year there . . That's really next to impossible to get away with.. I will simply say that you are better off just being forthcoming, rather than shooting yourself in the foot if you worked for so long to get this position.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Dealing With Cost of Living Differences (VIDEO)


Moving from a lower cost of living area to a higher one often poses challenges for job hunters. Here, I answer someone’s question about a move to Seattle.

Summary

I received the question from a luster that I thought was very good so I thought I would cover here. The question is, "I live in New Jersey and in interviewing with a company in Seattle. They're having a third interview with me for position at a general manager level, but they haven't asked me what my salary requirement this." They did asking what he was currently earning at the time of the 1st interview. Wisely, the job hunter has looked at several cost-of-living sites like Bankrate, Sperling (bestplaces.net) and CNN Money.com, Salaryexpert.com is between 13% and 21% more expensive than where he lives now. They all indicate that the salary in Seattle should be more to maintain his cost-of-living.is a more expensive area to live in.

The person asks whether it is reasonable for person to ask for a cost-of-living increase plus a salary increase in order to come to work for them. For example, if he stayed in New Jersey and took a new position, he would expect to get a 15% to 25% increase without having to move. It is reasonable to ask for an incentive increase on top of the cost-of-living increase to maintain a standard of living (ie. A 13% cost-of-living increase +20%)?

He goes on to say that if he gets an offer, it is a believer to be anywhere near his present salary +33%, which is what it would take me to move. This is based on information coming from Glassdoor plus the company is offering RSU's vesting over 7 years. He goes on to offer a few more details, but is asking for advice.

1st of all, let me start by saying he was wise that you went out to do some research here. The research has taught you that there is a different cost-of-living between the 2 areas. For example, if a person from Seattle moves to Florida, salaries are lower, cost-of-living is lower, housing is lower , yada, yada, yada. The reverse is also true. A person from New Jersey moves to Seattle and they find it more expensive.

Should you deal with this? Absolutely! You have to deal with it, certainly before you fly out and meet with them. It's wise of you to consider how to present this. For the purposes of this next interview with the general manager, unless you know this is the final interview, if this is 1/3 interview, like you say and it is not the final interview, you are still in selling mode. You want them to fall in love. If the role, no love, no money, no job. Keep selling. If it is a standard 3rd interview.

Now if this is a final interview, you need to address the salary stuff. Not not as rigid as you because my experience tells me the salary survey sites are notoriously inaccurate. After all, they pull certain people who are more likely to respond to salary surveys. Often the data is provided by organizations who is interested is to demonstrate that your salary is too low.

For example, some years ago there was a salary survey done by recruiting firm. Everyone salary look like they were making too little money. Using their interest to suggest, "You're not making enough money. You should change jobs! You should come to work for 1 of our clients."

If you are talking with them and it is a final interview, you need to address this in a casual way. If the money conversation comes up you can gracefully say, "This is what I'm currently earning. In case you weren't aware of it, there is a cost-of-living difference between where I live and where you live. I can't just pretend it doesn't exist. I don't plan on living with 3 roommates if I come to Seattle to work for you. I need to be compensated fairly for my move."

That he mentioned in his note that there are RSU's and the firm will counter with that. You need to respond to that by saying, "That's great! That's my future upside. For now, I need to pay bills. The difference between New Jersey and Seattle is between 13% and 22% (what ever it was again). That's just to make me hold with what I'm earning now. It doesn't advantage me in any way from a compensation standpoint. The fact of the matter is I'm not changing jobs just for a lateral. Now, to you, you may look like a big increase but to me it is a lateral just to get the same cost-of-living as to what I have now. AND I don't know what the cost of an apartment is comparable to what I'm living in costs in Seattle. I'm just working with data here. You need to be prepared to give me a decent sized offer here."

"What's a decent sized offer?"

"My current salary PLUS the salary differential to make me whole to the Seattle cost of living difference PLUS an increase."

They will probably attempt to do it on the basis of 13% because you said that the differential is between 13% and 21% (Instead of telling them 13% to 21%, tell them 18% to 21%). In doing so, you're giving them a sense of what is going to take to bring you on board. Now is is likely to blow up? With some firms as well and would someone wont.Let's not be foolish here. If it's going to blow up. It's going to blow up.

So if you are still interviewing, where there is the 3rd interview or the 5th interview, probably, this conversation should occur yet. If it is the final interview,It has to get laid out for them somewhere along the line here.

If they ask you whether you have any questions, you can respond by saying, "I just want to know how much I really love this job here.It is a terrific organization and I would so much like to come to work for you. At the same time, I have to look at the compensation, as well.I look at the cost-of-living difference between New Jersey where I live and Seattle, I see 18% to 21% difference between the 2 areas."

"Where did you find that out?" Then you give them websites with the higher ranges to look after themselves.

"If I just got 18% to 21% increase, that just balances things out to where I am now. You are not advantaging me in any way."

"But what about the RSU's?"

"That's not going to pay my bills. That's going to compensate me for all the effort in all the time that I put in for how many years until they become fully vested? For now, my focus is on getting an increase. It's not just simply an increase based upon my current base salary But all my cost-of-living increase and the base

You have to get it addressed. You cannot ignore it.Otherwise, they will extend an offer based upon the lowest possible pointThere will likely be turned down by you and you will have wasted even more time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

How Do I Job Search When I Work in an Open Area? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 779 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about how to job search when you work in an open space floor plan.

Summary

I'm here with the question for a job hunter designed to help them, help you with your job search.

The scenario they present is very simple. They work in office with an open floor plan and, unfortunately, if you take the call or even respond to email, there are a bunch of people around them. How do you do a job search. When you work in an open space?

The answer is actually pretty easy , but I understand the fear involved of being caught. I used to work for an agency where, whenever someone wore suit, the joke would be, "Where is the interview today?" If someone walked off on their mobile phone to take a phone call, the assumption was that they were looking for another job. I know it sounds crazy but that's the mentality the recruiters have and frankly the mentality of a lot of people in their fear that someone is going to detect them.

Here are 3 things to do the really very easy.
1. Have email only sent to your personal account. Never have it sent to an office account.. Make sure that account exists on your phone. This way, you can respond to messages on your phone and is not going through the firm's server.
2. If phone calls are coming to your personal phone, never take the call when it comes in. That so you never have to say to someone, "Would you hold on for 2nd so I can walk to can speak privately." That statement basically tells everyone that is a call from recruiter or someone about a job. Instead, let the call going to voicemail and, from there, you want to be able to respond to that call before lunch and before 5. That's so that you respond to every message within 24 hours. You always want to be able to respond within that amount of time. Remember, you are competing with other people were also looking at being evaluated for these jobs. Put yourself in a position where you responding quickly but not instantly.
3. If you mistakenly take a call from someone, always respond by saying, "I would like to speak with you. But now really isn't a convenient time. Can I call you at____." then you suggest an alternate time. Sometimes, we make a mistake. We take the call. This is the perfect way to respond when it is at your convenience you can walk to that office to have the conversation, you can leave the building to have that conversation and not be caught.

Texting should only be used when scheduling something. If you're responding to someone you have their mobile number . But, at the end of the day, I would suggest avoiding text for initial contact. Once you have the relationship the other person, simply tell them, "I work in an open space and sometimes it is hard to speak freely. Is it okay if I text you?" Get their mobile number and start texting them you scheduling things.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Re-Contacting a Company After You’ve Turned Down a Job Offer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about re-contacting a company that they turn down a job offer from.

Summary

Here's the question: Can I asked to be a job candidate again for a company to whom I told I was taking another offer? The language is a little quirky. I'm going to translate it.

Apparently this person received an offer or backed out of an interview cycle with a firm, saying that he is gotten another offer. Apparently, they decide to turn down that offer , and now is wondering whether or not he or she can go back and talk to that firm about a job.

The answer is, "Sure." There is no taboo about this except the awkwardness that you may feel about going back and saying this.

In approaching them again, recognize that on their side they are going to have questions. What happened? Why did it happen? They're going to wonder if you received an offer and turned it down. What was wrong with that offer… Things along those lines. They're going to wonder if they're going to be similarities that might cause you to turn down their offer. They're going to want to see if you are logical. They going to wonder if there is a practical reason why you did this. Whether you are sincere. Whether you can express yourself well about this in a way that is convincing.

Part of your responsibility here is to tie it into their circumstances. "I was really excited about this job. I received an offer and was ready to say yes and then something came to my attention about the firm (or about the hiring manager) that gave me cause for pause. " For example, the offer wasn't what I was led to believe it would be is a reason that would be valid.

"I was led to believe will be for such and such amount. It was for significantly less." You get you get the idea.

"So what is it that you're looking from us in the way of compensation?"

" For this job. I was looking for such and such. They offered me $30,000 less and I thought it was appropriate to turn that down." You get the idea.

They're going to want to explore the circumstances that caused that offer to go away or be turned down and then you're going to be looking to switch the conversation at a particular point in talking about their job, get into an evaluation process with them.

They may continue with you by saying, "Where are you in your job search now?" That's because they may be starting at the beginning with you (again). If you have 3 things are close to an offer, why would they start now?

Here's another variation on answering that question.

I don't know if this happened 4 years ago or 4 weeks ago. If it is 4 years ago, they may have some notes, especially for speaking to the same person as you did, then about the turndown that you gave them, and then go into the explanation for why you chose that firm over there firm. If it is 4 months ago, the 1st answer that I gave applies.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Can Replace LinkedIn? (VIDEO)


I want to answer someone’s question about what can replace LinkedIn as a tool for the job hunters. I also addressed this from the standpoint of small business owners and solopreneurs.

Summary

Someone asked me a question I thought would be useful one for people to hear the answer to because I think it is such a remarkably underutilized resource for people, whether you are in, job hunting mode, you are a business owner… Whatever it is, people need to start thinking a little bit differently.

The question I received from someone is, "What can replace LinkedIn?" People of gotten to the point where they think of LinkedIn as a stilted platform that doesn't feel comfortable and, although it remains the best platform for job hunters, for business owners, it's a little bit different and not as ideal as the alternative is.

What can be an alternative to LinkedIn whether you're a job hunter or a business owner, you are a solopreneur . . . Whoever you are? What can help in the business world differently than LinkedIn?

I think the real alternative to people despite the attitude that some have is Facebook. Facebook does a lot of things extremely well. I'm not the look at from a marketers perspective; I will look at from a user's perspective. From a job hunter perspective, you have the opportunity connect with people on Facebook that you find, perhaps on LinkedIn, perhaps you read about them, perhaps you meet a conference and start building a personal relationship and a business relationship, too.

Historically, Facebook was for your personal life and LinkedIn was for your professional life . However, I think the perceived limitations is now "self-perceived all self-perceived at this point and Facebook is trying to make inroads into the professional world in many different ways.

For example, they know me job postings available for people so if you're trying to fill a job, you can now posted on Facebook for free. More of you should be looking for those jobs on Facebook and applying to hiring managers or firms through Facebook rather than purely through LinkedIn.

Groups on LinkedIn are not great anymore.They have died the death that Yahoo and Google groups have died. They are just less effective in so many different ways.On Facebook, they are vital. There is a life to them that is very different. Facebook has encouraged this summary different ways.

I want to encourage you to start looking at Facebook as an alternative and start looking at Facebook as an alternative for building relationships with people who, right now, you don't necessarily know. Start building relationships with people you know, somewhat, but don't necessarily know well. Start cultivating the personal and begin extending it into the business.

For business owners, you already know that. Facebook allows you do a lot of different things to target users. I think in terms of the relationship. For example,If you are a solopreneur, there are groups that you can join on Facebook that will allow you to start networking With other business people in your area So that you can start giving and receiving referrals.

Why not do that? Why not start thinking of Facebook like an online Chamber of Commerce for you? If you are a solopreneur or a small business owner, you want to connect with others. If you think of Facebook is the place where you are constantly screaming, "Use my services,"You are going to blow it.No one wants to hear you say, "Hire me!"That's certainly true of job hunters.

Facebook is a relationship place. It's a place where you can cultivate relationships pretty easily so that people want to hear your views (that's certainly true service professionals) and they want to hire you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Is It Rude to Contact The Hiring Manager Directly & Ask Them Out for Coffee? (VIDEO)


Is it rude to contact the hiring manager of a job posting directly and inviting them for a coffee to ask more about the job?
I found this opportunity that has everything I’m looking for right now. I feel I can deliver, however, they ask for 10 years when I bring only 3 years of direct experience with the role and +5 of work experience. I feel I’m better off contacting the hiring manager to ask more questions.

By the way, at the end of this video you will hear me make a little squealing sound because I had trouble finding where to cut off the video.  I hope you have a laugh.

Summary

I was asked the question that I thought was great. "Is it rude to contact the hiring manager of a job posting directly and invite them for coffee? I want to ask them more about the job." Then they go on to say, "I found this opportunity that is everything that I'm looking for. I feel that I can deliver however, they ask for 10 years of experience and I bring only 3 years of direct experience with the role and 5 years of overall work experience. I feel like I am better off contacting the hiring manager to ask the more questions."

Is it rude? Absolutely not!

Is it likely to be responded to favorably? Absolutely not! Let me explain why.

I want you to put yourself in the position of the hiring manager and not the job hunter. They have an absolute stranger invite them for coffee in order to ask them questions and they are not qualified for the role.

Why do I say they are not qualified for the role? Real simple. A person with 5 years of experience has a different level of experience and competence in most organizations than someone with 10. They usually have managed people. They may have some of the experience with the functionality from a staff perspective, but not for me, leadership or management perspective.

Thus, when you say you have 3 years of, direct experience and 5 years overall, what you're telling me is that you don't fit the job and you want to try to talk your way into it. Before he or she is going to agree to anything, the hiring manager if they have half a brain in their head is going to say, "not quite yet. Can I see a copy of your resume? I need to see whether it is going to be worth my time."

Now, if your background screams that you fit this job, yeah, they will be happy to meet you for coffee because they are going to turn it into an interview and, yes, you will have time to ask questions, but, unless you follow some of my advice, it will be at the end of the interview when they have already evaluated you.

So, is it rude? Absolutely not!

Is it likely to be responded to favorably? Absolutely not!

That's because you are not qualified… You know this already. You are to Junior for the role. And, by the way, from a language perspective (and I'm not trying to be rude in any way), people use the word, "feel," when they should be saying, "think."

"I feel I would be qualified."
"I feel I would be better."

Instead of just saying, "I think I would be better," or, "I think I would be qualified."

When you use the word "feel," you reveal that you are insecure about yourself in the context of the situation and your capability around something. So you cop to the word "feel" instead of the word, "think." Switch your language here and be more direct.

"I feel like can deliver," isn't true. You think you can deliver. Your feeling about whether you can deliver is irrelevant to the hiring manager because they have no data that allows them to determine whether you can deliver. Think you can deliver. Think that you are better. These are accurate statements about what you can do for the hiring manager.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What LinkedIn Summary Should I Have to Attract Recruiters (VIDEO)


Recruiters are constantly scouring LinkedIn for candidates. What LinkedIn summary should you have to attract recruiters?

Summary

"What LinkedIn summary should I have to attract recruiters?" As is the case of most of these questions, the sender hasn't put themselves in the position of being a recruiter. I don't do that kind of work anymore but I did for more than 40; I have a good perspective on it.

The 1st part of the question is, "how to attract recruiters." From there, once you understand the recruiters are finding people on LinkedIn, it becomes clearer.

When someone is looking on LinkedIn to find someone to fill a job with the client, they do keywords in order to do a search. Thus, whether is your profile or specifically the summary area of your profile, it needs to be keyword rich in order to demonstrate a fit.

Now, I would think more in terms of your profile and then, from there, use the summary is a summary of what you will attributes are.

When I think of who might be writing this question, I think they might be a less experienced person. Thus, what you want to be doing is writing about what your background really is. That's because when you write your profile you want to write one That is all inclusive… A laundry list of stuff. You want to make your summary as concise as possible (I'm not talking about brevity, per se), but you want to create incident someone looking at your profile clearly understands what your strengths are. After all, you don't want to do pointless interviews, do you? Zero it in and let the rest of the profile be keyword rich in order to draw people to the page.

From there, what I always tell people to do, is put a phone number and email address in your summary. Why? Because LinkedIn charges about $11 per inMail to message you and you are not on LinkedIn all the time To respond to inMails and messages that you receive. The fastest way for recruiter to contact you is not by spending $11 or $12 waiting for you to go online, But, instead, calling you or emailing you.Putting this information in your summary makes it easier for them to contact you… That expedites it for them by making it easier for you them to contact you…That is what you said you wanted when you wrote, right? It isn't enough to just get the view page. You want to get them to contact you.

In addition, if you have a premium account of some sort,Just checking to see who looked at your profile and who hasn't contacted you. From there, what you do is reach out to them, Message them and simply say, "LinkedIn told me that you would look at my profile. Let's connect. Is there anything I can be doing to help you? Is there something you are looking for in my background that you didn't see which I can address in the conversation?" What this does is flush them out so that you have an opportunity to connect with them.

Again, use the profile for a lot of keywords and the summary area to summarize what a lot of your attributes are. If you are a more senior individual. This becomes even more important.

So, zero in In the summary, give them an easy way to contact with you And you will get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Ask The Big Game Hunter: I Was Lowballed on an Offer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about a tough salary negotiation.

Summary

I'm going to paraphrase the scenario for you, but just follow with me, okay? This person is an offer from a quality organization that he would really like to work for. However, they lowballed him. The hiring manager went the bat, saying that lowballing him was the wrong strategy; he is worth more. Regardless, HR has lowballed him.

With some trepidation, he decided to give notice. It is the middle the month as I am recording this. He is given 2 weeks notice and it would be starting at the beginning of the month with this well-regarded organization in this job that you prefer doing.

He gives his notice, having been a consultant for this 1 firm for a long time. They have been dangling a carrot in front of him and now that he is given notice, suddenly they go, "Wait! No no no no no no no no no! DON'T GO! WE WILL GIVE IT TO YOU NOW!" He has a dilemma. What do you do?

The negotiation is completely botched so let's acknowledge that. It should have been done differently and I will simply say he has some leverage on both sides. This is the way that I would play it.

He's not sure if his current firm will give them a promotion. I also know he really would prefer the other position more (the one with the celebrity firm), but, you know, there are always other fish in the sea.

You start off by determining from the current firm what they are really going to do for him. Let's start off with the position that he really wants and a raise to minimally manage that which he has given notice for. OR, if it is less money than what he is currently making,. He is getting a promotion, and more money should come with a promotion, right?

Even if they don't commit to the promotion and they just commit to a full-time job, ask them to put the offer letter in writing so that he has that as an indication of their good intentions.

Next, with the other firm, once he has this, he can go back to the celebrity firm and say," I gave notice and received a counter offer. I would frankly rather join your firm. However, let's get practical. All along I have said that I am likely to get a counter. You have lowballed me and guess what happened? I got a counter. I would rather join your firm. The hiring manager tells me that he went to you and told you not to do this but you did it anyway. But, regardless, I would like to join. This is the number that will cause me to join."

The 1st thing I would do actually is called the hiring manager before calling HR and tell them that you have another offer as a counter just as you would warned. " You know, I am not independently wealthy.. You won't see my name in the Forbes list of wealthiest Americans. I want to join your firm and I would like to work for you. I can't walk away from so much money and this role which is an interesting role. Can you get me more?"

Have him or her go to bat for you with HR. Have them call the big medium blowup the situation and force HR to do what they should've done all along. Some major organizations do this; they lowball and try to save some money. They act as though it is coming out of their pocket. But, at the end of the day, there are other firms that you can join.

Recognize that! This is a market where you have choices. Don't allow yourself to be bludgeoned based upon the old scenario of a year ago and beyond! Use your leverage well here.

The celebrity firm, the well-known firm, will up the offer or they are going to walk away and then the hiring manager is going to blow a fit. That doesn't help you. The real question is you can only do this if you would really accept the current situation. If you won't or can't, then you are stuck because you have no leverage. You don't really want to walk away.

If you are prepared to walk away, this is the best way to play it. Get the current offer,See if they will up the money a little bit when they do it. Then circle back to the celebrity firm's hiring manager and tell them what's happened and say, "Look, I want to join. You know what I am worth. However, HR has a bug up your butt about lowballing me. I don't know why. Do you?' Have he or she go to bat for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Finding Recruiters to Help You | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers someone’s question about finding a recruiter to help them locate an interesting new job.

Summary

Here is a question on Quora that I think is interesting and I will attempt to answer it.

"I'm working for a fairly large New York City company where I was the 1st software engineer on board. I have 10+ years of software development experience. In the past, I have applied normally for open jobs, however, the most interesting jobs seem to be filled before they are advertised. I would like to see if Tech recruiters can help me out here. In the past, I have been contacted by recruiters who just search for keywords which have just been a complete waste of time. I'm looking for recruiters who can actually find jobs that match my profile."

Like everything these days, it is all in the relationship. You want to put yourself in the position where you actually have a relationship with recruiters who are competent. How do you find recruiters there competent?

Let's start over the LinkedIn profile. You start with searching for recruiters who are in your target geography. You start searching for recruiters who might have positions that are available that superficially fit your background. If you think you can search from job search to job search with people looking out for you, let me just remind you the fact that you are asking people to work for nothing and they are actually getting paid by employers to fill jobs. I know this may not seem like a dichotomy to you, but it actually is.

If you think they recruit for you or you think they're trying to find work for you... That's not their job. Their job is actually to earn a commission by helping an organization find talent that they specify they need and then from there, identify talent that fits those roles. That's the nature of recruiting. Everything else are being told is BS. Let's go further.

How do you find those people? You can start with ads but is are probably going to get you more what you've already got. What you want to be doing is looking at LinkedIn profiles of recruiters that have jobs in your area. What you're looking for is a few things.

Numbers of years of experience. I'm not going to do a commercial for myself but more experience and a stable background is going to tell you something about the recruiter. What's it going to tell you? If you see someone with 6 months here and 3 months there and 9 months there who has change jobs pretty regularly, they are probably not a good producer because the firm would've wanted to tie them in and make them a part of their day to day operations. Instead, they are being let go regularly and they have to find another job regularly, someone else is giving them a chance, but they are not feeling lots of positions. That's trick number 1.

Trick number 2 is to see if you can find people who are writing, publishing, or what have you because they are committed to their career. They are not necessarily burn and churn artists. That's the 2nd thing that you can look for.

The 3rd thing is to listen to how they talk to you. Are they commoditizing you or are they taking some care and how they communicate with you. When they talk about the job opportunity, do they sound knowledgeable or do they sound like a jerk. I think you can discern the difference you recognize enough jerks of their behavior. At the end of the day, if someone calls you about the job, you can ask them, "So, tell me about your background." If they talk with you about it, you go to their LinkedIn profile and findings BS, they are lying to you.

There's an interesting thing that happens pretty often, recruiters of the truth of the LinkedIn profile and don't necessarily tell the truth when you talk to people over the phone. It's a funny dichotomy. At the end of the day, you have work to do in order to find these people, evaluate them and determine whether or not they can really help.

Recognize that if you find this job (it seems like you been in one place for 10 years and you are not a junior individual), stay in touch. Use them as a recruiting source for hiring. Keep them posted on what's going on at the firm that you joined and introduce them to people who are involved with hiring. That's can make you an ally for them and make you someone that they are going to want to help for many years to come.

Lurching from job search to job search is a mistaken strategy. Thinking that you can just arrive cold and have people leap all over you and care about you and be competent, it doesn't work that way. Just like you haven't paid attention to recruiters for 10 years, suddenly if you disappear it. After this search is complete, they are not paying attention to you.

I have a new little job guide that's available for Kindle and that my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us

It's called, "Get Ready for The Job Jungle." It's perpetration tips for beginning a job search. There is a good section there about care and feeding tips for recruiters. It's cheap. It is the let them try to get rich on this thing, you know?

Order a copy of my website or order a copy for your Kindle where he made a whopping $0.35 for this. I think it's a useful tool.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

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