How Do I Reach Out to a Recruiter Who Reached Out to Me A Year Ago? (VIDEO)


A recruiter reached out to me a year ago about a position but I wasn’t interested. Now, I decided to look for a job. How do I reach out to them? Is there any etiquette about doing that?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Why Do Behavioral Interview Questions Work?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why behavioral interview questions work.

Summary

I was asked why behavioral interviews questions work. What is a behavioral interview? I behavioral interview is a type of interview where questions start off, "tell me about a time when you…" You know questions where you are able to tell stories.

Even the toughest question… You can find the answer on the web. I but some of them on my blog, http://blog.thebiggamehunter.us. Use the categories featuring the Bonhomme to pull up tough interview. I have so many of these questions the job hunters don't spend the time practicing.. You don't spend the time learning how to answer these questions. You don't spend the time and review. Just like you don't spend the time practicing how to answer simple questions like, "Tell me about yourself." You just think that you should walk in and when it. That's why employers use this type of question. So many job hunters are just too lazy to take the time to be a champion.

I'm going to use the metaphor of the athlete. When you think a process football team comes out on the field do you think they haven't practiced repeatedly all the same plays for years? Do you think a baseball player hasn't spent time in the batting cage learning how to hit? Do you think they don't practice defense of plays with cutoffs in order to execute them? Yet you think you can go on an interview and just show up.

Do the smart thing. Start learning how to answer these questions. After all, great athletes are paid millions and millions of dollars to practice how to perform. Entertainers, singers, actors and actresses are paid millions of dollars in order to execute on the stage and allow them to be loved by an audience and make their performance credible. And you shop on an interview. Never having rehearsed your lines. Does that make a lot of sense to you?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

I Have the Skills & Experience for the Job But Not Getting The Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 724 Someone was perplexed that they didn’t get invited in for an interview, even though they had all the skills and experience for the job. I offer some ideas for why that may be happening.

Summary

The question for today is, "I have all the experience and skills required for the job and I'm not getting the interview. What's wrong?"

There are a few possibilities. I want to start off with an obvious one. You may think you have all the experience and skills needed to do a job but your resume doesn't say that. Thus, they don't know it. You are asserting it doesn't convince them. It's what's in the document that you are submitting to them that is the differentiator. Thus, unless it is in the resume, unless it is sufficient, they don't believe you. That's the 1st reason.

Number 2 is that you don't have enough of the experience. You've done it for 3 months and they are looking for 7 or 8 years. Sorry, you're not qualified so you don't have all the experience and you don't have all the skills.

That brings us to number 3. Your overestimating yourself and your knowledge and that comes across as, "I have one year of experience; they are looking for four. You think you have the skills and experience... But in their mind, you don't." After all, they have to live with the impact of your performance. They have figured out in their mind. What is needed to be successful in the job; you don't have it.

That leads to the last item. You have the experience. Like most job hunters whose resumes I've seen, or have seen, you are overestimating yourself and your capabilities. You may have taken a class in college or someplace else; that doesn't make you qualified. They're looking for someone with X numbers of years of experience doing that which you claim to be able to do.

Those are a few possible reasons for why your background is in getting you the interview.. In other words, you are acting like a job hunter. Overvaluing yourself, overestimating your capability and the company is shooting it down.

Sorry, it's a blunt message but an accurate one. These are the reasons why you might not be getting the interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Will A Company Reject A Candidate with Excellent Technical Skills But Lacking Social Skills? (VIDEO)


I think this is a great question that affects so many people, particularly those who work outside of their native land. I give my typical no BS advice but a solution so that does not affect you forever.

Summary

The question I received was, "Will accompany reject a candidate with excellent technical skills but lacking social skills?" I know what you want the answer to be but the fact is what you want and what the reality is are different. I want to take it across the life-cycle of your career to explain why.

As a very junior person, you have a chance. However, if you stay static with having poor social skills you won't have a chance.

Before I go further, let me ask, "What are poor social skills?" Generally, that would be interpreted as poor oral communications and/or more written communications. Rude behavior. Ineffective behavior In group situations while working in meetings or with others.

Who would want to work with someone who is rude or sullen. You work with other people. Whether it is in the US or other countries There is the hope that people will get along with one another. You may be dedicated to your craft, but part of your craft involves relating to others. For example, you as a technical professional have to attend meetings where you communicate your ideas. If you cannot communicate ideas, you are not an effective craftsman. That's the reality to it.

It's kind of like an artist he doesn't know how to market themselves or a coach who doesn't know how to promote themselves. I could be the greatest coach in the world (by the way, I'm pretty damn good) But if no one knows about it,, I'm not can be coaching anyone am I? If you have poor social skills, and you are not allowed to attend meetings, How will anyone know that you have great ideas to improve their environment?

So, at the beginning phase of your career, you have a chance; However, is not going to last long because they are going to push you aside pretty quickly. As you get mid-level and higher level, you cannot get away with poor oral communications, poor writing skills, bad behavior with colleagues, Ineffective communications. Why? Because it becomes magnified even more.

You are expected to lead situations. You are expected to be the person who talks to people within the organization outside of the technical areas to elicit information about what they need & how you can go about serving them. You are supporting them; you're working on budgets for a group; you are hiring people. How do you do that with poor social skills? You can't.

Social skills can be improved on. Like technical skills, when you were 6-year-old girl or boy learning how to code, were you great at that time? No, but you had an aptitude a you learned. You had mentors, coaches and teachers who helped you become better. The same thing applies with social skills. You can learn to get better at those, too. I don't care what profession you are in, we are talking about technical profession now, you can get better at these things if you work at them.

I want to be clear that I am a big proponent that you emphasize your strengths as being the core of your background but you have to improve the secondary skills in order to have a career in the primary ones. They go hand-in-hand, but your energy should be focused on your technical skills.

Again, will you be rejected? Probably, Because they'll never know what you know because you can't communicate, right? It is in life are going to hand you a piece of paper or a tablet And say, "Take this test and if you pass the test you will be hired." Managers want to know that you understand what they are telling you AND that you have growth potential. Without those, you are not going to get hired.

So, again, you have a chance if you're the junior level however, as you become involved in the organization, you have no chance.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What's Your Unfair Advantage

“What’s Your Edge Over the Competition?” (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter it’s ruse a subtle interview question, “What’s your edge over the competition?”

Summary

I have an answer to one of those tough interview is that someone wrote to me about. There's the question: in a job interview, what's the best answer to this question, "once you are edge over the other applicants?"

We both know that you have no idea what the other applicants are like. So it is a question that is designed to fry your circuits. In frying your circuits, they want to see you become weak. That's not what you want to do. The correct answer is NOT, I repeat, NOT to go through the usual platitudes about how you are a hard-working individual. That's because I've never seen anyone walk into interview in my 40+ years of recruiting who walks in and says, "I'm kind of lazy. Do you have a job for you lazy person?" So your typical platitudes don't work.

You can't talk about perseverance and passion because that kind of makes their eyes glaze over. Here's how you do. If you know me, you know that I believe that acting has a certain amount to do with it. This is 1 of those questions where they are demanding "theater" from you and you have to bring it.

Here is what you do. When they ask you this tough question, you respond by saying, "Look, you and I both know I have no idea what the competition is like. The one thing I can assure you of is that I am not going to give you any BS. So not to give you this lengthy speech about how I am hard-working, demonstrate a lot of effort, that have been successful at all the places because it doesn't matter. What I can tell you is that I am not going to give you any BS. "

Then you sit there staring at them with a determination and a firmness to your look that lets them know, not that you're angry, I want to be clear about this. You don't try to show anger and how you answer the question. You show your passion and you should your show firmness is exactly what they want to see. That firmness is something candidates rarely show in an interview. Strong candidates, leaders, people with potential, always show those exceptional qualities that let them know that you are not someone to be screwed with. That's what you want to demonstrating your answer. If they don't like it, isn't it a lot better than discovering that what they really want to hire is someone who is a nice order taker.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Two Months of Looking. No Interviews. Just Criticism. | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 717. Day in and day out, I am searching for jobs through various job boards.. I have been working with 8 different recruiters to assist me in my job search and not one has sent me on an interview. Instead, I’ve had numerous agencies rip me to shreds in regards to my last job, compensation and reasoning for termination, not return my phone calls nor my emails and just make disparaging remarks. 

Summary

There is an interesting message that someone left that I thought would make for a great show.

"As of today, I have been unemployed for 2 months. Day in and day out, I'm searching for jobs through various job boards hitting the pavement with resumes in hand, cold calling companies and trying to arrange interviews I have been working with 8 different recruiters to assist me with my job search and not one has sent me on an interview. Instead, I've had numerous agencies rip me to shreds with regard to my last job, compensation and reasoning for termination., Not returning my calls or my emails and just making disparaging remarks. For some reason this may put a damper on their spirit but not for me. I am more determined, driven and motivated now than I have ever been."

When I read this, I want to address the recruiters for second and just say that recruiters are unable to create interviews for people. Employers tell them about jobs open, skills required, the salary they are willing to pay for someone. Those 8 different recruiters representing 8 different recruiting firms that you've reached out to, they don't have anything for you. Their job is not to respond to your emails or to your phone calls for the heck of it because you want them to check in with you. They are there to deliver for their client who is PAYING THEM. These recruiters don't have a job for you. They are not out there pounding the pavement as you are because they are hired by corporations to fill jobs, not by individuals to work for free.

I'm glad your spirits haven't been dampened yet , but I must also say that you haven't been learning the lesson from the recruiter behavior. The lesson MAY BE (I have to said as "msy be" ) that perhaps your skills and perhaps are interviewing and the impact of the decision that you made (you say termination. I'll consider it as resignation) to resign your job may not suggest to them that you are a superior candidate.

You may be asking for too much money. You may be interviewing poorly. Your decision as to why you quit your last job may indicate immaturity. Or, if you were terminated, it's a story that suggests that you really weren't good at your job and that your employer fired you for cause.

What I want to encourage you to do is to take a little bit of time to reflect on the message. If they are wrong, if you have done a check as to the value that you bring to the job market and it's in line, not necessarily with the high range, but within the range in some way shape or form, but you just keep going out there and applying for jobs, pounding the pavement in doing what you're always doing.

I must also say that you're looking for job boards and recruiters and that those 2 together, statistically, fill approximately 30% of positions. The rest of filter networking. That's not what I'm reading that you're doing. When I'm reading that you're doing is spending time with a little bit less than one third of how jobs are filled and not mentioning all the networking that you are doing. As a result, I suspect you're not doing much.

Start doing some networking. Start to create relationships that allow you to present yourself to former colleagues, people that you know, people who attended the same university as you, and see if they can help you. If they can't help you, then you definitely have to adapt. But, recognize today, that it is important for you to (1) reevaluate to see whether or not the recruiters might be right. You can do that in a variety of ways. And (2) if they are not right, start adding networking to your repertoire. As a matter of fact, start adding networking via repertoire, whether they're right or not. This way, you have access to more positions than you're getting access to now

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: The Offer and The Interview (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone who has one job offer and has been invited to have an on site interview at a better company.

Summary

I have another question that someone asked of me. This 1 is a fun one. "Should I delay signing an offer letter? I have an opportunity for an on-site with a better company."

It is what we don't know. We don't know what the better companies interview process is like. Isn't one interview and a job offer? 5 interviews? How long do they plan on taking? Usually, the answer is "We will take as long as we need to in order to come to a good decision for ourselves. We are not going to get bullied into brushing our process."

On the other hand, "burning hand is worth 2 in bush." It's never quite that easy.

What I would do is sign the offer letter and accept it. And here's where it gets obnoxious. You then go continue interviewing with the other firm.

Why do I say that? I know HR people and hiring managers will tell me I am an awful human being. But the fact of the matter is organizations do what is right for them. Job hunters need to start learning that lesson for themselves, too. When times get tough, whichever firm you join, may lay you off. Don't feel this notion of chivalry, of respecting these other firms is a value that they are going to reciprocate.

Again, what I would do is sign the offer letter, continue interviewing, satisfy your curiosity because at the end of the day, you don't want to lose in an acceptable offer. You also don't want to lose an opportunity with a firm that intrigues you. You haven't mentioned anything about comparing the jobs so I'm working with the assumption that the positions are comparable. And they may not be. The only way that you're going to find out if they are comparable or better, with the hiring manager and the people you'll be working for and with our better is by interviewing with them. I know that's really what you want to do so just go out and do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Should I Tell My Employer That I’m Interviewing With Another Company? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 714 Should I Tell My Employer That I’m Interviewing With Another Company Although I Don’t Want to Switch?

Summary

"Should I tell my employer. I am interviewing with another company although I don't want to switch jobs? I have an interview scheduled with a super prestigious company and maybe my current employer will find out. I don't want to switch jobs; I just want to experience that crazy hiring process. In my current occupation. I am still in a probationary period. I am wondering if I should tell my boss about my plans."

I would cover this in a few different ways but I just want to start by saying," NO!!!" Don't go out there and tell them that you are curious about the super prestigious company and that they'll find out. Let me start with the "find out" part of this.

What do you think is going to happen? Do you think is going to be a billboard in your city saying that so-and-so is interviewing with such and such company? He is out looking for a job! NO!!! How are they going to find out? I also say that for most people when they talk about being curious, that indicates that they are not completely happy and they are starting to "date" other people. It's kind of like when you're married and think to yourself, ". I am happily married, but I'm curious about that other person over there. I have no interest in getting involved with them but I am curious." That's how employer stated.

If you think that telling your boss is going to make it any easier, it's like someone confessing to the wife/husband/partner that they'd had an affair." I've had an affair. I realize how terrible it was. I love only you." You feel better because you have assuaged any guilt that you have but now you have dumped it off on them and you expect them to go, "I am so glad you told me about this." It doesn't quite work that way, does it? It will be the same thing with your employer.

You don't go out there and vomit on them that you are curious about this on the firm to which you got recruited and you're going on this interview. You feel better; they feel worse. Why would you want to do that?

I want to come back to a point I made earlier. You're not completely happy in your job and that's why you are listening. You say you are curious, but I know from experience that if you are completely happy that phone call would've been responded to by saying, "you know, I am really flattered by the call but not at this time. This is not my time to change jobs. I really like what I'm doing. Etc. etc."

A simple answer is, "Don't do it." You are on probation. Why would you risk your probation by even going on the interview? That's really what you're doing. Even if you told them his or her reaction could be to say to you, "You know, get out. Now. Don't pass go. Don't let the door hit you in the rear. Just get out." That's really what you're doing; you are cheating on them. You are saying things that translate into that you are committed to your current employer, and are dating other people. Don't do it. It's really that simple.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Should I Tell Them What I Earn? (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses whether to disclose your salary during an interview.

Summary

I have one of those questions and someone asked me. Would it be a bad idea to be upfront about what I am getting paid in a job interview? They want to know whether they should disclose what their current earnings are.

To be clear, you generally have 2 choices-- not to disclose is the advice many coaches. The issue is that for many salary levels, the issue becomes disclose or if you don't the interview is over. The advice normally is don't disclose, because you get boxed in to a number and the range and their expectations are going to be lower if you. On the other hand, like I said, if you don't disclose, often firms respond by saying, "Tell us or this interview is over." You become stuck. That power differential that firms can exercise becomes heavily weighted on their side.

What I would say is if you do choose to disclose as friendly for most of you I think you should, the response has to be, "Now that I've said that. What is the salary range for this position?" If they choose not to disclose, then you pause for a 2nd and say, "So let me get this straight. I told you I'm earning but you're not prepared to tell me what this position is prepared to pay? I understand that there is a range for the role and I may not be qualified for the top number. What's the issue with disclosing the range for the job?" At that point, be quiet.

Let them squirm. At the end of the day, you learn something about this firm from their behavior. That's really important because individuals make the mistake of not paying attention to signals that employers give. After all, if this person who is probably in HR individual is unwilling to disclose, this suggests the command-and-control culture that you may or may not want to be involved with. Frankly, for me personally, I like being involved with command-and-control cultures. It's top-down management where you are expected to execute a task and you are not expected to think or offer ideas. That's not my idea of a particularly attractive environment. Maybe it's yours. But it's not mine.

If they are willing to disclose, you learn something about them that I think is very human and natural. You met them and you are looking for them to meet you with the answer to this question. That's fair. At the end of the day, like I said, you may be in a situation where you are not qualified for the high-end of the range.

Picking numbers arbitrarily, the range may be $135,000-$150,000 plus bonus. Understand that they could pay you $135,000, they could pay you $150,000, and there are many numbers between these 2 that they could also pay you.

When all is said and done, not disclosing carries risk. Disclosing really doesn't because firms are going to box you in any way. Better to make it easy and trade information with them and, like I said, if they don't want to trade, you have learned something really valuable.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Non-Offer Offer (VIDEO)


I received a question from someone the painted description of what I can only think of is a non–offer offer. Do you agree with my assessment? Do you disagree?

Summary

I am doing a video today because someone described the situation to me that they wanted some advice about. I think it is something that is pertinent to more than just simply this 1 person. They wrote about doing a presentation to the CEO of a firm that judging by this person's address would require relocation. The CEO love this presentation, loved his alpproach, loved his ideas and decided from the time of his 1st meeting till now that he has a choice to make about the direction of his firm. He has decided to change the model and that requires a different team and strategy and this is completely new information to the job hunter.

The CEO clearly liked him and wants him to be involved with improving the current model which brings in cash, while considering what will be needed for the other model. To that end he asked this person to present a proposal to work for him as a contract employee to improve the current model. At the end of 60 days, he would decide whether to bring them on full time. The question is whether this is a good thing to do. Is this an okay thing for him to do? Is he using a tactic where he can eliminate me after 60 days?

Knowing that this involves relocation, you have an offer to work for him for 60 days.Actually to make a proposal to work for him for 60 days. You have an offer to bid on 2 months of work. You have a full-time situation now and I know from other parts of this note that you are not happy with it. The idea of moving for 60 days of work when you have a house of family and stuff like that while uprooting everyone doesn't seem to be very sensible.

What comes to mind as an appropriate strategy Is to say, "I am interested in being involved. Talk to me about what you think is fair for me to be involved. Please don't lowball me. If the role, you are asking me to uproot myself and my family to move out here. So what do you think is a fair price?"

2. You have to ask them this next question point blank. "After 60 days if you decide to dump this business, sell it or what have you, What happens to me?" I know the answer that question – – You're gone. The CEO has had 2 months of consulting and adios. You want him to say what he believes he will do And then from there, put it in writing. If the goal is for you to get another job, then this isn't a job. It is a non-job job offer. It is an oppirtunity to bid for a consulting assignment.

For now, there is more to find out. The big thing is what happens after 60 days If, through no fault of yours, the CEO decides,, "I'm Going to bail on the sucker. Let's shut it down." You are out of a job.. Are you okay with that? Instead, ask them what happens to you then.. I could be completely wrong (experience tells me I'm not) This to be the most honest guy in the world is not going to fire you after 60 days.

But what if he does? Is that what you want?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

%d bloggers like this: