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Stupid Final Interview Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/21/stupid-final-interview-mistakes

EP 811 I outline a few stupid final interview mistakes that too many people make.

Summary

I'm back today with what I call stupid final interview mistakes. To be clear, these are the kind of mistakes that are little bit different than the ones that I have pointed out previously because these are the ones to just killed it off at that moment when the opportunity could be yours. Where you are competing on a final interview, and you just do something dumb. Let me just point out some of the things that people can do that will just shoot themselves in the foot and send the candidacy down the drain. They are in no particular order.

1. You arrive late.

2. You just barely or inappropriately for the interview. I'm looking to tell you how to dress because you may be listening to this at a time when styles are different. I simply say the dressing inappropriately for this audience . . . I use an example from a hedge fund the used to recruit for... They used to hate people who wore ties. If you suddenly were talking to an interview, they got turned off. They used to think of ties is something to catch food on if you are sloppy eater.

3. You start feeling arrogant because you think the job is yours. That attitude starts to leak out. You get too cocky and forget that you might be competing with someone and act like the job is yours. In fact, you are competing. You are competing against another person or people or your competing against, "Let's go back and see if there's someone else." Never treat this as though it is a formality.

I remember one time I was a relatively junior person, 1 of my colleagues had someone on interviews with someone in Westchester New York. The person was there from 8 AM until 5 PM. His final interview is with the head of the function he will be working for. What happens is is that the head of the function asks why he is looking for a job. It's hard to imagine someone delivering a racist moment like this. But he did. The candidate says, "I work with a bunch of slobs and Indians."

How do you expect someone to respond to this? Do you expect is can act like a best friend? No! Suffice to say, he didn't get the job offer, thank goodness. Recognize that you can shoot yourself in the foot by thinking that the job is yours and your arrogance comes out.

4. Your answers to questions are incongruent with things you said previously. As a result, people start to compare notes and go, "He said this. But is now saying this? Something doesn't add up." He makes them hesitate. When firms hesitate, they reject. They know they can trust you.

5. They ask stupid questions of the interview. How many weeks of vacation do I get? Immature stuff that seems ridiculous.

6. They arrived unprepared. MINIMALLY you look at the LinkedIn profile the person you will be meeting with to get an idea of your background. See what they look like if there's a photo there. Do a Google search to see if there's any new news about the organization to see if this is a subject that you want to ask questions about.

7. You start making new demands. This is part of that arrogance thing that people sometimes do. New demands make firm scratched her head and wonder, "What's with this person? I don't get it. We've been talking about this all along and now they bring this up? They ask for $20,000 more? No explanation? They just up the price?"

8. They are too casual and forget that there still competing. I mentioned this on a video and is the notion . . . It came from the story where represented someone for position, the firm flew him out and he is talking with his future boss. She asked him a question, everything had been going so well for so long in this interview for such a hard to find skill and experience. He is 1 of the few people in the world who have this background. His response to 1 of her questions was to say, "I'll talk with you about that when I come on board." She thought this was ridiculous and rejected him. Rightly so.

Recognize that you are always competing. You're always doing something to sell yourself into the role or cause you to be rejected. Don't get lazy. Don't get arrogant. Don't become casual and never EVER think that the job is in the bag.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

One Thing to Get Before Your Second or Final Interview


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/20/one-thing-to-get-before-your-second-or-final-interview

EP 810 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses something you need to get before your second or final interview.

Summary

I'm back with more advice for you for your 2nd or final interview. I have a number of videos about 2nd interviews and I believe there is even a playlist. See you want to watch the playlist of you have already see my other videos about this. I think will be a huge help for you in your preparation. Here's another point I want you to prepare for on your 2nd or final interview.

The point is get the feedback that is been offered so far about your performance. Most people think that if they been invited back, everything is great! I'll tell you a story. When I was working with an agency in New York some years ago, a colleague of mine was scheduling a candidate I was representing on 1st, 2nd, and ultimately final interviews with 1 of her clients. That was all going well. She told me everyone love the guy… bullshit. bullshit. bullshit . . .

It got to a point where the person was turned down. Then she told me what the reluctance had been all along. I was furious. It is all things that he could've addressed very easily on the interview if only he knew.

Here's my point for you. It's really useful to get the feedback from the HR person or from the hiring manager before you need to head of the function. If you're working with a third-party recruiter, get the feedback through them. If the third-party recruiter goes, "EVERYTHING IS GREAT!" Ask them, "could you go back and just say, 'Are there any areas of concern? Any reservations? What do you like? Are there any hesitations?'" Ask questions. The flush up any of the problem areas because there was one thing I learned in my 40+ years of doing search, small problems become BIG PROBLEMS unless they are addressed.

You are always best if you address them in the meeting, are prepared to address them in the meeting , and are proactive in addressing what their hesitation or concern might be... But you need to know what they are. You cannot assume it.

If you cannot get anything or find out something, I want you to think back to your 1st interview or previous interviews and see where the dead spots were, where the uncomfortable things were, where your background doesn't necessarily match up perfectly with the job and how you handled it then and whether you seem to have a receptive audience. Go back and review and that becomes the best that you can do to compensate if you cannot get feedback elsewhere.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Final Interview With The Person Who Did the Job I Am Trying to Get


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

This can be the easiest or most difficult interviews you can imagine. After all, this person has done the job that you are contending for. How do you play it?

Summary

A question I received from someone painted an interesting situation and that is the final person they are scheduled to meet with is the former person who did this job and has since been promoted and thus this position reports to them.

How do you handle that situation where the person you're talking with, your future boss, is coming out of this job and you're going to be reporting them?

So it's a fun scenario. It may be the trickiest of any interview you can do because they have opinions. They were obviously successful in that role and, as a result, can really offer you insights into how you can be successful. So consider that a lot of your interview is going to be picking their brain, asking them for advice, about how to be successful in the role. So, for example, they may talk with you about your background and talk to you about how you handled situations in the past and you answer those questions.

You answer them the same way you happened previously because as because, as I've said in other interviews, you want to be congruent with everything that you've said before. But at the end of answering some of the questions, you might turn around and say, "Given your experience in this role with this be effective in this case? How did you do it with this user? How did they respond to it? Was it effective? How would you recommend I do it?" Do certain things to extract from them information that (number one) will be useful to you when you're in the role. Or more importantly treats them as an ally that lets them know that this is not an adversarial conversation, that lets them know it's not an adversarial conversation but one where you're taking input from them about how to be successful. After all, would they have been promoted if they weren't successful in this role? I don't think so.

So it can be tricky if you're not someone who you asks the follow up, who doesn't approach them for advice or input about how to be effective in the role. You might ask them about some of the misses that they have, some of the things that backfired in some way shape or form did not work. Emphasize the positive.

As an afterthought, later on, say, "You have given me a world of information and, I'm sure, not everything that you did worked. What missed? What didn't work with these folks so I don't step into it.

So that's the simplest way I would approach an interview with the former manager for the group.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Final Interview Mistakes (VIDEO)


It is amazing sometimes what people say and do on interviews. Here, I outline a few stupid final interview mistakes that too many people of me.

Summary

I'm back today with what I call stupid final interview mistakes. To be clear, these are the kind of mistakes that are little bit different than the ones that I have pointed out previously because these are the ones to just killed it off at that moment when the opportunity could be yours. Where you are competing on a final interview, and you just do something dumb. Let me just point out some of the things that people can do that will just shoot themselves in the foot and send the candidacy down the drain. They are in no particular order.

1. You arrive late.

2. You just barely or inappropriately for the interview. I'm looking to tell you how to dress because you may be listening to this at a time when styles are different. I simply say the dressing inappropriately for this audience . . . I use an example from a hedge fund the used to recruit for... They used to hate people who wore ties. If you suddenly were talking to an interview, they got turned off. They used to think of ties is something to catch food on if you are sloppy eater.

3. You start feeling arrogant because you think the job is yours. That attitude starts to leak out. You get too cocky and forget that you might be competing with someone and act like the job is yours. In fact, you are competing. You are competing against another person or people or your competing against, "Let's go back and see if there's someone else." Never treat this as though it is a formality.

I remember one time I was a relatively junior person, 1 of my colleagues had someone on interviews with someone in Westchester New York. The person was there from 8 AM until 5 PM. His final interview is with the head of the function he will be working for. What happens is is that the head of the function asks why he is looking for a job. It's hard to imagine someone delivering a racist moment like this. But he did. The candidate says, "I work with a bunch of slobs and Indians."

How do you expect someone to respond to this? Do you expect is can act like a best friend? No! Suffice to say, he didn't get the job offer, thank goodness. Recognize that you can shoot yourself in the foot by thinking that the job is yours and your arrogance comes out.

4. Your answers to questions are incongruent with things you said previously. As a result, people start to compare notes and go, "He said this. But is now saying this? Something doesn't add up." He makes them hesitate. When firms hesitate, they reject. They know they can trust you.

5. They ask stupid questions of the interview. How many weeks of vacation do I get? Immature stuff that seems ridiculous.

6. They arrived unprepared. MINIMALLY you look at the LinkedIn profile the person you will be meeting with to get an idea of your background. See what they look like if there's a photo there. Do a Google search to see if there's any new news about the organization to see if this is a subject that you want to ask questions about.

7. You start making new demands. This is part of that arrogance thing that people sometimes do. New demands make firm scratched her head and wonder, "What's with this person? I don't get it. We've been talking about this all along and now they bring this up? They ask for $20,000 more? No explanation? They just up the price?"

8. They are too casual and forget that there still competing. I mentioned this on a video and is the notion . . . It came from the story where represented someone for position, the firm flew him out and he is talking with his future boss. She asked him a question, everything had been going so well for so long in this interview for such a hard to find skill and experience. He is 1 of the few people in the world who have this background. His response to 1 of her questions was to say, "I'll talk with you about that when I come on board." She thought this was ridiculous and rejected him. Rightly so.

Recognize that you are always competing. You're always doing something to sell yourself into the role or cause you to be rejected. Don't get lazy. Don't get arrogant. Don't become casual and never EVER think that the job is in the bag.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What They Want to See at a Final Interview (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

There are a few qualities firms want to see at a final. It isn’t hard. Pay attention and deliver.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about final interviews and what they want to see from you at the final interview. I want to be clear that I'm not good be covering what you want to be doing per se. You know you have to practice. That should be given. I look at it is having 3 primary "C's. "If you seen some of my early stuff, you would've seen that I talk about how a firm looks for competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry and charisma; all of which add up to personal leadership.

Here, I have it narrowed down and I want you to think in terms of CONGRUENCE, CONFIDENCE and CONNECTION as being the 3 primary things that they are looking for.

So what is congruence? You told him certain things before and what you're going to tell them today is going to be congruent or in line with what you said previously. I don't want you to tell him the same stories over and over again unless they want to investigate a particular episode. Think of a new story that you can tell them that they haven't heard before. It's kind of like if you watch the same TV show over and over again, yeah, is familiar but you want to see a new episode after a while, right? Be prepared with the new episode. If they want to investigate further on something old, you can talk about the old episode that is attracted them to you with the question, but you can continue by saying, "You know, it reminds me of another time…" Thus you can introduce the new story.

Confidence. They want to look across from you and find someone that they don't have to worry about. If you are nervous, if you are bashful, if you act as though you will become a slave to them, if you don't interview with them like you are an adult talking with your peer, they're not going really feel confident in you. They're going to see you like you're relatively junior individual. I don't care if you actually look relatively junior individual or senior talent. The idea is you are talking to an equal.

I don't care if they are 30 years older than you, you want to be talking confidently with them without being arrogant, without being annoying, without acting like (I will talk to those of you in your 20s)… You know what it's like when you're being dismissed or being treated dismissive way. You don't want to instigate that with your behavior. They may have a bias that you pick up on but I want you to have the choice as to whether you join.

The 3rd “C” is connection. You want to connect with them and 1 of the best ways to do that is to speak to them with a smile on your face. Engage with them. "Does that make sense to you?" “Am I being clear enough?" “I just want to make sure I am not losing you here." Obviously, you don't asked this in obvious place where you wouldn't lose them; that is insulting to them. You know what it's like when you go off the rails a little bit you're not sure if you've lost them?

“I just want make sure you're following me here."

“Yeah yeah, I'm following you."

Connect with them. Talk with them like an equal. Smile at times. Putting twinkle in your eyes! You would have that sort of spirit in your eyes and your behavior. The more they talk, the more they like you. I'm going to speak with the senior people here. You might ask about the org structure and where you would fit in. What is the upside for the role? Who is going to know about your work? What kind of visibility will you have? Things along those lines.

When push comes to shove, obviously you have to demonstrate competence but going beyond that, you want to illustrate congruence with what you have told them before and maybe expand upon it a little bit, self-confidence, and make a connection with the people that you meet. These are the keys to a final interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Final Interview? Here’s a Big Reminder | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 856 There are so many mistakes people make job hunting that are fatal. This reminder is one designed to head off a very painful one.

Summary

If you are on a final interview, and you know you been scheduled for final interview big a corporate recruiter has told you, maybe a third party recruiter has told you, wherever is you found yourself on a final interview, I know from my experience doing search, there is a tendency for people to ease up. They ease up, not just simply with the interviewer, but with the rest of their search, too because they think they've got it in the bag.

The thing I want to remind you about today is that rather than focusing in on this 1 job, I would encourage you to keep going pedal to the metal, really driving hard, even though you are scheduled for all final. You see, what I have found over the years is that sometimes, that dark or situation, that situation out of the blue shows up that's even better, but does become apparent to you but you keep going out on interviews.

I can't tell you the number of times that people I was contacted about a job with tell me, "I've got a final." I would tell them, "Terrific! Take your final interview. I have a client that I think is actually better than this 1." I would go through the reasons why and they'll be absolutely right on the money.

"No, "they would whine. "I think I'm done with job hunting." How costly that was. For some of these people and their careers.

You need to be driving hard all the time. I spoke about the importance of networking and continue to network while you're in a new job because, the fact of the matter is, you don't want to be lurching from one job search to another without a networking place, right? Well, from a job search perspective, you don't want to assume that this final interview is finished, closed, in the bag. You always want to be prepared just in case and because another situation can come in that is even better. Pay you more money! Be a better job! How do you know unless you meet with the firm?

I'm not telling you to take that job. I have no idea what the job is. But I'm telling you that sometimes the final interview doesn't work out because you're competing with someone else. As a result, you feel crushed because you let go of a number of things. You keep interviewing. You if someone is inviting you back for a 2nd or 3rd interview, you go! If you choose to take the one associate with the final, great! It's done!

He you imagine what it's like if you start canceling appointments until the recruiter, "I'm close to something else with another firm, " and then have to go back to them... Or have to start from the very beginning of your search.

My reminder is that you just go out and keep interviewing. Keep networking! Keep on interviewing. Until you have the offer letter, until you've walked in the door, ... Better to be safe than sorry. There is no harm here. If you keep going out on interviews.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Final Interview Q&A for Employers and Job Hunters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 855 Whether you’re an employer or a job hunter, being well prepared for final interviews is critical.  Although focused on employers, these questions are very important for job hunters, as well.

Summary

But background was in executive search. I filled a lot of positions over the course of a 40 year career and now I coach, job hunters. I know also coach employers about hiring. Generally, when I do video, it's for one side or the other. Today, I thought I would do something is really geared toward both of you and talk about Q&A for final interviews. Although it is slanted toward employers, I think job hunters will get a lot of benefit from this as well. That's why I title this, "Final Interview Q&A for Employers and Jobhunters."

Here's what I want use an employer to do when someone comes in to meet with you. Whether you are bringing back 1, 2 or 3 people, I want you to say, "This is going to be our final interview. At the end of this process, I'm going to have a clear idea of who I'm going to say yes or no to. That's what my goal is. I want you to be completely transparent. " At the same time, Mr. or Ms. Employer, I want you to start working in different ways to get commitment from the job hunter so that you will have a choice of potential higher.

For you as a job hunter, I know you want to know would you stand with an employer, right? You don't want to feel like you're being left up in the year in their thoughts knowing that are going to be making a decision and it is not going to drag on for weeks is huge. If it does drag out for weeks, you've learned something about this employer and how they make decisions. They are always good find it difficult to make a choice. Employers, that is the message that you sent to people. I think is very useful for you to hear that.

Once you have done that, Mr. or Ms. Employer, I have a great starting with question for you. "Deep completely understand the job description?" I think that is a great question to start off with because I think there are always nuances a job hunter doesn't know that they can ask you about. Let's say, they say, "Yes." Here's the question to ask next. "Give me 3 reasons why you would be a great choice." Folks, if your job hunter, you need to have some answers to that question other than simply saying something like, "I would be a loyal employee," and acting like you would be a good puppy. You want to have 3 practical reasons that scientists job for why you would be a great hire for them.

From there, if you are an employer, I would ask, "What are your thoughts and concerns about the role?" This should always be some sort of a question mark or concern a job hunter has . You would expect them to walk in and say, "No! I understand everything! Every last detail!" That isn't being a human being. That's BS. At the kind of BS to job hunters of been trying to give. You want a real person, there with whom you can have a conversation of trust.

So you start off with, "Do you understand the job description," progress to, "Give me 3 reasons why you be a great choice," and moved to, "What are your thoughts and concerns?" Next, here is a, "left-field question" that I think is a good one. "Tell me about 3 people who you like and respect most and what it is about these 3 people." That is question is a character check because what you want to do is understand the values.

There are a lot of people for many reasons including cultural reasons will talk about their parents, their grandparents and you must respect that choice of theirs. Do not diminish it in any way. From there, listen to them. But what your listing to is the values that they place upon the choice, not who the person is. I want to listen past who the person is to the values that are represented. Job hunters, that is a huge piece for you-- understand what your values are. When you join in employer, it shouldn't be just about the money. You want to demonstrate yourself as a human being with character.

As an employer, you want to ask a person about their long-term goals. You want them to be forthright with you. If you seen some of my videos, you know that there's a question that I picked up from Reid Hoffman, "What do you want your next job today?" I think that's a great question to ask. This involves longer-term goals and it's the same question disguised in a different way. After all, employers, you know that they are not going to be there for the next 20 years. Let's get real. You're not good be there for the next 20 years . So why would you expect them to think in those terms? Employers don't allow people to do that for many reasons. Employers, I want you to ask job hunters want to be prepared to answer what your long-term goals are.

A variation is, "Let's say I don't choose you will be don't get together on this job, what would you plan on doing next? What sort of choices would you make for yourself? What would you be looking for?" What you are looking for are people who would deviate from the role that you have outlined for them. It's a little bit of a trick.

For example, I'm going to use a black-and-white scenario, if you are interviewing for a sales job in their next choice of options would be for a non-sales role, you would want to hire them, right? You're looking for those offbeat kind of choices that would signal to you that they are just doing this for the money.

Employers, you will lay out what your standards are for great performance. What are your expectations? Normally, that really isn't addressed. I wish it was but a lot of firms them to address it.

Finally, I think there is a question that you should ask as an employer that you, as a job hunter, need to be prepared for. "Do you want us to move forward? Why?" I think that those 2 questions together as your final questions will go a long way toward indicating whether or not someone is really interested in your role. I think a lot of people go to final interviews and/or really ambivalent. They want the offer but they are not completely sold on it.

When you look at these questions, whether you are an employer or job hunter, what they are designed to do is find out more about a person and their values, demonstrate that they understand what the role is and what your expectations of them are. Thus, when it is time to make a decision, you have a much more whole picture of who this person is and whether they could be a good choice.

Deciding between multiple people that are really close, that is a question for another time. I think these are great questions for you and employer to look at and for job hunters to be prepared to answer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Second Interview Mistakes: Being Too Casual


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Here’s a dopey mistake people make on second interviews, third interviews and final interviews.

Summary

I wanted to talk with you about 1 of the stupid interview mistakes that happens more on 2nd and 3rd interviews than it would on a 1st interview. The nature of the mistake is acting too casually with the interviewer. You gotten comfortable; you've gotten involved with the conversation with this firm, the 1st time through. You met 2 or 3 people; they invited you back and now you're feeling really good. You started to feel like you belong and gotten comfortable.

So you some of the people you met last time and you stop selling. You stopped paying attention to what you said the 1st time through and started to tell different stories. You stop thinking that this is a situation where you have to sell yourself and start acting too casually. The result winds up being that you shoot yourself in the foot.

Again, this tends to happen more on 2nd and 3rd interviews that it would on a 1st interview because people know better than doing that on a 1st interview , . . unless they are an arrogant SOB. Then, you just so cocky and full of yourself; most people aren't that way. People know how to behave the 1st time through. It is generally the 2nd time through the people lower their guard, are more revealing and make this dumb mistake . They left their unprofessional nature come out and cause them opportunities.

Remember, don't act too casually. You are there to sell yourself and persuade them that you are the right person for this role, you are not there talking to your best friend . They are not your ally. They are there to evaluate and assess you until they get to the offer phase

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What They Want to See at a Final Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 843 There are a few qualities firms want to see at a final. It isn’t hard. Pay attention and deliver.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about final interviews and what they want to see from you at the final interview. I want to be clear that I'm not good be covering what you want to be doing per se. You know you have to practice. That should be given. I look at it is having 3 primary "C's. "If you seen some of my early stuff, you would've seen that I talk about how a firm looks for competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry and charisma; all of which add up to personal leadership.

Here, I have it narrowed down and I want you to think in terms of CONGRUENCE, CONFIDENCE and CONNECTION as being the 3 primary things that they are looking for.

So what is congruence? You told him certain things before and what you're going to tell them today is going to be congruent or in line with what you said previously. I don't want you to tell him the same stories over and over again unless they want to investigate a particular episode. Think of a new story that you can tell them that they haven't heard before. It's kind of like if you watch the same TV show over and over again, yeah, is familiar but you want to see a new episode after a while, right? Be prepared with the new episode. If they want to investigate further on something old, you can talk about the old episode that is attracted them to you with the question, but you can continue by saying, "You know, it reminds me of another time…" Thus you can introduce the new story.

Confidence. They want to look across from you and find someone that they don't have to worry about. If you are nervous, if you are bashful, if you act as though you will become a slave to them, if you don't interview with them like you are an adult talking with your peer, they're not going really feel confident in you. They're going to see you like you're relatively junior individual. I don't care if you actually look relatively junior individual or senior talent. The idea is you are talking to an equal.

I don't care if they are 30 years older than you, you want to be talking confidently with them without being arrogant, without being annoying, without acting like (I will talk to those of you in your 20s)… You know what it's like when you're being dismissed or being treated dismissive way. You don't want to instigate that with your behavior. They may have a bias that you pick up on but I want you to have the choice as to whether you join.

The 3rd “C” is connection. You want to connect with them and 1 of the best ways to do that is to speak to them with a smile on your face. Engage with them. "Does that make sense to you?" “Am I being clear enough?" “I just want to make sure I am not losing you here." Obviously, you don't asked this in obvious place where you wouldn't lose them; that is insulting to them. You know what it's like when you go off the rails a little bit you're not sure if you've lost them?

“I just want make sure you're following me here."

“Yeah yeah, I'm following you."

Connect with them. Talk with them like an equal. Smile at times. Putting twinkle in your eyes! You would have that sort of spirit in your eyes and your behavior. The more they talk, the more they like you. I'm going to speak with the senior people here. You might ask about the org structure and where you would fit in. What is the upside for the role? Who is going to know about your work? What kind of visibility will you have? Things along those lines.

When push comes to shove, obviously you have to demonstrate competence but going beyond that, you want to illustrate congruence with what you have told them before and maybe expand upon it a little bit, self-confidence, and make a connection with the people that you meet. These are the keys to a final interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Final Interview Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 811 I outline a few stupid final interview mistakes that too many people make.

Summary

I'm back today with what I call stupid final interview mistakes. To be clear, these are the kind of mistakes that are little bit different than the ones that I have pointed out previously because these are the ones to just killed it off at that moment when the opportunity could be yours. Where you are competing on a final interview, and you just do something dumb. Let me just point out some of the things that people can do that will just shoot themselves in the foot and send the candidacy down the drain. They are in no particular order.

1. You arrive late.

2. You just barely or inappropriately for the interview. I'm looking to tell you how to dress because you may be listening to this at a time when styles are different. I simply say the dressing inappropriately for this audience . . . I use an example from a hedge fund the used to recruit for... They used to hate people who wore ties. If you suddenly were talking to an interview, they got turned off. They used to think of ties is something to catch food on if you are sloppy eater.

3. You start feeling arrogant because you think the job is yours. That attitude starts to leak out. You get too cocky and forget that you might be competing with someone and act like the job is yours. In fact, you are competing. You are competing against another person or people or your competing against, "Let's go back and see if there's someone else." Never treat this as though it is a formality.

I remember one time I was a relatively junior person, 1 of my colleagues had someone on interviews with someone in Westchester New York. The person was there from 8 AM until 5 PM. His final interview is with the head of the function he will be working for. What happens is is that the head of the function asks why he is looking for a job. It's hard to imagine someone delivering a racist moment like this. But he did. The candidate says, "I work with a bunch of slobs and Indians."

How do you expect someone to respond to this? Do you expect is can act like a best friend? No! Suffice to say, he didn't get the job offer, thank goodness. Recognize that you can shoot yourself in the foot by thinking that the job is yours and your arrogance comes out.

4. Your answers to questions are incongruent with things you said previously. As a result, people start to compare notes and go, "He said this. But is now saying this? Something doesn't add up." He makes them hesitate. When firms hesitate, they reject. They know they can trust you.

5. They ask stupid questions of the interview. How many weeks of vacation do I get? Immature stuff that seems ridiculous.

6. They arrived unprepared. MINIMALLY you look at the LinkedIn profile the person you will be meeting with to get an idea of your background. See what they look like if there's a photo there. Do a Google search to see if there's any new news about the organization to see if this is a subject that you want to ask questions about.

7. You start making new demands. This is part of that arrogance thing that people sometimes do. New demands make firm scratched her head and wonder, "What's with this person? I don't get it. We've been talking about this all along and now they bring this up? They ask for $20,000 more? No explanation? They just up the price?"

8. They are too casual and forget that there still competing. I mentioned this on a video and is the notion . . . It came from the story where represented someone for position, the firm flew him out and he is talking with his future boss. She asked him a question, everything had been going so well for so long in this interview for such a hard to find skill and experience. He is 1 of the few people in the world who have this background. His response to 1 of her questions was to say, "I'll talk with you about that when I come on board." She thought this was ridiculous and rejected him. Rightly so.

Recognize that you are always competing. You're always doing something to sell yourself into the role or cause you to be rejected. Don't get lazy. Don't get arrogant. Don't become casual and never EVER think that the job is in the bag.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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