Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Treating It As Though There Is a Two Way Street

EP 866 This is one of the dumbest mistakes people make when they interview– not treating the interview like a two-way street.

Summary

The mistake I want to call attention to is stupid. It is not treating the interview like it is a two-way street. I understand that for a lot of you when you are young, there is the tendency to think of your potential hiring manager, your potential boss, as though they are some demi-deity looking down their nose at you, making it seem like they are superior to you. That could be furthest from the truth.

What the trying to do is evaluate and assess you. Most of them are not feeling as though they are high and powerful and all that sort of nonsense. Think of it from the standpoint that you have rights of the interview, too. You want to know what their expectations of you are, what the job is good be like, what it's like working there and need to arrive with some questions. After you answer something that they ask you about, you might just simply ask, "How does that fit into the role?" In this way, you can learn more about the job as you answer their questions.

For example, they ask you something, you answer and continue by saying, "How is that involved with the job that you are hiring me for?" They will tell you about it and it makes perfect sense. If it doesn't, you have learned something about them and that is useful to you.

Everything needs to be about you learning information about them as much as they learning about you. You need to understand what you will be stepping into in the way of a role, its responsibilities and have successful be measured. I want to come back to that one – – how success will be measured.

It's funny how often I talk to people who think success in the job is about one thing when it is about something completely different. Don't sell yourself short. Don't put yourself in the position where they are the powerful ones and you feel like a loser. Where they are up high and powerful and you feel weak and passive.

No one likes week people during dating; we want to talk to people who relate to at that doesn't involve superior-subordinate situations. The same thing is true on an interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Giving Pat Answers to Questions


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This is another 1 of those stupid mistakes people make that results in no connection and no further interviews.

Summary

I want to talk with you about another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that people make all the time. It's really very painful and, I don't care what level you are at professionally, doing this proves so costly.

You might be asked the question by the interviewer and your response will be to give what I call "the pat answer." The one that reveals absolutely nothing about yourself, the one that seems like it was taken out of the textbook on how to interview when you're in high school or college and basically translates into (using an example), "So, why do you want this job," and your answer translates into, "I want to learn. I want to work hard. I want to get ahead."

"Why do you want to make this career change?"
"I want to do exciting work."

You sound like a robot, even if you are not a robot or speaking robotically, it sounds like fiction because it really the pat answer.

You have to give them much the same information but do it in a way that is far more believable. The "believable" involves revealing your humanity.

I want to be clear that I am not talking about "over sharing." Using example from someone I coach not too long ago, you might just simply say in response to why you want to make this change, "I have been very successful for a long time and have been working 90 hours a week for years. The fact of the matter is that I have young kids at this point. Having kids isn't something I can just "work in." I am making a choice here very consciously to scale back. I don't mind the typical 60 hour week . . . You know what I did before and how much goes into that. I can't do it at this stage in life. I have no problem taking direction from someone. I have done it for years." I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this.

You reveal something personal about yourself that deals with the real issue or that they have. Unless you give them something to connect with, that makes sense, they think it is a bunch of BS and they don't trust you.

Risk opening up. The wrong firm will want to hire you if you don't open up. The rate firm will because they will understand what your needs are and they are not going to try to work you over.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Showing Up For an Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 859 There is a cascading impact that occurs when you don’t show up for a job interview. I outline several things that may occur . . . and none look good for you.

Summary

I wanted to talk with you today about the impact of not showing up for an interview. I want to start off like talking about what it does for you.

I understand that sometimes people wake up and they are conflicted. "I have a work thing going on and I'm not really all that keen on this job; I said yes but I don't really feel like going because I could get into trouble at work" or some other explanation that rationalizes not showing up. Except there's one thing. There's no excuse for not showing up and not calling. You see, it's not like days of old were you have to sneak off to make of call. You can call in on your way to work, leave a voicemail and simply say, "I'm going to cancel my interview today and not reschedule. I appreciate you making time for me." Yada yada yada.

Not calling and not showing up is rude. It is obnoxious. It is something that will come back and bite you in the butt and I'll tell you exactly why. The world is smaller than you think. That hiring manager and/or that HR person, that interview team was adversely affected but you not showing up. They blocked time out that they could've been using for other things to meet with you. There was the desire of the schedule. This 90 minutes. This 2 hour block of time in their schedule that now they can use for other things sure are but it was mentally invested in you. You didn't show up.

I will let you in on a secret. These people are not can work at this firm forever. They just aren't. When they change jobs, they have memories of them on the spot your name they may go back and remember… "Can I take a look at that resume? Yeah, this guy stood me up. I think will take a pass." You don't want to have 1 of those silent killers floating around, waiting to drop a bomb on your candidacy somewhere. You just want to do with it in a forthright way.

Another thing that happens is you have affected someone else. You see, that time you blocked out of their calendar could be used interview someone else could've actually been interested in this role, but your selfishness got in the way. There is a hurt that you inflict on someone else.

Plus, I know a lot of you don't really care about recruiters as though they are unfeeling human beings, but recruiters are human beings, they have kids and mortgages and other things and you are affecting the reputation with the client. That's your fault, not theirs. They thought you were good enough to state the reputation on and refer you to their client and you are not showing up. Clients get angry and guess who they take it out on? The recruiter who did nothing wrong. All they were doing is what you agreed to do when you submit a resume. You are interested in this job, you agree to go on the interview and you could talk up a storm and rationalize it, but is not the recruiters fault that you said yes. You said yes to going on this interview and you have hurt them. There is no reason for it.

Lastly, there is a nuisance factor. Sometimes these folks who you are scheduled to interview with our traveling from one office to another, leaping out of the lunch appointment they had schedule with their wife/husband/partner/friend/colleague, whomever, so that they could going meet with you. They are stepping out of a meeting to meet with YOU. And you don't show up.

Don't be an idiot. If you are not really interested in the job, just simply say to the recruiter who is scheduling you (this is agency recruiter, 1st), "I'm not really interested in this job. If you want to bully me into saying yes, I'll say yes and just not show up. ." That will cause them to back down. If it is a corporate recruiter, ask more questions.1st. Don't just simply agree and not show up. There really care figure take the job. All they really care about is filling the time slot with someone who they believe their internal user (their hiring manager) is going to be interested in. They don't really care if it is YOU.

Just be professional about this and stop wasting people's time.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more. 

 

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Knowing When to Shut Up | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 846 When I did recruiting, this mistake drove me crazy!  It cost too many people way too many opportunities.  

Summary

I have interviewed a lot of people in my career. When I worked in search, I'm not sure what it was just over three quarters of a million people that I interviewed. They were interviews that I conducted with people were I just want to put a bullet in my head. Why? Because this person just didn't know when to shut up. They just kept selling way too hard way too long, not knowing when they were scoring points with me and just feeling compelled to over-talk the situation. I will tell you, folks, if you've ever been on the same side is me in a situation like that, you know exactly what I'm talking about.

For you job hunters, consider the following: the attention span and most interviews is between 30 and 60 seconds. After that, most interviewers stop listening and start to "mentally channel surf." As a result, if you start talking for longer than 60 seconds, you're going to be putting them to sleep.

I encourage most people talk from no one than 45 seconds; for most of you that's close to the outer limit. If you are skillful with your voice and know how to pause at times, and you suggested you are thinking (or know how to fake that you're thinking of your answer), and you can be theatrical without being DRAMATIC (no one cares for hysteria in an interview), or uber drama . . . what they are looking for is answers to the question that demonstrates fit and be entertained in the process which is why you always hear about stories being affected but an interview.

Keep your answers down to about 45 seconds in life. AT TOPS, for skillful people, you go to 1 minute and 15 seconds. Otherwise, you're putting your foot in your mouth and kill your candidacy.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes Being Somewhere Else | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/06/30/stupid-interview-mistakes-being-somewhere-else

EP 790 There’s another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes people make, particularly executives – – – being somewhere else.

Summary

I want to talk with you today, I'm not concerned with your senior professional (though I see more with seniors with staff level people)... As an executive, you go to interviews and you've got a very full plate. You are handling a lot of things, you are walking out on situations that will require your attention. You are distracted. That's probably the best way to put. You are distracted. You arrive at an interview where people carve that significant portions of the day and you're not prepared to focus right away on delivering your message, let alone even remember your message. You're still back in your office you're still back at home , because the distraction could also come from your home. As a result, you don't deliver at the meetings.

Terrible mistake to make! It's 1 of the dumbest things you can imagine.

Your spending time to talk with people about the role. He clearly interests you, about an opportunity that appeals to sufficiently that you're carving out time in your day to talk to people about it, and you're not prepared because you still back at your office or your back still in an argument with your wife/husband/partner or the kids if absent you... Whatever it is, you are off somewhere else. Dumb thing to do.

I just want to encourage you that if you feel like you would be distracted, take a few minutes before hand, I out in your car, get some coffee, spend some time by yourself and focus. Meditate and beat you at your best.

After all, when you are evaluating and assessing people and you get the sense that someone is not on the game, what is your 1st reaction? Rejection, of course. It will be the same for you, too.

Put aside the members from now. Put aside the distractions. Be focused on being the best you, you can be.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Following Directions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/11/stupid-interview-mistakes-not-following-directions

EP 832 This is a mistake that hangs too many people.

Summary

I wanted to discuss 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that you many people do. It's the notion of not following directions. The obvious places you have a job application and they tell you to do certain things with the application and you don't follow through. For example, I think 1 of the funniest things that I've ever heard of that someone did (a client told me about this 1) is the place of their application where it said, "Give us one word that describes your strengths." One word! Got that one? They wrote, "I'm very good at following directions."

Was that one word? Was that really one word? Of course, not. This person didn't pay attention.

You see, what happens to a lot of job hunters is that they go on autopilot. They don't really listen. They built so many interviews that what happens is that they think they know what the question is, but they don't do it. They don't answer the question. They anticipate with this person is really looking for without really knowing what they are looking for. That shows up on applications in that way. It also shows up as you "basking your own magnificence" as you answer questions.

I mentioned this will many times before, the person who went off on this lengthy answer that had nothing to do with my question, but it got to a point where I said, "By the way, do you member what my original question was?" The answer, which I thought was wonderfully honest, was, "No."

You just have to follow directions. He answer the stupid question that is presented to you, whether is on the application or on an interview. That's what they are looking for at that point. In the therapy business, is referred to as, "following the contact function." They are reaching out to you about something, they want to know that answer, you can guide them with your answer to the next part but the idea is just give them what they want. Do it in your particular way.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: The Top Questions to NEVER Ask at a Job Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you 5 questions to NEVER ask at a job interview if you want to get a job offer. 

Summary

Today I want to talk about some of the worst questions, the questions you should never ask on any job interview. As much as I expect maturity, intelligence and professionalism from people, every once in a while I get surprised. Rather than commit these gaffes on the interview, I would rather head them off.

So let me talk with you about the time questions you should never ask a job interview.

1. "By the way, what does your company do?" Why would you ever asked this question? Why didn't you just Google the firm's website before the interview? Why didn't you just spend some time on their website to learn what the firm does in advance of your interview? If you are interviewing with the startup that's in stealth mode, I'm sure you can find something on Mashable or TechCrunch that my talk about what the firm is trying to do. Regardless, you can just Google and find out what the company does? When you ask a question like this, you send the message to an employer that they don't like.

2 & 3. Do you do a background check?" The Cumberland the question is, "Do you do drug testing?" I laughed at these questions because you have obviously sent up an enormous red flag for them that says, "There's a problem in my background," or, "There's an issue with my background." You have told him that there is an issue with such a thing.

4. "Do you have any other jobs available?" You basically told him that's a not interested in what they are talking with you about. You are better off continue through with the interview in a very professional way. If they ask, "Are you interested," you can be honest and tell them that you have some questions about whether this is the right role for you. It will allow you to get your questions answered. If you do have questions about the job. It's very mature they ask a question like this.

5. "What's your insurance coverage like?" What are things you don't want to cover the early stages of interviewing or early stages of a job search with the firm's benefits. You want everything focused on your ability to do the job, that you have a lot of passion and enthusiasm for "doing the job," you are there to help them satisfy THEIR needs, you are not there to have yours fulfilled AT THIS TIME.

That is a point later on in the interview where they are starting to fall in love and started to lust after you and you can start dealing with benefits. Initially ago stay off this question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Making Assumptions About Sexual Orientation

EP 825 I discuss a mistake many make, job hunters, corporate and third party recruiters make.

Summary

This is another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes I see people make all the time. It involves the habit of how we were acculturated in the US that comes into play that shows up in interviews where you make assumptions about "the other" that you can't make. There's so it goes.

You look across the table. There is a woman sitting there and you referred to her husband. Well, I'm gonna remind you of something. Same-sex marriage in the United States is legal. You now have to say something different. You now have to say something like, "husband, wife or partner. " If the role, she may be married to a man… She may be married to a woman she may have a partner. As a result, if you start saying things that assume that she is heterosexual, you are going to send up flags for the gay audience, and rightly so. You are denying the fact that they could be married.

Folks, I know some of you may be rolling your eyes and say things like, "Oh! Man!" Get over yourself! This is a fact. I'm going to say the from the job hunter perspective, you make the same mistake as employers do when you reference people as though they are heterosexual. You may see a man sitting opposite you; 35 years old. You notice a ring on their finger on the way in. You feel good that you notice that he's married... And then you refer to his wife... And maybe he is married to a woman. But maybe he isn't. In not referring to, "wife, husband or partner," I can assure you that he would hear an "ouch" that hits them in the gut. When it comes time to evaluate you to consider accepting your job offer, it weighs heavily. You can't help it. Nor would you want to.

People couldn't deny it does because they tend to be kind and say things like, "it takes time to change the habit." Saying, "wife, husband or partner," isn't necessarily going to get you "brownie points." But the fact is, you don't want to offend, right? That's true whether you are a third-party recruiter, a corporate recruiter or job hunter.

At the end of the day, same-sex marriage is legal. Get used to a different language because otherwise, you are going to hurt yourself somewhere along the line, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: What Was The Question, Again?

EP 818 People make so many stupid interview mistakes.  Here’s another one.

Summary

I'm back today with another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that people make. The title of the show is, "What was the question again?" It's really the notion of going off topic. And just basking in your own magnificence, talking until you're putting everyone to sleep by making them think about lunch or dinner or how the hell he get the heck out of his interview. It happens more often than you think.

I remember on one occasion I was interviewing someone for client. I'm a very easy interviewer; I just want to know what the truth is. It's really that simple. Tell me your story; help me understand; I would ask good questions. It wasn't complicated. In this person start to go on and on and on in such minute detail about nothing that relates to the question. There was a point where I said, "Hey! I have to ask you a question."

"Sure."

"Do you remember my original question?" He didn't. It let me know that he'd been on so many interviews that he stop listening to the question and just start to answer what he thought the question was, instead of listening to it.

You seek folks people are asking questions for a reason. They want to know something specific about how you match job, both from the standpoint of skills and experiences to getting a sense of personality. Do you make them feel confident in you that you can do the job. When you go off on these wild tangents that have nothing to do with anything that has been set up until that point, heck, they just go bonkers. I go bonkers! You're putting me to sleep and all I want to do is in the conversation.

Just be self-aware. Focus in on the question. Give your answer in 45 to 75 seconds. It's really that simple and you will make this mistake.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Final Interview Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 811 I outline a few stupid final interview mistakes that too many people make.

Summary

I'm back today with what I call stupid final interview mistakes. To be clear, these are the kind of mistakes that are little bit different than the ones that I have pointed out previously because these are the ones to just killed it off at that moment when the opportunity could be yours. Where you are competing on a final interview, and you just do something dumb. Let me just point out some of the things that people can do that will just shoot themselves in the foot and send the candidacy down the drain. They are in no particular order.

1. You arrive late.

2. You just barely or inappropriately for the interview. I'm looking to tell you how to dress because you may be listening to this at a time when styles are different. I simply say the dressing inappropriately for this audience . . . I use an example from a hedge fund the used to recruit for... They used to hate people who wore ties. If you suddenly were talking to an interview, they got turned off. They used to think of ties is something to catch food on if you are sloppy eater.

3. You start feeling arrogant because you think the job is yours. That attitude starts to leak out. You get too cocky and forget that you might be competing with someone and act like the job is yours. In fact, you are competing. You are competing against another person or people or your competing against, "Let's go back and see if there's someone else." Never treat this as though it is a formality.

I remember one time I was a relatively junior person, 1 of my colleagues had someone on interviews with someone in Westchester New York. The person was there from 8 AM until 5 PM. His final interview is with the head of the function he will be working for. What happens is is that the head of the function asks why he is looking for a job. It's hard to imagine someone delivering a racist moment like this. But he did. The candidate says, "I work with a bunch of slobs and Indians."

How do you expect someone to respond to this? Do you expect is can act like a best friend? No! Suffice to say, he didn't get the job offer, thank goodness. Recognize that you can shoot yourself in the foot by thinking that the job is yours and your arrogance comes out.

4. Your answers to questions are incongruent with things you said previously. As a result, people start to compare notes and go, "He said this. But is now saying this? Something doesn't add up." He makes them hesitate. When firms hesitate, they reject. They know they can trust you.

5. They ask stupid questions of the interview. How many weeks of vacation do I get? Immature stuff that seems ridiculous.

6. They arrived unprepared. MINIMALLY you look at the LinkedIn profile the person you will be meeting with to get an idea of your background. See what they look like if there's a photo there. Do a Google search to see if there's any new news about the organization to see if this is a subject that you want to ask questions about.

7. You start making new demands. This is part of that arrogance thing that people sometimes do. New demands make firm scratched her head and wonder, "What's with this person? I don't get it. We've been talking about this all along and now they bring this up? They ask for $20,000 more? No explanation? They just up the price?"

8. They are too casual and forget that there still competing. I mentioned this on a video and is the notion . . . It came from the story where represented someone for position, the firm flew him out and he is talking with his future boss. She asked him a question, everything had been going so well for so long in this interview for such a hard to find skill and experience. He is 1 of the few people in the world who have this background. His response to 1 of her questions was to say, "I'll talk with you about that when I come on board." She thought this was ridiculous and rejected him. Rightly so.

Recognize that you are always competing. You're always doing something to sell yourself into the role or cause you to be rejected. Don't get lazy. Don't get arrogant. Don't become casual and never EVER think that the job is in the bag.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

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