Sabotaging Your Job Search: Lukewarm References | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another way that people sabotage the Job Search – – mediocre references. He also offers a way to get around a mediocre reference at a particular employer.

Summary

I worked in recruiting for a long time and I've seen it time and time again. Job hunters sabotaging their search by just making stupid mistakes. I'm continuing on with the series on sabotaging your search and talking with you about some of the ways the people do it.

Here is one that I can't believe happens but it happens all the time -- giving it references the don't just sing your praises, they may not be completely lukewarm but they come across as being disinterested and ambivalent.

When you are giving a reference, this is your opportunity to get across the finish line. Firms are going to decide whether or not to give you that great job offer, they have been thinking about or continue on looking. On occasion, they will make a lukewarm offer and just move on with it. Often, the neutrality of the reference causes them to pause. If the role, this is completely in your control. You are giving out the references. You can choose any 1 of the world to give them some reference you give them this person who gives you a halfhearted disinterested reference.. That is your fault.

Before you give out references, even at the beginning of your job search, as you're trying to get leads from places to go to, as you are trying to get out and about, start talking with the people who you are considering is a reference.. Just simply say, "I would love to give you is a reference. Would you feel comfortable with doing that I would you sing my praises to the rafters and let people know how wonderful it was?"

If you were a mediocre employee, you have to find those people who will support you because those people who will claim that they are only allowed to give out name, rank and serial number, type of references (your dates of employment and whether you are eligible for rehire), those are useless references. It is better to go to a former employer or to someone who is already left the organization who is not handcuffed by the policy (or I have to say, "alleged policy" because everyone finds a way around that if they care). Find someone who used to work with that that employer who will say wonderful things about you.

Again, don't give out lukewarm references. Find exceptional people who give an is will and will later so exceptional reference..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake | Job Search Radio

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

Summary

Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Mistakes Recent Grads Make Job Hunting | Job Search Radio

Everyone makes mistakes. I make mistakes. You make mistakes.

Here are a few of the things recent grads often do you wrong when they start job hunting.

Summary

I want to talk to you today about mistakes you as a recent graduate often make that prove costly that resulting you being in the job search mode longer than you want to be and sometimes lose your career through inertia. Let me point to a few things.

1. You overestimate your value. Sometimes, career services, sometimes your professors blow smoke up your derrière. They tell you you are worth more than the market really thinks you are. Want to get a clearer picture of what your real value is? On LinkedIn there is a drop-down that allows you take a look for alumni from your school. Reach out to a few of them. Find out how much they were earning at the time they started their career. I'm talking about people from the last year or two. Find out what they got and what their process was like.

2. You don't network particularly well. These folks that you're reaching out to are like gold because they can introduce you to their boss, people at their firm, AND THEY ARE PAID FOR IT. Firms offer employee referral bonuses to their employees and they make money if you join. While you are speaking with them, get friendly with them, talk with them about what it is like working there, and ask them if there any open positions that you as a new grad can be introduced for.

3. You don't customize your resume.You keep sending out the same resume over and over again To every job known to mankind, because your parents are telling you,, "You've got to get a job,"You don't want to send it out to "stupid jobs," (things you are qualified for or interested in). Don't just send it out to everything. Tell your resume to each individual position you are applying for so that the fit looks obvious. Certain jobs are going to emphasize certain points; You will want to emphasize those things in your resume..
4. Your online all the time and not talking to people. You are sending emails, you're texting, You are on Snapchat trying to connect with people. That's fine, but you have to do the conversion from shooting the bull with them and saying, "Do you know of any jobs that might fit?"Especially with people you don't know particularly well, Talk with them about what you're looking for because your goal is to expand your network a lot to talk to more people. , even if these are people who are friends of your parents, they are people who are in "the world of work" And they might know some things that can become valuable to you. They might not be the right person right away, but they might be able to introduce you to someone Who might be the right person who could steer you better.
5. You don't follow up well.You get a message back from the firm because was sent as email, You're not checking your email and not responding quickly. I want to thinking about responding as quickly as you do your friend when a company sends you a message.You have to get crisp with your answers. You have to learn what to say and how to say it properly. If someone leaves a message for you on your phone, you want to call them back very quickly So that, if they want to talk with you about the job, you want to wait a week to get back to them, do you? By that time, 35 other people may be Interviewing for this role and you are going to be out of luck.
6. Not being proactive enough. You are not reaching out to people And doing what are called "informational interviews." Setting up time to pick someone's brain for about 15 minutes By phone, in person or Skype to see how they might be able to steer you on your search. Start to think about what you want new job, the kind of role you want. Talk with them about what they see the labor market is like for what you do or want to be doing. This is going to help you a lot Because you will be out there talking to people.

As a statistic you need to hear. Networking fills 70% of all jobs.70% of the 70% (49%) are filled by introductions the people that you didn't know at the beginning of research who recommend you to opportunities or from whom you hear about opportunities. You've got to expand your network.You can't connect with people. If that talk to people.. Otherwise, You are going to be in mom and/or dad's home a lot longer than you want and that's no fun Because they are going to nag you to no end.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes Being Somewhere Else | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/06/30/stupid-interview-mistakes-being-somewhere-else

EP 790 There’s another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes people make, particularly executives – – – being somewhere else.

Summary

I want to talk with you today, I'm not concerned with your senior professional (though I see more with seniors with staff level people)... As an executive, you go to interviews and you've got a very full plate. You are handling a lot of things, you are walking out on situations that will require your attention. You are distracted. That's probably the best way to put. You are distracted. You arrive at an interview where people carve that significant portions of the day and you're not prepared to focus right away on delivering your message, let alone even remember your message. You're still back in your office you're still back at home , because the distraction could also come from your home. As a result, you don't deliver at the meetings.

Terrible mistake to make! It's 1 of the dumbest things you can imagine.

Your spending time to talk with people about the role. He clearly interests you, about an opportunity that appeals to sufficiently that you're carving out time in your day to talk to people about it, and you're not prepared because you still back at your office or your back still in an argument with your wife/husband/partner or the kids if absent you... Whatever it is, you are off somewhere else. Dumb thing to do.

I just want to encourage you that if you feel like you would be distracted, take a few minutes before hand, I out in your car, get some coffee, spend some time by yourself and focus. Meditate and beat you at your best.

After all, when you are evaluating and assessing people and you get the sense that someone is not on the game, what is your 1st reaction? Rejection, of course. It will be the same for you, too.

Put aside the members from now. Put aside the distractions. Be focused on being the best you, you can be.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Knowing When to Shut Up (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

When I did recruiting, this mistake drove me crazy! It cost too many people way too many opportunities.

Summary

I have interviewed a lot of people in my career. When I worked in search, I'm not sure what it was just over three quarters of a million people that I interviewed. They were interviews that I conducted with people were I just want to put a bullet in my head. Why? Because this person just didn't know when to shut up. They just kept selling way too hard way too long, not knowing when they were scoring points with me and just feeling compelled to over-talk the situation. I will tell you, folks, if you've ever been on the same side is me in a situation like that, you know exactly what I'm talking about.

For you job hunters, consider the following: the attention span and most interviews is between 30 and 60 seconds. After that, most interviewers stop listening and start to "mentally channel surf." As a result, if you start talking for longer than 60 seconds, you're going to be putting them to sleep.

I encourage most people talk from no one than 45 seconds; for most of you that's close to the outer limit. If you are skillful with your voice and know how to pause at times, and you suggested you are thinking (or know how to fake that you're thinking of your answer), and you can be theatrical without being DRAMATIC (no one cares for hysteria in an interview), or uber drama . . . what they are looking for is answers to the question that demonstrates fit and be entertained in the process which is why you always hear about stories being affected but an interview.

Keep your answers down to about 45 seconds in life. AT TOPS, for skillful people, you go to 1 minute and 15 seconds. Otherwise, you're putting your foot in your mouth and kill your candidacy.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

How to Sabotage Your Job Search Part II | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another way job hunters sabotage their job search.

Summary

I find it incredible that people take so much time to write resumes and find jobs to apply to. Although applying for jobs not the ideal way to find the job, is a path a lot of people take. That isn't the way that you're sabotaging your search. Here is how you are doing.

Again, you write a resume, you look for places that are positions for you, you send the resume out, you get a phone call and you never call back! It is incredible somebody how often I make a call to someone after receiving a resume or send an email to someone with a few questions and I get no response. Help me understand how that makes sense.

At the end of the day, you are trying to find work. You found the position that you think your background fits, you submit a resume and you don't respond.

That is another way to sabotage your job search.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​
Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Following Directions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/11/stupid-interview-mistakes-not-following-directions

EP 832 This is a mistake that hangs too many people.

Summary

I wanted to discuss 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that you many people do. It's the notion of not following directions. The obvious places you have a job application and they tell you to do certain things with the application and you don't follow through. For example, I think 1 of the funniest things that I've ever heard of that someone did (a client told me about this 1) is the place of their application where it said, "Give us one word that describes your strengths." One word! Got that one? They wrote, "I'm very good at following directions."

Was that one word? Was that really one word? Of course, not. This person didn't pay attention.

You see, what happens to a lot of job hunters is that they go on autopilot. They don't really listen. They built so many interviews that what happens is that they think they know what the question is, but they don't do it. They don't answer the question. They anticipate with this person is really looking for without really knowing what they are looking for. That shows up on applications in that way. It also shows up as you "basking your own magnificence" as you answer questions.

I mentioned this will many times before, the person who went off on this lengthy answer that had nothing to do with my question, but it got to a point where I said, "By the way, do you member what my original question was?" The answer, which I thought was wonderfully honest, was, "No."

You just have to follow directions. He answer the stupid question that is presented to you, whether is on the application or on an interview. That's what they are looking for at that point. In the therapy business, is referred to as, "following the contact function." They are reaching out to you about something, they want to know that answer, you can guide them with your answer to the next part but the idea is just give them what they want. Do it in your particular way.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How to Sabotage Your Job Search Part 1

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you one of the most effective ways to sabotage your job search.

Summary

Here is the technique. You want to do it? It is your prerogative. I think you are crazy but people seem to do it all the time.

You don't put your city, state or ZIP Code on your resume. You have a phone number on your resume that doesn't correlate with where you live.

Do you think were searching all the time based upon your phone number or are we searching by where you are living and, most likely, ZIP Code? ZIP Code is how the systems are set up. If you work in technology, you are an idiot if you don't know it. I received yet the hundredth resume this week of someone who did not put their location on the resume. The only reason I know that they are in the Bay area is that you happen to mention it in an email you sent to me. But, your resume has a phone number the correlate to someplace in upstate New York.

No address. No ZIP Code. No city state. No nothing! We are supposed to know that this phone number is actually located in the Bay area.

If you want to sabotage your job hunting for now and for years to come, please continue to not put your ZIP Code on your resume or your city, state and ZIP Code on your resume. I understand that you are concerned about identity theft and put your actual street address, I understand. But not having a ZIP Code? Come on! Give me a break!

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: The Top Questions to NEVER Ask at a Job Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you 5 questions to NEVER ask at a job interview if you want to get a job offer. 

Summary

Today I want to talk about some of the worst questions, the questions you should never ask on any job interview. As much as I expect maturity, intelligence and professionalism from people, every once in a while I get surprised. Rather than commit these gaffes on the interview, I would rather head them off.

So let me talk with you about the time questions you should never ask a job interview.

1. "By the way, what does your company do?" Why would you ever asked this question? Why didn't you just Google the firm's website before the interview? Why didn't you just spend some time on their website to learn what the firm does in advance of your interview? If you are interviewing with the startup that's in stealth mode, I'm sure you can find something on Mashable or TechCrunch that my talk about what the firm is trying to do. Regardless, you can just Google and find out what the company does? When you ask a question like this, you send the message to an employer that they don't like.

2 & 3. Do you do a background check?" The Cumberland the question is, "Do you do drug testing?" I laughed at these questions because you have obviously sent up an enormous red flag for them that says, "There's a problem in my background," or, "There's an issue with my background." You have told him that there is an issue with such a thing.

4. "Do you have any other jobs available?" You basically told him that's a not interested in what they are talking with you about. You are better off continue through with the interview in a very professional way. If they ask, "Are you interested," you can be honest and tell them that you have some questions about whether this is the right role for you. It will allow you to get your questions answered. If you do have questions about the job. It's very mature they ask a question like this.

5. "What's your insurance coverage like?" What are things you don't want to cover the early stages of interviewing or early stages of a job search with the firm's benefits. You want everything focused on your ability to do the job, that you have a lot of passion and enthusiasm for "doing the job," you are there to help them satisfy THEIR needs, you are not there to have yours fulfilled AT THIS TIME.

That is a point later on in the interview where they are starting to fall in love and started to lust after you and you can start dealing with benefits. Initially ago stay off this question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why You Don’t Even Get The Interview. (VIDEO)


Simulcast of No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio: Why You Don’t Even Get The Interview

Summary

I was coaching someone yesterday who is up a position and in the course of the conversation, he reminded me of something in his circumstances that I thought would be helpful to you as well.

What he reminded me of was paying attention to the language that is used in the job description or the questions that are asked by HR that signal certain things that may not be obvious. For example, in his case, he was told by HR that the next interview was with someone who is trying to 4X growth within the particular business unit.

We were working on language to use that illustrated his experience with that. The language that we came up with was his background with "aggressive growth." Instead of using the usual metrics of percentages, their language was to talk in terms of "times." He was involved with almost 3X growth in the previous situation.

Recognize that there are signals that are used in job descriptions or in the questions that HR asks that can be a signal to you of how to communicate with them and the kind of information they are looking for.

Another thing that came up in a different conversation was concerned that one firm had about someone where they perceived his background was more internally oriented, rather than externally oriented. He was savvy enough to pick up on that and said, "I just want to be clear about my background. I've had 5 years of internal experience and and, of those 5, 3 of them were taking internal programs and bringing them to customers and converting them from internal systems to external systems, thus, of my 20 or 22 years of background, 17 of them really related to external customers."

Notice one going with us. You always want to be listening for cues that are coming in job descriptions or in interviews that signal the real interest that the firm has because job descriptions are a list of qualifications that they look for. You are looking for what you can do for them. You are looking for ways that you can demonstrate that you as a professional, with your staff level individual or in the C suite, have the capacity to deliver what it is that they want. As you know, sometimes these job descriptions and sometimes their questioning is a little obtuse.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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