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Turning On Your Acting Chops (VIDEO)


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I was reminded again of how important your acting skills need to be when interviewing.

Summary

Him and him

Friends, Romans and countrymen. Let me you ear. Obviously, I am pretending to be acting but when you are on an interview, you are pretending to be an actor or actress, and are putting on her performance. 1 of the most difficult performances you have to put on is the performance of sincerity.

You see, I was reminded of this by someone I started coaching recently who, when they came to me, spoke about coming so close on so many interviews. Employers seem to be concerned about her taking a step backward in her career. She has been in very senior roles and, as she says so eloquently, I've made my money already.

Now, I want to do something I like. I believe her because she could certainly go out and find something similar to what she's done before. So she's interested in a lesser role than what she's held. The result winds up being firms have difficulty trusting her so they choose other people.

It doesn't help that she's not 24 and that she's an older worker probably early 50s, mid 50s, I'm not absolutely sure, but be that as it may, you know she's dealing with ageism. So let's put that aside for a second.

I've dealt with ageism in others videos. Here, it's about the acting performance. The performance you have to deliver is the one around sincerity. How do you recognize sincerity?

So if I speed up my my speech and and and I just talk in a direct way with you and I'm asked, "You know, this is is gong to be a job that is beneath you. If you respond back with the the typical rebuttals-- "Well this is something I'm interested in. What is it that I could do for you to prove that to you," . . . all the usual stuff. It's not going to work.
"
But if what you did when they said something along the lines of, "I'm not sure if this position will be a fit for you. It would probably be a step down," they're being sincere and you have to mirror that

The mirroring comes down to , "I can understand how you feel and I know what if I were hiring I'm I would have that concern as well."

What I've done is slow down my speech to project sincerity and honesty so that you I'm appearing as though I'm being completely vulnerable in front of you and, as such, did you notice how my speech got a little softer, that my speech slowed down radically.

I acknowledge this almost like it was feel, felt and found close. "I know how you feel You feel. I felt that way myself before, but you know what I found?"

That's the feel felt and found close. If a salesperson puts that on if you can just smile in the future, remember this conversation. For you what you need to do in these situations is project, sincerity. That comes from slowing your speech down, speaking a little softer, maybe periodically breaking eye contact, and you doing the kinds of things that you normally would do in order to demonstrate how honest and credible you are, his

This my version. I think the slow speech and the softer tone are you a send may be US centric but I think the notion applies throughout the world.

Sincerity is how you convince people that when they're telling you what their concerns are, you hear them, you understand how they feel, but this is what you really want to do and no amount of arguing with them is going to work. I don't know how it is with you, but it's like the more they argue more the more I don't listen.

When you appear vulnerable and open, there you can win.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t Kid Yourself. Promoting Yourself Is Critical. | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the importance of branding and building a reputation for your career.

Summary

Branding. I know you don't like that term. You roll your eyes up. "What am I talking about branding for? What even care about this kind of stuff?"

The fact of the matter is no one I know has been raised to believe that branding is important. The idea that you need to promote yourself, just like you are a box of detergent or a cereal has any meeting to you.

Yet, when you stop and think about it, for career management purposes, branding is the most important thing that you will be doing over the next 5 years if you are my age, 25 or 40 years if you are younger.

Let me give you different word to think of. Reputation. Reputation is based upon your past. How you delivered when the chips were down. How many people knew about it and what they knew about your contribution to this when the chips were down. Let me offer a few examples.

If you're not is the person who did such and such, and everyone in your organization, every last person you corporation knows, how many people is that really? If you're the major American corporation, that can be 1/4 of a million people. But the likelihood of all of those people knowing about your contribution is next to nonexistent.

Let's say it is all the people your department and it is a large firm. Abby people do you think that might be? 50? 100? 500? 1000? And again, the likelihood of all those people knowing about your specific accomplishments is very very small. If you're the small firm, and everyone at the firm knows about you, 50, 75 people, 100 people! 300 people know about you and what you have done. And who else?

Part of the notion of branding requires self-promotion. People outside your organization know what you have done and open what you think about. LinkedIn is now a great tool for that in a variety of different ways. You are not restricted to LinkedIn as a venue for self-promotion. Think in terms of press releases, articles that you write, a blog, a whole host of avenues where the notion that your ideas and your contributions have meaning becomes incredibly important.

I do a want to promote myself, whether it's with videos, podcasts, e-zines, a blog, a whole host of ways where I do things so that people know about me. I know I know a lot do. But, even then, it is not enough. I am working on new venues to promote myself.

You need to think creatively for yourself and what you can do to speak at the conference, for example, on your contribution to something or your thoughts about something. If you are a beginner or a to your person, that might be a club related to or a trade group related to your industry or your area of specialty.

No matter, it is important that you get out there and create an image for yourself a brand for yourself, an expectation for yourself that others will know about. Otherwise, you may just get stuck in a rut and be another wage slave for the rest of your career.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​
Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

Why Have You Had So Many Jobs?

EP 827 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers several different ways to answer this question depending on when in your career this occurred.

Summary

Today, I want to offer up 1 of those tough interview is that show up from time to time. The question is, "So, I want that your resume and you have had a lot of jobs. Why be had a lot of jobs?"

You can understand from an employer's perspective that they are hiring someone and they help is like a marriage that last for a long long time and you look like someone who, when the going gets tough, you get going… Out the door.

There are several different ways to approach answering this question. The 1st 1 is, if it happened early in your career, you can point to the fact that when you were young, you didn't have the perspective that you do now for the hills you can acknowledge that and that you wised up. Somewhere along the line.

"I now understand that persistence is sometimes more important than the sometimes alleged again and I start to tough through situations when they got more difficult. "

The 2nd possible way of answering this question is if, some of these changes were because your consultant and you laid out your resume in a way where you just listed each of your individual engagements there and not the consulting firm names, you can very simply say, "Many of what you see, there are consulting assignments where I was only expected to be there for 5 or 6 months. As a matter of fact, some of the engagements ran long, because they like my work so much that they kept me around longer than the original contract was for." That becomes the 2nd way you can address.

A third way, and this is a variation that may apply to more recent economic times, you can point to the economy. "I intended to stay with each of these firms for a long time. However, the economy decimated sectors of our business. Eventually, our firm, in an effort to survive, needed to cut people. I was 1 of the last ones in and became 1 of the 1st ones out. As much as people like my work, and if you check my references you'll find that, I like the work of everyone else in the group and became very much like 'eeny meeny miny mo' when they made their decisions. It wasn't a reflection of my capabilities. It wasn't a reflection on my work. I was told they will provide great references. They basically chop the newest one.

That's how I would handle it from 3 different angles based upon how it was in your career.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What Are You Genuinely Bad At?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/03/05/what-are-you-genuinely-bad-at

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this complicated question. PS you’re probably answering it all wrong.

Summary

I've got a fun question for you today. I think your instinctive programming about how to answer this 1 will be all wrong. The question is, "What are you genuinely bad at?"

Most people are programmed to turn the weakness into strength. In the realm of emotional intelligence, in the realm of (you're going to see the subtle flip to this, not the traditional one) effective interviewing, you're going to need to divulge something that you're not particularly good at.

Hiring managers who asked that question don't want you to deflect it. They want something real. They want some meat on her bones. This is going to require some thought on your part, because, in this sense, you don't want to reveal something that relates the work, right? You don't want to reveal something that's going to be problematic for you in their assessment, but you also don't want to give them something flimsy.

The trick is to give them something and then pause and say, "You know, I don't know if that's but the relevant for the job. But, one thing I know is relevant is my focus is really on my strengths and trying to maximize my strengths pretty definitely so that, yes, I'm working to improve, but, at the end of the day, I really try to focus on my strong points in order to ensure that you get the best from me well I'm still trying to improve the other.

You get the point? You've got to give them something. You gotta give them something with some significance that's not going to harm you in their assessment. You don't want to give them something to trivial because it's not going to be good enough. Then, flip it to say that you tend to focus on your strengths and playing to those Wally you worked to improve the things you judge are deficient act.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Job Search Is Rigged Against You


Let me explain how recruiters set you up.

Summary

If you are in the United States and you decide to buy a house, they make you sign a document that says you understand that there is a sellers agent and the buyers agent and that you understand that at times the realtor is going to operate in both capacities.

Why do they do that? Because the realtor has a financial interest in the transaction and that depending upon who they represent it by different frame from yours. If you are a sellers agent for a combined agent, your interest is with the seller because they are the ones paying you.

If they are the buyer's agent, they are representing you and have your interests at heart

In the recruiting there is nothing comparable explain to you or offer to you. They are always the agent of the employer; they are never your agent.

Why do I say that? Who's paying? Where do they earn their money from? As a result of that quote unexplained relationship" that exist between a recruiter and the employer, you always need to look at this person, this recruiter as, "can I trust this person to speak for me." How are they trying to manipulate me? How are they trying to change my mind, my beliefs, in order to accommodate an employer? How am I being "finessed" or manipulated into doing what the employer wants me to do at the lowest possible price?

I believe it's important for you to get unbiased representation. You can't always go to the immediate sources or resources (recruiters or employers) because they are looking out for their interests.

If you go to friends, family, wife, husband, partner, former managers, you may be getting advice from someone who knows as little as you do about job hunting. After all, my experience with former managers is that they think they know more about job hunting than they actually do. They deceive themselves because they think that because they hired someone in the past (or many people in the past) that makes them qualified to get advice about job hunting. Seeing them is job hunters as often as I do, I know how wrong they are. Most know less than nothing about job search.

Many of the people that you might seek out for advice are as uninformed as you are. You need to find someone who if you quality advice throughout your job search, who can guide you all the way through the process and represent you and your interests, who is not beholden to an employer.

I do that kind of work and I'm sure others do it as well. I to it with great content jobsearchcoachingHQ.com and I do with coaching where you hire me to answer your questions and concerns. I'm not be hired by an employer to place you in a job; I'm there to help you find your next position.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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