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There is Nothing Permanent About a Permanent Position

There is Nothing Permanent About a Permanent Position | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/11/17/there-is-nothing-permanent-about-a-permanent-position/

EP 437 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out that there is nothing permanent about a permanent job and what you should do about it

Summary

There was something interesting going on on my other show, "Job Search Radio," where four guests in a row pointed out a fallacy the job hunters hold, that employees hold.

You see most employers try to seduce people (for you) by describing their jobs as "permanent positions," when they aren't.

Here I  point out that there is nothing permanent about a permanent job and what you should do about it.

The term, "permanent position," is an anachronism.

You see, there are full-time jobs that occupy your time for 40 hours per week or more. But they are not permanent. They just occupy your time.

Philosophically as you evaluate positions there are a few things you need to think of.

What are you going to get out of this experience?
What sort of knowledge, skill or experience can you plunk on your resume they will make you desirable to the next employer?
Think of this job as having a tour of duty-- 18 months, 24 months, whatever it is. How will they determine what your next tour will be with the firm. What sort of benchmarks will they use to consider you for another role?
Remember, just as the achievement you would have if you were to change jobs will be measured by another employer, the job you perform for this firm will be used to measure you for other opportunities internally. Don't let their chump job be how you are evaluated by them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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Why Do So Many Employers and New Employees Become Disappointed Once They Join a New Company?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I have addressed the subject in different places before. Here I tackle it directly.

Summary

I received a great question that I've answered indirectly for a long time. So, as to the question pointedly today, so let me use it as my subject.

'What is somebody employers and new employees become disappointed wants to join the new company?"

To me, this is very very easy. It's also the fact that both sides, both employers and employees forget 1 of the basic truths of job hunting and hiring. The basic truth is that everyone is on good behavior.

The employer was presenting things in a good light; their subordinates are presenting things in a good light. The job hunter is putting on a "happy smile button face." They are showing the credentials as being exquisite and perfect.

In other words, everyone is lying.

Everyone is lying because they are not telling you what is wrong.

For example, I've never heard of the job hunter say, "You know, I get cranky unless I have a chocolate bar by 4 o'clock each day. Sometimes that crankiness pisses off my coworkers." It's never happened! No employer has ever talked about those last for people who sat at the desk. They want you to sit at and why they quit. Never happens.

Even if you have asked them about what happened to the person using the job before, they will talk about going onto another opportunity without discussing where the failure was. They will never say, "You know, I pissed them off. They got annoyed with my constantly needling them about getting things done on time and within budget." Or, "They kept running away with stuff that got me annoyed and eventually, blew my stack at them." No one ever says that.

Thus, that lie that both sides tell becomes the seed of the eventual discontent.

There is a statistic that says that within a year of a hire, employers have buyers remorse and judge a higher as being a mis-hire. Job hunters are no different. That's where the seat of the soul lies. Everyone is presenting themselves in the best light and no one is being completely honest about what they are stepping into. No job hunters ever told, "Do you see that woman over there? I have no idea what they work here. I can't fire them." Or, "she gets on everyone's nerves." Or, "he's a jackass." No one ever says that.

No job hunter ever talks about how he was the jackass or how he annoys everyone and his current firm that they have suggested he start looking elsewhere. There can provide a great reference because they don't want him around.

So, understand that the problem stems from the fact that each side is lying. Worse than that, each side looking for "a good fit." How will you ever know that someone will be a good fit. If each side is trying to deceive one another?

That's what I see.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

Stupid Career Mistakes: Not Being Clear About What You Want.


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Another one of those stupid career mistakes too many people make that cost them PLENTY!

Summary

I debated whether to make this into a "stupid interview mistakes," or a "stupid career mistake." I eventually decide is about a person in their career and how they viewed it, rather than just simply an interview mistakes. The mistake I'm going to address today is not being clear about what you want and where you are going.

Think about for second. If you are driving from New York to Boston or from Chicago to Kansas City or from Kansas City to Los Angeles and you didn't have a roadmap or GPS and were not very clear about where you wanted to get to if you just got into your car and drove, how would you know if you got the right place? Often, people going to their job search and view their career kind of like the leaf in the movie, "Forrest Gump" that floats around from place to place, eventually landing somewhere. Is that really how you want to manage were unmanage your career?

I think most people want to have a clear idea w they are aiming for. Instead of letting corporations make that decision for them. To be clear, if you are not qualified, you have to develop the qualifications to get there. After all, no one year person is going to make the C suite in their 2nd year unless it is their own company. When job hunters look at their career and decide they want to look for job, that is as far as they really think about it. They start looking for a job. I don't care if you are a junior person or a senior individual that is how people conduct themselves more times than not. It's foolish. It's self-destructive.

If you are not sure, you need to spend time talking with people and getting advice. Maybe, coaching for the picture. Here, I'm not to sell myself to you. I am available and there are many people you can talk with who can help you sort it out and point you in the right direction.

The mistake here is not really being clear about it. As a result, you want going to interviews and firms try to persuade you that their job is wonderful and you forget the benchmark against your own aspirations. You are not evaluated against your own needs except for money, location . . Concrete stuff but not the bigger picture. The bigger picture is what you want to do with your professional life and how does this role fit into it?

Thus, whether you're interviewing or looking at your career in general, it winds up being a huge mistake that many people make.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Career Mistakes Too Many People Make (VIDEO)


Here I speak about a few of the mistakes people make in how they view their career.

Summary

I'm not sure that these are specifically career mistakes; I think some of them could go into business category as well. I'm going to try to cover both and start off with the big one.

1. You made a mistake. You are going to make more mistakes.. The real question is how you will respond to the mistake. Do you beat yourself up? Do you punish yourself? You spent hours or days or weeks fixating on the mistake or do try to learn your lessons and move on?

I wrestle with this 1 myself. I'm a guy who spent a lot of time searching for perfection and not spending in time, accepting excellence. Maybe you are the same way, too. I think there's a chance to learn and be kinder to oneself because there's a chance that you are going to make mistakes and more mistakes! It happens.

What can you learn from the experience? What can you do to learn and move forward from it?

2. If you are interested in being happy in your work, it is probably going to take time. Especially when someone is junior, what tends to happen is you get what is called, "grunt work." It tends to be the foundation for how people learn the fundamentals of the craft.

For example, in IT, someone starts off by being a coder. Although the technology will change over the course of time, they will use it as the baseline for how they learn and grow to manage people, how to lead organizations and such. Certainly being a kind coder doesn't guarantee that you will be a good manager, but understanding the fundamentals of your craft and not taking shortcuts will help a lot.

That's the important thing – – learning the fundamentals of your craft and not taking shortcuts. What are the fundamentals? You ask for help and advice? I'm not talking about asking your manager, but from other people? That is what's going to help guide you and help you progress.

3. Another thing is about being patient with yourself. It takes time to be successful. As I said before, the secret to success without hard work is still a secret. What can you do to lay the foundation? If you think you can figure it out by yourself, you are going to make it a lot harder than what you need to do.

4. Always be networking and always be asking other people for advice. Save the information. Collate it. Start creating spreadsheets or data categories that kind of fit with one another so that you can learn what's being told to you constantly and see whether it meets with your experience. Adapt and change.

5. The last thing going to talk with you about is the fact that so many people separate the work from the personal life. It's hard of these days, but I remember an old story from the original owner of the New York Jets. He was trying to figure out whether or not to promote someone into particular role and one person over another. The reason he made the particular choice he made as he tell the loser in the situation, that for the loser this was a job with all the template of being a job. This contrasted with the other person who loved what he did.

Your goal is to find work that you love. I don't presume to know what it is and there are a million ways to find it and figure it out. Think of your career as being a longer race than just today, even if you are in your 60s, and start laying the foundation, working at it and finding work that you really love.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Self-Sabotage: A Misdiagnosis (VIDEO)


I wrote an article last week about how self sabotage by job hunters is mislabeled that was viewed by many, many people. I decided to look at this more broadly than job hunters and look at how it affects self-employed people and entrepreneurs alike.

Summary

“When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” - Alexander Graham Bell

I wrote an article for my website that I also published on LinkedIn that spoke to job hunters about how they often incorrectly blame self-sabotage as a cause of their failures. I want to extend my thinking here to include entrepreneurs, freelancers, self-employed individuals and others who are leaders and complain to themselves about how they sabotage themselves at critical junctures.

When I spoke to job hunters, I pointed out that so much of what is referred to as self-sabotage comes from lack of preparedness. They forget that the skills needed to find a job are different but complement those needed to do a job. This their ignorance of how to job hunt, write a quality resume, brand and market themselves, interview and negotiate are often indicative of that and not of self-sabotage. It is the fact that they don’t know what needs to be done in an environment where all information is almost every piece of information is available that comes back to haunt them that dooms them to failure.

However, for entrepreneurs, freelancers, self-employed people and other business leaders what often happens is a little different. It all starts with the courage to step out of their comfort zone and do something they have never done before.

You are someone who is willing to try, rather than accept the role you are in now and, if you are like most entrepreneurs I know, you are willing to take a chance having thought it out, lost sleep, asked for advice and the opinions of those close to you before having this misstep. You courageously took a chance and it didn’t work. Now your thoughts punish you for being “incompetent,” “stupid,” “foolish and worse.

This is not evidence of “self-sabotage” or some “psychological defect.” It doesn’t make you “a choker,” “a loser” or “a failure.” Instead, it makes you someone who tried and who would not accept the status quo in your life and/or business.

We watch athletes who fail in the big game or the big match and return the following year to win. How did they do that.

Self-employed people decide to get out of their comfort zone. You may be world class at what you do now but you are a rookie at the new thing you want to try. Getting out of your comfort zone takes courage. Good for you. View this new idea as an experiment. Edison failed at the light bulb 1000+ times. Alexander Graham Bell failed many times, too.

Self-employed people learn they are close but not ready. Organization and talent are only a part of the equation to be a winner. Often, it takes experience being in the arena that is required. Yes, there are teams and players who win the first time but many don’t. You are very good but that isn’t enough in sports or in business. Michael Jordan and his teams were incredibly talented. So were the Detroit Pistons, Golden State Warriors and others. They learned from the experiences they had losing in the playoffs.

Self-employed people adapt to what they learned from the experience. Losing a title, losing a big match is incredibly painful. You spend an entire season in order to play on the big stage and you came up a little short. For you, it is time to dissect the lessons from the experience and start to put them into practice. The first time it may feel awkward and unfamiliar but, with practice, you get better and internalize the lessons and the changes.

Self-employed people risk failure again until they win . . or give up. No one likes to lose but you cannot win without risking another losing. Sometimes, people and teams fail repeatedly. They get up and try again until they win or their spirit is broken and they quit.

Self-employed people get help. Great athletes and entertainers all have coaches. Successful business people usually do, too. And you are trying to do this on your own with no advice from anyone other than yourself. Not smart. Coaching offers extra eyes on your problems and the ability for someone who is outside the immediate circle to look at the issues and recommend change. Hire a coach to work with.

This brings me back to self-sabotage. For you who are self-employed, freelancing, entrepreneurs and leading small businesses. You usually are not engaged in this “deep psychological drive to subvert your success. You are learning more about what you need to know in order to be successful.

Winners find the way to win. They battle back from individual defeats to see them as opportunities to learn, practice getting better and winning. It is not lack of talent or self-sabotage that causes their defeats. It is inexperience that does.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Is There Such a Thing As a Career Coach for High Level Executives? (AUDIO)

 

Great question from a smart person who knows he needs or she needs help.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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