Finding Recruiters to Help You (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers someone’s question about finding a recruiter to help them locate an interesting new job.

Summary

Here is a question on Quora that I think is interesting and I will attempt to answer it.

"I'm working for a fairly large New York City company where I was the 1st software engineer on board. I have 10+ years of software development experience. In the past, I have applied normally for open jobs, however, the most interesting jobs seem to be filled before they are advertised. I would like to see if Tech recruiters can help me out here. In the past, I have been contacted by recruiters who just search for keywords which have just been a complete waste of time. I'm looking for recruiters who can actually find jobs that match my profile."

Like everything these days, it is all in the relationship. You want to put yourself in the position where you actually have a relationship with recruiters who are competent. How do you find recruiters there competent?

Let's start over the LinkedIn profile. You start with searching for recruiters who are in your target geography. You start searching for recruiters who might have positions that are available that superficially fit your background. If you think you can search from job search to job search with people looking out for you, let me just remind you the fact that you are asking people to work for nothing and they are actually getting paid by employers to fill jobs. I know this may not seem like a dichotomy to you, but it actually is.

If you think they recruit for you or you think they're trying to find work for you... That's not their job. Their job is actually to earn a commission by helping an organization find talent that they specify they need and then from there, identify talent that fits those roles. That's the nature of recruiting. Everything else are being told is BS. Let's go further.

How do you find those people? You can start with ads but is are probably going to get you more what you've already got. What you want to be doing is looking at LinkedIn profiles of recruiters that have jobs in your area. What you're looking for is a few things.

Numbers of years of experience. I'm not going to do a commercial for myself but more experience and a stable background is going to tell you something about the recruiter. What's it going to tell you? If you see someone with 6 months here and 3 months there and 9 months there who has change jobs pretty regularly, they are probably not a good producer because the firm would've wanted to tie them in and make them a part of their day to day operations. Instead, they are being let go regularly and they have to find another job regularly, someone else is giving them a chance, but they are not feeling lots of positions. That's trick number 1.

Trick number 2 is to see if you can find people who are writing, publishing, or what have you because they are committed to their career. They are not necessarily burn and churn artists. That's the 2nd thing that you can look for.

The 3rd thing is to listen to how they talk to you. Are they commoditizing you or are they taking some care and how they communicate with you. When they talk about the job opportunity, do they sound knowledgeable or do they sound like a jerk. I think you can discern the difference you recognize enough jerks of their behavior. At the end of the day, if someone calls you about the job, you can ask them, "So, tell me about your background." If they talk with you about it, you go to their LinkedIn profile and findings BS, they are lying to you.

There's an interesting thing that happens pretty often, recruiters of the truth of the LinkedIn profile and don't necessarily tell the truth when you talk to people over the phone. It's a funny dichotomy. At the end of the day, you have work to do in order to find these people, evaluate them and determine whether or not they can really help.

Recognize that if you find this job (it seems like you been in one place for 10 years and you are not a junior individual), stay in touch. Use them as a recruiting source for hiring. Keep them posted on what's going on at the firm that you joined and introduce them to people who are involved with hiring. That's can make you an ally for them and make you someone that they are going to want to help for many years to come.

Lurching from job search to job search is a mistaken strategy. Thinking that you can just arrive cold and have people leap all over you and care about you and be competent, it doesn't work that way. Just like you haven't paid attention to recruiters for 10 years, suddenly if you disappear it. After this search is complete, they are not paying attention to you.

I have a new little job guide that's available for Kindle and that my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us

It's called, "Get Ready for The Job Jungle." It's perpetration tips for beginning a job search. There is a good section there about care and feeding tips for recruiters. It's cheap. It is the let them try to get rich on this thing, you know?

Order a copy of my website or order a copy for your Kindle where he made a whopping $0.35 for this. I think it's a useful too

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The #1 Lie Employers and Recruiters Tell

I worked in recruiting for more than 40 years, filling more than 1200 full time positions plus consulting assignments. I now coach job hunters with their searches, working worldwide with people in a variety of professions and careers.

When I worked in recruiting, I noticed a sad truth. Employers and recruiters told a big lie when describing the positions they were recruiting for. If you re-read my first sentence, you will see that I used the correct language, rather than perpetuate the lie when I described the jobs I filled as a recruiter as “full time positions” and not “permanent positions.”

The dictionary defines the word “permanent” as “existing perpetually; everlasting, especially without significant change.” Do any of you really think your job will be permanent if there is another economic slowdown? Seriously, do you really think your work is “permanent” by this definition or any other definition of the word that you can find?

Of course, not.

So why are jobs described as being “permanent positions?”

I think it all goes back to the way we have been conditioned from the time we went to school and were taught skills to prepare us for being employees. I am not speaking of math, English or science. I am speaking of conforming to systems and institutions that demand your loyalty without any offer of real reciprocity in return.

In school, you were taught:

  1. Do what you are told when you are told to do it . . . or else!The #1 Lie Employers and Recruiters Tell
  2. Get good grades . . . or else!
  3. Have the right answers. Collaboration is cheating. Don’t collaborate . . . or else!
  4. Shut up. Don’t disagree . . . or else!

At work, you are taught:

  1. Do what you are told when you are told to do it . . . or else!
  2. Get good reviews . . . or else!
  3. Have the right answers . . . or else!
  4. Shut up. Be a team player. Don’t disagree . . . or else!
  5. There is job security at a big company.

You see, what you compete for are not permanent positions but “full time jobs.” These are jobs that want to purchase your services for a minimum of 40 hours per week to do a bunch of predetermined tasks and any other task they think you should do.

And they have the right to fire you (or if you prefer another lie, “rightsize you” out of a job, lay you off, furlough you). The #1 Lie Employers and Recruiters Tell Remember, you are seen as disloyal if you decide that what they promised you is unsatisfactory and firms reserve the right to punish you for their mistakes (including paying you less than market value, underpaying you, demanding you work insane hours, etc.) by the collective action of seeing you as (GASP!) a “job hopper!”

Let’s start turning the tables on the situation. If they use the word, “permanent,” let you “BS detector” go off and mentally convert the term to “full time.” Instead of blindly looking at these positions as being the panacea to career advancement, look at consulting or temp assignments as being preferable, particularly at early stages of your career. After all, many of these job will pay double your full time salary (minus insurance, minus paid vacation plus the ability to deduct commutation and other work related expenses that your full time co-workers or clients are unable to do) leaving you ahead of your full time brethren by a lot.

Yes, there may be a time when it makes sense to go to work for one of these firms on what LinkedIn founder, Reid Hoffman, describes as a “tour of duty”(work done for a fixed task and period of time after which your manager may even help you find your next role.

But no matter what, don’t allow yourself to be tricked into thinking you are taking a permanent position.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

Jeff Altman, The Big Game HunterJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

 

If you would like to read another article of mine, try, “6 Ways You Know It’s Time to Change Jobs.

 

 

How Do I Attract Recruiters to My LinkedIn Profile Without…? (VIDEO)


How do I attract recruiters to my LinkedIn profile without my boss thinking I’m job hunting?

Audio on this is not perfect.  The content is. I hope you can tolerate it.

Summary

I was asked the question that I thought was really very good. People sometimes lose track of the importance of doing this so I thought I would do a video about it. The question is, "How do I attract recruiters to my LinkedIn profile without my boss taking them looking for a job?"

The question needs to be answered in 2 parts. I'm going to deal with the 2nd part first-- "without my boss becoming suspicious or thinking I'm looking for a new job. To answer this really starts off with your privacy settings. We start looking at changing your privacy settings, you want to make sure the people are not notified when you make a change to your profile.

You go to your LinkedIn homepage. There is a little picture of yourself for a little icon on the upper part of the page. You go to privacy settings and what you are looking for is dealing with an area where you are sharing profile edits. Next to it, you will see "change," and change it to, "no." This is about choosing whether you network is notified of your profile changes. Assuming your connected with your boss, this will prevent he or she from being notified of any profile changes which is usually a signal that someone is looking to change jobs.

The other part of your question was, "How do you make your profile sufficiently attractive so that recruiters want to contact you?"
That one is also easy.

For the field that you are in and the work that you do, you want to SEO and optimize your profile like you would a resume. Why would someone want to contact you? What skills do you have that would make someone want to reach out to you?

If you're not exactly sure, what I want you to do go to a site like Indeed, a site where job descriptions are aggregated. Search for positions that you might apply for. Look for 20 or 25 of them. Start looking for keywords for these jobs.

I want you to start thinking of patterns. If 15 of the jobs use particular language to describe what is being looked for in 5 don't, include the language that is used in the 15 jobs and then, from there, include some of the language from the other 5. The idea is that if recruiters are searching LinkedIn, they are using keywords to find people with particular skills.

From there, make it easy for recruiters to contact you. You do that by including your email address and phone number in the summary area of your profile. Say something like, "If you would like to reach me, contact me at…"

Again, to summarize my answer the question, use your privacy settings and turn off notifications to changes in your LinkedIn profile and then use keywords for job descriptions to improve your profile to use terms that recruiters are going to be using to find someone like you and then include your email address and phone number in the summary area of your profile.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.

Summary

Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Working With Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


On this show, Jeff speaks about working with recruiters and what you can expect.

NOTE: This show was recorded in 2011 and was among the first recordings for No BS Job Search Advice Radio. Do you notice any progress?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Finding The Good Recruiters | Job Search Radio


Recruiters. Can’t live with them. Can’t live without them. Recruiters fill many positions throughout the world but are lightening rods for many job hunters for their frustration with job search.

On this show, I speak with Bob Larson of Berman, Larson Kane about how to find good recruiters to work with in your job search and throughout your career.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Finding Recruiters to Help You | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers someone’s question about finding a recruiter to help them locate an interesting new job.

Summary

Here is a question on Quora that I think is interesting and I will attempt to answer it.

"I'm working for a fairly large New York City company where I was the 1st software engineer on board. I have 10+ years of software development experience. In the past, I have applied normally for open jobs, however, the most interesting jobs seem to be filled before they are advertised. I would like to see if Tech recruiters can help me out here. In the past, I have been contacted by recruiters who just search for keywords which have just been a complete waste of time. I'm looking for recruiters who can actually find jobs that match my profile."

Like everything these days, it is all in the relationship. You want to put yourself in the position where you actually have a relationship with recruiters who are competent. How do you find recruiters there competent?

Let's start over the LinkedIn profile. You start with searching for recruiters who are in your target geography. You start searching for recruiters who might have positions that are available that superficially fit your background. If you think you can search from job search to job search with people looking out for you, let me just remind you the fact that you are asking people to work for nothing and they are actually getting paid by employers to fill jobs. I know this may not seem like a dichotomy to you, but it actually is.

If you think they recruit for you or you think they're trying to find work for you... That's not their job. Their job is actually to earn a commission by helping an organization find talent that they specify they need and then from there, identify talent that fits those roles. That's the nature of recruiting. Everything else are being told is BS. Let's go further.

How do you find those people? You can start with ads but is are probably going to get you more what you've already got. What you want to be doing is looking at LinkedIn profiles of recruiters that have jobs in your area. What you're looking for is a few things.

Numbers of years of experience. I'm not going to do a commercial for myself but more experience and a stable background is going to tell you something about the recruiter. What's it going to tell you? If you see someone with 6 months here and 3 months there and 9 months there who has change jobs pretty regularly, they are probably not a good producer because the firm would've wanted to tie them in and make them a part of their day to day operations. Instead, they are being let go regularly and they have to find another job regularly, someone else is giving them a chance, but they are not feeling lots of positions. That's trick number 1.

Trick number 2 is to see if you can find people who are writing, publishing, or what have you because they are committed to their career. They are not necessarily burn and churn artists. That's the 2nd thing that you can look for.

The 3rd thing is to listen to how they talk to you. Are they commoditizing you or are they taking some care and how they communicate with you. When they talk about the job opportunity, do they sound knowledgeable or do they sound like a jerk. I think you can discern the difference you recognize enough jerks of their behavior. At the end of the day, if someone calls you about the job, you can ask them, "So, tell me about your background." If they talk with you about it, you go to their LinkedIn profile and findings BS, they are lying to you.

There's an interesting thing that happens pretty often, recruiters of the truth of the LinkedIn profile and don't necessarily tell the truth when you talk to people over the phone. It's a funny dichotomy. At the end of the day, you have work to do in order to find these people, evaluate them and determine whether or not they can really help.

Recognize that if you find this job (it seems like you been in one place for 10 years and you are not a junior individual), stay in touch. Use them as a recruiting source for hiring. Keep them posted on what's going on at the firm that you joined and introduce them to people who are involved with hiring. That's can make you an ally for them and make you someone that they are going to want to help for many years to come.

Lurching from job search to job search is a mistaken strategy. Thinking that you can just arrive cold and have people leap all over you and care about you and be competent, it doesn't work that way. Just like you haven't paid attention to recruiters for 10 years, suddenly if you disappear it. After this search is complete, they are not paying attention to you.

I have a new little job guide that's available for Kindle and that my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us

It's called, "Get Ready for The Job Jungle." It's perpetration tips for beginning a job search. There is a good section there about care and feeding tips for recruiters. It's cheap. It is the let them try to get rich on this thing, you know?

Order a copy of my website or order a copy for your Kindle where he made a whopping $0.35 for this. I think it's a useful tool.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Should I Email The Recruiter When They Miss an Interview With Me? (VIDEO)


Well, should you or is there another way?

Summary

Today's question is, "A recruiter missed the call with me for an interview. Should I email them to follow up?"

No. Don't email them. Call them! Call them on the phone and say, "we were scheduled to speak at 4 PM on Tuesday. I was there waiting for your call. Is everything okay?"

What you are trying to do is to flush them up to encourage them to respond. Before I go further, I just want to say that an employer would be will be emailing you if you missed an interview.. However, for you, your human being as human beings we want to connect person to person. They will have a degree of guilt. They may also say, "Oh! I'm so sorry. I had an emergency such and such occur. Whenever they cite the emergency situation, it is a lie. No emergency overwhelms the situation sufficiently that they can't send you a quick email and say, "I'm not could be able to make our call. Can we reschedule?" If they say something like this there telling you bull.

What you want to hear it in their tone of voice. You definitely call. You don't email.

If they don't respond to your call and there is nothing on their voicemail to say that they are out of the office indefinitely or that they are going to be out of the office for a few days, and they are not getting back to you, you can assume that something changed for them and that they are not considering you. When the position is suddenly come on hold (that's a different form of change but that's a different conversation).

At the end of the day, you have learned something about this person, not the company, but the person And whether or not you could trust them through how they respond to you when they call that you won't get from an email.

An email is impersonal and allows them to hide in certain ways I never encourage people to email to follow-up. I encourage you to call. Learned from the tone of voice and the behaviors and how apologetic they are.

I just had a speaking engagement cancel on me 2 weeks in advance. Stuff like this happens. The person who organized the event, send an email to me and also said I would like to schedule a Skype with you so that I can personally apologize and work on rescheduling. There was a nice way to handle it. The 1st thing was an email to let me know. She said she personally wanted to apologize to me; it was a nice way to handle it.

Hiding in an email is not good enough. You wasted your time. Find out directly from them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

How Can I Tell a Recruiter “No” When They Ask for References? (VIDEO)


Here answer the question from someone who is asked for references by recruiter during the 1st interview and doesn’t want to provide them.

Summary

I was asked the question I thought was great, "A recruiter has asked me for references at the time of the 1st interview. I don't really want to give it to them. How can I say no to a recruiter if they asked me for references during an interview?"

I want to start off by differentiating and start by answering the question about a contingency recruiters. That's definitely a place to say no. They may tell you that they want to check references on behalf of their clients. That's a great line. But what they are really doing is trying to use your contacts to recruit other people. I know this because I listen to sales trainers for years talk about this is a great gambit to get talent and you don't want to be complicit.

The easiest way to respond is to smile and say, "In due time but not right now."

If you respond by saying, "We need to have it because the client wants us to check references at the time that we submit a cabinet," (I want to be clear, not talking about retained search firm's or C suite professionals) I am answering in this way for the Average Jane or Joe who is approached by a recruiter and is being told that the client wants it.

"Great! I'll be happy to provide my references to the client."

"They want us to check the references."

"Not at this time."

"Then we can submit you."

"OK."

Leave it at that. You know why? It's because if they can get you in the door they'll get you in the door.

And they can't. What they're trying to do is parlay one contact into 2 or 3 were they call them up and trying to recruit them, extensively under the guise of checking a reference.

So, they might say, "We need a former manager, it was start by contacting your manager in doing a reference check and then flip it in an effort to get recruiting business from them.

Or they may try to talk to a peer reviewers and then say, "Say! This is a position I am trying to recruit for. Is this something that might interest you? There are a lot of little gambits that go on with third-party recruiters.

I know there are a lot of people who might respond by saying, "Would you do that with a company?"

"NO!" Unfortunately, too many third-party recruiters or sleazy. We know this already. The idea is to push them off because you don't know if you can trust them yet (wink wink. Probably you can trust many of them anyway. There are exceptions, but most of them you probably can't.) And it's kind of like being on a 1st date with someone.

"Can I get a reference from your former husband or wife, please. I would like to get a reference from them. Maybe someone else you went out with previously because I want to know what you are liked by talking to them."

No, not on a 1st date, especially with an absolute stranger. Obviously, you would never do that in a dating situation! Here, I want you to do this very casually and with a big smile on your face, say, "In due time , we'll get that."

"But the client wants it!"

"If you can't present me with out that, obviously you don't think I am a fit. So let's leave it at that and just move on."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes  

What to Do When The Recruiter Calls | Job Search Radio


With all the effort recruiters make to find someone using LinkedIn, Facebook, social media, the web and other tools, you can expect to receive calls at your office from recruiters reaching out to you and trying to engage with you.

Frank Risalvato and I talk about what to do when the recruiter calls.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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