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What to Do When the Head Hunter Calls (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice about what to do when a head hunter calls you.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about working with recruiters and what you need to know and say and NOT SAY when you are working with a recruiter. Let's work with the assumption that this is NOT 1 of those calls were you send a resume in and that instead, you are getting a call out of the blue. The call might sound something like this, " My name is Jeff Altman. I'm a professional recruiter. I heard some nice things about your work and want to get acquainted with you in the context of the search time doing. Is this a good time to talk or would be better if we spoke another occasion?"

That's a pretty standard phone call for people to get. Often, people start off by making the mistake of trying to put the recruiter on the defensive. "Who gave you my name," are the 1st words that come out of their mouth.

Why? What difference does it make who gave them your name or how they found you? They found out about you. They might've had a research group that found out about you online and found out about you… There any number of ways that people could learned about you. It really doesn't matter how they found you, even if it came from your boss! Your boss doesn't want you around, right? Pay attention to the phone call and give up this notion of finding out who it was who gave them your name.

Most of the time when I would call someone, 1 of the few things might have happened.
1. We did research and found this person.
2. Someone was kind enough to point me in your direction.

Those are the 2 basics all the time. What difference does it really make to you where it came from? If it came from a friend, you still have to qualify. The friend doesn't know everything about you; you still have to qualify. Start listening and answering questions. Listen to what the recruiter tells you about the job.

They'll usually turn around and ask, "Is this a good time, or would it be better if we spoke another occasion?"

"It would be better if I call you back in 10 or 15 minutes. Does that work for you," if it's not a good time. If it is a good time, great! "Tell me about the role that is involved." Let them talk with you about the job. You'll learn 2 things from this. The 1st is that you will learn something about the job. The 2nd is that you learn something about the recruiter.

Listen to how the recruiter tells the story. Do they seem competent or they tell you a whole bunch of generalities that don't mean anything? Are they talking with you about (super excited voice) this great opportunity where you have an opportunity to be Emperor of The Universe! You know I'm being facetious here, but so often, recruiters, in their youth in their enthusiasm and in their inexperience, start talking about "the great opportunity."
.
STOP THEM! They told you something about themselves. They're going to try and sell you some sizzle; stick with the content for now. What is the job? What do they need someone to have done? What will be the expectations of you? What is the compensation like?

If the money isn't right or the job isn't right, you can politely say, "This role isn't really for me. I am earning more (or the job is really interesting). Let me tell you little bit about myself." Then, you can tell them about the work you actually do and give them a sense of the compensation level. Do it in a professional way. Don't try to put this recruiter on the defensive.

Why? All they did was try to get you a better job.. They made one phone call. Maybe it lasted 2 minutes in length. What's the big deal? Be courteous. After all, you never know when someone in recruiting will put you on a list to never call you back again. I used to do that. I don't need to have my time wasted by people who are discourteous. They also involve the institutional customers who I fired regularly.

1. Find out about the job.
2. Answer their questions. This doesn't just mean answer their questions. It means answer their questions in the context of what they are trying to find. Sell those elements of your background that relate to the job that is involved.
3. Once you've done that, talk with them about what their background is. Yes them, whether they have submitted any people for this role. How old is this search? It is brand-new and just opened up or is it one that has been open for a while? It's hard to win. If you're 1 of the 1st people walking in the door, right?

Let me also say that if it's 3 months into the search, they may be close to exhausting the pool of people to consider. They may have people on 2nd or 3rd interviews. Why get involved then? If they don't have anyone coming back on 2nd or 3rd interviews, why get involved? The other don't know what they're looking for. They don't know how to interview or evaluate people.

Find out about the status of the search and ask about the recruiters background as well. I will let you in on a secret. Most recruiters don't have 40 years of experience like I did. They live in tell you that they have 10 years of experience. That's why listing at the beginning of the conversation tells you a lot about them.

Are they experienced will do they seem amateurish? Do they sound like they know what they're talking about or are they saying a whole bunch of "stuff" to you that comes out of the recruiters playbook of "fabulous opportunity," "great job,", "you really need to talk to them," "you've got nothing to lose." The amateurs use all those clichés. If that is the case, thank them for making the call, asked him to send you some information and move on.

You can decide to listen to some youthful recruiter speakers may not have their people behind them that will actually be quite competent. Inexperienced recruiters is not someone that you really want to talk to. You might ask, "Are you coordinating the search for are you doing legwork for someone else?" Really simple questions tells you a lot about the competence of the recruiter.

The most important thing I could tell you the is to listen. Listen to what they have to tell you, and listen between the lines to learn about their competence. Sell to them because even if it's not this job. It could be another one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do What Recruiters Do (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to do what recruiters to when they are conducting a search.

Summary

Let's talk about what recruiters do that you are not doing.

If you look at the process of being a recruiter, there are 2 ways the recruiters find candidates. What is the classic "someone sends them a resume."
Really being a recruiter. A recruiter someone who goes out there, find someone in France them down for a particular client.

To do that what recruiter needs to be doing (I'll speak about my own experience doing recruiting) is start talking to people and asking for help. The classic question is, "Who do you know who…" You not necessarily going for the actual target right away. You're going for someone who can get you further along your goal of getting to that person. It requires asking for help , which I know culturally in the United States is very difficult for most people. However, asking for help is essential in your job search.

You see, the statistics are 70% of jobs are filled through networking. We all know that. However, 70% of the 70% involve people who you didn't know at the beginning of your job search. How do you get to those people?

Answer. Asking for help. That's because, at the end of the day, the things that you do by yourself will only carry you so far. You don't know what you don't know. You think you do, but you really don't. In networking, you are always asking for help. You are always asking for someone who can get you a little further along.

If you're not quite sure what to do, here's. What I am going to suggest you do (you're going to laugh)… Ask for help! Hire a coach. Get someone to give you advice. Ask questions. Learn what you don't know. Frankly, it's a lot easier someone is telling you the answers, rather than you having to figure it out.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Sh*t Recruiters Say


More sh*t recruiters Say

The good stuff that will help you find work is located at TheBigGameHunter.us

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Mistakes– Only Relying on Recruiters (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another mistake job hunters make too often – – only working with recruiters.

Summary

If you don't know me personally, you don't know that I'm a recruiter for a living. That's why make most of my income.

However, I want to say something to you very bluntly, in your job search, don't rely on recruiters. There are the statistics:

20 to 22% of all positions are filled by recruiters. Thus, 78% are filled by other means. Why are you spending all your time working with search firms or recruiting firms or agents or headhunters?

Being blunt, when I'm doing a search to fill the position, you are not paying me anything. The client is paying me to find someone. If you don't fit that job, you go into "inventory." Then, you get frustrated because you are counting on me and I never made that commitment to you, either explicit or implicit , and you think I'm supposed be working to find YOU a job? Respectfully, how much skinned you have in the game?

Zero. All you have is a lot of wishing and hoping and thinking that you are qualified and you are not. You're not from my clients anyway at a given time.

So the fact of the matter is, that is true when you are working with other recruiters. The recruiter that's giving you lots of time, the one who is rewriting your resume, or telling you what they think about your LinkedIn profile is a green kid who doesn't know squat.

Just recognize how the business works. Whether it is a retained firm or contingency firm, recruiters are paid to fill openings. We are hired by a firm that has made a promise to pay us, either partially a retained basis or entirely on a contingency basis when we identify someone who they decide to hire, So why do you think we work for you? We don't!

You are responsible for your own career. Don't sacrifice your search to a third party who says, "I'm going to find you a job," because they are not. They are going to fill a job with YOU. That's different.

Maybe they can and you know, the statistics for yourself. They are probably not.

Because you are spamming your resume all over the place hoping recruiters pick up on it. We work for companies don't rely upon address exclusively. You have a lot of other tools to use in order to find work. If you don't believe me, I have more than 800 other videos (in fact, more than 2000 other videos) that can teach you how to find work more quickly.

Start learning what you need to. Get to work on finding work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Difference Between How You Deal With Recruiters and What C Level Pros Do


There is a very clear difference between how C level professionals deal with recruiters and how non-C suite professionals and non-professionals do. What are you doing wrong?

Summary

I was coaching someone this morning and it reminded me of something where I want to talk with you who are not executives, who are not in the C suite, in terms of how you deal with recruiters.

What I coach C level professionals, one thing is incredibly obvious. They treat every interview with the recruiter as though are an interview with the client. They prepare for it. They want to understand the job. They start researching their own background and how it meshes with where they have connections that can play into the organization that the search firm is doing the search for. They treated very seriously.

For most people, they don't work at that way. They view it as a nuisance and an inconvenience. Often, the the messages given, "They are wasting my time," or "They are getting in the way." They send all sorts of messages that in for nuisance an inconvenience. Sometimes, the contingency recruiters not seen as being as professional as the executive search firm. Sometimes, that is absolutely true. AND half and you don't know that going into the conversation; all you know is that you got a phone call or an email or an inMail talking about a particular search, maybe they are asking for help, and suddenly this is PAIN. Suddenly, you are whining and complaining vs. a C suite person who will offer a referral , make a suggestion to the search firm and prepare for the interview.

They get results and you get aggravation. They become successful the search was far more often than you do. What's the message in that?

Again, sometimes contingency recruiters are not competent. Sometimes, executive recruiters an optically competent either. You are times that executive search firms that in the contingency area AND it makes no difference.

One thing I want to leap in with is that sometimes those contingency firms are approached with racism.

"Some Indian firm called."

"Some Indian guy called."

Excuse me? I want to stop eating the tracks on that one. The fact that they have a particular national origin or from a particular nation and hired by a US firm to do recruiting for them? STOP IT. STOP IT!

Take a bias outside because you wind up being no different than any other bigot and cutting yourself off at the knees, even if they are a very junior individual and from a nation other than yours, no matter where in the world they are, does not make them incompetent, rude, or worse.

Slow down and work on creating a great impression. It is what executives and people in the C suite do.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

When the Recruiter Won’t Negotiate | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what to do if the headhunter says they cannot negotiate the Job offer.

Summary

What sometimes happens is the recruiter extends the offer and you really aren't happy with the number. What you're basically saying to them is, "I need more money." They turn around and say, "There is no negotiation." A lot of people by that bull.

There are sometimes situations where that is true but not a lot of them. Let me give you an example.

I had one negotiation not long ago when the client told me point blank that they had blown your budget to get the number that was offered. All along, the client the talked about one number that was too low for the candidate and they up the offer, still too low for the candidate. I was is much as they could go They told me that point blank.

The trick to dealing with the recruiter who says that there is no negotiation is to asked them, "Why is that? Why is there no negotiation?" Make them justify it to you.

They may tell you exactly what I just said. "The client went to bat for you. They were unable to offer more. Etc."

The follow-up to that is, "I'm just going to call the client because am not really happy with the money."

"NO! NO! NO! NO! You'll blow the deal!"

What they are trying to do is close you on the number that was offered.

If you do choose to call client, obviously, don't start off in an indignant snit, the ideas to say something like, "I want you to know I appreciate the offer. It is a little lower than what I was looking for. Could you do a touch better?" The idea is to get them to up the number a little bit more. Do this around the recruiter, rather than through them, because this recruiters obviously represented themselves in a way that suggests that they might've been deceptive and unwilling to go to bat for you. They are more concerned with closing the deal. Having you be happy. It suggests that they are more interested in maintaining the relationship with the client than satisfying you.

Again, at the end of the day, you may want to accept the offer so you don't want to walking indignantly and act like a jerk and be immature in your conversation with them.

"Thank you so much for extending the offer. I'm really excited about the possibility of joining. Frankly, the salary was a little bit more than I was hoping for. Could you do a touch better?"

"How much better?"

Tell them. They're not going to do $20,000 better. There going to do a few dollars better at most. Be prepared that if you ask for something crazy, they're going to start backing out of the offer and you will be left with nothing. Don't get foolish. If you do have that conversation, keep it simple and let them know, "I really want to accept. I would really appreciate if you could do a touch better."

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching or help with a salary negotiation, email me at [email protected]. In the subject line, tell me which service you are interested in and in the body how you would like me to help you.

If you would like me my help critiquing your resume and/or LinkedIn profile or perform a Job Search Makeover, visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us, look for the tab on top, place an order and follow the instructions for scheduling an appointment.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is a website with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally in your job search with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Sh*t Recruiters Say


Here’s some more BS recruiter say.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Sh*t Recruiters Say


More sh*t recruiters say to people when they’re trying to recruit them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

More Sh*t Recruiters Say


More dumb stuff recruiters say.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more 

Sh*t Recruiters Say


More BS recruiters say

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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