What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.
 
Summary

Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Your Expectations of Recruiters Are Out of Whack | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011). PLEASE NOTE I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. ANY JOBS MENTIONED DURING THE SHOW ARE LONG GONE. PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT A RESUME.

Maybe you are playing a part in why recruiters are not calling you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Two Months of Looking. No Interviews. Just Criticism. (VIDEO)


As of today, I have been unemployed for 2 months. Day in and day out, I am searching for jobs through various job boards, hitting the pavement with resumes in hand, cold calling companies and trying to arrange interviews. I have been working with 8 different recruiters to assist me in my job search and not one has sent me on an interview. Instead, I’ve had numerous agencies rip me to shreds in regards to my last job, compensation and reasoning for termination, not return my phone calls nor my emails and just make disparaging remarks. For some, this may put a damper on their spirit but not for me. I am more determined, driven and motivated now than I ever have been.

Summary

There is an interesting message that someone left that I thought would make for a great show.

"As of today, I have been unemployed for 2 months. Day in and day out, I'm searching for jobs through various job boards hitting the pavement with resumes in hand, cold calling companies and trying to arrange interviews I have been working with 8 different recruiters to assist me with my job search and not one has sent me on an interview. Instead, I've had numerous agencies rip me to shreds with regard to my last job, compensation and reasoning for termination., Not returning my calls or my emails and just making disparaging remarks. For some reason this may put a damper on their spirit but not for me. I am more determined, driven and motivated now than I have ever been."

When I read this, I want to address the recruiters for second and just say that recruiters are unable to create interviews for people. Employers tell them about jobs open, skills required, the salary they are willing to pay for someone. Those 8 different recruiters representing 8 different recruiting firms that you've reached out to, they don't have anything for you. Their job is not to respond to your emails or to your phone calls for the heck of it because you want them to check in with you. They are there to deliver for their client who is PAYING THEM. These recruiters don't have a job for you. They are not out there pounding the pavement as you are because they are hired by corporations to fill jobs, not by individuals to work for free.

I'm glad your spirits haven't been dampened yet , but I must also say that you haven't been learning the lesson from the recruiter behavior. The lesson MAY BE (I have to said as "msy be" ) that perhaps your skills and perhaps are interviewing and the impact of the decision that you made (you say termination. I'll consider it as resignation) to resign your job may not suggest to them that you are a superior candidate.

You may be asking for too much money. You may be interviewing poorly. Your decision as to why you quit your last job may indicate immaturity. Or, if you were terminated, it's a story that suggests that you really weren't good at your job and that your employer fired you for cause.

What I want to encourage you to do is to take a little bit of time to reflect on the message. If they are wrong, if you have done a check as to the value that you bring to the job market and it's in line, not necessarily with the high range, but within the range in some way shape or form, but you just keep going out there and applying for jobs, pounding the pavement in doing what you're always doing.

I must also say that you're looking for job boards and recruiters and that those 2 together, statistically, fill approximately 30% of positions. The rest of filter networking. That's not what I'm reading that you're doing. When I'm reading that you're doing is spending time with a little bit less than one third of how jobs are filled and not mentioning all the networking that you are doing. As a result, I suspect you're not doing much.

Start doing some networking. Start to create relationships that allow you to present yourself to former colleagues, people that you know, people who attended the same university as you, and see if they can help you. If they can't help you, then you definitely have to adapt. But, recognize today, that it is important for you to (1) reevaluate to see whether or not the recruiters might be right. You can do that in a variety of ways. And (2) if they are not right, start adding networking to your repertoire. As a matter of fact, start adding networking via repertoire, whether they're right or not. This way, you have access to more positions than you're getting access to now

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Should I Email The Recruiter When They Miss an Interview With Me? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 740 Well, should you or is there another way?

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE SPECIAL OFFER FOR MAY 2017 CELEBRATING THE 300TH EPISODE OF JOB SEARCH RADIO.

Summary

Today's question is, "A recruiter missed the call with me for an interview. Should I email them to follow up?"

No. Don't email them. Call them! Call them on the phone and say, "we were scheduled to speak at 4 PM on Tuesday. I was there waiting for your call. Is everything okay?"

What you are trying to do is to flush them up to encourage them to respond. Before I go further, I just want to say that an employer would be will be emailing you if you missed an interview.. However, for you, your human being as human beings we want to connect person to person. They will have a degree of guilt. They may also say, "Oh! I'm so sorry. I had an emergency such and such occur. Whenever they cite the emergency situation, it is a lie. No emergency overwhelms the situation sufficiently that they can't send you a quick email and say, "I'm not could be able to make our call. Can we reschedule?" If they say something like this there telling you bull.

What you want to hear it in their tone of voice. You definitely call. You don't email.

If they don't respond to your call and there is nothing on their voicemail to say that they are out of the office indefinitely or that they are going to be out of the office for a few days, and they are not getting back to you, you can assume that something changed for them and that they are not considering you. When the position is suddenly come on hold (that's a different form of change but that's a different conversation).

At the end of the day, you have learned something about this person, not the company, but the person And whether or not you could trust them through how they respond to you when they call that you won't get from an email.

An email is impersonal and allows them to hide in certain ways I never encourage people to email to follow-up. I encourage you to call. Learned from the tone of voice and the behaviors and how apologetic they are.

I just had a speaking engagement cancel on me 2 weeks in advance. Stuff like this happens. The person who organized the event, send an email to me and also said I would like to schedule a Skype with you so that I can personally apologize and work on rescheduling. There was a nice way to handle it. The 1st thing was an email to let me know. She said she personally wanted to apologize to me; it was a nice way to handle it.

Hiding in an email is not good enough. You wasted your time. Find out directly from them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

How Do I Know A Headhunter and Their Opportunities Are Legitimate? (VIDEO)


The motivations that many recruiters have are frequently questioned by job hunters. In this video, I’m asked to address 1 of the basic questions that job hunters have. Is the opportunity being presented to me real?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Are You Willing to Go For Broke? | Job Search Radio

EP 282 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses going for broke as part of your strategy and uses the story of an actor to make his point.

Summary

So you send a resume to a recruiter, you had a phone interview, they make a suggestion for you to tweak your resume in a particular way, you send back a resume where you change 2 words. Why did you do that?

The recruiters tell you exactly what he or she needs . And they are telling you that not to waste your time, but because the client is communicated to them exactly what they need to see. Let me give you an example.

I'm doing a search for client (I'm not going to tell you where they are but it is a C-level position with this firm) And they have changed directions on what they are looking for. Instead of an executive type, they want to hire someone who came up the technology ranks who can do some technology work but has managed resources at a firm of a particular size. GREAT!

They are clear now about what they want.I can handle the fact that they change directions; I'm not happy that I wasted time on it, but I got back to 1 of the candidates I qualified for it and told them that, "the position and the client Have changed directions in a way that I thought sooner the better.. I'm looking at you at your resume and needs to have a couple of tweaks. Can you get that to me later today or tomorrow?"

"Sure," and he sends back a document where one change had been made in one sentence. It addressed none of the Concerns about size and scope of the firms that he had done work for, did make clear his current technology expertise... He wasted everyone's time.

Don't be a fool.Do what you are being coached to do as long as it is not a lie. I want to I want to be clear about that.. Do what you are being coached to do as long as it is not a lie. I don't believe in lying; I know you don't as well. Everyone gets hurt when lies occur BUT the recruiter is telling you something when they are asking for a revision tooth your resume.

If you said to them, "You can make the change," They can't. Yes, they could type a couple words But you know the depth of your skill far better than they. Put it in the resume when they ask for! It takes 10 minutes for you to do it. It takes an hour for them because they don't know you. Because they are going to send it back to you for approval, you will say, "That's not exactly right" save time and type out the few words to make it accurate.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY!

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The Self Assessment Profile for The Executive Search Firm (VIDEO)


If you want to play in the big leagues, you will probably need to change your thinking about the self-assessment the executive search firm sends to you.

Summary

I want to talk with you folks today, particularly if you are a senior professional, and are working with an executive search firm. To be clear, I'm not talking about a contingency firm that is saying to you, "we do executive search, too." I'm talking about the real deal firms. You're up for an SVP role or a C suite position of some kind and you're dealing with "the big boys," and "the big girls." Often, they will send the document to you that requires a self-assessment. How do you respond to this?

I had a conversation with someone I coach received a three-page document that he was asked to complete before he met the partner who is responsible for the search. His 1st reaction was to blow through it pretty quickly. I said, "Stop! Your job here is to make the case for your candidacy. They have developed a specification for the client. They sat down with them and met them. You spoken with the head of corporate HR prior to speaking with them. You have an advantage over some of the others. But, at the end of the day, they use this is a legitimate screening tool AND it can be used as the basis for their presentation of you to their client for how you fit. Why would you blow through this?"

I decided and persuaded him to take this three-page document and turn it into 7 - 8 pages in length. It's more than 100% increase in length, not being on the questions that seem pretty straightforward (questions like, "what's your compensation?" How long is that going to take? 3 lines? 4 lines?") but on questions that go to the heart of your ability to demonstrate how you fit the role and demonstrate your communications style.

If you want to blow through that, you are not ready for the big leagues. If you want to look this is the eyes of how the search firm is going to view you, not just simply by what you say but by what you don't say, but what you communicate, by what your style of communications is, then you are ready to play at this level.

Don't give short shrift to this because in the past you were less experience than thought this was a trivial exercise and thought someone should call you and talk to you. To play in the big leagues you have to deal with how the big boys and big girls want to be dealt with. They want your best take on how your background fits in. You're going to take the time to reflect and answer the questions in detail to give them great material to make the case for why you fit this role.

DON'T BLOW IT because there is nothing worse from your vantage point, then to not take something like this seriously and then wind up losing an opportunity because you were dismissive of it. That's a mistake. Don't make it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Going Behind the Recruiter’s Back | Job Search Radio

Ep 280 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you from going behind a recruiter’s back to contact the client directly.

Summary

There are some recruiters that are terrific; there are many that aren't. The 1st and will remind you of his to not paint them all with the same brush. You have to evaluate and assess each person individually in much the same way as if you are being being evaluated, you want to be treated individually, not as part of one group of individuals who works in a particular company painted with the same broad brush stroke that someone else is. You want to be standing on your own. Why you expect recruiters to be any different than you. So the 1st thing is to evaluate and assess people individually.

One tip about working with recruiters... You have a recruiter who has scheduled you for an interview and you are not hearing back right away and you contact the client directly. WHY? This person has a relationship with the client. Yes, you haven't heard anything and it is very likely that they haven't heard anything. If they had good news, don't you think they would've told you already? Of course! See you call the client and that makes no sense.

Trust that there is good news they are going to leap all over and get in touch. If there is no news or bad news, there is a message and a lack of communication, be patient with them. There is no reason to contact the client directly; they are busy folks, too. Just because you are impatient don't make it their problem. Just simply reach out to the recruiter and send them an email or text and say, "Have you heard anything yet?"

If they say that they haven't, accepted at face value. Do you think you can bang on the client store and say, "I want to know what is going on," because that is how they take that phone call, you think anything good is going to come of that? It won't. All that you're going to be doing is going over the head of the recruiter and piss them off. It's going to make them less likely to represent you. I know you don't care about that but the fact of the matter is you should. Recruiters have a pulse on the market that you will never have.

I want you to hear that again.

Recruiters have a pulse on the market that you will never have. You need them. You may not think you do. But you need them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Why Are Most Recruiters Unhelpful? (VIDEO)


Why is her most recruiters unhelpful and tend to constantly ignore emails from applicants in the interview process? From my experience, recruiters always say something along the lines of, “Don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions,” but 90% of the time if it is not something they want to know from you such as your availability for interviews, it will just ignore your question or email.

Summary

The question for today is, "Why are most recruiters unhelpful and tend to ignore emails from applicants during the interview process? From my experience, recruiters always say something along the lines of, 'Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.' But 90% of the time. It's only when they want something from you, like your availability for an interview, that you will hear from them."

You have to understand the job of a recruiter. I always start off at this basic point – – how much are you paying them? Probably nothing. How much is an employer paying them? Employers are paying their fee. Thus, they are being paid to find the person who fits a job requirement and are qualified to do what employer needs to have done. Period. Everything else is window dressing.

So that you have questions, well, they are not paid to answer questions. Coaches are. As a result, you have this mistaken notion that they are working for you or that you are working together to find you a job. That could be furthest from the case.

Those kind of phrases like, "Don't hesitate to reach out," our part of the seduction that recruiters used to help build relationship. The idea of the relationship is designed to engender trust by you (which obviously isn't occurring here) so that at the time with the employer extends a job offer you are less resistant to their "closing techniques" that will allow them to earn a fee.

They are not there to answer your questions. They are not social workers. They are not counselors. They are there to recruit talent and fill positions and coincidentally make you happy.

Before you start replying and telling me that without you they don't earn their fee, that is absolutely right. However, there are a lot more review than there are employers willing to pay them a fee. Recruiters always believe that they can get a replacement person because they have proven it time and time again.

You, on the other hand, want that one job and, as a result, recruiters are not particularly responsive unless the client asked to meet with you, if there is the possibility that you might use that information to take a different job than the one that they are representing. After all, why should they help you? Their job is to deliver you to their client an unnecessarily help YOU get a job.

So, the confusion, the question comes from the mistaken notion that they should be responsive to you. That's not their job. In recruiters there to fill positions with companies and coincidentally coaching into getting that job with their client. Period. In doing so, they earn a fee from that employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Being Foolish with a Recruiter | Job Search Radio

Ep 281 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the foolish things people do when they are interviewed by a recruiter.

Summary

It happened so often that I have to mention it..

I'm interviewing someone over the phone, and I'm asking questions about the work. Eventually I am asked something that translates into, "Didn't you read my resume?"

Well, don't you understand what a recruiter does? Recruiters pay to evaluate and assess people on behalf of their institutional customers. We may have read, skimmed or not read your resume. Anything is possible.. But what we are trying to do is get an idea of how well you will interview. How you present your ideas. How cogently you discuss them. Whether your voice sounds flat or animated.

Are you someone that we would risk putting in from the client, knowing that at the end of the day if you do a terrible job it affects our relationship with the firm. When we evaluate and assess, we want to know how you are telling your story.

Thus, when you ask that question, "Didn't you read my resume," you are showing that you are a moron. You are showing that you don't know how the system works. Although I encourage people to make the system work for them, think about it for 2nd. This person is going to be paid somewhere between $20,000 and $100,000 to refer you and you are being argumentative with them.. They have a point to doing everything that they do.

Why would you be confrontational? It makes no sense. Understand, again, they are being paid to evaluate and assess people and refer someone who is going to be hired by the client. They just want this to work like clockwork.

Act like a jerk, you show your jerk. Don't do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

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