Kill Blocky Resumes! | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter gives you some No BS Resume Advice by encouraging you to think of the reader when you write your resume.

Summary

I'm back today with more no BS resume advice to help you develop a better resume, one that is going to get you more results.

I'm sorry I have to do this podcast because some of you just don't get the point. Most of you get right, but a large number of you make a huge mistake that is incredibly annoying.

You write your resume and share it in small print, in ugly fonts, and enormous blocks that are completely unreadable. Understand, all of us who read resumes are reading lots of them. The statistics are that we make decisions, and 6 seconds. Do you know what I do when I get a blocky resume? I hit the delete key. I know a lot of other people do as well.

The reason is that you haven't made it easy for me to find the experience that you have that is relevant to my clients. Do you think I'm going to sit there and read every word that you have written in that 6 or 8 point font in F-15 wine paragraph that you have written to find what I'm looking for?

No. You are supposed to accommodate me. You are supposed to accommodate the HR people in an organization, the hiring managers in an organization and make it easy.

What you should be doing your resume and is a comfortable sized font. I personally like 12; some people like 10. Take a look at it.

I have preference for certain phones but I get surprised sometimes by other fonts. I'm not going to make a font recommendation. I am again going to recommend a font that is sized at 10 or 12; I also recommend judicious use of white space. You don't want to have your text go all the way out to the left side or all the way out to the right side. You want to be able to keep your text so that it has adequate whitespace so that it is easily viewable.

What is the easiest way to know whether it has adequate white space? After you have written a resume and have printed it out,, folded in thirds. Hand it to someone and say, "tell me the 1st thing your high lands on when you look at this."

Time then for 6 seconds. Then, from there, turn it over to the next 3rd. Do the same thing.

Then, ask yourself, are these the points that you want the reader to really notice about? If not, you need to rework the resume so that the things that are really of value in the background that you want to be recognized for our easily visible to the reader. Without that, all you doing is throwing a bunch of stuff out there without consideration for the reader.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What is The Best Way to Start a Cover Letter? (VIDEO)


Questions like this make me crazy, but since someone needed an answer, here it is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Most Underutilized Feature on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

FROM THE ARCHIVES

 

Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter offers advice about using the most underutilized feature of LinkedIn as part of your job search.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 1 of the most underutilized features on LinkedIn – – applications. But we're talking about applications. Were not talking about applying for jobs. We are talking about programs that are built into LinkedIn to provide additional services that are available for you to use for free. They may allow you to do something very simple-- put a resume on your LinkedIn profile. Put work samples or presentations that you've done. Useful information that people can pick up on on your LinkedIn profile.

Have you written a book? You can make reference to it on your LinkedIn profile. Applications are more than just things like this. It is a way that LinkedIn tries to be more social than their base product tends to be.

For your convenience, why don't have that presentation that you did 2 years ago, those powerpoints as part of your presentation, available on your LinkedIn profile to slideshare. Why not make it easier for people to find your resume by having it on your profile? They can actually see how you eat your backroom fits the job that they are recruiting for.

That's my reminder for today. Come over and look at LinkedIn profiles and spend some time playing around with the applications and see how they fit you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for most job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 632 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a format for answering those trick behavioral questions. 

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the best, most effective way to answer those tricky behavioral interview questions that are asked on job interviews. You can recognize them because what the employer is asking is about how you handled situations in the past. Not what you know, but what you did. The type of situations that you were in and how you handled them.

They are tricky because, so often, because people become modest and understated, or are completely unprepared to answer them. The questions, invariably start off with a scenario.

"Tell me about a time when you…"

"Describe a situation where you…"

Things along those lines. Suddenly, people get this false modesty. They talk about what their group did. They talk about what the manager did. They talk about everyone except using "I" statements. You know, I did this. I did that. I statements.

You don't want to sound boastful but you want to paint a tapestry for them. You want to get the paint on the canvas in a way that describes the situation that you faced. The methodology is called the STAR method.

You describe the situation (that is, the S in star) that you faced and do it with some depth that really paints the picture of the situation that you faced. Then, you start looking at the Task that was ahead of you. Perhaps it was assigned to you; perhaps you looked at the situation and figured out what needed to be done (that is, the "T" in star). The Action that you took. What was the action that you did? Were there any bumps in the road that you had to overcome? It could be difficulties with the user. It could have been colleagues who you had to persuade to get on board with the program. Whatever it was, you talk about the actions that you talk and what the Result was. To me, results are invariably are about outcomes. When I think about outcomes, I think about money saved or money you helped an organization earn. Where that isn't possible, you talk about delivering that fantastic result beyond everyone's expectations that cause you to receive incredible praise.

If you don't really have a situation like that, don't concoct it, but you need to be prepared to talk about situations where you handle the crisis. Perhaps, you need to problem solve in a unique way. Perhaps what you did have a significant financial contribution. Think big picture here.

As you talk about what, again, you can start off, as I always say, with a little bit of theater.

"Wow! That's a great question. There was this time about a year ago when I…" Then you describe the situation that you faced. "My boss asked me to do…" Again, paint the picture of your manager coming to you in describing in detail (or not) what needed to be done. The action that you ultimately took and what the result was of that action, preferably in terms of money saved or money earned for your organization.

Then, if you want to put a cherry on it, talk about what you learned from the situation from the problems that you faced and how you overcame them.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Resume Pet Peeves

From The Archives


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers effective resume advice that will keep you from annoying the people screening your resume. No jokes. No B.S..

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 2 of my resume pet peeves. The 1st 1 is embedding your contact information into the header of your resume. I'm not speaking about not having it there; I'm talking about using the embedding feature in Microsoft Word to place your contact information. The 2nd peeve is separating your phone number from your resume. It's all part of the same thing.

As someone who was a recruiter for many years, whether I speak as a third-party recruiter or as a corporate recruiter, we are all using parsing software. After all, did you really think we were really typing your resume to get them into our database? Of course not. 1 of the things that embedding your contact information into your resume may do is cause someone to need to manually parse that information. That is, open up the embedded header, , close it, paste, select all, copy, paste… Come on! Be considerate! You may think it looks good but it is a pain in the rear!

Same thing with separating the phone number. I just saw a resume a few minutes ago. The person puts the name and email address on the resume. I then have to go find where they put their phone number and if they provide me with the phone number. I found in the message area of, their email. Okay. They provided it. By then have to copy it into the resume or copied into my database. It doesn't sound like much but I'm reading 300 resumes a day! HELP ME HELP YOU!

I'm selling for 11. I'm trying to help a lot of people who are out of work find work. I'm trying out my clients find people to hire. It's a pain in the rear! Make it easy it easy for all of us and stop doing the stupid little things that waste people's time.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

More Advice About Resumes That Get Results (VIDEO)

MORE ADVICE FROM THE ARCHIVES

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers more advice for creating resumes that get results.

 

Summary

Today, I'm going to give you a little bit more, no BS resume advice.

Let me start by asking, "do you enjoy receiving spam?" You know, all that garbage will receive an email… Thousands and thousands of pieces of garbage that waste our time. It's ridiculous!

I don't like receiving it anymore than you do but most people are too lazy to tailor their resume to demonstrate how they fit the job that they are submitting their resume for. Instead, they flip their resumes like they are burgers at a fast food restaurant. Over and over again, they are spamming resumes that are a colossal waste of time. I don't know about you, but when I was doing recruiting, I was reading 300 resumes a day! I don't have a lot of time to waste..

My clients were asking me to find people with specific backgrounds. If you're thinking I'm going to call 300 people and asked them, "Have you done this? Have you done that?" I'm not. I don't have the time.

Do the math on my schedule. On a light day, I'm receiving 150 resumes plus lots of emails, following up on interviews from hiring managers trying to find out more about people that they have been interviewing. There's a lot of work that I do and I just don't have the time.

I think what you'll find is if you tell your resume to demonstrate the fit that your experience has with the job requirement, you are going to get a lot more results.

You may say, "I don't really know a lot about the job. I need to know more in order to tailor it."

Bull. What you have is a job description, you saw something on the web that prompted you to send your resume, you just didn't gratuitously send it, right? Tailor your resume. Use the keywords to tailor your resume. I'm telling you, you're going to get results. You are not going to waste people's time.

If you are not sure if your background fits, you can politely send your resume, saying, "I saw this job. I'm not sure if my background is perfect for it. This is what my background has that fits it. This is where I am not sure."

If you just want to send resumes to people who are in your area (by that I mean, people who are recruiting for positions in the field that you work in), you seen a job description and want to put a resume in a recruiter's hands, in the subject line, put the phrase "On Spec." Don't just simply submitted as though your background fits the particular job. If you do, all you're doing is wasting people's time.

If you do that with corporations, do you think you are going to get results? I don't. If you do that with third-party recruiters, all that, they will probably do is hit the delete key or imported into their database. Come on! Save us all some time.

My advice for today is to tailor your resume. Make the fit obvious. Pretend that a 4-year-old is going to read your resume (Frankly, there are a lot of recruiters who have the experience of 4-year-olds). Do that and you're going to get more results.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for most job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Preparing for Your Skype Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 631 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains some of the details you need to execute in order to set up doing a Skype interview.

 

Summary

Let's talk about video interviewing, Skype interviewing, FaceTime interviewing… A whole bunch of stuff. I want to make a point.

It's important to have a relatively blank backdrop behind you. If you were to look over my shoulder, you would see the pictures of my son at the young age. Books. However, you might not be looking at me.

If I were to move over slightly and hand the blind backdrop behind me, what happens is that you are focused on me..

Also, I wore striped shirt today. I have bolder stripes but, in some cases, stripes don't video quite as well. You want to have a solid shirt on. Right now what I'm wearing looks slightly washed out and, yes, your attention is on my face but their are better looks that I have the would complement a video for better.

For you, a blank backdrop, solid shirt, dress appropriately for the organization that you are interviewing with. You could be doing a video interview with a startup that respects casual attire but you know the difference between great casual attire and sloppy casual attire.

Look like a star wherever you can.

When you speak to the camera, I also watched be aware of your hands but if you bring your hands into the line of the face they become a distraction. Again, as I've said in my videos and podcasts, always keep your hands away from your mouth. You can use your hands up to the middle of your chin. But, at the end of the day, solid shirt or blouse, blank backdrop, be careful with your hands because they can wind up being very distracting.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Asking Your Manager if Your Job Is Safe (VIDEO)

From The Archives

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice for people who are worried about their jobs

 

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about those times in your career when you are hearing about the potential for layoffs.

Often, when John Hunter started thinking about job hunting, it's because there are some rumors going on in their offices. They are hearing "stuff." There is the grapevine going on. There are going to be job cuts occurring. Suddenly, people start talking to one another. It becomes a situation of the blind leading the blind.

Sometimes, there is the brave soul who has the courage to talk to their boss or manager. They asked them, "Hey! It is my job safe? Do I have anything to worry about? What do you think?"

95 times out of 100, what the manager tells them, "There is nothing to worry about. You are very important to us. Really. Don't worry about it."

When you stop and think about it, that manager doesn't know anything more than the subordinate does is coming to talk to them. That manager is so far down the ladder on a low wrong that all they are trying to do is hold that employee in place. They don't have any more information that the employee does.

Let's stop kidding ourselves. Let's start by analyzing.

Frankly, if you have reason to worry, there is a bigger problem that is going on. Your firm is struggling. You are reading about it in the press. Everyone is cutting back on jobs. Why would you put up with that?

Instead of waiting passively to see if the shoe will drop, put yourself in the position to be found. Put yourself in the position where your profile is up to date on LinkedIn where you might have your resume on a job order two. Where you are starting to network with some people, maybe a former manager of yours who is at another organization that may be in better shape than yours.

Connect with them. Talk with them. Get a feel from them about what's going on at their office. Maybe, there is a place for you at their firm.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

No BS Coaching Advice Ezine December 20 2016

The December 20 2016 edition of No BS Coaching Advice Ezine

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Tell Me About a Professional Failure You’ve Had | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep.629 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses answering a question an interviewer might pose asking you To discuss a professional failure you have had. 

 

Summary

Today, I'm going to talk with you about a new hot question in interviewing, It's a variation on an old one but had it has been taken to a much more extreme level.The original question was, "Everyone makes mistakes. I make mistakes. You make mistakes. Tell me about a mistake you made and what you learn from it."

That was the original framing of the question. Now, let's see how it is being taken to an extreme.

"Tell me about a professional failure you have had (Notice how are no longer talking about a mistake. We are talking about a failure. Something far more extreme in everyone's mind). Tell me about what you've learned from it (okay, that part is the same). Tell me about what you could've done differently." That last part. It's a whole new dimension.

In answering the original one, I used to tell people to talk about something that the screwed up at the beginning of their career. The ideal things to talk about something where you learned it doesn't pay to just buckle down and work harder. You learn that what's most affected is communicating your difficulty, making sure you ask for help and that, at the end of the day, no one is surprised if things don't come in on time.

Today, when we are asking about failure, I want you to think seriously about this. I don't want you to go back to that beginner scenario because that is a weak answer to me. What they are looking for is something far more self reflective. They're not looking for you to confess that you are the most incompetent employee at your last 2 organizations. They are asking about a specific instance where you struggled.

You might talk about something where you were assigned a responsibility, perhaps, didn't reach out early enough to get consensus on some of your thoughts, tried to force things through that word really wanted and learned from this the importance of getting consensus from key stakeholders. That's always a good answer to work with. If you are in your 50s or older, you can talk about this when you are in your 30s, and this was your 1st leadership role. If you're in your 40s, you can talk about something more akin to what I suggested earlier...A time earlier in your career where you needed to learn how and when to communicate, the impact that that had on the organization, project, others,, and how egregious mistake it was.

Part of the way that you answer this is theatrically. You can make it seem as though you have a canned answer. You have to act as though you are agonizing over this because part of what they are looking for is a personality type that has a degree of self reflection. You can't answer this question by saying, "I never failed anything in my life. I have been an A+ performer every step along the way. There has been no instance in my life, no instances in my circumstances professionally where I messed up."

Steve Jobs failed. Barack Obama failed. Donald Trump failed. Everyone fails. The question becomes, what have you learned from it and what could you have done differently To avoid the worst circumstances from the failure.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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