You’re Willing to Take Less But Are Afraid They’ll Reject You | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 757 You earned more than they are paying for the job. You know they’ll be afraid to hire you fearing that you’ll leave for a higher paying job. How do you handle that in the interview? 

Summary

Today, let's talk about an interview tactic. Let's say you are interviewing for a job that is paying less than what you were previously making. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that employers are reluctant to hire people who were making more than what they are willing to pay now. Their thinking is that is soon as the economy gets better, as soon as you find another job, you are out the door.

How do you counteract that? How do you deal with that? Obviously, you can tell them the truth. "I was making X number of dollars per year; I understand this position is paying less and I am willing to take less." Then you're back in the same boat.

There's an idea of what to do instead. What you can do is respond to the question of, "How much were you earning," by saying, "My last employer was very generous with me, probably too generous as a matter fact. They will probably pay me more than what the market is. My understanding is that this is a position that is paying less than what I was previously earning. I understand I was earning a very generous compensation; I am willing to come to that level."

If they persist, they will ask you, "So how much were you making?"

"I was making X number of dollars per year. Does that make sense to you or does it seem like they were being particularly generous?" Most of the time, they will say something that confirms that they were paying more than what the market is. "We are paying up to such and such."

You can say, "That's what I understand the market is right now; I'm very willing to accept that. I know my employer was paying more than market value; I was happy to take the money but now it is time to come back to the market."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The New Background Check | Job Search Radio

 

EP 306 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the new way firms check you out.

Summary

You know it, you've read it, you've heard it many times.

The warning I'm giving you is to watch your social media presence. I had someone last week who is going on 1/3 interview. The client called me up and said, "Were going to cancel the interview."

"What happened?"

They had done on Twitter and saw something stupid he wrote there. If for one thing, they would've let it slide.. But they saw whole bunch of stuff they gave them cause for pause.

I'm reminding you that a lot of people have gotten warned about Facebook. LinkedIn is pristine for most people. Twitter is a place where people get sloppy sometimes.

Don't say stupid stuff. It comes back and haunts people. It's like the new reference check is going to twitter or going to Facebook and see what you have written there.

This guy lost an opportunity he really wanted and I have to explain to him. I'm going to tell him to purge his twitter feed.

When all is said and done, you can't do stupid stuff because there's an audit trail for you in everything that you do these days that you create. You don't want to put yourself in that position were something you wrote comes back and haunt you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

What’s the Best Way to Get Your Resume Noticed (VIDEO)


What is the best way to get your resume noticed? There is a better way to get an interview that I offer as well as answer the question.

Summary

The question I was asked is, "What's the best way to get your resume noticed?" I want to preface my answer, which will be directed to the point like they always are, by saying that if you are submitting your resume, you are swimming in the pond with everyone else. It's hard to be caught as a fish if you're in there with millions of other fish., What you're telling me is that you are attempting to approach this through traditional channels by submitting your resume through an applicant tracking system or some other form of direct communication, rather than working at networking through the hiring manager, developing a relationship with that person, and trying to gain entrée that way.

Be that is it me, I just given a summary of the preferred way to do things -- you would not submit a resume; you have an introduction to someone by someone who knows them will vouch for you and give you the opportunity to present yourself to the manager.

If you really want to submit your resume, the best way, if you are determined to send it through an applicant tracking system, is to DEMONSTRATE THAT YOUR BACKGROUND ACTUALLY FITS THE JOB. Make it obvious as though the reader is 6 years old reading the resume that you fit this.

How do you do that?

If you have a job description (after all, you question tells me that you want to submit your resume against the particular job), make sure that all the criteria of the job description are your resume. Make it so it is obvious!

In doing this, you want to use their language. For example, there was someone I was coaching, who is in a sales role. He would normally talk about how he it helped increase sales by a certain percentage. However, the firm he was interviewing with spoke in terms of 4X or 10X. Language along those lines. You want to use their language because you want to be understood by them. It's like speaking French and interviewing in Germany. If you don't speak the same language, it is harder to connect.

Take the time to speak their language. Use their phrasing in your resume. Make the fit obvious even if you're going to use a summary at the very top of your resume that takes care of the requirements of the position, the functionality of the job, and lays out each of them.

For example, this is always an easy one. when I use IT as an example, you list the skill and next to it you might write, "3 years/current." Then you would list the next skill and say, "2 years/until one year ago." Item by item into columns so that the fit is obvious to the reader and you're not making them struggle to find the information.

(2) As you proceed, the rest of your resume needs to confirm what you've just written and use their language.

(3) Finally (this is one the people sometimes forget), make sure your LinkedIn profile is congruent with what you say your resume. If the profile isn't congruent (it doesn't have to use the same language because I'm assuming that you're not submitting your resume to just one company), you want to make sure that your profile is as all-inclusive as possible, telling the story of what your background is so that, as I said, a 6-year-old knows that you can do this job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Finding a Job You’ll Love | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2012). Any job mentioned was filled years ago PLUS I no longer recruiting.

Keeping with the theme of Valentine’s Day, on this show, I speak of several things you can avoid doing in order to be successful.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

How Much Are You Looking For? Version 2 | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 756 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to respond by asking a question.

Summary

Let's use a "what if" scenario. You are adding networking event, you are at a job fair you're not a formal interview, but you're doing some networking and talking to a recruiter. They talk with you about your background and have a position available, it is clear that you have a background that's interesting to them and they are going to ask you, "How much you making? How much are you looking for?"

Let's say the get the question out 1st. "How much are you making?"

"I'm happy to answer that. But can I ask you a question?"

"Sure."

"Did you tell me about the salary range for this position?" They give an answer.

"Any flexibility with that?"

"Yeah, there is probably a little flexibility with that."

"Good." Then you answer the question about and what you currently earning.

Why? If you answer 1st, most of the time they are not going to tell you the range.

I also want to say that when I have been in those scenarios where someone poses the question of me, the way I respond is to say, "I want you to hear something. " Then I picked to numbers at random. Let's say the job is paying between $100,000 and $110,000. So in the person asks whether there was any flexibility on the salary, "I want you to hear something.. When I talk about the salary range, people only hear the top number. They never hear the bottom number. There is a range of numbers between $100,000 and $110,000. It's possible that you might be offered less than $110,000 that you have in mind. The responsibility that YOU have is to convince the employer that you have that value." This is absolutely true

Your responsibilities to convince them that you have that value. However, in terms of answering the initial question, is really way too early to get pinned down, but that is why employers try to do.

Right off the bat, which were trying to do is push them up just a little bit. So that in that example I gave of $100,000-$110,000, you ask, "Is there any flexibility with that? Could you be a little flexible if you needed to?"

"Sure! We could be a little flexible."

"Great!" Eva ready move them off the pot a little bit and moved them in their thinking to knowing that they might need to come up a little higher.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.
 
Summary

Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What’s the Probability of Two Dice Coming Up With Different Numbers? (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this brain teaser, “What is the probability of two regulation dice coming up with different numbers?”

Summary

We are going to do 1 of those fun hedge fund questions. Let's see how you do. You have a pair of dice. They are regulation. Perfect. Un-tampered with.What is the probability that you are not going to roll a pair?

We start by trying to figure out what the possible combinations are that might exist. How many different sorts of numbers might exist. The answer is 36, by the way.. Then we start looking at the number of possible pairs that we have. 1 and 1.. 2 and to. 3 and 3. You get the idea. 6 possible pairs.

6/36 is 1/6 Is the probability of rolling a pair. If 6/36 is the probability of rolling the pair, that means that 5/6 is the probability of not rolling a pair.. You have is 5/6 probability of not rolling a pair.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Is There a Recruiter Blacklist? (VIDEO)


I answer a question about whether recruiter blacklists exist.

Summary

Someone asked me a question that translates into, "Is there a blacklist of people that recruiters won't represent?".

If you think there is a central database that consists of individuals that all corporations and all recruiters will not represent or will not hire, that is not the case. HOWEVER, we all have long memories. When I worked in recruiting. I remembered every person that screwed me, every person who accepted a job offer impact out of it, every person who lied on an interview Once we had technology it is very easy to track that information. I assume that I am not unique in that every search firm, every corporate recruiter, every corporation has their version of that.

For example, if you work at a company or working your firm and someone has accepted a job offer and then accepted a counter offer from your current employer or elsewhere, there is a notation about that. If you interviewed poorly or misrepresenting your skills in some way, claiming that you have expertise that you do not have, I am sure there is an notation about that in their applicant tracking system. Or, shall we say, if you have lied in some way, found out at a later date and decided not to extend an offer to you as a result of the deception that they found out about, I am sure there is a notation about that.

However, if what you are asking is whether there is a central repository, I saw there was one attempt to create one. But the domain does not exist anymore so I'm not even going to mention the name. However, I will say that it is something to be concerned about.

There is also the social stuff. For example, you are at a networking event and to recruiters talk to one another, they are from different firms and they see you and one says to the other, "That person presents so well, but we lost the higher with him because he lied." Do you think the other recruiter doesn't file that way? Of course they do!

I remember the guy who interviewed for me, we scheduled for interviews on a given day as he walked out of each 1 of them, saying, "Would you mind cashing a check for me? Someone robbed me on the way over for the interview." It wasn't for a lot of money, maybe $20 or $25, but he bounced checks to everyone! Do you think I don't remember that?

There is stuff like that that goes on, but there is no formal, central repository. Each search firm. Each Corporation may keep their list of individuals that just do not fit or are just not appropriate that they will never consider hiring or representing. However, there is no central database.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Lying | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 755 It’s one thing not to remember, it’s another thing not to remember. In this video, Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from lying during your job search. 

Summary

Some years ago on, "Saturday Night Live," Jon Lovitz played a character named Tommy Flanagan. Tommy was a guy who is a pathological liar; If you have a chance on YouTube, there are quite a few videos there. The tagline that Jon Lovitz used as the character was, "Yeah, that's the ticket. Yeah. Yeah. That's the ticket!" Every time he said that phrase, you knew he was telling a lie.

There are going to be times in your job search that you will be tempted to lie. I want to discourage you from doing it. Just try to remember this reminder. You can get away with some lines for a while but, as is the case in your personal life, lies will be exposed and found out.. The problem with that, as happened to someone I will tell you about in a minute, one day you may be met by security at your desk. They will escort you out with your possessions. That will be it. You will have to explain to people why you were fired. You will have to find another job on the heels of having been fired from lying.

Some years ago, there was a person I was representing for position at a bank who was hired, he lied as to whether or not he had a college degree. The degree was not a requirement for the position, there was no reason to lie. I had told him that this was the firm that would do a copious background check and yet he still felt compelled to lie. His first Friday of employment with this firm, he was met by security at his desk as he came back from lunch and allowed to pack up a small box of his things and was escorted out of the building.

Another instance, again, with another firm where I had warned someone about life. "This is a firm that will meticulously go through your resume to try to find inconsistencies. That 1st Friday, he was met by the head of HR who we had a frank conversation with, he confessed to the lie, again, he was escorted out the door with his possessions in a box. He was out of work like the other gentlemen for quite some time before he could land another position.

Maybe that part wouldn't be a part of your experience, but do you really want to test it?

It's one thing to be unsure of the date on your resume or the exact salary that you earned 15 years ago. It's another thing to exaggerate by $15,000 or $20,000 what your salary was a year ago. It's another thing to hide the date on the resume by extending forward or backward a date by a dramatic amount.

I'll simply say that if you are not sure about a date from a long time ago, or a salary from 10 years ago for example,Next to that date or salary, just put the expression, "approx." When asked about it, say, "I wasn't exactly sure and I didn't want you to think that I was lying to you. I would rather just reveal to you that I was not sure and put in that phrase 'approx' so that you don't have a concern about me." That solves that issue..

To go out of your way and lie, you risk putting yourself and your family into a huge bind and a firm cannot help from firing you. Why? I use an example from someone I knew some years ago who made this mistake, he was working for the securities firm. He was found out for some lie that he told. He pleaded his case with them for staying on board.

I paraphrase the language that was used. Suppose this individual had embezzled grandma's life savings And a lawyer had found out that he had lied on the application. (1) do you think the firm would've lost a court case? Of course! they kept the liar on board and it is no wonder that he embezzled grandma's life savings. If it was your grandma that was involved,, would you have wanted this person fired and the firm fined? of course! (2) I'm sure their liability insurance won't pay off if that employee is found to have life. They knew about it and then he or she committed a crime.

Just make it easy on yourself. It's one thing not to be sure; it's another thing to go out of your way and lie. Do you really want to risk losing your job after you are on board, settled in and spent all this time working to find a job only to get fired because you were stupid enough to lie.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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