Sabotaging Your Job Search: Lukewarm References | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another way that people sabotage the Job Search – – mediocre references. He also offers a way to get around a mediocre reference at a particular employer.

Summary

I worked in recruiting for a long time and I've seen it time and time again. Job hunters sabotaging their search by just making stupid mistakes. I'm continuing on with the series on sabotaging your search and talking with you about some of the ways the people do it.

Here is one that I can't believe happens but it happens all the time -- giving it references the don't just sing your praises, they may not be completely lukewarm but they come across as being disinterested and ambivalent.

When you are giving a reference, this is your opportunity to get across the finish line. Firms are going to decide whether or not to give you that great job offer, they have been thinking about or continue on looking. On occasion, they will make a lukewarm offer and just move on with it. Often, the neutrality of the reference causes them to pause. If the role, this is completely in your control. You are giving out the references. You can choose any 1 of the world to give them some reference you give them this person who gives you a halfhearted disinterested reference.. That is your fault.

Before you give out references, even at the beginning of your job search, as you're trying to get leads from places to go to, as you are trying to get out and about, start talking with the people who you are considering is a reference.. Just simply say, "I would love to give you is a reference. Would you feel comfortable with doing that I would you sing my praises to the rafters and let people know how wonderful it was?"

If you were a mediocre employee, you have to find those people who will support you because those people who will claim that they are only allowed to give out name, rank and serial number, type of references (your dates of employment and whether you are eligible for rehire), those are useless references. It is better to go to a former employer or to someone who is already left the organization who is not handcuffed by the policy (or I have to say, "alleged policy" because everyone finds a way around that if they care). Find someone who used to work with that that employer who will say wonderful things about you.

Again, don't give out lukewarm references. Find exceptional people who give an is will and will later so exceptional reference..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Robert Herjavec

The First 30 Seconds of an Interview (VIDEO)


Robert Herjavec has discussed how to standout on Shark Tank, I take that and convert it to job hunting.

Summary

Robert Herjavec from the TV show, "Shark Tank"  did the video recently where he talked about how to stand out on the shop.  I think there lessons for job hunters here that are useful and I'm going to translate what he says it is something for job hunters.

The 1st thing he talks about is the 1st 30 seconds.  The cast of the show, "the sharks" are out there for 12 hours a day, listening to page after page. They are board. They are tired.  They are hungry.  After a while, they don't want to be there. They'll be back at home working on their business.  However, they are committed to doing the show and doing it well so they come out and put on a performance.

Sound like many hiring managers you talked with?

They are bored, tired, hungry, and have interviewed multiple people a day. Their staff is the same way. They are distracted because they have other things to do.  You have to engage them in the 1st 30 seconds.

There are a few ways to do it.  Robert talks about how they walk into the tank.

For you is your approach to the hiring manager and who you are interviewing with.  How do you approach them. In many cases, the 1st contact us by phone.  How do you answer your calls?

You may be getting a call on the mobile, looking at it, and wondering, "Who the hell is that," and answer as though there is a Viagra salesman on the other line and discover that it is in HR person, a hiring manager, someone who's doing screening for the hiring manager who works in his department.  While you're doing your job search. You need to be focused in on how you answer every single phone call.  This could be someone that you are selling to.

From the 1st moment you pick up the phone, answer with enthusiasm and excitement, speaking with a certain style with the aggressiveness that allows people that you are awake and not asleep at the switch.

If they introduce themselves to you over the phone, immediately leap into, there is also,

That makes them talk about the job with you at the beginning of the interview. So, mentally, you can get your switch turned on, and be prepared to talk about what you have done that matters to them, and not just simply talk about what you've done.

Notice there is a difference in their between those 2.

Talk about what you've done that matters to them versus talk about what you've done.

If it is in person, remember, you are walking in and shaking hands with someone and there has to be a certain command presence that you have, especially if you are a manager or above interviewing for a position.

These lessons are all true, the matter where you are in an organization, but they are particularly critical for those in a manager level and above.

Why?  Because you are a visible representative of the person who is evaluating you – – the VP, the director, the SVP – – whoever it is ata more senior level than you, you represent them. And if you come across like a slug, you reflect poorly on your future boss.  You also present yourself poorly for yourself.  You become a bad representative for them and for you. It's an immediate turn off.

If you think for some ideas makes a difference, it's a big world, it's a big country, there are a lot of people who are going to be is capable of doing this job. As you and present better.  Don't be a slouch with this. Dress well. Present well.

Robert talks about people who walk into the tank and they don't know the numbers and the sharks help them.  There are also people who walk into the tank and they beat the crap out of.  That's the difference in how someone presents.

I want to be clear.  There are people who will interpret what I am saying as talking about being "professional."  I think in terms of being honest, open,, effective, strong, prepared… A leader.  I don't care what lovely Warden organization, it doesn't mean that you have to prepare is being ruthless.  You can be a nice person and be a nice person and firms will like you and engage you.

There's also another thing that comes into play and that is the idea of engaging on a human level.  How you speak to them as an honest individual who is engaged and forthright and self-confident.

There is the classic question of, "Tell me about yourself."  There is also,"Hey, thanks for so much for making the call.  I remember the position description but I want to get your take on the role.  Would you tell me about the role as you see it and what I can do to help?"

That's the 1st thing you do.  If you are meeting them in person for the 1st time, and you are sitting down in the chair, ask that question.  Then when they get around to them, "Tell me about yourself," or some other equivalent question they ask, here's what I want you to follow up with – – it's the standard answer that question, but you need to do some homework.  This is the way I would like you to continue on with it:

"I'm sure a lot of people say similar things to you, but what makes me different is…" And then you talk about being a difference maker for them.  What makes you different than the other 25 people that have spoken with about this job.

I don't care if you are a recent grad, a college senior preparing for your 1st job or in the C suite looking for another position.  You can still present yourself as being a difference maker.  That's the thing that is going think immediately get their attention.

Figure out what your critical difference is.

You can say things like, "I'm sure a lot of people at said stuff like this to you before.  But, what makes me different is that I've actually delivered on what I'm talking about.  I'm just someone who stepped into organizations with problems and what I've done is…" Then, you talk about how you took a disengaged organization and got them to recommit.

"How did you do that?"

"Well, often organizations with engagement problems hired engage people, but, along the way, these people got turned off by management decisions. They didn't buy into.  Then,…" Do you see where I'm going with this?  I talked about being a difference maker and working in an organization with problems.  What I've done is… And I talked about how you took a disengaged organization and got them to recommit.

I took the standard question was prepared to answer how I went about doing it.

So, it's 30 seconds to get their attention, that 1st question (Tell me about the role as you see it and what I can do to help) is a great attention getter. It follows up with another attention getter where you talk about your differences from the standard individual, they might interview who walks in the door but you have an additional thought that encapsulates how you are different and that is going to benefit them to have you around.  If they don't like the idea that you took a disengaged organization and turn them into a productive organization because of how you will achieve buy-in, this isn't the place for you, is it?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What They Want to See at a Final Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 843 There are a few qualities firms want to see at a final. It isn’t hard. Pay attention and deliver.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about final interviews and what they want to see from you at the final interview. I want to be clear that I'm not good be covering what you want to be doing per se. You know you have to practice. That should be given. I look at it is having 3 primary "C's. "If you seen some of my early stuff, you would've seen that I talk about how a firm looks for competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry and charisma; all of which add up to personal leadership.

Here, I have it narrowed down and I want you to think in terms of CONGRUENCE, CONFIDENCE and CONNECTION as being the 3 primary things that they are looking for.

So what is congruence? You told him certain things before and what you're going to tell them today is going to be congruent or in line with what you said previously. I don't want you to tell him the same stories over and over again unless they want to investigate a particular episode. Think of a new story that you can tell them that they haven't heard before. It's kind of like if you watch the same TV show over and over again, yeah, is familiar but you want to see a new episode after a while, right? Be prepared with the new episode. If they want to investigate further on something old, you can talk about the old episode that is attracted them to you with the question, but you can continue by saying, "You know, it reminds me of another time…" Thus you can introduce the new story.

Confidence. They want to look across from you and find someone that they don't have to worry about. If you are nervous, if you are bashful, if you act as though you will become a slave to them, if you don't interview with them like you are an adult talking with your peer, they're not going really feel confident in you. They're going to see you like you're relatively junior individual. I don't care if you actually look relatively junior individual or senior talent. The idea is you are talking to an equal.

I don't care if they are 30 years older than you, you want to be talking confidently with them without being arrogant, without being annoying, without acting like (I will talk to those of you in your 20s)… You know what it's like when you're being dismissed or being treated dismissive way. You don't want to instigate that with your behavior. They may have a bias that you pick up on but I want you to have the choice as to whether you join.

The 3rd “C” is connection. You want to connect with them and 1 of the best ways to do that is to speak to them with a smile on your face. Engage with them. "Does that make sense to you?" “Am I being clear enough?" “I just want to make sure I am not losing you here." Obviously, you don't asked this in obvious place where you wouldn't lose them; that is insulting to them. You know what it's like when you go off the rails a little bit you're not sure if you've lost them?

“I just want make sure you're following me here."

“Yeah yeah, I'm following you."

Connect with them. Talk with them like an equal. Smile at times. Putting twinkle in your eyes! You would have that sort of spirit in your eyes and your behavior. The more they talk, the more they like you. I'm going to speak with the senior people here. You might ask about the org structure and where you would fit in. What is the upside for the role? Who is going to know about your work? What kind of visibility will you have? Things along those lines.

When push comes to shove, obviously you have to demonstrate competence but going beyond that, you want to illustrate congruence with what you have told them before and maybe expand upon it a little bit, self-confidence, and make a connection with the people that you meet. These are the keys to a final interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake | Job Search Radio

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

Summary

Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

How Can They Catch You Bluffing? (VIDEO)


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How do recruiters and HR experts catch someone in a bluff during salary negotiations? What will you do to find out their real baseline?

Summary

I shorten the question for the title. The full question is, "How can recruiters and HR professionals catch someone in a bluff during salary negotiations? What would you do to find out there will baseline? "

I'm going to start with the 2nd question 1st. Part of how it is done is that you tell us. From the time of the 1st conversation until the time an offer is going to be extended, you been saying certain things. In the 1st conversation, you may be asked, "How much are you currently earning? How much are you looking for? Do you have anything else going on? What is the rock-bottom base salary, exclusive of bonus that you find acceptable to join the staff of the firm?" Recruiters might ask questions like that in the 1st conversation.

From there, as interviews progress, I recruiter might ask questions that test what is going on with you. "Do you have anything else going on? Where is that in the process?" Here's the real thing you can't head off – – we know much of the behavior that other firms engage in.

You see, recruiters have a pulse on the market for a long time and you are just a novice stepping in. For example, if you say that you are earning $95,000 or $125,000 , and are expecting an offer of $140,000 if you are making $95,000, we think to ourselves, "Sniff sniff. I smell bullshit." That's because firms tend not to do that. They try to get firms for the least amount rather than the most amount confirms just don't give out 50% raises.

So, you are telling us a lot of stuff along the way that allows us to detect BS. Then, from there comes "the wild offer" that is completely out of bounds with reality. I will give you an example of why think it is a wild offer. And $95,000 your person does not do the same work as a $140,000 your person. A $140,000 year person does not do the same work is a $200,000, per year person. Get where I'm coming from?

Organizations have similar, although not identical, wage structures, where they pay for certain tasks. If you are an assistant director or a director in an organization, you tend to be slotted in a certain bandwidth. As such, when you are taking this dramatic increase, from one bad to something that is radically different, we smell BS.

You are telling us a bunch of stuff along the way that allows us to know that you are bluffing.

The classic bluff is, "I have another offer. I need a decision by 4 o'clock this afternoon."

"What's the other offer for? What's keeping you from accepting it? What are you waiting for our offer for if that one is so good?" You better have an answer for that one because that's the ultimate bluff that most people fail at.

"I will take the other offer. It is a good one. I'd like yours better."

"Why do you like our position better?"

What they are doing is extracting from you why you should turn down the other offer.

Like I said at the beginning, you give us a lot of information in the course of interviewing, in the course of conversations, that exposes lies. That tells recruiters, both corporate and third-party, that something is not quite right. Coupled with their own knowledge of the market, it is hard to get away with stuff.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

They Might Check My Credit History? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers about the likelihood your credit report will be checked prior to being hired.

Summary

Someone wrote to me as part of researching an article that she was writing asking whether firms really use credit reports as part of the hiring process. The answer is that is generally restricted to firms in the financial services industry-- banks, credit card companies, investment firms, occasionally firms to provide services to those industries. Generally, his financial institutions that require this.

Why? If you look back at their history, people who were employed by them have access to people's money very easily and they were concerned that someone might be tempted to steal. The policies even carry through to these days with computers and automation and such because it is easier to steal in many respects. Can you imagine what would happen if you have stolen "grandma's life savings?"

They get a lawyer who presents the case very simply, "So you knew this person had bad credit. You knew they were in deep kimchi financially and you still hire them and still put them into a situation where they have access to people's money, right?"

"Well, they seemed so honest."

"Your judgment was faulty about that." The financial institution loses the case, their insurance company might not pay off on the claim and thus the bank (I use bank is the example, credit card company, whomever) is out-of-pocket and that is investor money. If you think that is the "1%" you may be the 1% with your IRA and 401(k).

When all is said and done, financial firms try to avoid hiring someone who they perceive is credit risks. If you are pursuing careers in that industry, it is important to maintain a pristine credit history so that you don't work hard to get a job that, at the end of the day you're not to get hired for.

EP 373 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us
Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Are You Interviewing? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 842  This is a variation on the question of, “Where have you been on interviews?”  Here. I explain what the intention is behind the question.

Summary

This is 1 of those questions is a variation on another one that I have addressed previously. This is the question of, "Are you interviewing?" It's a variation on the, "Where have you been interviewing," question. I want to speak to this 1 because really depends on who you're talking to as to what the intention of the question is.

Let me start off with third-party recruiters. With a contingency recruiting firm, you'll be asked this question for several reasons.
1. If you have been interviewing, they may turn around and say, "Where have you been on interviews so far?" They may be trying to find out have you been to the client, job leads of other organizations that are trying to hire so that you release that information to them and then they start reaching out to those firms to see if they can wind up being positions to work on and earn money from.
2. Another thing there trying to do is to see how far along you are in the process. So if you tell them that you have met with 14 firms, had 3 finals and you are close to 2 offers, they're probably going to hit the delete key on your resume when they are finished talking with you. That's because they will see any point in doing anything.

So one, shall we say, slimy approach to asking the question and the rest are pretty innocuous.

When an employer asks, they are obviously not good be contacting firms for job leads. What they are trying to do is (1) find out if you are aggressive job hunter. Companies have a bias against aggressive job. Their belief is that people who are actively looking for work are less attractive than those who, shall we say, are recruited. If they have contacted you and are asking this question, you might simply say, "I am not aggressively looking for work. But when you approach me, this is an interesting opportunity. Frankly, since the time you initially contacted me, 2 other firms have approached me as well" that you can talk about where you are with those firms.

Part of the reason that employer asks the question is to see how much time they might have before you have to make a choice, whether they can keep interviewing or, shall we say get off the pot and extended offer or move more quickly. You see, they like you (that's part of what the communication is), but they want to see if they can date others for a while before getting married.. You follow what I'm getting at here?

Recognize that their intent is to get a sense of how much time they have with you before they risk losing you. If you say that you have nothing else going on, they can sit back and relax a little bit, knowing that they can interview for a while. Let us know what's going on with you.,

"If anything changes, give us a call. We want to know. "

Most of the time when that happens, they have already seen a bunch of other people and never come back and make the offer.

However, if you say, "Since the time he reached out to me, a couple of other firms have reached out to me as well. I have had some really good interviews and there are some interesting opportunities out there," that will get them motivated to take more action.

Now, if you apply for job and submit a resume, this won't always work obviously, because you have indicated that you are an active job hunter. Thus, all, they are trying to do is see where you are in your process. If they are on a 1st interview and you are on a fifth interview somewhere, there are 1 of 2 ways that they might respond:
(1) accelerate the process
(2) hit the delete key because they know they cannot move fast enough.

I have found over the years that many firms where I mentioned to them that I had found this individual that really fits your role very well, but they are only 3rd or 4th interview and there are some folks who are interested, they never really move. So, caveat emptor. Recognize the impact of what you say and what the firm's motivation is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Working With a Recruiter (VIDEO)


People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Are You Actively Interviewing?


How do I answer when a recruiter asks me “Are you actively interviewing, and do you have any deadlines, pending offers, etc.?”

salary-negotiation

Summary

How do you answer the question, "Are you actively interviewing?  

What are they really trying to find out?"

There are a few ways to answer this question based upon where you are in your job search.

If you have been out of work for 6 months and they asked this question, they are tossing you a lifeline. After all, if it is been 6 months that you've been out of work, they are thinking that there was something wrong with you. It gives you a chance to say, "I took a few months off. I never did that at any point in my life before that. The kids have grown up. I decided to take it a little easy.  It's time for me to get back to work."  That's the way to answer the question if there is been a period of time where you been out of work.

If They Recruited You . . .

Let's work with the assumption that they are recruiting you and they asked this question.  Then, the purpose of the question is very different than when asked of the person is been out of work for 6 months.

Here, they are trying to figure out whether (1) you are out interviewing and where you are in your job search. (2) I've had people who contacted me about position side advertised for, and they have 3 job offers and expect my client to jump through hoops to compete with those other offers in one day. after one meeting that lasts for 1 minute.

It doesn't work that way. You went out on a bunch of dates before you decide to get married, right? Employers are no different.

The implication for the person who was recruited and is asked this question is to figure out whether we were lucky enough to just find you and your background fits the job or did we stumble across someone who is actively interviewing and is been on 27 different interviews… You get the idea.

The correct way to answer if you have been on a few interviews is to say, "Yes, I have been on a few interviews recently."

"Where are you in your search?"

"I don't think I'm close to an offer. I have had firsts and seconds at a few places. Firms seem interested, but I don't have any offers yet and no one is talking to me like I am getting one yet. That's a good way to deflect the question.

Now, if you are close to an offer, from the recruiter's perspective, they are thinking, "Why should I invest time in this person when I not going to make any money or my client will take too long for this person and their timetable. I know this hiring manager can take a month to even decide to interview this person."  On and on and on.

From the standpoint of the employer-recruiter, based upon what they know of the hiring manager, they are trying to figure out whether they have the time to get you into the process and bring it to a successful end.

If you say something like, "I have a few things I seem to be on final rounds for but I don't have any job offers yet"

"What would keep you from accepting an offer from 1 of those firms?"

"Well, money, of course. After all, I'm not looking to take a lateral or less. If they offer too little, I'm not going to join."

"How much would you be looking for?"

"Well, that depends upon the opportunity. I obviously want to contribute to an organization . . . "

I'm trying to give you a sense of the flow of the conversation as you answer questions.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

 

What Happens to My Resume After It Is Submitted to a Job Posting? (VIDEO)


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http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here’s how the sausage is made.

Summary

The question I received was, "What happens to my resume after it is received for a job post?" This is like the sausage and how it is made. It is really an ugly process.

Once you've submitted it to a job posting, there are now 2 possibilities. One is when you've submitted through an applicant tracking system; the other one is when it asked to the email a resume. Smaller firms might not have the systems in place and you are emailing a resume.

The applicant tracking system is a filter. It parses your resume and inputs data into their system and may or may not, depending upon the system, score your resume based upon your use of keywords to determine whether or not you are a POSSIBLE FIT. I want to be clear. POSSIBLE FIT.

It is not perfect, obviously, and depending upon the scoring system and how it has been set up, and how the dictionary of terms has been created to evaluate, you may or may not be passed on to THE FIRST HUMAN BEING. Often in corporations and with the search firm that person is representing that business area or that hiring manager who is attempting to fill the position. They are doing a visual scan. Again, if you came in through an applicant tracking system, some systems will never let you get that far because if they are seeing you doing "serial applying" as 1 of my guests on Job Search Radio described or you are applying to lots of different disparate jobs, they are just going to block you and never let that resume get through even if you might be qualified because they have identified that behavior as being reflective of (please excuse my language) bullshit artists.

Assuming that that is not you and you're getting to the 1st level human being who is there to check, with some organizations that could be the hiring manager. Most of the time, it is HR. With smaller firms, it is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes. That's the reality to it. It is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes because the owner was busy. "You look at the resumes and show me the ones of the people who think fit." That person makes a determination and passes it to the hiring manager or, if it is a search firm or an HR person, they are going to do the 1st screen.

Ultimately, systems are there to save time and, obviously, they are not perfect. They do a lot better as a time-saver then you as a job hunter would prefer that they do. You are applying to jobs because you think they are right.

Now, in some organizations, HR is not even going to interview you on till the hiring manager says to do so. "I want to talk to that person." You are dealing with the ladies all the time, because your resume is going from the applicant tracking system to HR to a hiring manager for home hiring is only 1 of their priorities; they have a job to do. As a result, they are not there sitting by their computer instantly giving responses. They are looking when they have some time. Sometimes that is on their commute. Sometimes it is when they need to take a break. Sometimes it is when they schedule something on your calendar to review resumes. They are trying to work it into their day when they have time that they can take away from their "real job." That is the way they think about. Taking time away from their "real job."

Your resume is an interruption. They may wait for the weekend to review a bunch of resumes. They may wait so the evening. They may wait for their commute. Whatever it is, they are not instantly looking at your resume.

That is what goes on behind the scenes from a process perspective. Some systems may send you questionnaires; some recruiters, both HR and agency recruiters, may send questionnaires to clarify particular parts of your background because your resume wasn't clear enough to them answer those questions because you are not going to get to the interview otherwise.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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