Do I Look Like a Job Hopper?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/14/do-i-look-like-a-job-hopper/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question as to whether someone looks like a job hopper.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The premise is that the person is concerned that the resume makes them look like a job hopper. The question goes like this, “I’m a software developer with a job that I’ve had since college. 1.5 years. 4 years. 2 years. 3.5 years. 2.5 years. I’m a year into my latest gig and started to think about switching industries like from going from finance to tech. How bad does this look?”

Great question. I think there is a more complicated answer to this. Let me start with the premise that I have the idea that some of these might be consulting assignments. Where that is the case, you can aggregate dates into one combined area that shows that you are a consultant during that period. Let’s say the 2 years and the 3 1/2 years were as consultants, aggregate the dates there. The reason I have the idea is your choice of the word “gigs”or, “gig” for that last position . I have the idea from not that you might be a person who is been a consultant. If that’s the case, aggregate some of those dates to demonstrate clearly.

More important than a tactic, is the bigger picture. You are not talking about career progression. You’re talking about how over 10 years as a developer. If my math is right, for 14 1/2 years, you are talking about yourself being purely a developer; do not talking about being a lead. You not talk about being an architect and you’re not talking about being a manager. You talking about being a developer.

That may have been a conscious choice of yours but some employers of the start looking down on you because you haven’t progressed in your career. That may be a bigger issue for you. Why are you still a developer? Why are people not give you the opportunity to get ahead?

If you’ve always wanted to be a developer, that’s going to be a real easy question to deflect. You’re going to have to address in the cover letter.
Again, I don’t see these dates as being intrinsically wrong. I just think the bigger issue is that at some organizations, and organizations that like fast-track individuals, they’re not going to see you as being fast-track. There going to see you on the slow road.

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: The Helium Balloon in the Car Brainteaser

 

EP 871 This is a hedge fund brainteaser that will stump quite a few of you.

Summary

The brainteaser for today is a fun one; it goes like this: "you are in a stopped car with a helium balloon floating in the passenger compartment. All the windows are closed. The car accelerates forward. With respect to the passenger compartment, does the blue move forward, backward, or stay stationary?"

The key to this is that air moves too. Got that?

The obvious answer is that the bullet would have a tendency to move backward in the passenger compartment , as would all the compact discs on the dashboard.

In fact, the blue moves forward in the passenger compartment because inertial forces air molecules back, creating low pressure up front into which the blue moves.

So, because the air starts moving backward, it creates a momentum that causes a low pressure up front , which moves to belong forward.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/20/whats-the-first-rule-of-negotiating-a-job-offer-2/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: The Helium Balloon in the Car Brainteaser

EP 871 This is a hedge fund brainteaser that will stump quite a few of you.

Summary

The brainteaser for today is a fun one; it goes like this: "you are in a stopped car with a helium balloon floating in the passenger compartment. All the windows are closed. The car accelerates forward. With respect to the passenger compartment, does the blue move forward, backward, or stay stationary?"

The key to this is that air moves too. Got that?

The obvious answer is that the bullet would have a tendency to move backward in the passenger compartment , as would all the compact discs on the dashboard.

In fact, the blue moves forward in the passenger compartment because inertial forces air molecules back, creating low pressure up front into which the blue moves.

So, because the air starts moving backward, it creates a momentum that causes a low pressure up front , which moves to belong forward.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The #1 Characteristic to Look for When Hiring Leaders | No BS Hiring Advice Radio


Sam Walker, author of,”The Captain Class” shares what he learned from researching the most successful sports teams of the last hundred plus years. This takeaway and how to evaluate for it is priceless for hiring managers.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

How Do I Deal With a Fly In Interview In The Future | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/14/how-do-i-deal-with-a-fly-in-interview-in-the-future-no-bs-job-search-advice-ra

EP 804 I respond to someone’s fly in interview gone terribly wrong.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I received a message today from someone who posed a scenario asked different opinion. He has done a phone interview and is told that it will is a technicality for the client wanting to meet him. The recruiter tells him he needs to pay the airfare and travel and that if he is offered the job and takes it, he will be paid back for the trip.
Let’s read between the lines. You lay out the money. If you get the job, I will pay you back. If you don’t get the job, you will get nothing.
When he asks about what happens if they don’t select me, the recruiter says that this is for sure them to stop talking negatively. Like I said, the recruiter is going to pay him back if he gets the job and if he doesn’t get the job, he is out of luck.
Everything sounds find any books a flight from one city to Atlanta and rents a car. The night before, he goes to a friend’s wedding and he is on a 3 AM flight the next morning. Let’s get practical. He knows the guy for long time. It’s a big decision to go to the wedding, but he is only 3 AM flight so his at the airport at [1:30] AM. He is sleep deprived when he lands; he has an interview going on for in the long and the short of it is, he doesn’t get the job. His body just wants to get to sleep and he didn’t perform on the interview.
He tells the recruiter what happens. I want to explain it to the company. “I don’t even care about the expenses.” The company doesn’t want to talk to him; the recruiter has no interest. The company doesn’t want to talk to him. At the end of the day, he asks this question, “Is it a good deal to go on these fly outs prepaid? Does it come across stronger to say that I want half the money up front? Is it worth taking the risk of the client not paying up front?” He is looking for a way to protect themselves.
Here’s my thinking.
1. If you have a wedding the night before, it isn’t like the wedding wasn’t on the schedule when the interview showed up, right? You knew about that before hand and you miscalculated. As a result, you will that going out sleep deprived. That has nothing to do with whether or not you are going to get paid back. That has to do with you making a mistake
2. The way you handle this in the future is that you don’t put yourself in the position where you are going to be sleep deprived and unable to perform. This is nothing to do with the money. This has to do with you.
You didn’t deliver the goods on the interview and who would want to pay for you to have an excursion to stink up the joint. At the end of the day, what you could’ve done is say, “I can’t do Monday. I can do Tuesday. I have plans on Sunday that I cannot change. Tuesday I can be there on an early morning flight.” Do you know what you could have also done? You could go out Monday afternoon for a Tuesday interview, get a good nights sleep in a hotel and then walk in refreshed.
Instead, you made a mistake. People make mistakes and you ask for my advice… I give no BS advice. In the future, don’t put it back to back like this on yourself. You’ve already demonstrated that you can’t deliver under these circumstances; don’t do it again.

Stuck: Deciding Between Resignation, Perseverance and Acceptance in Your Career

I worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years before transitioning into career coaching. I did not make many job changes because I did very extremely well during the boom times. It was only during the busts in the economic cycles when clients disappeared (and a lot of my income because firms weren’t hiring) that I changed my professional employers. That included divorcing a business partner, closing a business and joining the first search firm I worked for in 20 years and then the few job changes I made.

As I look back at it, I realize that the people I was recruiting often made a smarter decision than I did. I looked at things purely from the financial side. How different my career and life might have been had I made had I not been resigned to tolerate feeling miserable as a condition of my work and gone out and changed jobs more frequently.

Are you tolerating things in your career?

Is that true of you, too? Are you tolerating things in your career because you have become resigned that this is how it is everywhere?

I was coaching someone not long ago who struggled with their travel schedule. 25% travel became 50% travel and soon after 100% travel with no end in sight. He rarely saw his children, his wife treated him like he was a stranger. “Only three more years until I make Director,” he told me as we plotted his next course of action.

“What happens if it takes four years or five years? What then?”

“It won’t.”

“But what happens if it does?”

Silence.

I sat while wheels started spinning between his ears and his circuits fried, realizing that maybe he would be giving up too much . . . or need to adopt a different strategy for himself.

When I worked in recruiting, I remember being contacted by someone who spent almost 40 years with one of the oil companies. He spent his entire career with this firm starting in a relatively junior role and moving up at a snail’s pace that financially did not keep up with inflation.

“I gave my life to this firm and I am now sitting at a desk with nothing to do and 90 days to find a job.”

Before you jump up and say how foolish he was to trust this firm, every day, you (and I certainly did back in the day) and your employer enter into a bargain. You do what they tell you to do and they will give you a certain amount of money and benefits.

Unfortunately, many job hunters attach certain additional things that the employer does not or no longer agrees to.

  1. If I do a job and work hard I can “get ahead.” Where do you see that in your offer letter? It isn’t there.
  2. Your work will be interesting. Maybe your first assignment or assigned work will be but, after that, who knows? You could be assigned to do work that the last three people have resigned after doing for 6 months. You don’t know. Why? On average, turnover is at 25% or more at many employers. Why? “They were recruited to a better opportunity,” is one explanation. Exactly!
  3. We care. Despite all the pictures of happy people in the benefits brochure and on the website, look around. How many people are smiling let alone looking happy? Try asking this question of your future boss. “Tell me about a time when you defended your people to your boss or your management.” They ask behavioral interview questions of you. Why can’t you ask a simple one like this?

When you think back upon what you were told about the job before you were hired and what it and your employer have become, would you have taken this job today?

On a podcast interview I did recently, the host, Jeff Hyman, started a question by commenting that half of all hiring managers have buyer’s remorse within a year of hiring someone (I’ve heard as much as two thirds). I will tell you from experience that it doesn’t take most job hunters to come to the same conclusion about their manager and the decision they made to join.

It starts with becoming resigned to the fact they are stuck for fear that they look like a job hopper, so they try to persevere and “tough it out” through the adversity and, then, develop acceptance that like every job they have ever had it won’t get better (resignation). A little death in their heart converts them into being excellent cogs in the apparatus.

It is so important to be in an environment that supports you at your best, rather than converts you into more of the same mediocrity they already have . . . and that includes firms you would include as being among the best.

It Starts with Courage

It starts with courage—the courage during job interviews to ask questions as tough as the ones they ask you, instead of being nice docile sheep; authenticity when interviewing instead of being “nice” (To be clear, to me, the opposite of being “nice” is honest). Demonstrate your ability to serve others, how you can be truthful and show care for everyone while being effective for them.

Look around your workplace. Ask yourself, “If knew then what I know now, would I have taken the job?” If your answer is, “No,” it is time to stop being resigned to your situation and make a change.

NOW!

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2017

Are You Interviewing? (VIDEO)

This is a variation on the question of, “Where have you been on interviews?”  Here. I explain what the intention is behind the question.

Summary

This is 1 of those questions is a variation on another one that I have addressed previously. This is the question of, "Are you interviewing?" It's a variation on the, "Where have you been interviewing," question. I want to speak to this 1 because really depends on who you're talking to as to what the intention of the question is.

Let me start off with third-party recruiters. With a contingency recruiting firm, you'll be asked this question for several reasons.
1. If you have been interviewing, they may turn around and say, "Where have you been on interviews so far?" They may be trying to find out have you been to the client, job leads of other organizations that are trying to hire so that you release that information to them and then they start reaching out to those firms to see if they can wind up being positions to work on and earn money from.
2. Another thing there trying to do is to see how far along you are in the process. So if you tell them that you have met with 14 firms, had 3 finals and you are close to 2 offers, they're probably going to hit the delete key on your resume when they are finished talking with you. That's because they will see any point in doing anything.

So one, shall we say, slimy approach to asking the question and the rest are pretty innocuous.

When an employer asks, they are obviously not good be contacting firms for job leads. What they are trying to do is (1) find out if you are aggressive job hunter. Companies have a bias against aggressive job. Their belief is that people who are actively looking for work are less attractive than those who, shall we say, are recruited. If they have contacted you and are asking this question, you might simply say, "I am not aggressively looking for work. But when you approach me, this is an interesting opportunity. Frankly, since the time you initially contacted me, 2 other firms have approached me as well" that you can talk about where you are with those firms.

Part of the reason that employer asks the question is to see how much time they might have before you have to make a choice, whether they can keep interviewing or, shall we say get off the pot and extended offer or move more quickly. You see, they like you (that's part of what the communication is), but they want to see if they can date others for a while before getting married.. You follow what I'm getting at here?

Recognize that their intent is to get a sense of how much time they have with you before they risk losing you. If you say that you have nothing else going on, they can sit back and relax a little bit, knowing that they can interview for a while. Let us know what's going on with you.,

"If anything changes, give us a call. We want to know. "

Most of the time when that happens, they have already seen a bunch of other people and never come back and make the offer.

However, if you say, "Since the time he reached out to me, a couple of other firms have reached out to me as well. I have had some really good interviews and there are some interesting opportunities out there," that will get them motivated to take more action.

Now, if you apply for job and submit a resume, this won't always work obviously, because you have indicated that you are an active job hunter. Thus, all, they are trying to do is see where you are in your process. If they are on a 1st interview and you are on a fifth interview somewhere, there are 1 of 2 ways that they might respond:
(1) accelerate the process
(2) hit the delete key because they know they cannot move fast enough.

I have found over the years that many firms where I mentioned to them that I had found this individual that really fits your role very well, but they are only 3rd or 4th interview and there are some folks who are interested, they never really move. So, caveat emptor. Recognize the impact of what you say and what the firm's motivation is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Don’t Let Them Distract You | Job Search Radio

EP 786 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you know not to pay attention to employer BS and keep your eye on the prize.

Summary

You got to think of it like the Wizard of Oz-- don't look what's behind the curtain. Just pay attention to the big, powerful voice. Don't worry about what's behind the curtain.

Let me take you behind the curtain for second. One of the classic that employers try to do Is distract you into the job and focusing about the job, rather than the money. The probability is you are not a wealthy person. If you are this is not for you. You can click away now. The fact of the matter is that almost everyone who listens to the show is trying to improve themselves professionally. AND make more money.

When employers try to do is talk with you about how important what you are going to learn is, how important are going to be in the firm and give you a warm fuzzy feeling... And avoid the money conversation except to talk you down from what you really want. I want to remind you that money is incredibly important.

I've made this next point and other videos. If you get $5000 more over the course of 5 years, pretax between salary increases and raises That you will get over 5 years, you will be ahead by about $25,000 and $26,500 more than if you accept a lateral might be offered to you.

However, if what you do is get $10,0000 more, that is going to become $51,000 or $52,000 more.. If you get $15,000 more,, that becomes between $75,000 and $78000 in increased earnings..Change jobs before the 4th year In either of these scenarios you will have catapulted quite a bit more.

As far as I can tell, money should be important to you and shouldn't be lost from your equation of evaluating things. Don't focus on the deflection. You know, I'm I pretend to be the puppetmaster here… Talk to the hand while I completely hypnotize you with what I'm saying here and avoid the money.

Let me take a quick story. Someone came to me for coaching advice. We reviewed some of the decisions he made in the previous job search. I listen to a story and listen to his story and said to them, "You have made some mistakes."

"What kind of mistakes that I make?"

"You fell for the BS. Employers have trick you into focusing on the career opportunity and the same employers of the firms that laid you off when times get a little tough. When that have been better if you had a few thousand dollars more in your pocket then to be out of work for 4 months like you are now?"

Recognize that you have to look out for yourself. You have to look after your family. The employer isn't going to do that. The hiring manager that is telling you all this wonderful stuff may get fired, just like you at the time of the next economic crisis.

Pay attention to the money. I'm not saying to hold out and squeeze them and bleed them dry. Push up a little bit. Don't just accept the 1st offer. Try to do a little negotiating, see if you can up the money. Like I said, $5000 more over the course of 5 years is an extra $25,000 pretax. Let's say you're the highest tax bracket, that's an extra $12,500 or $13,000 In your pocket. Would you rather have that?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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