Managing Up (VIDEO)

Sometimes, the biggest challenge to success is your boss. You need to master the skill of managing up.

Managing Your Boss

Summary

This video is talking about the importance of “managing up.” 

When you think about it, your boss has expectations and, at the same time, you have expectations, too.  Sometimes, there is a disconnect between the 2 of you and your expectations.  Sometimes, your boss is your problem.  That’s a legitimate thing. I’m not talking about whining, complaining or criticizing.  Let me use an example from a session I did recently.

The guys a very successful individual.  His boss is energetically different.  They are much more methodical type than the person I am coaching.  The result is that things aren’t getting done.  It shows up in a variety of different ways that aren’t important to go into. But, in the effort to “manage,” what is happening is the firm is losing staff, the environment everyone is working in has become “complicated,” there is friction in the office and a lot more.

Managing up involves working with your boss to get a handle on some of their challenges… It is a coaching exercise.  If you think you can have one conversation and resolve all issues, man!  It doesn’t work that way, does it?

If anything, you need to be somewhat consistent over the course of time in order to ask great questions to bring them to a place where they are able to see things through your eyes, share with their experiences that may be different than yours.  In this way, there is greater understanding.  Ultimately, what is going on is that the 2 of you, even though there is a power differential (they are your boss and you are not), because you are having a human conversation with them, the playing field starts to level out.  Even though they may trump you by pulling rank, they are telling you something as well.  The idea is to go in without any judgment or preconceived notion, and, in the course of chatting about one thing, you might talk about this other thing.

I was wondering… I noticed that…“And you start the conversation along those lines.

I’m curious.  Have you ever considered such and such? If so, what were your thoughts? “

You might talk about your experience of what is going on. You leave it as a flat conversation with no expectation that there is going to be a successful conclusion.

Coming back on another occasion, not an hour later, but having given them time to think about it, you let it rumble in their subconscious. You introduced the subject again in a later conversation a week, a month, 2 weeks later… Whenever and see what their thoughts are. 

You go a little bit deeper with your opinion.

Managing up is a relationship issue. They are using power differentials to get things done, driving things and pushing things that is creating friction and that isn’t really what they want.

In doing this over time, you are becoming a trusted advisor for this person, someone that they can rely upon. They can open themselves up to you in different sorts of ways than they might have, up until this point.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

Ready to schedule your first coaching call?

Remember Karma When You Job Hunt | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the importance of being respectful and courteous with people that you meet while job hunting.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about karma. Karma in your job switch and conducting yourself in a proper manner. 

The trait of this is an email I received last night from someone. Let me set this up by saying someone contacted me because they knew I was recruiting for position looking for a certain type of background.  They interview with my client 2 or 3 times.  At the last one, he speaks with the overall head of technology and a peer.  The position is a manager’s role.  He comes of the interview higher than a kite and is very excited and enthusiastic. He is really interested.  Then, last night at 10 PM, he sends an email saying, “I am withdrawing.”  No explanation.

Okay. Help me understand this.  It is not like you are not entitled to change your mind about something.  It is not that you cannot be disinterested in a job.  It’s how you carry yourself in doing.  Politely withdrawing from the situation and saying thank you is good up to a point, but we are deserving of an explanation.  After all, the client, myself, have all been putting a lot of effort and care into trying to help you.  To simply withdraw without explanation is discourteous.

Again, there is a “karma thing.”  I know we have all heard the expression, what goes around comes around.  Whether you believe it, as I do, that can happen. Many many years in the future, perhaps lifetimes in the future, or in some of the professional situation doesn’t matter.

You always want to carry yourself in a way that allows another person to say, “I may not like the decision, but I respect the person where they are coming from.

Again, treat recruiters, whether they are corporate or third-party with respect.  Treat them as though they are a member, your family, and, Lord knows, I know that every recruiter is deserving of that. But that doesn’t mean that you have to carry yourself that way.  You can still be professional.  You can deal with people in a kind manner without being rude as this individual was.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Is It OK to Take a Counteroffer in This Case? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is OK to accept a counteroffer.

Is it OK to accept a counteroffer in this case?

Summary

Here is 1 of those questions I was asked on quora and I want to help sort this out for someone.

Here is the scenario. A person has been working in a job that he or she really likes. He gets a call from someone that he interviewed with. Several years ago. In the call, the person is offered a 45% increase in salary. They don’t feel underpaid about the amount of the increase was so significant that they had to consider it. When they gave notice, the boss countered with a proposal that exceeded the increase the other firm had made and saying that it would change nothing in their relationship. There will be no ill will or anything like that.

The boss said that the salary gap was big enough that he couldn’t blame me. He would have done the same thing in my shoes.  They had a candid conversation and the person writes, “I would love to stay in my current job with this new salary. I know for sure I will be much happier at my current company. Then with the new one   But the advice is usually to never ever take a counteroffer.  I am wondering if this should be 1 of those exceptions.

I want to start by saying that there are no rules except the ones that you want to engage with.

So, don’t look to the outside for the rule; just look for what feels right.

I don’t know if there will be an impact on you by staying; that’s usually what most of the caution is about.

The cautions usually say “You are getting your next raise in advance. They’re going to hold it over you. After all, when it comes time for promotion, are they going to reward you or the loyal person who hasn’t made waves?” That is the standard advice.

When I hear about a 45% raise, I tend to think of an individual with a lower salary. So it’s not like you’re making $240,000 per year and being offered a 45% increase. The probability is that you are a lower wage relatively new person in the workforce for whom (I don’t know what your real numbers are because you don’t really speak about them)– let’s say you’re a $40,000 per year person getting a 45% raise– you are still under $60,000. That’s chump change to a firm.

Don’t be concerned about percentages. Even though everyone is throwing that percentage in your face , and I know will make a difference, but at the end of the day, it still translates into, “you are not making a lot of money and you have been underpaid for a long time.

The real thing is can you trust your boss. I know from experience that if I feel blackmailed to do something and there is a bad day, the 1st thing I would do is say, “I can’t believe I gave this person 45% more and they are still working like crap for me!”

Again, it’s an emotional response. I’m not criticizing your boss. I just know that at that moment he was trying to sell you on staying with their firm. Just consider that they have good intentions and, like an abusive spouse, may not be able to fulfill them in their entirety.

At the end of the day I have to say trust your gut.

It is really the best advice someone can give you. After all, you know the people that are involved.

The only question I would have for you is if your value was so much higher than what you are being paid previously, why were you underpaid for so long? Why did your current firm take advantage of you?

Once you have that answer for yourself, I think you know what decision to make.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Hunt for a Stable Job | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the mistake you are making if you are looking for a stable job.

Summary

I want to start off by sharing the story with you. I have been a professional recruiter for more than 40 years. I remember being fairly junior, like my 2nd or 3rd year in search and saying things to candidates like this, “Hi! I have this great company that wants to meet with you,” I would then describe the environment that the person would work in. I was only doing IT work at that time. But that’s not the point of the story.

I would describe the technical environment. How smart the hiring managers were. A whole bunch of things that I had been taught.

I would continue by saying, “it’s with a bank. If banks start to lay off it is time for all of us to leave the country.”

Well, banks have laid off, I haven’t left the country. Maybe you have. By the way, the name of that bank was Manufacturers Hanover Trust which, as a name, has long since disappeared from the banking circles in the United States. They were acquired by another name that is long since disappeared, Chemical Bank.

In the hunt for stability I want to point out, there is no such thing as stability it with corporations anymore. Things always change. After all, the stories about the Fortune 500 at the time of the Great Depression, including the company that manufactured buggy whips and RCA and other firms with antique technologies and businesses are legendary.

There is no stability. What you can do is keep your head up instead of your head down. Look at trends in your field. See how you can capitalize on being current or ahead of the curve so that in this way, you are attracted to other firms.

The reality is if you are at your firm for the next 10 years that is now an unlikely occurrence. You are statistically an aberration.

Why is that? Frankly, to an employer, you are disposable.

I wish it were different, but their behavior tells me that.

The people who make the promises to you, are often long gone by the time the promises need to be kept. The promotional opportunities and the salary increases – – trivial. You move from droll level I to drone level II all the way up to drone IV. Who cares!

What is important is your personal marketability. If you are able to stay with the technology of your time, if you are willing to stay with the trends of the time and not fall prey to the laziness or the financial inertia of your employer who tries to persuade you that doing this work that no one cares about in the market in general is so wonderful… There will come a day where you will learn. To the contrary.

All I’m going to tell you is stop looking for stability within your organization or from the next company. The only stability that you can create as millions of people learned during the last recession is with your skills, knowledge and network.

Get that again.

Your skills, knowledge and network.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Becoming an Expert with LinkedIn Publishing | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to use LinkedIn and its publishing/blogging platform.

Summary

Let’s talk about LinkedIn’s publishing platform as a vehicle for you to have people reach out to you.

In case you don’t know what it is, if you look at your homepage and that the box we could put a message to your followers, if you see a paperclip there

or a button that says, “Write an Article,” if you click that, there is an opportunity there to write and post longform articles or upload videos to LinkedIn that allow people to get to know your thinking. The idea behind this is reputation building.

Obviously, you can build your network because people see these articles and get an impression of you and want to connect with you.

The 2nd reason to do this is you want to have people reaching out to you and believe that you are an expert. Writing or creating videos about your area of expertise that allows people to get a handle on you as an expert goes a long way toward building a reputation.

Finally, it is a way to show off your expertise and create conversation with others, all of which go a long way toward establishing you as an expert in the audience’s mind, so that recruiters, both corporate and third-party, want to reach out to you as an expert.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Facing the End of the Honeymoon | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses that time after you join a company where you wake up and realize that the honeymoon is over.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about the end of the honeymoon.  Those of us who are or have been married understand that there is a glow period after you get married.  Everything about this person is perfect. They are wonderful.  It isn’t like you fall out of love. But things change.  So it is with your new job.

You join an organization and everything is going to be perfect.  Everything is going to be wonderful.  Nothing could ever go wrong.  There are things that you have been promised that are absolutely terrific.  You have a bright future.  Then one day things start to change.

A decision is made that you don’t agree with.  A coworker says something that seems a little snippy.  Whatever it is, things start to change as the relationship with you, your work, your manager, your organization starts to shift as well.

It doesn’t mean the job is bad.  It doesn’t mean that you should immediately go out and change jobs.  By any stretch of the imagination. That is the wrong approach to take.  It is just that the relationship is changed.  The environment is becoming more apparent to you.  Maybe it will become time to change. But, initially, all it is is a change.

It’s like in a marriage, things ripen. Sometimes they break.  Sometimes they ripen beautifully. Sometimes they sell.  Marriages end in divorce.  Jobs in the divorce.

Your goal is to try to make it work.  Your goal is to see whether it is just a change or something pivotal.

I don’t presume to know what those pivotal things should be for you.  I’d could list a few. But I don’t want to sour your thinking in any way.  You’ll know what it is time to go because you have the case that brought you to this firm. One day you woke up, realize this wasn’t the right place for you and decided it was time to move on.

If you or someone who’s been one organization for a long period of time. There is a pattern that I want to bring to your attention as well.. For those of you who have been with the firm for a long time. The next job tends to be of much shorter duration.  Often, under a year.  That’s because you have unrealistic expectations of what the firm will do for you.  What this firm will do for you will be different than what your previous firm did for you.

That’s not their fault.  That’s you and having unrealistic expectations.  Be patient.  Be patient with them and be patient with yourself.

Rome was not built in a day. Positive change and synthesis and marriages are not built in a day.

Again, one day you’ll wake up in your new job and will feel the same as it did when you 1st started there.  You will feel concerned about that.  Yet, most of the time, there was nothing to be concerned about.  It is just that the relationship has changed.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

3 Things to Never Put on Your Résumé | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses three things job hunters should never put on their resume yet commonly do.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 3 things to never put on your resume.

1. Objective. “I want to work for a progressive organization where I can rise through the ranks and reach my…” Cut it out! No one reads objectives.. If anything, they are only used to disqualify you for being stupid. Get rid of the object.

2. References are available upon request. It is filler. Everyone knows it is filler. You are trying to balance out the appearance of your resume and had nothing else to say. Get rid of it. We know the references are available upon request. You don’t have to tell us that.

3. This is a biggie especially for you senior people. Get rid of the stuff from 20 years ago. As a matter of fact, in most cases you get rid of the stuff from 15 years ago. It is extraordinarily unusual. If you are ever going to be hired based upon things that you did 15 or 20 years ago.

If you are, in most cases, you want to keep it a secret. After all, you will be taking a huge step backward professionally. Instead, focus in and give the most space to the current work. The further that you go back in time, the less information that you want to provide. Frankly, the older it is, the less valuable it is to the employer.

From their perspective, how much do you think they believe you really remember from 15 or 20 years ago? Next to nothing, of course. Why submit your resume for jobs that require experience that you had from the Stone Ages?

Firms aren’t going to care for it. They are not going to believe it. Get it off your resume altogether!

Maybe you have a sentence or 2, but you are not going to try to really find work based upon stuff (let me use an example of an IT person) work that you did as a programmer back in The Stone Ages… You don’t remember how he did it. You could reconstructed and they don’t have the technology from 20 years ago. Get rid of it.

So, no objectives, no “references are available upon request,” and certainly nothing from 15 to 20 years ago.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Preparing for the Next One | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to network and prepare yourself for the next recession now before you experience the crisis.

Summary

Let’s have a quick and honest conversation with ourselves.  Right now, if you are like most people, you are working.  You are out there plugging along, doing your job well or trying to do your job well, and any thought about the economy and planning for your career future or long out of your mind.  If the wall, fear has disappeared from newspapers as layoffs have declined.

However, I want to point something out to you.  It’s obvious, but most people don’t think in these terms.  I do.

Here’s the thing I want to remind you of – – the next recession is on the way.  This isn’t a political statement. I don’t care about the politics of it.  The next recession is coming.  I don’t know when it is going to happen, you don’t know what is going to happen but a recession will come.

There has never been an easier time than now to build your brand, to start networking with people, to maintain connections and create an impression with people who hire, with people who recruit, that you are a leading individual.

There are many ways to do it.  If you follow my YouTube videos. You will see that there are things about keeping a resume up to date, taking steps to network, stay in touch with people who you have worked with or had a relationship with at one point or another.  A lot of stuff that will help you.

For now, my encouragement to you is don’t be an ostrich and pretend nothing is going to happen.  It may not happen for a while.  It may not happen for years, 2 years or 4 years.  It could happen in the next month.  He could happen in the next year.

You don’t want to be caught short with the network that is not in place, with a resume that is not up to date, with the LinkedIn profile that doesn’t do an adequate job of attracting people to you… There is a huge list of things, but for now just consider the things that I have mentioned to be of value.

Again, the recession is coming.  Now is the time you need to take action. Now is the time before you might be in crisis that you can prepare yourself for what is inevitable.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Being a Real Leader on Job Interviews | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out the false “Hollywood Leadership Model,” defines what leadership really is and encourages you to show it on your interviews.

Summary

Today I want to talk with you about expressing your leadership on interviews.  Some people have the silly idea that people are born leaders, they are completely charismatic. It’s like they walk into a room and the seas part and the heavens open up… And it’s wrong.

In point of fact, most leaders are individuals who are passionate about what they do, can make a case for themselves and cause people to suddenly say, “I want to follow them.”  Let me give you an example.

Whether you like his politics were not Pres. Obama is someone (communicated case out of his life) who, as teenager,  got high regularly, didn’t show up for classes and is now president of the free world.  Is it they just hypnotized people along the way?  I don’t think so.  Along the way, he exhibited qualities that cause people to trust him, unlike him and respect him.  There have certainly been a lot of people who have said, “No,” to him along the way.  Yet, there was a and perseverance and determination about him that brought him to where he is today.

Again, let’s not get into the politics.  I’m talking about the personal qualities the man has.

So, when you are interviewing, what is a firm looking for?  I talked about competence, self-confidence, character, chemistry, charisma, personal leadership.  This is the part of the conversation I’m having with you weren’t talking with you about complete belief, your complete self-confidence. And, understand, people will say no to you.  It’s not as though, again, the heavens will part and the seas will open up.  You need to display qualities that cause people to trust you, to have belief in you and have belief that you are the solution to a problem.  How do you do that?

I was listening to a podcast recently where Seth Godin was talking about You have no answers.  Most people walk into interviews and they are arrogant and they can tell an employer what they are doing wrong.  You 1st have to listen.  One may ask you, “How do you think you can help us,” answer, “I don’t know.  What problems do you have?  What issues do you have?  What have you tried so far?  I don’t want to presume I know anything about your environment and make suggestions to you that are pointless.  You know, far more about this than I do.  Tell me what you have done so far.  Tell me what I can help you with.”  Big difference in attitude!  My encouragement to you is to be someone who inspires confidence. Be the leader that you can be.

I was listening to a podcast recently where Seth Godin was talking about the ASPCA which most people don’t know was originally an organization that puts animals to sleep.  Through the efforts of one person whose name I don’t recall right now, they 1st set up a trial in San Francisco of no kill.  This man, who fought hard for this was supposed every step along the way.  He was nondescript. He was the antithesis of what in our Hollywood style culture is seen as a leader.  But he had faith, determination and persistence in him, that even though opponents flew in in the early 20th century to oppose his opinions, he still worked at it and persisted and eventually found the group of individuals to support them.  Eventually made that trial environment in San Francisco work.

He then took it elsewhere.. All the while he was the individual who was nondescript and, again, not exactly the image of a leader.  However, he became a leader.  He became someone who inspired belief in his ideas.  You can do that to you and you need to show that on your interviews.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Emotional Side of Job Hunting | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the emotional side of job hunting and encourages you to get support.

emotions

Summary

Today’s shows about the emotional side of job hunting, how touchy you may be, how frustrated you may be and not even be conscious of it.

For many of you, job hunting is harder than it needs to be.  However, let’s work with the premise that you are in the middle of this slog and you are trying your best, and all that is happening is that you are hitting your head against the wall or nothing is happening for you fast enough.  Your impatience is working its way under your skin.  These are pretty common responses to the process of jobhunting.

Your anxiety is higher.  You feel tense.  You may not amount.  When all is said and done, you may find yourself testy.  The people that you love, care for, your family, a lot of individuals around you may start walking on eggshells because they are afraid to set you off.

There are way too many of the people who been out of work too long. Who killed their families and then kill themselves.  I’m surely not suggesting that you are in that boat, but it is indicative of the emotional side of job search, how much we have our identity wrapped up in our work and when it is taken away from us. Or, even if you are working, and you’re trying to find something else. How frustrating the process can be when it just doesn’t go your way.

  1. Be aware that there’s times where people are going to make suggestions to you.  They are doing that because they are seeing things in your behavior or seeing things in what you are doing, where they think they can help you.  I don’t want you to push them away.  If anything, I want you to be inclusive with them. Even if you think they are wrong.  I want you to say, “Tell me more about that.” Then listen and respond by saying, “You’ve given me a lot to think about and I don’t want to respond right now because my instincts may not be working properly.  Trust me, I am going to think about this and circle back to you.”
  2. Don’t push anyone away.  You never want to be pushing someone away under any circumstance and particularly in the job search circumstance, you want to have as many allies around you as possible to support you emotionally as part of research.  If the advice you get is bad. I still want you to think people for taking the risk of talking with you about. It may be better than you think it is about. For now, let’s assume that it is bad advice and you still want to thank them.
  3. People may say that you are angry all the time.  You are snapping at people.  Well, you don’t want to be snapping at people or feel angry all the time.  You certainly don’t want to respond by saying, “What do you mean by that?”  It is a joke here, but when all is said and done what you want to be doing is taking in things from people, keeping them in your sphere of influence, inviting them in, encouraging them to support you.

Most job hunters don’t fully appreciate the emotional side of jobhunting.  They think that is soon as they start looking for work. The heavens will open up, they will instantly be successful and unfortunately it doesn’t work that way.  You need emotional support throughout your process.

Most of you don’t know that I am trained as a psychotherapist so I can help you with the emotional side of your job search, as well as with the concrete things to be done.

The best way to engage me is by joining JobSearchCoachingHQ.com in order to have access to all the concrete material as well as discounts on my coaching work with you.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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