Who Should You Network With to Find a Job? (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Who Should You Network With to Find a Job?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Blogs You Should Be Reading


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points you blogs and websites that offer great info to help you with your job search . . . Other than mine, of course.

Summary

Today, I want to be talking with you about learning what it takes to be effective in your job search. A lot of job hunters believe (and they really do believe) that if you do your job well that immediately translates into being able to find a good job. To some degree there correct, but they are missing a big point. The people who believe this miss the point that job hunting, in and of itself is a skill and it has rules and requirements to it that people need to learn. I want to talk with you about how you can get more the information that you need to be effective in your job search.

Let me start by saying there's a lot of great information on my website, jeffaltman.com or thebiggamehunter.us and visit the blog, you will find many articles, podcasts and videos that will help you with your job search. You can sign up for complimentary subscription to my e-zine and receive it twice a month.

(The Free Job Search Guide is no longer available).

CareerRealism.com also great information to help job hunters.
BrazenCareerist.com
Ask The Headhunter
LindseyPollak.com
JobMob.co.il
CareerRocketeer.com

All the sites are going to provide you with information. What you want to be doing is reading with their advice, learning, practicing the advice that you get from them so not just purely selling yourself based upon your skills, but you're actually selling yourself. Your selling yourself in your knowledge and experience in a way that audiences will find acceptable to them. It'll be much easier for you to find work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Mechanics of the Job Interview (VIDEO)

 

From before you arrive for your job interview to their first question, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter takes you through what you should be doing to be ready.

Summary

I want to take you to the mechanics of the in person interview today from before you meet the interviewer to arriving at the building through their asking the 1st question.

60% of getting a job is already accomplished before you set foot in the door in that each of you believes that you have something of the other one wants. From there, 20% is involved with each of you convincing one another to what you been told about the other is true and the remaining 20% is purely subjective criteria. That is, are you the kind of person that can fit into their organization; do they seem like the kind of people and does it seem like the kind of job that is going to be of interest to you. Each of you needs to get an A in the course.

If you drive into the interview, give yourself some extra time to get there. There's nothing worse for you or for them than you arriving there late. Try to target get into the building about 15 minutes early. If you taking the subway or bus, or some other version of public transportation, you can take a dry run before hand. If you can't, do a dry run. Just give yourself adequate time to arrive to the building early.

If for some reason, it is extremely hot or extremely cold, I want you to take the time to warm up your hands if it's cold, or dry your hands of perspiration, dry your forehead or face of any perspiration if it's hot; there is nothing worse than shaking hands with a popsicle at the beginning of the interview or having sweaty palms when you are shaking hands with someone.

By getting there a few minutes early, it also gives you a chance to focus on what your objectives are for the interview. If the role, much as you may believe that you're going to have some great energy walk again with 1 minute to spare you are not could be as well prepared. Give yourself adequate time to get there and give yourself a few moments to prepare some of the points that you want to make again.

Let's assume that you got through security, you've gone upstairs because invariably it is an "upstairs" that you are to be interviewing in and now you're at the reception. Inevitably she will say, "So how can I help you?"

You'll say, "Hi! I have a 2:30 appointment to see someone so." They'll invite you to take a seat and maybe give you an application and you'll sit down. I want you to sit down at a point in the room facing the greatest number of entry points so that you can see someone approaching announce your name. I mentioned that because of something I saw happen years ago where I had an appointment with someone at the bank and there was someone there for an interview. It was a rainy day and they had a raincoat on, an umbrella, they were reading a copy of the New York Times. They had the raincoat folder on their lap, had a briefcase and were engrossed in their reading.

They didn't realize that the person was going to interview them was going to arrive in the reception area from the direction of your immediate right shoulder. Thus, when the person stepped out of the doorway and announce the name, I could see this person be visibly startled, have to pick up the raincoat umbrella briefcase, fold the New York Times, shake hands and they were startled so you knew that this interview wasn't going to start off well.

You have to understand that the 1st 10 minutes of an interview are the most important time because that's where each of you decides whether or not to pay attention during the remaining 30 or 40 minutes you might be talking. So it's important for you to get off to a good start.

Sit facing the greatest number of entry points to the room and thus, when someone comes out to greet you, although you may be reading, you will have adequate time to notice them (again, don't get so engrossed in the reading that you don't notice that someone is coming out to announce your name) and thus be prepared when they announce your name.

As soon as they do, walk over and give them a firm handshake and as soon as you do, immediately size them up as a person and deal with them as you presuppose them to be. Are they smart or not. Are they aggressive or not. What are they like as a personality. Do they seem like a friendly individual? Are they out type person? Are there aggressive person? What kind of individual are they? As I said, deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

Most people make the mistake of thinking that they can feel out the interviewer in the 1st few minutes. If you do that, unfortunately you're going to be paralyzing your personality while you feel out the interviewer. The mistake here, as I said, each of you decides within the 1st 10 minutes whether or not to pay attention to the remainder of the time. By hiding your personality, there is nothing for them to like. You want them to like you as a person.

As I mentioned earlier, the hardest part of getting a job is accomplished before you arrived. They are going to be making a snap decision about you just as you are going to be making about them. As I said, I want to encourage you to decide what this person is like as soon as you meet them. If the role, if you are in a social situation and you met some of the 1st time, 95% of the time your instincts about that person are going to be right.

Unfortunately, because it's an interview and you think it is important it is about a job in your career you really need or want this job, most people paralyze their personality behind it. I want you to trust your judgment. If the role, if you are at a casino in knew that you would win at craps 95 times out of 100, you wouldn't really worry about the 5% were you lost. If anything, you might get happy and excited. I'm going to encourage you to do the same thing. Size them up as a personality and deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

There going to escort you into an interview area or office; they may sit behind a desk with you on the other side, seated in a chair. Male or female, I want you to sit there comfortably with your arms on the armrests cross your legs in a position that is comfortable for you and before they say anything, before they have a chance to answer your 1st question, when I want to do is say this to them, "Thank you for taking the time to see me today."

If you were referred by a recruiter, you might continue by saying, "I spoke with, Jeff Altman about this role and he gave me a brief description but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the role as you see it and what I could do to help?"

If you are referred by a friend or you answered and ad, if it is a friend, you mentioned their name. If you saw an ad, you might start by saying, "I remember the position description I saw advertised and it seemed interesting, but I want to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

The reason I suggest this is very simple. Most of the time, it interview is like a karate match. They ask you a question in your reply. They start by saying, "Tell me about yourself," you do that. They going to more depth and you answer. Eventually, they get to the point where they ask whether you have any questions for them. You say, "Tell me about the job." They do that. You say, "It sounds great." And they tell you, "Terrific. We'll get back to you."

By asking the question at the beginning, you are getting information about the job at the beginning of the interview where you can use it to your advantage. I say use it because I want you to answer questions based upon what they tell you. I don't want to just talk about what you've done; I want to talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for.

Instead of droning on and on about things they don't care about, I want you to focus in like a laser on the points that matter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

You Need to Change Jobs to Get Ahead (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s critical for you to make strategic job changes periodically to get ahead.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the fact that you really need to change jobs from time to time. The system is set up to keep you in a tough position financially.

Think about it. If you stay in one organization, most people are going to get very modest salary increases. When you're the junior level, they may give you $5000 or $10,000. That may sound like a big percentage when you are making $50,000. They may say it is a 10% or 20% increase... But think about it. Archer costs going up even more? Isn't the government taking more in taxes? You are basically standing still.

When you become more experienced in the percentage increase comes down a lot (many individuals are getting 2%, 3% or 4% increases), even at that $50,000 level, haven't you noticed your insurance premiums have increased? Haven't you noticed that everything your bind cost a lot more than it used to? Movie tickets are going up?

Financially, the system is really set up to force you to change jobs. If you are getting that 3%, 4% or 5% raise, how do you get ahead financially?

Here's some simple math. If you change jobs as a $50,000 your person, and you change jobs for another $5000, if you didn't change jobs again, over the next 5 years receive the same modest increase of 3% or 4%, you probably be ahead by about $27,000 pretax. By changing jobs one time and staying there for 5 years, this is where you would pay.

If you change jobs one time and 3 years into your tenure with this 1 firm, you change jobs again, you would be $35,000 ahead pretax even though in the way that I've explained this you did not get a raise during that five-year period of time. I'm not saying that $5000 Is is a big increase. Obviously, it isn't.

But let's look at $10,000 or $15,000 increases and see what happens. If you get a $10,000 raise for changing jobs and stay there for 5 years, you would be about $53,000 ahead Given that modest 3% or 4% increase. If you changed jobs a 2nd time, you be about $74,000 or $75,000 ahead. How can you stay still at your current organization within give you a 3% decrease when they are just telling you that you are doing great work? That handshake they give you is not going to pay your bills when they start increasing!

My advice to you is to be smart.. Do what organizations do when they start establishing a budget. When things get tough, they do what's right for the stockholders and for the Board of Directors and they cut jobs, right? They look out for the business interests and, if that involves you, tough luck. You have to look out for the Board of Directors for your organization. "Atta boys," and, "Atta girls,"

"You're doing a great job. We're going to give you a promotion. You're doing great work."

I've got to tell you that other firms will have you do great work, too. AND you will make a lot more money.

My advice to you is to be smart and start looking for something else from time to time and if you just want to keep your profile up to date on LinkedIn and attract recruiters to it, think of it like a resume with keywords.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Endorsing What Is Happening | The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast


Listen to the full episode here:
https://anchor.fm/no-bs-coaching-advice

I share a story of my own life as a gateway to talking about something that may be happening to you.

Summary

Many years ago, I work for an employment agency in New York. The owner was obnoxious. Rude. Mean. Successful. Intolerant. Abusive and a whole bunch of other negative adjectives.

I put up with it for a number of years because I believed the economy was good and I didn't want to rock the boat. I wound up leaving when the economy turns sour and I could go to another place, would have the financial wherewithal to write it down , but I didn't want to rock my numbers nor disturbed my circumstances where I was making a lot of money at that time.

I tell the story because many of you are putting up with things unconsciously. I didn't consciously. I talked about it with a number of people and discuss of my choices were in evaluating situations. But many of you are at the point where you are being worn down by organizations and growing to tolerate bad circumstances. They may not be as abusive as the ones I was in, but bad circumstances nonetheless.

The funny thing is, when you start to tolerate them as I've grown to learn over the course of time, what you're doing is endorsing the behavior. You are basically saying, "It is okay to treat you in this manner. .

I'm not suggesting that you go off the handle and yell and scream or throw a tantrum. There are ways to cope with a manager or an owner, a person who is just abusive.

For you as a professional, I don't see a reason (and this is true myself, as well) to put up with abusive treatment. There is no reason to give them tacit endorsement for their behavior. Someone else will treat you well AND you will be able to make more money.

I want to be clear that I'm not telling you to move instantaneously but to wake up to the poor treatment that you are receiving and take action in your own time and in your own way. Waking up is the 1st step.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Are you interested in my coaching you?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

The Most Underutilized Feature on LinkedIn (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter offers advice about using the most underutilized feature of LinkedIn as part of your job search.

Summary

Him him and the most underutilized features on LinkedIn – – applications. But we're talking about applications. Were not talking about applying for jobs. We are talking about programs that are built into LinkedIn to provide additional services that are available for you to use for free. They may allow you to do something very simple-- put a resume on your LinkedIn profile. Put work samples or presentations that you've done. Useful information that people can pick up on on your LinkedIn profile.

Have you written a book? You can make reference to it on your LinkedIn profile. Applications are more than just things like this. It is a way that LinkedIn tries to be more social than their base product tends to be.

For your convenience, why don't have that presentation that you did 2 years ago, those powerpoints as part of your presentation, available on your LinkedIn profile to slideshare. Why not make it easier for people to find your resume by having it on your profile? They can actually see how you eat your backroom fits the job that they are recruiting for.

That's my reminder for today. Come over and look at LinkedIn profiles and spend some time playing around with the applications and see how they fit you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Strung Along? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 813 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a simple but elegant tactic for moving things along.

Summary

This 1 is a classic situation the job hunters run into. It's the one we keep going back for interview after interview after interview after interview... And it seems like there is no end in sight. What do you do?

I reminded of this because of the situation I had years ago with someone who I had interviewing with 1 of the investment banks. 19 interviews. I made a mistake in how I handled it. 19 people interview this guy over at least 7 or 8 occasions. Here's what I should've done and what I didn't do.

Somewhere along the 3rd or 4th interview I should've asked this question, "how much longer do you think this process is going to go on?"

"Gee. We don't really know. There are a lot of people who want to meet him that are represented by different constituencies within the firm. They all need to sign off."

I should've then continued by saying, "Well, he has other things going on and is going to be making a decision in the next 2 weeks. Do you think you can get things together in 2 weeks time. Otherwise, I'm sure he will withdraw his candidacy."

What that would've done is set a timeline for action. If they would have responded with, "Gee, I don't know," that would have basically indicated that they would have been shopping and shopping and shopping... And you never really know what the target is because they don't really know what it is.

I just want to encourage you that if you are in a situation where you going on lots and lots of interviews (I'm not talking about 2 or 3. I'm talking about, you are at number 4 or number 5 and nothing is really moving and they are not really indicating when things are going to be over), reach out to them after that interview and tell them,"C could you give me an idea how much longer this process is going to go on." Then, sit there quietly and listen to the answer.

If it is appropriate, then you turn and say, "I have a few other things in the hopper right now that are pretty close to fruition. I expect to have an offer on the next 2 weeks. Do you think you could be done in that amount of time or should we just pull the plug on this, which one another well and move on."

It's very graceful because you are giving them a timeline. You are not saying it in a demanding way with an ultimatum. You are just very politely saying, "I have my life to live. You have yours. We each have decisions to make and I am going to be doing minor the next 2 weeks. Do you think you can do yours in the amount of time."

If they don't like it, that basically indicates that this could go on forever.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

10 Steps to Prepare to Job Hunt

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses his ebook, “Get Ready for The Job Jungle.”

Summary

Well tell you very simply, is that you need to understand that there are steps in preparation for job hunting that I know that almost everyone fails to take. It's not just writing a resume; writing a resume is probably 1 of the least important things that you can be doing.

I have 10 things to do to prepare to get ready for a job search in this short guide.

How to work with recruiters well. Lord knows, most of you create adversarial relationships with recruiters.
Your LinkedIn profile and things that you can do there.
Career assessments.
Getting clear about what your goals are and how you want to live your life beyond simply finding yet another job.

10 things that you can do to get ready to job hunt.

This book is also good if you are in the middle of the search because, frankly, I would encourage you to stop for a short period of time in order to backtrack to do the steps here.

10 steps. Not a big deal.

1 of them. Take some time, but it's important one. At the end of the day, if you do these 10 things, you're going to find the job hunting is a lot easier than you are finding right now.

The book is called, "Get Ready for the Job Jungle: 10 Steps to Prepare for Your Job Search." Is an Amazon for the Kindle. Come over to www.TheBigGameHunter.us for the PDF of the product.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Is It OK To Hide a Job on My Resume? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

What do you think? I have my opinion.

Summary

A message from someone asked, "Is it okay to hide the job on my resume?"

There are so many different things I don't know here; I will just start by saying that if you are an employer and they find out, what is the impact on you? Answer… They fire you. Is it okay knowing that? You have to make the decision.

I also want to say that if we are discussing a job you have for 2 weeks, 15 years ago, no one cares. However, if what you are doing is changing your resume to hide something that (I'm picking something at random) one year 3 years ago and you are extending job dates and extending both dates in order to hide that one year that you don't want anyone to know about because you got a bad reference and were fired for cause, that's going to be a problem because they will find that one out. You see, employers to post employment background checks. Sometimes, they will do it before you join. And they will find out because they will contact your former employers directly and when a former employer hears an inconsistency in the date, they are going to out you. The firm that you have worked so hard to get the job with will probably withdraw the offer.

Again, if we are talking about something from 6 years ago, 10 years ago, 15 years ago and it is a very short duration, no one cares. However, if it is something more recent, would you care for was then and finding out that you are lying to? What other lies have they been told? That's the message they take from this.

Is it really okay to hide a job on your resume? No, it isn't okay. That's because if they find out, they will fire you. It doesn't matter how long you have been on board, that is going to happen. Just like those executives who, when they find out that they don't have the college degree that they claim, this is no different.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

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