The Two Best Questions to Ask at a Job Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you two great questions to ask at a job interview and when to ask them.

Summary

Today, I'm going to talk with you about the 2 best questions you should ask on every interview, you go on and when you should ask them. Let me start by reviewing the way a typical interview goes.

You walk in. You sit down. The interviewer looks and you and in that certain voice says, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally." You answer. Then, they ask you some follow-up questions and you answer those. If you are in disciplines that require certain objective knowledge like in IT, engineering or accounting, they will ask you some questions to measure your knowledge. Eventually, they will say, "So do you have any questions for us?" You will say, "Tell me about the job," and they will do that. You will say, "Sounds great." They will say, "Terrific. We'll get back to you." That is a typical interview.

Let's do a different interview. You walk in and sit down and, as the 2 of you get comfortable in your seats, just as the 2 of you have your derrière reached the seat, I would like you to start talking. You start by saying, "Thank you for making the time to meet with me today. I remember seeing the position description but wanted to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help?" If you been scheduled by an agent, you might say, "I spoke with Jeff Altman about the job and he gave me a brief description but I wanted to get your take on the role. Could you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help you?"

What this does is take the question you would normally ask at the end of the interview and moves it up to the very beginning. My thinking is even if you seen a job description, even if you reply to in hand or spoken to her recruiter, what you're able to do now is by moving a question to the beginning is get the current thinking about the job and tailor your answers to what matters to them.

You see, even if you seen the job description, from the time they start interviewing until now, they may have changed their thinking about it. As a result, you want to get their current thinking about the job, get that information at the beginning of the interview so you can use it to your advantage.

What are you going to do? Not lie but talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. You see, most people talk about what they've done in the course of the interview, but they don't talk about what they've done in the context of what the employer is looking for because they don't know until the end of the interview what they actually are looking for.

So that's a great question to ask and I have told you exactly when to ask it. So, since we taken that question out of the end of the interview, you can't just simply re-ask the question. You have to substitute a different question. This is the question I'd like you substitute at the end of the interview when they ask you whether you have any questions for them.

"Let's say it's a year from now and it comes time for you to give me my review. I have a just a good job. I have a just a great job. I have done 1 of the best that you have ever seen. What what I've done during that year that would cause you to give that kind of review?"

1. You are giving the employer the idea that you're not going to think small, but are prepared to do great work.
2. You are going to get an idea of how realistic they are in the thinking about the job. If the role, if they talk about something that will be absolutely crazy for you to have accomplished, how could you ever do it?

The real thing is that you are planting a seed in their minds about your drive for excellence, you're getting them to talk about the job and some of the day to day stuff in the role, differently than they might otherwise with a great question that I believe will give you a lot of terrific information.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Don’t Job Ads Include Salary? (VIDEO)


There are 2 primary reasons why job ads don’t include salary. I explained both to you here.

Summary

"Why don't job ads include salary?" Great question! It's really very easy. There are 2 answers – – one for you is the job hunter, one for them as the employer.

The one for them as the employer is that frankly, information is power and they who have the information controls the conversation. There is an impact to revealing salary information publicly.

1. Their own people get an idea of what their firm will pay for the what they believe is the same job. They can start to complain and drive salaries higher. Employers don't want to do that. They want people to stay in place and some people would like more than the range, some people will make less than the range or at the low end of the range. What happens is that you join in your at the low end of the range and discover the people internally have been making more, you get annoyed, right? They don't want people to know anything that takes advantage of the fact that people are pretty secretive about their salary. Firms use that against them to control the conversation with both outside people and their own staff.

To use an example, if they list the salary between $100,000 and $125,000, and they offer you $112,000, and you are making $95,000, that's a pretty good salary increase. However, you still wonder, "Why didn't I get $125,000?" You get annoyed; they suddenly start risking losing the new hire because you don't get the top number. If you never know what it is, you can just look at it and think, "Okay. I get a 12% increase (or whatever the percentages)," and feel good about it. After all, you don't know that, internally, they might be paying all these people $130,000.

Again, knowledge is power and firms want to control the conversation by not letting you know as an outside person so that they have an advantage in their negotiation AND they want to control it with regard to their internal staff so they don't annoy their own people so that they want to leave when they find out that they're willing to pay someone from the outside more than what they're willing to pay them.

Those are the 2 basic reasons. Sometimes, there are others. Usually, it is to come down to those 2.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I Was Fired at the End of My Probation . . . | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/07/i-was-fired-at-the-end-of-my-probation/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer an interview question about why you were fired at the end of your probationary period.

Summary

Here's the question. "I was let go for my last job at the end of my 6 month probationary period. How do I address this in future job applications and interviews?"

There are 2 ways to do this; I would hope that you have you both of these as truthful answers and not just lie to people.

Here is answer number 1. "I was brought on (let's say, on a contract to hire opportunity or I was hired as an employee with a six-month probation). At the end of 6 months, the work that I was needed for wasn't necessary. I was let go. I can see where they viewed me as a temporary solution for the immediate need that they had. I was let go at the end of the 6 months. " That's one way of answering.

Here's what I can read between the lines – – maybe your performance wasn't that good. You are left there within the probationary period. It is the way to respond to that. "I was hired with a six-month probation. The fact of the matter is I didn't perform as well as I could have. I made mistakes. I have been thinking about this and working at it and I have taken their feedback to heart. I can assure you that I have learned my lessons here to resolve the issues. I am now ready to roll."

That's the 2nd version how to answer that question where you did screw up. You can't deny it because they are going to background check you so pretending like there was no problem whatsoever won't work. If there were problems, you have to acknowledge them, indicate you formed your lessons and move on.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How to Answer Illegal Interview Questions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 829  Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer any illegal question you might be asked on a job interview. 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about 1 of those tough interview questions that show up from time to time. The question is when you are clearly as something that is illegal. You know, "How old are you anyway?" Or, "What is your maiden name?" Or, "Are you planning on having kids now?"

Your variety of different ways of answering questions like this. The 3 basic ones are:
1. You can answer the question. That just encourages them to try to go even deeper into the stuff.
2. You can say, "You can ask me that question! That's illegal question!" All that you've done up until this point to build rapport between yourself and the interviewer is out the window. You can pretty well kiss this job goodbye.
3. You can deflect it. Behind the question is fear on their part. They have a concern about you in some way.

For example, if I were asked, "So, Jeff, how old are you?" I can answer that I am 62, or I could answer, "You can ask me that!" Or, I could answer, "Out of curiosity, is there concern that because of my age. I can't really perform this role?"

"No no no no no no no! Nothing like that. I'm just curious."

"We just talk with you about my experience and how it could serve you very well." That becomes one way to answer.

If your woman being asked whether you are planning on having kids anytime soon, you can respond by not answering the question and saying, "I just want to be absolutely clear with you and Delaney concerns that you have that I am 100% behind my career. I am motivated and dedicated to really being successful professionally. I want to give you reassurance like that." You can use your language to that effect, give them the 22nd answer that basically says that you are dedicated to your career and then you can pause and smile at the end of that and let the subject move on.

What you've done is (1) there is no legal obligation for you do not have kids when you want to; (2) if given the answer that you are hoping for. So they should be ready to move on.

Basically, again, to summarize, if you are asked and illegal question, you have 3 choices. 2 or bad, and the 3rd 1 always their concerns that in some way, you might not really work out because of, in my case, my age or a woman's case, that you might be interested in having children.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Look for and Seize the Moments | The No BS Job Search Advice Podcast

Kurt Warner’s Hall of Fame Induction speech brought me to tears (which you can hear) . Yet it was the last few lines that I presented on the show where Warner delivers magic.

Summary

I don't know how I am going to get through this 1 without crying. Some not going to. I'm just going to cry if that's necessary. I do the show regularly to talk about some element of life, the universe and everything. So far, it has been about 4 days a week that I come out with the show.

I want to do yesterday, but I couldn't pull it together to do it. This show is going to be based upon parts of the Kurt Warner Hall of Fame induction speech that was done this past Saturday night. If you haven't seen it, watch it on YouTube. I'll think it matters which one you watch.

Warner has an incredible story. I'm going to pull from the very end of the speech and allow you to watch it. If you're not familiar with it.

What he says at the end of his speeches. He says, "We don't get to choose the nature of our moments. . . . We don't get to choose the substance of our moments. . What we get to do is choose what we do with those moments."

He encourages people to see these your moments . . . That moment with your kids, your spouse, your siblings, with your friends, your teammates, and, as a football player, his players.

Knowing the back story to his life makes it that much were touching that he could stand there and deliver the speech having been a guy who bagged groceries, ran out of money and just got lucky to have an opportunity with people who looked out for him.

Enjoy watching the video or reading the speech. As you can tell from my voice. For me it was very touching.

Again, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. Look for moments of your life and sees them as he did.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” “No BS Job Search Advice,” and “Job Search Radio.”

Are you interested in my coaching you?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Subscribe to the “No BS Coaching Advice” podcast.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

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