How to Answer the One Question That Every Employer Needs Answered (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer that one question that is on every employer’s mind when they interview.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about how to answer the single most important question that employers try to find out from you. Do you know what that question is?

Can you do the job? Can you do the job they need to have filled? Most of you have no idea what the job is when you apply for it.

You may have seen an ad. You may have seen some place or you may have been told something about the job… But you really just don't know. If you posted your resume on a job board all you're going to do is talk about yourself, but the most important thing that you can do is contextualize what you've done and how it relates to what they need.

How do you do that? How do you find out what they really need to have done? It's really simple. Let's say, you get a call out of the blue.

Ring ring. Ring ring.

"Hi I am Nancy Recruiter from ABCDEF Corporation (by the way, if there is a firm out there by that name, my use of that name is purely fictitious). Is this Jeff Altman?"

"Yes."

"I saw you resume the job board want to have a chance to speak with you about a position. Is this a good time to talk?"

"Sure, Nancy, I'll be happy to speak with you. Nancy, before we get started, maybe I can just ask you , could you give me an idea of the position you have in mind for me and what I might be able to do to help you?"

Noticed, what I'm trying to do is find out about the job before I start answering questions.

The next alternative... You are in the physical job interview. An in person interview. Maybe you've seen an ad and you are now at the interview and you are now escorted to sit down with Nancy Recruiter. As soon as the 2 of you lower your butts into the seat, I would like to start speaking and say, "Thank you so much for making time to meet with me today. I recall the position I saw advertised but I want to get your take on the role. Could you tell me about the job as you see the what I can do to help you?"

Again, a simple way to find out about the job at the beginning of the interview where you can use that information to help sell your credentials. Obviously, if you are introduced by recruiter… "Hi! I spoke with Jeff Altman about the job and he gave me a brief description. I want to get your take on the role. You tell me about the job as you see and what I can do to help?"

Again, always try to find out about the job before you start answering questions.

It certainly possible that that they might say, "We'll get to that later on. I want to ask a few questions of you." What you've done is learn something about them right then and there. They like to do things close to the vest, they don't like to be particularly transparent. They would rather play gotcha.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Turn Down a Job Offer With Class When The Money Is Too Low?


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I am going to turn down their offer because they came in too low. How do I turn it down with class?

Summary

I received an interesting question is really geared toward a freelancer by think they can be applied to job hunters, as well. It's basically about turning down an offer. When the money isn't good enough and how do you do it with class. Here's the original note and then I will translate it for job hunters.

This person is a freelance writer and I get cold calls for job opportunities. They are in a position where they can afford to be choosy about which projects they take on. GREAT! This is exactly what everyone should do, whether you are freelancer or job Hunter.

He got a call from someone with an interesting job description but the money was way low for what he normally works on with his clients. He doesn't specify a percentage but just describes it as "way low."

"How do I turn this offer down with class while subtly making the point that they want to hire someone with my capabilities, they need to pay me 8 times what they offered me?"

As a job hunter, you are into problems like this all the time. You get calls from recruiters, you get calls from referrals, that land on your doorstep and the money is way off.

Job hunters often react foolishly by taking it personally. They get indignant. "WHAT!? This job should be paying . . . " They bark and they carry on like a little poodle. They bark at the recruiter. They bark at the manager who has the particular need. They bark at the person who wants to refer them. It's goofy.There is a better way to do it and one demonstrates class

What you simply say is, "I really appreciate you contacting me. It sounds like a great opportunity, but my rate is much higher than what you're prepared to offer for this role. I can recommend people to you and perhaps for the list over to you, but I think you may run into the same problem. For me, this is about 20% of what I normally charge. I will love to help you in the future, but this is way low for me. Here are few people who might be willing to take up on a project like this." Then you refer them to others.

Referring them to others is a classy thing to do. Then, is up to those individuals to decide whether it is good enough for them or whether they should refer the job out to others as well. Doing it in a way with style is to demonstrate that you have people you can point them to is to do it in a way that is not shaming, critical or disturbed in any way by what has been proposed. It is flattering that they reached out to you but, the fact of the matter is, the money isn't right.

Better to do it with style as you requested and just give them a referral to someone else.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

No BS Coaching Advice

No BS Coaching Advice August 1 2017

The August 1 2017 edition of No BS Coaching Advice Ezine

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

No B. S. Resume Advice: Templates?


In this short video, Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from using resume templates.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about resume templates. 1st of all, there are millions of them all over the web. Frankly, don't use them. I'm going to make it that simple. Don't use them. Here's why.

1. You have to comply with their format. Yes, you can look for lots of different formats. You really want to take that time?

2. The issue is that the template or the format. The issue is the content that you are putting in. You may think is attractive and presents very nicely, but it may cause problems for the reader. All of us, whether a corporation or a recruiting firm, are using applicant tracking systems. We are looking to parse data. We are not manually rekeying things. We don't want to copy your resume and pasted into your system. Whether a corporate recruiter or an agency recruiter, all the software is designed to parse resumes into particular fields. A lot of the templates have embedded headers. That can cause a problem because a lot of applicant tracking systems have trouble reading embedded header. They have to manually rekeying your information. You are now officially a pain in the ass.

3. Some people aren't cognizant of how the resume fits into the template. Sometimes, I see resumes that are cut off midfield or midsentence because a person didn't pay attention the fact that the sentence that they were writing didn't fit into the field correctly for the template that they were using. As a result, the sentence scrolls out of view. As a result, you always have to take a look at it.

4. The real issue is about parsing and ensuring that your resume is parsable by all of us who receive it. For large companies, the issue becomes about government reporting. They may delete your resume if it doesn't parse.

If you're using the template, you may have problems that you will never be conscious of, but are impacted by. If you're sending it to a recruiting firm, you don't want to be a problem resume to them and frankly, most of the template so you can look that good.

It is fine to copy the look of the template, but don't actually use one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Stupid Interview Mistakes: The Top Questions to NEVER Ask at a Job Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you 5 questions to NEVER ask at a job interview if you want to get a job offer. 

Summary

Today I want to talk about some of the worst questions, the questions you should never ask on any job interview. As much as I expect maturity, intelligence and professionalism from people, every once in a while I get surprised. Rather than commit these gaffes on the interview, I would rather head them off.

So let me talk with you about the time questions you should never ask a job interview.

1. "By the way, what does your company do?" Why would you ever asked this question? Why didn't you just Google the firm's website before the interview? Why didn't you just spend some time on their website to learn what the firm does in advance of your interview? If you are interviewing with the startup that's in stealth mode, I'm sure you can find something on Mashable or TechCrunch that my talk about what the firm is trying to do. Regardless, you can just Google and find out what the company does? When you ask a question like this, you send the message to an employer that they don't like.

2 & 3. Do you do a background check?" The Cumberland the question is, "Do you do drug testing?" I laughed at these questions because you have obviously sent up an enormous red flag for them that says, "There's a problem in my background," or, "There's an issue with my background." You have told him that there is an issue with such a thing.

4. "Do you have any other jobs available?" You basically told him that's a not interested in what they are talking with you about. You are better off continue through with the interview in a very professional way. If they ask, "Are you interested," you can be honest and tell them that you have some questions about whether this is the right role for you. It will allow you to get your questions answered. If you do have questions about the job. It's very mature they ask a question like this.

5. "What's your insurance coverage like?" What are things you don't want to cover the early stages of interviewing or early stages of a job search with the firm's benefits. You want everything focused on your ability to do the job, that you have a lot of passion and enthusiasm for "doing the job," you are there to help them satisfy THEIR needs, you are not there to have yours fulfilled AT THIS TIME.

That is a point later on in the interview where they are starting to fall in love and started to lust after you and you can start dealing with benefits. Initially ago stay off this question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why You Don’t Even Get The Interview. (VIDEO)


Simulcast of No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio: Why You Don’t Even Get The Interview

Summary

I was coaching someone yesterday who is up a position and in the course of the conversation, he reminded me of something in his circumstances that I thought would be helpful to you as well.

What he reminded me of was paying attention to the language that is used in the job description or the questions that are asked by HR that signal certain things that may not be obvious. For example, in his case, he was told by HR that the next interview was with someone who is trying to 4X growth within the particular business unit.

We were working on language to use that illustrated his experience with that. The language that we came up with was his background with "aggressive growth." Instead of using the usual metrics of percentages, their language was to talk in terms of "times." He was involved with almost 3X growth in the previous situation.

Recognize that there are signals that are used in job descriptions or in the questions that HR asks that can be a signal to you of how to communicate with them and the kind of information they are looking for.

Another thing that came up in a different conversation was concerned that one firm had about someone where they perceived his background was more internally oriented, rather than externally oriented. He was savvy enough to pick up on that and said, "I just want to be clear about my background. I've had 5 years of internal experience and and, of those 5, 3 of them were taking internal programs and bringing them to customers and converting them from internal systems to external systems, thus, of my 20 or 22 years of background, 17 of them really related to external customers."

Notice one going with us. You always want to be listening for cues that are coming in job descriptions or in interviews that signal the real interest that the firm has because job descriptions are a list of qualifications that they look for. You are looking for what you can do for them. You are looking for ways that you can demonstrate that you as a professional, with your staff level individual or in the C suite, have the capacity to deliver what it is that they want. As you know, sometimes these job descriptions and sometimes their questioning is a little obtuse.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

A Few Ideas About Informational Interviews | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 826 A few ideas about how to use informational interviews more effectively

Summary

I wanted to talk with you about informational interviews today. I know you know the part that they are not about asking for jobs. However, they are about building relationships and I want to start with you about a few simple approaches to them.

1. If you're going to be reaching out to someone to ask them to introduce you to someone on LinkedIn, for example, give them an idea of the questions that you want to be asking this person. For example, someone emails or messages me and says, "Would you introduce me to so-and-so. I would like to pick their brain about something." I know if that's can be a worthwhile use of someone's time, but if you say to me, "I would like to talk to them about (not finding me a job) have their field is developing, how they got to their firm, where they see trends are, "stuff along those lines that does not appear to be an abusive use of someone's time, I'm very happy to provide an introduction. I can forward those questions to this person at the time that I reach out to them. I think on LinkedIn, in particular, but it the works outside of LinkedIn in the off-line world is well.

2. After you meet with someone, instead of an email thank you note, take the time to actually write a thank you note... Hand write it (assuming your handwriting is good, of course. If it isn't, be careful with your writing in order to ensure that you understood.). The hand written quality to this is a nice touch.. I don't believe in doing this after real interview because time is of the essence and you don't have time to mail it before they make a decision. Since you're not applying for a job, per se, what you're doing is picking someone's brain and opening dialogue with them that, hopefully over time will help you develop a relationship where they feel comfortable referring you, where they may feel comfortable hiring you or talking with you about being hired, it is a relationship building tool. Time is not of the essence and thus, I hand written card is a nicer touch.

3. Sometimes when you are in an informational interview, you want to create the circumstances for reciprocity. I think this is a big strategy that people neglect because they think that everything is all about ME. . What I need what I need. They forget to say things like, "Is there anything I can be helping you with? I don't know if you see my background or not, but this is what I do." It opens up the possibility where they pick your brain for ideas.

4. Here's a fun technique. If there is something that you are asked about that you don't really know, instead of just simply saying, "That's not my turf. I don't really know." Circle back after you've done the research, after you have taken the time to think, let this person know what you've researched and found out for them. Give them something back, even if you take more time than they did. Why? Do you think it's impressive, especially if the quality of what you've done is good? Do you think you create an impression? That's what you're trying to do in all of this is to create an impression with someone AND receive information. It's a two-way street here and you want to take advantage of the opportunity. Even if their 1st question, or their 5th question is one that you don't know, go back to them afterwards, do the homework,, find out, dig deep, put in the effort. Give it back to them and say, "I was thinking about our conversation and I know I came up blank on your questions about such and such. I did all bit of homework and this is what I found."

You can also do this on a real job interview, but normally it is not enough to get over the hump and be brought back into consideration. Informational interviews, since you're not being evaluated for a job, you create the impression of tenacity and perseverance and effort which s few people demonstrate these days.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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