Should I Respond to a 3rd Party Recruiter or Apply for a Job Directly? (VIDEO)


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Should I respond to a 3 party recruiter for a job that their client or apply directly at the company’s job page. If I don’t like working with pushy recruiters?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I had a great question asked that I paraphrased in the title: “Should I respond to a 3 party recruiter at their client or apply directly at the company’s job page. If I don’t like working with ‘pushy recruiters?'” Ooooh! Pushy recruiters!
1st of all, we don’t know what makes you think THIS RECRUITER is pushy. As someone who used to work in the search (and I no longer do so I don’t have skin in the game), a lot of people think a recruiters pushy because they reached out to them to talk with you about the job or because they wanted to talk with you about the job. That is not a pushy recruiter. That is someone who is doing what the company hires them to do– locate talent to fill So if you think this definition of pushy is pushy you are mistaken.
If you think someone is pushy because they are yelling, arguing and abusive, I suspect you gotten nowhere near that point you. That’s because this is a person who’s done a cold call or reached out to you through LinkedIn for advice. This is not being pushy. Again, this is what firms hire them to do.
Next is whether you should apply directly. Hmmm. You mean, go through the black hole. Go through the computer system that is designed to filter people out. One in a million years would you want to put yourself in that position? Why would you ever apply for job in that manner? Let me go one level deeper. Why would you ever be a thief and still proprietary information and use it to your advantage?
To me, this is no different than stealing software. This is no different than being a thief. That’s because you are taking information. It is not known to you at the beginning and using it to your own advantage, taking away the ability of someone to earn a living from it. Bad karma, folks, the stated very clearly. It is a very bad move on your part. You are just being a thief.
Should you respond to the recruiter? Yes. If they decide not to submit you, find out why. . From there, if the reason is cogent, accepted. If not, then apply directly. The probability is that they are not there to filter people out; they are there to screen people in because they are not paid to reject people. They desperately want to refer people who are qualified. If they tell you you are not qualified, you probably aren’t… Unless you done a bad job of presenting yourself, of course.
Go through the recruiter who told you about the opportunity and then, from there, if you are not presented to their client, then apply for the role.

The Nuances to Writing a Resume | Job Search Radio


Debra Mastic and I spend time helping you understand how a resume navigates a hiring pipeline and how to write a great resume.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching throughout your search, interview coaching or help with a salary negotiation?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line. In the body of the email, tell me what you would like help with.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Why Do Recruiters Ask You About Things They Can Find Out in Your Resume | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


There are 2 reasons why recruiters ask questions about things that they can already find out in your resume. Here, I lay them out simply for you.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why do recruiters ask about things they can already find out in my resume?"

This may be a shock to you and if it is, I apologize to you for sharking you.However, I always have to answer with "no BS." for why they do this.

The 1st reason is that people lie.They don't tell the truth. Thus, when you put them on the spot during an interview,, sometimes they give you information than what's on the resume.

Assuming that you are a "truth teller," and your 1st reaction was to groan about people lying, another thing that we are trying to do (Although I don't do recruiting anymore, I did for more than 40 years and have a good idea of the my thought process when I was doing this),I wanted to see if I want to hear how you tell the story Of what you did and how you went about doing it So that I would get a sense of how you interviewed.

For me, if I stumbled into someone who is trying to con me, that was a "bonus point."I am assuming that everyone is telling me the truth in the resume.In telling me the truth in the resume I'm moving onto the next thing, which is if I'm going to invest my time and energy in representing someone, how are they going to perform on an interview? Do I have a chance of earning a fee? If not, (buzzer sound) I delete the resume because it is a waste of my time, no matter how good you think you are. My client won't wind up hiring you. Do you understand?

We don't do things to "find you a job." You are paying nothing. What recruiters do is fill a position with a client and the client pays us.As a result, you are the person who will allow us to earn the fee… Or not and we are trying to figure that out.

In telling us what you've done and how you went about doing it, You are helping us to discern between different people because we can't submit everyone. We are not paid to submit resumes as though they are a burger at a fast food restaurant.What recruiters are paid to do is to deliver someone who the client has determined that they need because the person has a particular background and a particular personality type who will do the job and has particular skills that they have specified.

If you cannot interview well, if you can't interview well with the recruiter, (buzzer sound) they will hit the delete key because they have no chance of hurting a fee.

So take it seriously. Don't just simply question why they're asking you these questions and wasting your time because they aren't. You are wasting their time if you don't deliver wellAnd demonstrate that you have the required skills that their client is looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Another Job Search Lesson from “The Godfather” (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers another pearl of wisdom from “The Godfather” to teach you about loyalty to your employer.

Summary

This is a quote from the 1st movie where the oldest son, Santino, talks to Michael is about to enter the military.  I think this is the scene where he gives in a noogy.  This is the quote: 

"Your country aint your blood.  Remember that."  It is not in typical James Caan fashion.

The lesson here is going to pertain to job search.  It isn't about your country. It's about the company you work for.  

A lot of the way you've been trained to think about employers is propaganda from the employer's perspective.  The training you to be loyal.  It's about working hard for the organization and rising up through the ranks.

"Don't change jobs too often.  After all…" Lots of cautionary tales that basically tell you to keep your mouth shut and go to work.

The lesson here is really what do employers do on their side?  They do whatever is necessary to stay afloat.  Most firms will do that ethically; on occasion, there are some firms that will do it unethically and sometimes, illegally.  With regard to how they deal with employees, frankly, employees are disposable.  They use you as long as they can. If they don't need you, you are gone.  If economic circumstances change, your gone.

You need to conduct your career in much the same way, too.  You can't just sit there waiting patiently for some of the tapping on the shoulder and say, "I think you're ready for that promotion to program her grade level II."  (I just use that as an example of 1 of those stupid institutional titles that employers sometimes use)

Instead, think in terms of what is going to advance your career.  What is going to help you get ahead?  That can be internally or externally.  As I've said many times, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those are great qualities to have).  The people who get ahead are the ones who are alert to opportunity.  Sometimes those are internal to their current organization. But, more often than not, they are external to it.

When you're tapped on the shoulder for an internal opportunity, is normally as a result of the patient, slow ascent up through the ranks.  When you're tapped on the shoulder externally, it is because someone sees something in you that they want.  They believe they need.  They think you have it.  

That is a halo that allows you to leverage that situation much more aggressively.

Isn't that really what is about?

It isn't about rising through the ranks slowly because the think you're ever going to get to the point where the 65 years old and retiring from these firms? Of course not. They will get rid of you way before then, or make the conditions untenable for you way before that.

You need to think of your career as being a series of steps, up through the ranks. Sometimes, you will make mistakes. You want to be in a position where you are in charge of your life, not your employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The “Not One Single Person Gets Off” Brainteaser (VIDEO)


There is a bus traveling to the Hay River full of people and no one gets off the bus throughout the journey.

Summary

I have another brainteaser in a long long time. I thought I would do want today and see if you would get the answer. Here's the question:

There is a bus traveling to the Hay River full of people and no one gets off the bus throughout the journey. When the bus gets to the Hay River, not a single person is left on the bus. How is this possible?

The trick in most brainteasers is that there is a keyword or phrase you have to listen to and catch before it sneaks by you. That is the key to answering the problem.

Were you able to spot the keyword in there?

The keyword in the question is "single." As in, "not a single person got off the bus."

The answer is it is because all of them were married.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

After The Interview (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what to do AFTER the interview. If there is a reference to any jobs on recruiting for, these positions were filled years ago.  I no longer do recruiting.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

what are you tolerating?

What Are You Tolerating? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Summary

I was doing a coaching call yesterday with someone and we got to a point in our conversation where he said something wonderful. What he said (and I think it is very relevant for you as a job hunter), he asked himself the question, "What am I tolerating?" I asked the question of you-- What are you tolerating? What are you putting up with, what was he putting up with, what was he putting up with in his current job that he knew he didn't like, but you just grown so numb to it where he grew to tolerate the condition?

For you as a job hunter, particularly when you get to the counteroffer phase or the resignation phase, which may lead to the counteroffer, it is important for you to be conscious of the things that you are putting up with work that just really don't serve you. That's because when you get to the point when you resign and your employer says, "What is it going to take? What is it going to take to keep you," and they start selling you about the money, is not just the money that is been driving you out the door. It is the things that you been putting up with for the longest time there really forcing you to look at other choices.

So, again, write down the things that you are tolerating, the things that you're putting up with that you really don't care for were there making you emotionally numb rather than conscious and passionate and loving everything about your work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t Waste Peoples’ Time (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not waste peoples’ time when you submit your resume.

Summary

So far today, I have been wasting my morning reading resumes that in no way, shape or form fit anything that are submitting them for.

There is one example. Resume I just received for an IT director's job. The cover email they sent was terrific. I must say, this person writes a great cover letter.

The only problem is that the resume doesn't back it up. So I write this cover letter, he tells me about all this wonderful work that is done at the last firm, and in the last industry he worked in. He has been consulting since then. Then, you open up the resume and discover that he has worked as a consultant for the last 10 years (that is absolutely fine). However, he summarized that last 10 years in 5 lines of which 2 of those lines were less than half of a line.

Let's just say it is for lines to cover 10 years of experience.

Do you think my client will actually believe this cover letter? I know I don't. I had a lot of smoke alone at me and my time wasted because this person is too lazy to actually give me some data about what he did, probably because he knows that will knock them out of consideration because it was nonsense work.

For you out there, be considerate of other people and their time. By being considerate I'm asking you not to spam your crap at me.

If you have the skills needed for the job, demonstrated the fit in your resume. If you don't, don't spam your resume. You are nothing more than a Cialis spammer at that point.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

What Should I Do Before My First Interview For a Job? (VIDEO)


Here are a few ideas if things you can do before your first job interview.

Summary

I was asked the question on Quora today. The question translates into, "What should I do before my 1st job interview?" I think it's a pretty simple question and that most people know the answer to it . But this person is a little frightened and it's understandable.. It's the 1st 1.

1. Lighten up on yourself.. Reduce some of the pressure. There will be other interviews after this. You want to do well. Think of it as great practice. Even with thinking about it is great practice, you want to do a certain amount of preparation.

2. Make sure you have an appropriate wardrobe. You want to be dressed properly for the kind of job you are interviewing for. Obviously, if you are interviewing for training program at an investment bank, you would dress differently than a job in Silicon Valley and differently than you mind if you are interviewing at Whole Foods for job. So dress appropriately for the dictation.

3. Start to do a little research about the job is involved. How do you do that research? In all probability there was a job you that you applied for or you are referred by someone. Look for the job description or talk with your friend who referred you for the job about the position and what is being sought.

4. Start to prepare answers to predictable questions that firms might ask you. Don't notice what some of them are? Go to www.thebiggamehunter.us and visit the blog area. Look for tough interview questions among the tags that I have for the blog. Start the practice answers for tough interview questions. Start with the basics like, "Tell me about yourself," and then go on from there.

It isn't enough to think the answer. You have to hear it come out of your mouth. It is best if not only you hear come out of your mouth but you practice with someone who is able to give you constructive feedback. I'm not talking about feedback like, "That's sucked." You want to get someone who will listen to you speak and say something like, "The way you spoke you sounded a little frightened or scared. " Maybe they say something like, "The way you spoke, you spoke quickly and was hard to follow you." Whatever it is, look for someone who can give you that kind of feedback in order to help you improve.

5. Practice. Practice. Practice.

6. Everyone tells you research the firm. It isn't like it's hard to do that. Go on the web. Go on the website. See what they do. You probably already know it. But, assuming that you don't, find out what they do. Go on LinkedIn and look at the person or people you will be interviewing with. If you aren't connected to them in any way, try a Google search or one using www.li-usa.info. That's a US centric site to look at LinkedIn public profiles of people in the United States. If the person doesn't have a LinkedIn profile, obviously, you're not defined. But it searches all public LinkedIn profiles in the United States. Look at their background; that will let you know if they are it in HR or a hiring manager.

Again, practice, practice, practice. Practice to the point where you seem sincere and believable. After all, when you go to the theater and watch the show or go to a movie, you don't start thinking, "Oh! That's so and so on the screen or on the stage." You start seeing them in character pretty quickly. They have rehearsed to be that simple in their presentation and so believable in the role, you forget that they are human being playing a part. You see them in that part and has that part. That's what you want to be doing. You want to be believable, credible. You want to be a human being who is looking for a job, not just simply an "applicant."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Starting a Negotiation with Yes (VIDEO)


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
.
It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

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