Who Should You Network With to Find a Job? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly who you should be networking with to find a job.

Summary

Today's question is, "we all know that networking is the primary way that people find jobs." You do know that, don't you? As a matter of fact, the statistics show job boards fill about 6% of all positions. Recruiters fill about 20%. There is overlap in those 2 numbers because recruiters may find a resume from a job board. Let's get job boards total credit. They fill 26% of all positions. The rest of filled networking. The question becomes who do you network with? How do you find that who the right person is for your next job?

The question of who you should network with is really easy. The answer is EVERYONE! EVERYONE you come into contact with should be someone that you networking with. I'm not telling you to have a conversation with your butcher and say to them, "Hey! I'm trying to find the job," because all that's going to happen is are going to think you can afford what you buying.

I'm telling you that there are so many people that you come into contact with you could be talking with about what it is that you do and just say, "If you know of someone or could point me to someone, it would be really great."

My favorite story about networking comes from someone who runs a networking group. He tells a story about someone in his group that lost their job with 1 of the banks. Is cleaning person overheard the conversation he was having with someone over the phone and asked whether she could have a copy of his resume. Thinking that she was ONLY a cleaning person, he could've pooh-poohed the request and then give her the resume. She asked again about a week later and he still didn't do it. Finally, she asked his wife and the wife came to him and said, "Would you give her a copy of the resume? It's only a piece of paper."

As it turns out, her husband, ran a large group at another bank. She worked as a cleaning person as part of her religious practice of humility and, as a result, he found his next job was cleaning person.

There are people that you know at your church, synagogue or mosque . . . Temple . . . Any number of places who can be of help to you. You need to make people aware. It isn't about telling people that you're looking for work is a critical mistake. Not telling folks that you're connected with on LinkedIn that you can use some help is a huge mistake. Unless people know that you need help, they are not going to help you.

A great story from a few years ago . . So I know work at the old Merrill Lynch and I listen to an audio tape that they used to give to their top performers. These are the top salespeople who worked at the old Merrill Lynch. Huge performers! Great salespeople! They had this trainer who they flew out to Hawaii to meet with the top 1/10 of 1% of all salespeople at Merrill Lynch and he says to them, "How would you like me to increase your business and will only take about 6 seconds? 6 seconds that you can invest in every phone call." They all look around and think to themselves, "6 seconds and you can increase your business by 8%? That would be terrific!"

"You in the front row. Time this. Here's what you have to say in every call. 'Is there anyone else you know who I can be helping?'"

For you, you want to be helping people and also want to be sure that they know that you can use some help. You just want to simply say, "I just want to remind you that I am looking for a job. This is what I do. If you hear of something, don't hesitate to make me aware of it or point someone to me."

It's really simple and straightforward approach to networking. It's something that you can do all the time..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Lying | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/05/26/stupid-interview-mistakes-lying

EP 755 It’s one thing not to remember, it’s another thing not to remember. In this video, Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from lying during your job search. 

Summary

Some years ago on, "Saturday Night Live," Jon Lovitz played a character named Tommy Flanagan. Tommy was a guy who is a pathological liar; If you have a chance on YouTube, there are quite a few videos there. The tagline that Jon Lovitz used as the character was, "Yeah, that's the ticket. Yeah. Yeah. That's the ticket!" Every time he said that phrase, you knew he was telling a lie.

There are going to be times in your job search that you will be tempted to lie. I want to discourage you from doing it. Just try to remember this reminder. You can get away with some lines for a while but, as is the case in your personal life, lies will be exposed and found out.. The problem with that, as happened to someone I will tell you about in a minute, one day you may be met by security at your desk. They will escort you out with your possessions. That will be it. You will have to explain to people why you were fired. You will have to find another job on the heels of having been fired from lying.

Some years ago, there was a person I was representing for position at a bank who was hired, he lied as to whether or not he had a college degree. The degree was not a requirement for the position, there was no reason to lie. I had told him that this was the firm that would do a copious background check and yet he still felt compelled to lie. His first Friday of employment with this firm, he was met by security at his desk as he came back from lunch and allowed to pack up a small box of his things and was escorted out of the building.

Another instance, again, with another firm where I had warned someone about life. "This is a firm that will meticulously go through your resume to try to find inconsistencies. That 1st Friday, he was met by the head of HR who we had a frank conversation with, he confessed to the lie, again, he was escorted out the door with his possessions in a box. He was out of work like the other gentlemen for quite some time before he could land another position.

Maybe that part wouldn't be a part of your experience, but do you really want to test it?

It's one thing to be unsure of the date on your resume or the exact salary that you earned 15 years ago. It's another thing to exaggerate by $15,000 or $20,000 what your salary was a year ago. It's another thing to hide the date on the resume by extending forward or backward a date by a dramatic amount.

I'll simply say that if you are not sure about a date from a long time ago, or a salary from 10 years ago for example,Next to that date or salary, just put the expression, "approx." When asked about it, say, "I wasn't exactly sure and I didn't want you to think that I was lying to you. I would rather just reveal to you that I was not sure and put in that phrase 'approx' so that you don't have a concern about me." That solves that issue..

To go out of your way and lie, you risk putting yourself and your family into a huge bind and a firm cannot help from firing you. Why? I use an example from someone I knew some years ago who made this mistake, he was working for the securities firm. He was found out for some lie that he told. He pleaded his case with them for staying on board.

I paraphrase the language that was used. Suppose this individual had embezzled grandma's life savings And a lawyer had found out that he had lied on the application. (1) do you think the firm would've lost a court case? Of course! they kept the liar on board and it is no wonder that he embezzled grandma's life savings. If it was your grandma that was involved,, would you have wanted this person fired and the firm fined? of course! (2) I'm sure their liability insurance won't pay off if that employee is found to have life. They knew about it and then he or she committed a crime.

Just make it easy on yourself. It's one thing not to be sure; it's another thing to go out of your way and lie. Do you really want to risk losing your job after you are on board, settled in and spent all this time working to find a job only to get fired because you were stupid enough to lie.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Avoid Creating a Franken-Resume | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you from creating “a Franken-resume.”

Summary

What is a "Franken-resume?"

It is a hodgepodge from an old resume to something that you it into updated... And the old stuff doesn't matter anymore. As a result, it is like a Frankenstein resume.

Think about it. If you look back at your resume at the things you did 5 years ago, 10 years ago, does it even matter? What matters about it to people? I guess the
on this show, Marcus Ronaldi,commented that some old resumes master email. 20 years ago, that mattered. Do you think anyone cares today that you mastered email?

Your resume may have some of that old, legacy kind of comments in it and you haven't looked at in the neck context. All you have been doing for years is probably one update on top of another, haven't changed the tenses on the old information to the past tense, and now today you have a Franken-resume.

Before you send a resume out to people, if you have updated it with new information, start at the very end of your resume and work your way forward. You will be more patient with yourself. If you do it that way that if you work from the top and work your way back in time. Trust me. I've seen so many people do this and it works much better.

Again, make sure your resume isn't a hodgepodge of antiquated stuff that makes you look obsolete anyway. Pay attention to what is written. Change the tenses and update it well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

 

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Making Assumptions About Sexual Orientation

EP 825 I discuss a mistake many make, job hunters, corporate and third party recruiters make.

Summary

This is another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes I see people make all the time. It involves the habit of how we were acculturated in the US that comes into play that shows up in interviews where you make assumptions about "the other" that you can't make. There's so it goes.

You look across the table. There is a woman sitting there and you referred to her husband. Well, I'm gonna remind you of something. Same-sex marriage in the United States is legal. You now have to say something different. You now have to say something like, "husband, wife or partner. " If the role, she may be married to a man… She may be married to a woman she may have a partner. As a result, if you start saying things that assume that she is heterosexual, you are going to send up flags for the gay audience, and rightly so. You are denying the fact that they could be married.

Folks, I know some of you may be rolling your eyes and say things like, "Oh! Man!" Get over yourself! This is a fact. I'm going to say the from the job hunter perspective, you make the same mistake as employers do when you reference people as though they are heterosexual. You may see a man sitting opposite you; 35 years old. You notice a ring on their finger on the way in. You feel good that you notice that he's married... And then you refer to his wife... And maybe he is married to a woman. But maybe he isn't. In not referring to, "wife, husband or partner," I can assure you that he would hear an "ouch" that hits them in the gut. When it comes time to evaluate you to consider accepting your job offer, it weighs heavily. You can't help it. Nor would you want to.

People couldn't deny it does because they tend to be kind and say things like, "it takes time to change the habit." Saying, "wife, husband or partner," isn't necessarily going to get you "brownie points." But the fact is, you don't want to offend, right? That's true whether you are a third-party recruiter, a corporate recruiter or job hunter.

At the end of the day, same-sex marriage is legal. Get used to a different language because otherwise, you are going to hurt yourself somewhere along the line, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Preparing for the Fly-In Job Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers 7 tips to help you prepare for a fly-in job interview. ‘

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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