Developing A Brand For Your Career and Your Job Search (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter identifies the importance of your brand in your job search and why you should work on one now.

Summary

You may have heard of the term, "branding," in the context of job hunting, maybe even start doing some work on branding--Creating a profile for yourself on LinkedIn, developing a reputation for yourself in your profession . . . That's all fine and good but if you 1st learning about branding,, congratulations. You are Going to be doing work to help yourself not on this job search but on your next one. That's because the fact is branding is that something that you do overnight And suddenly people go, "oh! That's Lady Gaga in front of us!"

Lady Gaga and other roots like her spent years becoming Lady Gaga. They worked on creating an image for themselves. The just pop out and suddenly become rock stars.They paid their dues. They did their work.They don't fill up to relationships and their act and eventually became Lady Gaga.

So don't just simply think about this job search but, instead,, think of every job search thereafter.Even while you are doing great work and being happy doing what you're doing where you're doing it,, you are going to be doing things so that people learn about you, find out about you, understand you, trust you and thus want to hire you, rather than that absolute stranger that they know nothing about.

You see, branding is that thing that gives you the edge.. It's the thing that makes people say, "Hey! That's The Big Game Hunter! He knows what he's talking about.." That's how good the brand is..

I don't want you to think about being me or Lady Gaga. I want you to think about what you can do to develop a reputation that people will know, like and trust, not for this job search but for every other one that you're involved with from now on.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do executive search firms looking unsolicited resumes?

Do Executive Search Firms Look at ‘Unsolicited’ Resumes (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Unsolicited resumes. Do they look or ignore?

Summary

The question for today is, "Do executive search firms look at unsolicited resumes?" The way the question was originally phrased was, "Are executive search firms even looking at unsolicited resumes they get sent to them?"

You have to understand how the search business has evolved. It's history involves never looking at unsolicited resume. However, there might be someone in the office who parses unsolicited resumes; they have software that's going to input resumes that appeal to them into their system. There is this thing that you may have heard of called LinkedIn . . That part of the business is very data oriented. They are not looking for job hunters; they are looking for the best talent to fit the client's requirements.

A client hires them to do a task-- fill a particular job. The task has specific criteria. They may, but probably won't, input your resume to their system. You will need to have extraordinary skills to fit the search criteria that they tend to work on for clients; most firms have an orientation that focusing on certain lines of business or perhaps certain functions.

The question I have to ask back is, "Why should they?" Because you think your resume might be useful to them? How do you know? Oh! You want to get on the radar. Good. Do something great that fits their search criteria. Get written up. Get featured in an interview. Do things that turn your work into celebrity so that you are not just some person sitting at desk doing a job that you think is so valuable to other people. Get known!

This is the branding process that most people don't get. Search firms are acutely aware of how important the brand processes; it makes someone more salable to their client. It is not like they're trying to fill some staff level position. They are trying to fill positions for successful executives.

What makes someone appear to be successful? Answer. A vivid credential. I refer to it as a vivid credential because it is known, respected, been recognized, been written or interviewed about, has been on the stage talking about . These are criteria that allow them to recognize that other people have vetted you and identified you as being successful, smart and a leader.

Sending a resume to them? Useless! Let me restate that – – it's almost useless. You may get lucky. But the likelihood of you being lucky is so small that it is far better for you to put all that effort into developing a reputation so that you become visible and written about. You want to be published, you are on stage talking about your accomplishments, instead of simply being some guy who says a resume in.

Why do you want to be "some guy" or "some woman" who sins a resume in has some researcher look at it and ask themselves, "What we have this anyway? And then feel good about deleting it. Seriously. "Why do we have this resume?" If it's nothing that we are looking for.

Again, the nature of search has evolved so that data is more readily available. It's not like in the old days when I started often recruiting where you had to deal with microfiche and look at newspapers on microfilm and find the article that was written about you. There are so many places where you can get known! Focusing on that and not on, "whether they are even looking at your resume."

Who are you that you that they should even be looking at your resume?. That is what you should be focusing in on.-Who you are. That should make them want to focusing on you. -

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Keeping Your Network Alive After You’ve Found a Job | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s important to keep your network active when you’re not looking for a job and how to do it.

Summary

Usually, when people talk with you about networking, is with the idea finding a new position. I also want talk with you about networking from the standpoint of what really advantages you and your career. There was a survey not long ago that said that 60% of chief financial officers saw that there networking value to them in their work from the standpoint of building their business, helping with the business growth of the organization. 10% of them spoke in terms of job hunting.

Notice that big disparity. In most of your life, in most of your career, it is about business growth. It is about helping yourself as a professional advance. As a matter fact, 1 of the best answers that I suggest people give to the question, "How do you use LinkedIn," is not the talk about job search, but about talking about having a ready supply of people to reach out to in order to help you in your career with being successful and getting input on problems that may crop up.

Once you have this network established, like any garden, it needs to be tended to. I suggest a couple of things.

First of all, keep you network growing. Do things to advance your network that could be something as simple as tagging articles and sharing them, posting new information, helping others. That's the idea of passing it on. It is the idea of helping others.

If your professional association, I know there is the temptation to be less involved with it once you are in your new job. However, the relationships that you build in the professional organization will go a long way toward helping you in your new career. Thus, it becomes really important for you to be out there networking all the time.

Lastly, and I know that is the tendency to slack off on this, keep your online presence up to date. Other folks have questions and they want advice. Be helpful. You never know when your relationship with someone is something that you are able to benefit from later on. And, from the good karma perspective, you're obviously doing a good deed by being helpful to others.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You Run Into Several Types of People When You Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 839 I speak with Jeffrey Goodman of Careerhearted.com about the general roles and categories of people you meet.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Another Job Search Lesson from “The Godfather” (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers another pearl of wisdom from “The Godfather” to teach you about loyalty to your employer.

Summary

This is a quote from the 1st movie where the oldest son, Santino, talks to Michael is about to enter the military.  I think this is the scene where he gives in a noogy.  This is the quote: 

"Your country aint your blood.  Remember that."  It is not in typical James Caan fashion.

The lesson here is going to pertain to job search.  It isn't about your country. It's about the company you work for.  

A lot of the way you've been trained to think about employers is propaganda from the employer's perspective.  The training you to be loyal.  It's about working hard for the organization and rising up through the ranks.

"Don't change jobs too often.  After all…" Lots of cautionary tales that basically tell you to keep your mouth shut and go to work.

The lesson here is really what do employers do on their side?  They do whatever is necessary to stay afloat.  Most firms will do that ethically; on occasion, there are some firms that will do it unethically and sometimes, illegally.  With regard to how they deal with employees, frankly, employees are disposable.  They use you as long as they can. If they don't need you, you are gone.  If economic circumstances change, your gone.

You need to conduct your career in much the same way, too.  You can't just sit there waiting patiently for some of the tapping on the shoulder and say, "I think you're ready for that promotion to program her grade level II."  (I just use that as an example of 1 of those stupid institutional titles that employers sometimes use)

Instead, think in terms of what is going to advance your career.  What is going to help you get ahead?  That can be internally or externally.  As I've said many times, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those are great qualities to have).  The people who get ahead are the ones who are alert to opportunity.  Sometimes those are internal to their current organization. But, more often than not, they are external to it.

When you're tapped on the shoulder for an internal opportunity, is normally as a result of the patient, slow ascent up through the ranks.  When you're tapped on the shoulder externally, it is because someone sees something in you that they want.  They believe they need.  They think you have it.  

That is a halo that allows you to leverage that situation much more aggressively.

Isn't that really what is about?

It isn't about rising through the ranks slowly because the think you're ever going to get to the point where the 65 years old and retiring from these firms? Of course not. They will get rid of you way before then, or make the conditions untenable for you way before that.

You need to think of your career as being a series of steps, up through the ranks. Sometimes, you will make mistakes. You want to be in a position where you are in charge of your life, not your employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Keeping Your Network Alive After You’ve Found a Job | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/18/keeping-your-network-alive-after-youve-found-a-job/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s important to keep your network active when you’re not looking for a job and how to do it.

Summary

Usually, when people talk with you about networking, is with the idea finding a new position. I also want talk with you about networking from the standpoint of what really advantages you and your career. There was a survey not long ago that said that 60% of chief financial officers saw that there networking value to them in their work from the standpoint of building their business, helping with the business growth of the organization. 10% of them spoke in terms of job hunting.

Notice that big disparity. In most of your life, in most of your career, it is about business growth. It is about helping yourself as a professional advance. As a matter fact, 1 of the best answers that I suggest people give to the question, "How do you use LinkedIn," is not the talk about job search, but about talking about having a ready supply of people to reach out to in order to help you in your career with being successful and getting input on problems that may crop up.

Once you have this network established, like any garden, it needs to be tended to. I suggest a couple of things.

First of all, keep you network growing. Do things to advance your network that could be something as simple as tagging articles and sharing them, posting new information, helping others. That's the idea of passing it on. It is the idea of helping others.

If your professional association, I know there is the temptation to be less involved with it once you are in your new job. However, the relationships that you build in the professional organization will go a long way toward helping you in your new career. Thus, it becomes really important for you to be out there networking all the time.

Lastly, and I know that is the tendency to slack off on this, keep your online presence up to date. Other folks have questions and they want advice. Be helpful. You never know when your relationship with someone is something that you are able to benefit from later on. And, from the good karma perspective, you're obviously doing a good deed by being helpful to others.All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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