Should I Indicate My Availability in My Resume | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains whether you should indicate your availability in your resume.

Summary

The question reads, "should I include date of availability in my resume?"

This is something that would apply to both students and consultants as well as temporary workers, so I'm going to texture my answer given the circumstances.

For the student, of course, it depends on when you are writing this or sending a resume. If this is November at the time before graduation, you might, in the resume, indicate your expected degree date and when that would be. Let's say it's made or June of the following year, that sends a clear signal to them as to when you're available. If this is March and you have an expected degree date I had, they have an idea as to when you are available, right?

If you are a consultant in the assignment is going to complete in 3 months, what are you sending a resume now? You are way early in the process. I might start to or 2 1/2 months before TOPS. For a consultant, really just send out the resume earlier than that is just a waste of people's time. It's not like they're going to save it and come back to it and say to themselves, "You know that guy who is going to be available in 3 months? Now is the time!" No, it is just going to go to their system and that little bit of data is not going to be remembered or saved. It's a time waster to send it out to early.

For students, the indication of expected degree date is important. If you have an internship that is going on they might allow you to (wink wink) give people the idea that you are working full time, it really depends on when you can start. If the ideas that you be willing to start within those last few months before graduation, that's one layer and I would indicate that I would explain in the cover email. That's in the body of the email to which your resume is attached.

Beyond that, keep it simple. Leave it in the resume as to what your expected degree date is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

The Simplest Résumé Hack | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2016/12/28/the-simplest-rsum-hack

Ep. 606 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a all simple advice for writing a great resume using this hack.

Summary

I will give you some no BS job search advice in the form of a resume hack. This is going to be a simple way to write resumes.

When most people write a resume, then write his master resume and they prune out everything that is not going to be relevant and then mail out the same resume to every job that they apply to. Like the broken watch that is right twice a day, it works sometimes but no where near often enough.

Here's the solution to the issue. It requires that you take the time to think of everything that you've done professionally.

What I want to do is to write this 1 grand master resume. It has everything in it that you have done – – role, responsibilities, accomplishments, if you are in IT, the technology that you have utilized. It also includes the revenue that is been generated by your work and/or the resume saved by your work.

Once you have that master, and it could be 10 pages long for all I care, but it's most important for you to start with your most recent job, work backward, and then create this master document.

Then, as you apply to things, as you submit your resume to friends who tell you about opportunities, I want you to prune out irrelevant things and call attention to the major things that you've done that relate to that specific job.

Some of you are going to say, "Gee! That sounds like a lot of work!" In fact, it isn't a lot of work. It is a lot more work to edit all the time than if you have a master document for which you are pruning each time into something useful for an employer.

After all, when you buy a personal computer (if you still buy them), it was a big deal when plug and play technology was introduced. What's that? All the devices could be plugged into any computer and you could create something customized based upon the need of the individual buyer.

If the manufacturer was deciding everything that you needed, you would wind up with a lot of unnecessary things and a lot of unnecessary cost in your device. By creating plug and play, you got a customized system based upon your unique needs.

The same is true with a resume. You need to, deliver a customized product for every single job that you apply to. If you think that's a lot of work. Let me ask you a question. Is a lot of work from your vantage point. To do this and "risk" getting a $15,000 or $20,000 raise or $25,000 or, for you veteran people, $50,000 or $75,000 increase? I don't think so. When all is said and done, it is not a big deal.

Write the master. Create this enormous document. Call attention to every little bit of substance that you have done. Then, each time that you are submitting your resume, take the relevant parts of it per employer, pull it into a separate resume and submitted to that firm. That's what you do. That's the simplest hack I can give you for resume writing because what you are doing up until this point isn't working, is it?

Try my way. It does work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Beware of Resume Formatting Self-Sabotage


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/02/17/beware-of-resume-formatting-self-sabotage/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a resume formatting mistake too many job hunters make.

[/spp-transcript]

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.

Summary

Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Explaining Employment Gaps in Your Résumé

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to explain how to discuss the gap in your employment history.

Summary

Today, let's talk about how to deal with that gap in your resume . . . You know, that time in your background were took you 5 months, 8 months, 7 months . . . whatever it is to find a new position 3 years ago. How do you deal with that interruption your experience?

Some people have this silly idea that they are supposed to lie and cover it up. I must in all honesty tell you it doesn't work anymore. Employers are cooperating with one another and do background checks post-employment (after you join their firm). They will send a note to your previous employer and say, "So, Jane told us in their application that you work for your firm for such and such period of time. Does that seem somewhat accurate?" If they find inconsistency in your job application, it is grounds for termination. They can't keep you on board because, frankly, lying can get them into trouble.

Imagine for a 2nd that you are employed by them and commit some sort of crime. For example, you work on Wall Street and trade grandma's life savings down to zero. Can you imagine what happens when a lawyer gets a hold of the firm and asks, "you knew he lied on his employment application and you still kept them on board!" How do you think that would play out in the courts?

Employers have a very simple policy. They will terminate you. They will terminate you without any warning whatsoever. What they will do is meet you at your desk with security and hand you a box with your personal things and send you on your way. You don't want that to happen. Here's how you deal with it.

When you have a gap in your background, you use the cover email that you send your resume in (these are like the old cover letteyrs people use to mail the resume with. Today, that is the message area of your email) to sell yourself.

You might write in the cover email, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was recommended by so-and-so, you told me that your position for such and such." Or, you might say, "I saw your ad on such and such site that told me that you trying to hire such and such type of person. "

The 2nd paragraph my talk about your qualifications and how your background fits the role. The 3rd 1 might say something like, "you may notice my job history that for years ago I was unemployed for 6 months. During that time, the on the economy was terrible and they found it difficult to find work. Ultimately, I was able to land a job with another organization. "

Or, you might just simply say, "I had an injury at that time. I was in a car accident and had surgery. It was impossible for me to work." Or you might talk about how you assisted your dying mom during the last 6 months of her life. These are pretty common stories that employer hears.

Another one that they here is, "I took a package to leave my organization. I decided that I had not had a lengthy vacation since I was in college and decide to take 4 months to travel in China before coming back and resuming my career." What ever it is, do that in the 3rd paragraph and then come back and sell yourself in the remainder of the cover email.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in your background. Then, you have to remember what you told them in your email. So when you meet with them in person and raise the subject, they are looking for consistency. Thus, if you talk about that vacation that you took, you say, "I know a lot of people would find it difficult to believe, it was 1 of the great 4 months of my life. I love my work, but it was an opportunity to travel. I had money in the bank and decide to take advantage of this time." You just speak to them in a way that sounds absolutely sincere.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in the background.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Resume Advice | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


This episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio was originally recorded in 2011. Please disregard the jobs that might be mentioned during the show! Please follow the advice mentioned in the show!

I hope you can see my progress.

BTW, disregard the section where I discuss job openings.

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

A Federal Resume What the Heck Is a Federal Resume? | Job Search Radio


Believe or not, the US federal government requires a different type of resume than the private sector does.

LeTonya F. Moore and I discuss some of the differences between the two styles and what you should be doing differently when applying for US government jobs.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

More Advice About Resumes That Get Results (VIDEO)

MORE ADVICE FROM THE ARCHIVES

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers more advice for creating resumes that get results.

Summary

Today, I'm going to give you a little bit more, no BS resume advice.

Let me start by asking, "do you enjoy receiving spam?" You know, all that garbage will receive an email… Thousands and thousands of pieces of garbage that waste our time. It's ridiculous!

I don't like receiving it anymore than you do but most people are too lazy to tailor their resume to demonstrate how they fit the job that they are submitting their resume for. Instead, they flip their resumes like they are burgers at a fast food restaurant. Over and over again, they are spamming resumes that are a colossal waste of time. I don't know about you, but when I was doing recruiting, I was reading 300 resumes a day! I don't have a lot of time to waste..

My clients were asking me to find people with specific backgrounds. If you're thinking I'm going to call 300 people and asked them, "Have you done this? Have you done that?" I'm not. I don't have the time.

Do the math on my schedule. On a light day, I'm receiving 150 resumes plus lots of emails, following up on interviews from hiring managers trying to find out more about people that they have been interviewing. There's a lot of work that I do and I just don't have the time.

I think what you'll find is if you tell your resume to demonstrate the fit that your experience has with the job requirement, you are going to get a lot more results.

You may say, "I don't really know a lot about the job. I need to know more in order to tailor it."

Bull. What you have is a job description, you saw something on the web that prompted you to send your resume, you just didn't gratuitously send it, right? Tailor your resume. Use the keywords to tailor your resume. I'm telling you, you're going to get results. You are not going to waste people's time.

If you are not sure if your background fits, you can politely send your resume, saying, "I saw this job. I'm not sure if my background is perfect for it. This is what my background has that fits it. This is where I am not sure."

If you just want to send resumes to people who are in your area (by that I mean, people who are recruiting for positions in the field that you work in), you seen a job description and want to put a resume in a recruiter's hands, in the subject line, put the phrase "On Spec." Don't just simply submitted as though your background fits the particular job. If you do, all you're doing is wasting people's time.

If you do that with corporations, do you think you are going to get results? I don't. If you do that with third-party recruiters, all that, they will probably do is hit the delete key or imported into their database. Come on! Save us all some time.

My advice for today is to tailor your resume. Make the fit obvious. Pretend that a 4-year-old is going to read your resume (Frankly, there are a lot of recruiters who have the experience of 4-year-olds). Do that and you're going to get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

What’s the Best Way to Get Your Resume Noticed (VIDEO)


What is the best way to get your resume noticed? There is a better way to get an interview that I offer as well as answer the question.

Summary

The question I was asked is, "What's the best way to get your resume noticed?" I want to preface my answer, which will be directed to the point like they always are, by saying that if you are submitting your resume, you are swimming in the pond with everyone else. It's hard to be caught as a fish if you're in there with millions of other fish., What you're telling me is that you are attempting to approach this through traditional channels by submitting your resume through an applicant tracking system or some other form of direct communication, rather than working at networking through the hiring manager, developing a relationship with that person, and trying to gain entrée that way.

Be that is it me, I just given a summary of the preferred way to do things -- you would not submit a resume; you have an introduction to someone by someone who knows them will vouch for you and give you the opportunity to present yourself to the manager.

If you really want to submit your resume, the best way, if you are determined to send it through an applicant tracking system, is to DEMONSTRATE THAT YOUR BACKGROUND ACTUALLY FITS THE JOB. Make it obvious as though the reader is 6 years old reading the resume that you fit this.

How do you do that?

If you have a job description (after all, you question tells me that you want to submit your resume against the particular job), make sure that all the criteria of the job description are your resume. Make it so it is obvious!

In doing this, you want to use their language. For example, there was someone I was coaching, who is in a sales role. He would normally talk about how he it helped increase sales by a certain percentage. However, the firm he was interviewing with spoke in terms of 4X or 10X. Language along those lines. You want to use their language because you want to be understood by them. It's like speaking French and interviewing in Germany. If you don't speak the same language, it is harder to connect.

Take the time to speak their language. Use their phrasing in your resume. Make the fit obvious even if you're going to use a summary at the very top of your resume that takes care of the requirements of the position, the functionality of the job, and lays out each of them.

For example, this is always an easy one. when I use IT as an example, you list the skill and next to it you might write, "3 years/current." Then you would list the next skill and say, "2 years/until one year ago." Item by item into columns so that the fit is obvious to the reader and you're not making them struggle to find the information.

(2) As you proceed, the rest of your resume needs to confirm what you've just written and use their language.

(3) Finally (this is one the people sometimes forget), make sure your LinkedIn profile is congruent with what you say your resume. If the profile isn't congruent (it doesn't have to use the same language because I'm assuming that you're not submitting your resume to just one company), you want to make sure that your profile is as all-inclusive as possible, telling the story of what your background is so that, as I said, a 6-year-old knows that you can do this job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.
 
Summary

Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

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