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Are You Actively Interviewing?


How do I answer when a recruiter asks me “Are you actively interviewing, and do you have any deadlines, pending offers, etc.?”

salary-negotiation

Summary

How do you answer the question, "Are you actively interviewing?  

What are they really trying to find out?"

There are a few ways to answer this question based upon where you are in your job search.

If you have been out of work for 6 months and they asked this question, they are tossing you a lifeline. After all, if it is been 6 months that you've been out of work, they are thinking that there was something wrong with you. It gives you a chance to say, "I took a few months off. I never did that at any point in my life before that. The kids have grown up. I decided to take it a little easy.  It's time for me to get back to work."  That's the way to answer the question if there is been a period of time where you been out of work.

If They Recruited You . . .

Let's work with the assumption that they are recruiting you and they asked this question.  Then, the purpose of the question is very different than when asked of the person is been out of work for 6 months.

Here, they are trying to figure out whether (1) you are out interviewing and where you are in your job search. (2) I've had people who contacted me about position side advertised for, and they have 3 job offers and expect my client to jump through hoops to compete with those other offers in one day. after one meeting that lasts for 1 minute.

It doesn't work that way. You went out on a bunch of dates before you decide to get married, right? Employers are no different.

The implication for the person who was recruited and is asked this question is to figure out whether we were lucky enough to just find you and your background fits the job or did we stumble across someone who is actively interviewing and is been on 27 different interviews… You get the idea.

The correct way to answer if you have been on a few interviews is to say, "Yes, I have been on a few interviews recently."

"Where are you in your search?"

"I don't think I'm close to an offer. I have had firsts and seconds at a few places. Firms seem interested, but I don't have any offers yet and no one is talking to me like I am getting one yet. That's a good way to deflect the question.

Now, if you are close to an offer, from the recruiter's perspective, they are thinking, "Why should I invest time in this person when I not going to make any money or my client will take too long for this person and their timetable. I know this hiring manager can take a month to even decide to interview this person."  On and on and on.

From the standpoint of the employer-recruiter, based upon what they know of the hiring manager, they are trying to figure out whether they have the time to get you into the process and bring it to a successful end.

If you say something like, "I have a few things I seem to be on final rounds for but I don't have any job offers yet"

"What would keep you from accepting an offer from 1 of those firms?"

"Well, money, of course. After all, I'm not looking to take a lateral or less. If they offer too little, I'm not going to join."

"How much would you be looking for?"

"Well, that depends upon the opportunity. I obviously want to contribute to an organization . . . "

I'm trying to give you a sense of the flow of the conversation as you answer questions.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

 

What Happens to My Resume After It Is Submitted to a Job Posting? (VIDEO)


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Here’s how the sausage is made.

Summary

The question I received was, "What happens to my resume after it is received for a job post?" This is like the sausage and how it is made. It is really an ugly process.

Once you've submitted it to a job posting, there are now 2 possibilities. One is when you've submitted through an applicant tracking system; the other one is when it asked to the email a resume. Smaller firms might not have the systems in place and you are emailing a resume.

The applicant tracking system is a filter. It parses your resume and inputs data into their system and may or may not, depending upon the system, score your resume based upon your use of keywords to determine whether or not you are a POSSIBLE FIT. I want to be clear. POSSIBLE FIT.

It is not perfect, obviously, and depending upon the scoring system and how it has been set up, and how the dictionary of terms has been created to evaluate, you may or may not be passed on to THE FIRST HUMAN BEING. Often in corporations and with the search firm that person is representing that business area or that hiring manager who is attempting to fill the position. They are doing a visual scan. Again, if you came in through an applicant tracking system, some systems will never let you get that far because if they are seeing you doing "serial applying" as 1 of my guests on Job Search Radio described or you are applying to lots of different disparate jobs, they are just going to block you and never let that resume get through even if you might be qualified because they have identified that behavior as being reflective of (please excuse my language) bullshit artists.

Assuming that that is not you and you're getting to the 1st level human being who is there to check, with some organizations that could be the hiring manager. Most of the time, it is HR. With smaller firms, it is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes. That's the reality to it. It is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes because the owner was busy. "You look at the resumes and show me the ones of the people who think fit." That person makes a determination and passes it to the hiring manager or, if it is a search firm or an HR person, they are going to do the 1st screen.

Ultimately, systems are there to save time and, obviously, they are not perfect. They do a lot better as a time-saver then you as a job hunter would prefer that they do. You are applying to jobs because you think they are right.

Now, in some organizations, HR is not even going to interview you on till the hiring manager says to do so. "I want to talk to that person." You are dealing with the ladies all the time, because your resume is going from the applicant tracking system to HR to a hiring manager for home hiring is only 1 of their priorities; they have a job to do. As a result, they are not there sitting by their computer instantly giving responses. They are looking when they have some time. Sometimes that is on their commute. Sometimes it is when they need to take a break. Sometimes it is when they schedule something on your calendar to review resumes. They are trying to work it into their day when they have time that they can take away from their "real job." That is the way they think about. Taking time away from their "real job."

Your resume is an interruption. They may wait for the weekend to review a bunch of resumes. They may wait so the evening. They may wait for their commute. Whatever it is, they are not instantly looking at your resume.

That is what goes on behind the scenes from a process perspective. Some systems may send you questionnaires; some recruiters, both HR and agency recruiters, may send questionnaires to clarify particular parts of your background because your resume wasn't clear enough to them answer those questions because you are not going to get to the interview otherwise.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

No BS Coaching Advice

No BS Coaching Advice Ezine August 15 2017

The August 15, 2017 edition of “No BS Coaching Advice E-zine.”

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: How Do You Get In The Zone? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 841 I think this is a ridiculous question, but someone was asked her last week.  There’s more than one way to answer the question.

Summary

Almost every day, early like this, I go online to talk with people about some element of job search. That's because I believe jobs hunting doesn't have to be hard, difficult, painful or take a long time. To me, the skills needed to find a job are different than those needed to do a job.

Today, I thought I would answer 1 of those tough interview questions I get asked on interviews. If you're interested in hearing more of my answers, I'm doing a year of shows about interviewing on my podcast, "No BS Job Search Advice Radio." That's available in iTunes, stitcher and other podcast services.

The question for today is, "How do you get in the zone?"

I'll simply say that this is a dumb question. It would never be as to the senior person. It tends to be asked of staff level people. How do you get in the zone? It's really very simple. What you have noticed on your way in what's the energy like in the office that you are interviewing with. Is there a buzz? Is it loud? Or is a quiet? What is it like energetically?

If you haven't noticed it, you have to take a cautious approach. Again, if this is something that is true of you, you talk about, "I love working in place with high-energy." Or, "I love working in a quiet place. When I get in the zone, I'm really locked in and the distraction of other noise . . . "Do you see where I am going?

If you haven't noticed it on the way in, you say something all bit more ambivalent or wishy-washy for lack of a better term. It's basically hedging your answer.

The way you say it, is something along the lines of, "hey look, I have worked in a lot of different places and I had been able to key in very well and perform at a high level. What is my preference? I like working with smart people." Thus, you deflect off of working or talking about the energy level in the office and focusing on that.

Again, either mirror what you walked into. Or, you hedge, and that get you off the hook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Do I Look Like a Job Hopper? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question as to whether someone looks like a job hopper.

Summary

The premise is that the person is concerned that the resume makes them look like a job hopper. The question goes like this, "I'm a software developer with a job that I've had since college. 1.5 years. 4 years. 2 years. 3.5 years. 2.5 years. I'm a year into my latest gig and started to think about switching industries like from going from finance to tech. How bad does this look?"

Great question. I think there is a more complicated answer to this. Let me start with the premise that I have the idea that some of these might be consulting assignments. Where that is the case, you can aggregate dates into one combined area that shows that you are a consultant during that period. Let's say the 2 years and the 3 1/2 years were as consultants, aggregate the dates there. The reason I have the idea is your choice of the word "gigs"or, "gig" for that last position . I have the idea from not that you might be a person who is been a consultant. If that's the case, aggregate some of those dates to demonstrate clearly.

More important than a tactic, is the bigger picture. You are not talking about career progression. You're talking about how over 10 years as a developer. If my math is right, for 14 1/2 years, you are talking about yourself being purely a developer; do not talking about being a lead. You not talk about being an architect and you're not talking about being a manager. You talking about being a developer.

That may have been a conscious choice of yours but some employers of the start looking down on you because you haven't progressed in your career. That may be a bigger issue for you. Why are you still a developer? Why are people not give you the opportunity to get ahead?

If you've always wanted to be a developer, that's going to be a real easy question to deflect. You're going to have to address in the cover letter.
Again, I don't see these dates as being intrinsically wrong. I just think the bigger issue is that at some organizations, and organizations that like fast-track individuals, they're not going to see you as being fast-track. There going to see you on the slow road.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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