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Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 729 I discuss another cardinal sin of interviewing–unpreparedness

Summary

I want to talk with you about another 1 of those stupid interview that job hunters make way too often. This is the mistake of being unprepared.

If you're aggressively looking for work, you may be sending out your resume to tons of different places. You just don't remember. The phone rings, they start saying, "Hi! My name is so and so. You forwarded your resume," and your 1st response is, "Which position is this?"

Right off the bat you let people know that you are spamming your resume to a bunch of places. I'll be kind. . . You submitted your resume to a lot of different places looking for jobs. The way to handle that situation is to say, "I want to talk with you. I am in with someone right now. Can I call you back at…? (Offer up time)" this way, you can go back to your notes, see which job this was and then be able to speak intelligently about your background and how it fits. Remember, your job is to talk about what you've done that relates to what they are looking for and not just talk about what you've done.

Another boo-boo, and this 1 is even worse. You're an in person interview. They just invited you into talk. You taking no time to research the firm and what it does. A lot of firms like to know you understand some basic information about them so that you can link it to what you've done, not just simply what they're looking for what their business does.

Or, you walk in the door and sit down and basically say, "So, which job is this?" Or words to that effect. There are lots of little ways that it comes across that you are unprepared to talk about their job. You can't do this. What you're basically doing is indicating that you don't care. What does it really take to be prepared? After you submit a resume, you save the original job and into a file refer to it before the interview. It's that simple.

Don't be unprepared. It sends a bad signal to an employer about laziness . You don't want to be doing that. You always want to be in control and demonstrating that you are a professional.

Rather than be unprepared, in the case of a phone call, simply say, "Can I get your name and number and can I give you a call back in about an hour," or "Can I call you back at 2:30?" Whatever the time is. "That doesn't work for me. Can we do it at 4 PM?"

"Sure, we can do that four."

"What's your number?" You get your notes and call back, look at your job description so as you're ready. You will be able to speak intelligently about your background and how it fits their job.

Even knowing what the job description says, remember to ask my Single Best Question You Should Ask On Any Interview before things kick off because things may have changed a little bit since the 1st conversation or since you saw the ad.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Interests You About This Job? (The Second Way to Answer It) | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 728 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this question in a style that makes people believe you.

Summary

This really isn't a tough interview question, but people don't really answer in the correct way. The question is, "What interests you about this job opening?"

On the surface, you can list 4 or 5 different things that you like about this job. That's the easy part of this answer. The hard part is that people forget to demonstrate enthusiasm and passion when they speak. So they speak in a relatively flat way.

Instead, if you answered, "What interests me about this job? Man! There are 3 or 4 different things that are really exciting about it." Then you going to your list. Having speeded up your speech, having your eyes brightened with excitement, a smile on your face as you talk... It's not just simply what you say that matters is how you answer this question that is so important.

There is a theater to answering interview questions well. Here, the theaters about excitement. You want to just have joy in your voice as you answer questions. In this way, people know that you really are excited about this job. Often, that is the tiebreaker between you and your competition.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

It’s Harder to B. S. Companies | Job Search Radio

EP 278 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how LinkedIn makes it harder for you to BS an employer.

Summary

I did an interview last night that's going to be on job-search radio very soon , with a tilt acquisition director for a firm. The idea of the show is what firms look for when they hire. part of what I want to do was understand how his organization selects people to interview.

Yes, there is the obvious stuff– – Does the resume demonstrate a fit with what they are looking for? They don't want to have to read between the lines. You need to be explicit.

People argue with me all the time that they have the experience to my client is looking for. However, when I look at the resume, there is nothing there to indicate it. They then ask, "Why didn't you call?" Who has time! That was one detail.

Another thing that they do that I thought was really interesting is that they have an account with LinkedIn that lets them see that the entire LinkedIn database. Fabulous! What they look for his how you explain what you have done on your profile to see if it is congruent with what you've written on your resume. They are also looking for endorsements and recommendations on your profile. With endorsements,, I'm going to use an example (he didn't use this one; . I think it is a good example). Because it is something that I did recently.

A person sent they are resume to me for a PHP job. I look at their profile on LinkedIn. They have 25 endorsements for Java and 2 for PHP. What is the message? Obviously, that they are not as experienced in PHP as they are in Java. You have to have a profile that is congruent with how you are marketing yourself. Because recruiters are looking at your profile for clues. They are trying to see whether what you are communicating your resume is BS or whether it is accurate.

They look at recommendations as a way of seeing what kind of what kind of references you have. It's a really interesting approach that this guy talked about.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

How Can You Do Well on Interviews? (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the question from a view were about to interview well.

Summary

I received the question today. I'm going to do my best to answer it. The question is, "How can I do well on interviews?"

This is too generally question is one obvious thing I have to say. I don't know you. I don't know how well you perform so I have to give a basic answer.

1. You have to do research. Research the firm; research the individual that you will be speaking with. Again, I don't know if this is a phone interview or an in person interview. Research is a certain component of it.

2. Understand the job. What do they want to hire you for? Why are they interviewing you? What's the nature of the position? What is in your background that fits this role?

3. Practice. Practice comes in a variety of different forms. There are hundreds of different questions that, in theory, you could be asked. I have a bunch of them available at my website. Not knowing the nature of the firm you will be interviewing with, it could be any type of question so it's impossible for me to prepare you other than to say, practice, practice, practice. Spend some time reviewing and practicing answers. You can do that on my channel on YouTube. Search for "Jeff Altman TheBigGameHunterTV" and look for the option on the left-hand side for playlists. You will find to their that are relevant. One is, "Tough Interview Questions;" the other one is for brainteasers. Not knowing the nature of the firm that you're interviewing with. I don't know which, or both, you should prepare with.

Practice. Practice. Practice. When top performers are starting out, they don't just simply "wing it." They rehearse. They rehearse of the things become 2nd nature. Athletes. The best athletes in the world don't just simply perform willy-nilly. They practice in order to develop the muscle memory in order to perform well. You have to do much the same thing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Is It OK To Take Notes During The Interview? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 725 You want to remember what you are told but is it okay to take notes?  That’s what I answer in today’s show.

Summary

This is a question that shows up from time to time that I've avoided answering but I thought I would address it today because to me, it is very simple. The question is, "Is it okay to take notes during an interview?"

Let me ask you this, "If a hiring manager constantly looked down at his desk to take notes would you feel about them? Would you think that they are paying attention to you, care about you or were they focused on the note taking process?" Answer. Not number 1! Not number 2! Number 3!! Focused on the note taking process.

The same would be really true for you as well. If you are staring at your pad, if you're constantly looking down, taking notes, there is a problem. And if you don't ask if it is okay to do this, you are being rude. So, if you are interested in taking notes, if you want to jot down a few things, the best thing to do is as you sit down and ask them what I call The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview, as they are about to speak and respond to your question, asked them, "Would you mind if I took down a few notes? I promise I will be staring at my pad or iPad the entire time."

Once they say, "sure," you can't make it seem like you are taking dictation. If you are working with an iPad or some other tablet, you can't sit there and start to whimper if you start having typos in your note taking. You just have to let it go and corrected later on.

Experience tells me that when I'm interviewing someone in there taking notes, I find that I don't really mind as long as it is not the prevalent part of our conversation where they are looking down and sending me the message, either intended or unintended (remember, everything you do or don't do communicate something) that they may have a memory problem, are they really listening to what I am saying, and, worse than that, you are not connecting with me because your more focused on your notes.

You see, interviewers want to FEEL like they are dealing with a human being that they're going to interact with once they are on board. They want to like you, as well as believe that you are competent. Often, if what you are doing is staring at the pad/the iPad/stenographers pad/whatever it is you're taking notes on, you are not paying attention to them. You are not giving them eye contact. You're not smiling and, if you are smiling you are not looking at them when you're smiling. That takes away a lot of power.

So, if I were just looking down and taking notes during the entire time of this conversation, you might have the feel for me and I'm kind of weird. That's the issue with notetaking.

So, again, start by asking The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview, as they are starting to talk ask them, "Would be okay if I took them a few notes I want to make a mistakes. Certainly if it's a problem I will do it." Don't be fixated on the note taking process. You need to be fixated not just simply on giving great answers to questions but on connecting with the interviewer as a human being..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Why Do Behavioral Interview Questions Work?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why behavioral interview questions work.

Summary

I was asked why behavioral interviews questions work. What is a behavioral interview? I behavioral interview is a type of interview where questions start off, "tell me about a time when you…" You know questions where you are able to tell stories.

Even the toughest question… You can find the answer on the web. I but some of them on my blog, http://blog.thebiggamehunter.us. Use the categories featuring the Bonhomme to pull up tough interview. I have so many of these questions the job hunters don't spend the time practicing.. You don't spend the time learning how to answer these questions. You don't spend the time and review. Just like you don't spend the time practicing how to answer simple questions like, "Tell me about yourself." You just think that you should walk in and when it. That's why employers use this type of question. So many job hunters are just too lazy to take the time to be a champion.

I'm going to use the metaphor of the athlete. When you think a process football team comes out on the field do you think they haven't practiced repeatedly all the same plays for years? Do you think a baseball player hasn't spent time in the batting cage learning how to hit? Do you think they don't practice defense of plays with cutoffs in order to execute them? Yet you think you can go on an interview and just show up.

Do the smart thing. Start learning how to answer these questions. After all, great athletes are paid millions and millions of dollars to practice how to perform. Entertainers, singers, actors and actresses are paid millions of dollars in order to execute on the stage and allow them to be loved by an audience and make their performance credible. And you shop on an interview. Never having rehearsed your lines. Does that make a lot of sense to you?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Show Some Product Knowledge & /or Curiosity! | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to prepare questions that demonstrate your product knowledge.

Summary

I want you to start off that section of the interview where you normally ask about the job with a question that makes them want to talk about what. They want you to accomplish during your 1st year with the firm, during the 1st 90 days of the firm… Stuff along those lines.

I also want to think a little bit further and going to a little bit more detail. This 1 of the scenarios I want to ask you, in terms of your preparation.

If you interview for a job with Facebook and you never use the product, do you think you might qualified? You could come up with all sorts of rationalizations but you really wouldn't understand how the business works and what they really do and stuff like that. How about if you interview with Google and it never done a Google search before. Again, it's a complicated scenario. Maybe there are some jobs you will be qualified for the not a heck of a lot. Same thing when you interview with a lot of other organizations.

Why not ask informed questions about the firm, its business and how you fit in? You work for car company and are interviewing for design role. Our design decisions made? You drive up to Ford in a Mazda? Probably not. Do you interview at Pepsi and bring the Coke product? Probably not. Do you do things that might ask about how design decisions are made, indicate your curiosity about particular curves in the line of the car that really got you excited and how that got created? Yeah, you do stuff like that!

You put a twinkle in your own as you talk about these things. Maybe it's a car accessory and you speak in a way that shows your passion for cars and your curiosity about the product... Whatever it is, going extra layer that demonstrates some product knowledge as well.

Don't think it at the time of the interview; actually take some time to prepare for this because they will pick you apart otherwise and find that you are a bullsit artist. Don't be goofy about this.

I think is very helpful when you interview to show some product knowledge, and some product curiosity, rather than just appear ignorant.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

I Have the Skills & Experience for the Job But Not Getting The Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 724 Someone was perplexed that they didn’t get invited in for an interview, even though they had all the skills and experience for the job. I offer some ideas for why that may be happening.

Summary

The question for today is, "I have all the experience and skills required for the job and I'm not getting the interview. What's wrong?"

There are a few possibilities. I want to start off with an obvious one. You may think you have all the experience and skills needed to do a job but your resume doesn't say that. Thus, they don't know it. You are asserting it doesn't convince them. It's what's in the document that you are submitting to them that is the differentiator. Thus, unless it is in the resume, unless it is sufficient, they don't believe you. That's the 1st reason.

Number 2 is that you don't have enough of the experience. You've done it for 3 months and they are looking for 7 or 8 years. Sorry, you're not qualified so you don't have all the experience and you don't have all the skills.

That brings us to number 3. Your overestimating yourself and your knowledge and that comes across as, "I have one year of experience; they are looking for four. You think you have the skills and experience... But in their mind, you don't." After all, they have to live with the impact of your performance. They have figured out in their mind. What is needed to be successful in the job; you don't have it.

That leads to the last item. You have the experience. Like most job hunters whose resumes I've seen, or have seen, you are overestimating yourself and your capabilities. You may have taken a class in college or someplace else; that doesn't make you qualified. They're looking for someone with X numbers of years of experience doing that which you claim to be able to do.

Those are a few possible reasons for why your background is in getting you the interview.. In other words, you are acting like a job hunter. Overvaluing yourself, overestimating your capability and the company is shooting it down.

Sorry, it's a blunt message but an accurate one. These are the reasons why you might not be getting the interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Forgetting or Ignoring The Question | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 722 I discuss the impact of doing this and how to fix it.

Summary

I have been doing a series on what I call stupid interview. This 1 is 1 of the classics. I remember experiencing it when I was a beginner... And when I was junior.... And I remember experiencing it very recently! It's the classic thing of forgetting or ignoring the question and just start talking about what you think I want to find out about you.

This is a sin committed by beginners and experienced interviewers alike. I have to tell you that you veteran job hunters are often the worst offenders. What happens is is that you start to anticipate my questions because you been on so many interviews. As a result, you think you know what I am looking for. So you decide to offer it up. And what you think. I'm looking for isn't what you think it is. I'm really just asking the question and from there I want to probe.

Your job as the job hunter is to guide me through your background.. By following the script of the questions that I ask. I have an agenda. Employers interviewing you have an agenda.. They want to learn what you know and what you are like that relates to the organization and what they are looking for in a new hire.

When you go off on these long tears (long is in excess of a minute and 1/4).. The impact of doing this is that I start to zone out. I know employers do because they tell me this all the time.. "I could listen to me after a while, "I said to me a while back.. As a result, you want a failing on the interview..

You think you're crushing it out of the park because you are basking in your own magnificence when, in effect, you are losing your audience and, unfortunately, you're talking yourself out of a job..

Again, most people do it because they think they know what someone is looking for.. But you really don't.

Interviewing requires that you answer questions and 30 seconds to 1 minute and 15 seconds TOPS! While I suggest that? Why do I say that that is important? It's because people stop listening after a minute and 15 seconds. You are anticipating clicking away from the show now, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

More of What to Expect on a Second Interview (VIDEO)

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers more detail about what to expect on a second interview.

Summary

This is another 1 of those daily shows I do about job search. My channel on YouTube is TheBigGameHunterTV . I have a lot there that you can watch the will help you with your job search. This is a show about 2nd interviews and a few of the things that you can expect of the 2nd interview.

The 1st thing I always tell people that you will meet a whole new crew of people. You already spoken to HR and maybe a line manager. Sometimes all it had you talk to the team; sometimes or have you talked to the user population.

1 of the interesting things about meeting with the business group that this job supports or a different constituency that the job supports is that their agenda is sometimes a little bit different. If you watch my video called, "The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview," I want to ask that question again of the user population or the 2nd group in order to make sure that you get their thoughts about what they are expecting from someone in the job.

You can't assume that what you been told. up until this point is the same that they are going to be looking for.

I was on intake call yesterday with the hiring manager who is trying to fill a position. It was an IT job and he was talking about what his boss was looking for in hiring him and his replacement (he's to be moving on to another job). We got to a point where we were talking about the user group. It was my turn to ask questions. I asked, "Are they clear about what they are looking for and how does it match up with what you expect to be looking for?"

The cat was now let out of the bag. "Yes, it is going to be complicated because the 2 groups have a different viewpoint of what is to be looked for… Completely different viewpoints." He tried to make the best out of it, but I heard loud and clear that they are on different pages as to how they are doing the interview.

Expect this group is going to go into more detail with your background. Whoever it is, I don't care if you're an IT accounting, engineering, or whatever, expect that they are going to go with the meticulous detail about what you did, how you went about doing it. If you are an IT, the technology that you utilized. Why you made certain decisions… All this sort of stuff that comes up in an interview.

Thus, if they start off with some questioning on the 1st interview that they didn't quite get to complete, expect that they are going to complete it here.

They may pose some behavioral interview situations to you. Some "what if" scenario to you just as a way of seeing how you think. This is more true of higher level positions than it is for staff level jobs AND it sometimes occurs in staff level interviews.

In answering questions like this, remember, you are signaling how you would be as an employee in their organization. You also want to tie your answer into something that you already know about the job. Understand that they are asking these questions for a reason and they are not just simply hypothetical, out of the blue, nonsensical questions... Most of the time. As such, you want to tie the bow on your experience and how you do the job in the context of what they are looking for.

You can expect to talk money with them. Someone is going to ask how much you are making and how much you are looking for. It's almost going to be a casual thing at a certain point in the interview were almost everything has been done so far, but they will cover it at some point. They may talk about next steps… What their expectations are... Frankly, if they don't, I want you to ask about them.

It's kind of like in dating… "So where do we go from here?" You want to ask them, if they don't explain it to you, "I assume that you're talking to other people. When should I expect to hear back from you about next steps? What would those next steps be." It's questions along those lines that you want to pose in a logical break-point in the interview.

So when they ask, "So, is there anything else?" You'll see that they're trying to get out the door... That's really the ideal time to ask this. "I know you have other things to contend with today. I just want to ask you, I assume that you're interviewing other people, when you explode back to complete this round and when can I expect to hear back about next steps."

"Well, we have people schedule between now and doomsday. Sometime around when hell freezes over you will hear back from us." Okay, they have told you that they are not interested. You get where I'm going to from here.

When all is said and done, these are all pretty predictable things that happened on 2nd interviews and things that you should anticipate and be prepared for. I have another few videos on 2nd interviews. Look for those on YouTube. I think you'll find some great value from them as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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