The Extra Value | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 838 Since launching Job Search Radio, there have been a lot of good interviews. This is one of the great ones.

Whether it is about speaking the language of numbers, how to discuss achievements better, promoting the future benefits of your expertise, taking control the next contact or how to create a powerful cover letter, Donn LeVie and I share many insightful ideas to help you think like a job hunter hiring manager wants to bring on board.

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes Being Somewhere Else | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/06/30/stupid-interview-mistakes-being-somewhere-else

EP 790 There’s another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes people make, particularly executives – – – being somewhere else.

Summary

I want to talk with you today, I'm not concerned with your senior professional (though I see more with seniors with staff level people)... As an executive, you go to interviews and you've got a very full plate. You are handling a lot of things, you are walking out on situations that will require your attention. You are distracted. That's probably the best way to put. You are distracted. You arrive at an interview where people carve that significant portions of the day and you're not prepared to focus right away on delivering your message, let alone even remember your message. You're still back in your office you're still back at home , because the distraction could also come from your home. As a result, you don't deliver at the meetings.

Terrible mistake to make! It's 1 of the dumbest things you can imagine.

Your spending time to talk with people about the role. He clearly interests you, about an opportunity that appeals to sufficiently that you're carving out time in your day to talk to people about it, and you're not prepared because you still back at your office or your back still in an argument with your wife/husband/partner or the kids if absent you... Whatever it is, you are off somewhere else. Dumb thing to do.

I just want to encourage you that if you feel like you would be distracted, take a few minutes before hand, I out in your car, get some coffee, spend some time by yourself and focus. Meditate and beat you at your best.

After all, when you are evaluating and assessing people and you get the sense that someone is not on the game, what is your 1st reaction? Rejection, of course. It will be the same for you, too.

Put aside the members from now. Put aside the distractions. Be focused on being the best you, you can be.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

You’re Willing to Take Less But Are Afraid They’ll Reject You (VIDEO)


You earned more than they are paying for the job. You know they’ll be afraid to hire you fearing that you’ll leave for a higher paying job. How do you handle that in the interview? Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an easy tactic for this job interview trap.

Summary

Today, let's talk about an interview tactic. Let's say you are interviewing for a job that is paying less than what you were previously making. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that employers are reluctant to hire people who were making more than what they are willing to pay now. Their thinking is that is soon as the economy gets better, as soon as you find another job, you are out the door.

How do you counteract that? How do you deal with that? Obviously, you can tell them the truth. "I was making X number of dollars per year; I understand this position is paying less and I am willing to take less." Then you're back in the same boat.

There's an idea of what to do instead. What you can do is respond to the question of, "How much were you earning," by saying, "My last employer was very generous with me, probably too generous as a matter fact. They will probably pay me more than what the market is. My understanding is that this is a position that is paying less than what I was previously earning. I understand I was earning a very generous compensation; I am willing to come to that level."

If they persist, they will ask you, "So how much were you making?"

"I was making X number of dollars per year. Does that make sense to you or does it seem like they were being particularly generous?" Most of the time, they will say something that confirms that they were paying more than what the market is. "We are paying up to such and such."

You can say, "That's what I understand the market is right now; I'm very willing to accept that. I know my employer was paying more than market value; I was happy to take the money but now it is time to come back to the market."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Executive Presentation Interview (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

The Executive Presentation Interview

I outline the 10 minute presentation and how to get ready for it.

Summary

I have been coaching someone recently who is up for a very senior role and he is been asked to do presentation to the senior leadership of the organization. 10 minutes. That's it. He will be doing is via Skype and need to be prepared for his presentation. I thought this would be a good subject for many of you for how to do this kind of an interview because you are going to face this pretty regularly.

Here are a few pointers.
1. The visuals. What is the wardrobe you're going to be wearing? You want you and your presentation to pop. You want to stand out. What can you where that will make you look like a star? You're being seen as a potential leader in an organization and need to look like a leader in an organization.
2. In 10 minutes time, you don't have room for 45 slides, do you? If anything, you want to demonstrate that you have done your research, while, at the same time, getting on with the subject. Invariably, when you are doing this presentation, they are giving you a topic that they want you to cover. It's almost like free consulting for them. There is an expectation that you are (a) competing with other people but (b) you are giving them advice about how to go forward in the business as you see it. You can't go into 45 slides. You have to narrow it down to a few basic points . Yet, at the same time, demonstrate that you have done your homework. For example, you use opening slides to talk about whatever public numbers are available about whatever organization you are interviewing with BUT basically blow through them while demonstrating that you have done your homework. For example, in one case that I coach not long ago, the idea was to very simply say, "These are some of the slides that I have been able to find that demonstrate your organization and where it has come from, these are your demographics that I've been able to find publicly, these are a few of the things I believe you're doing extremely well." From there, you talk to the leadership about a few the positive things that they been doing very well.

3. From there, subsequent slides are only about a few points. From there, in total, 8 or 10 slides tops. Each slide may have 3 bullet points but is making one significant point that you are going to emphasize. You might make the three points recessed a little bit but the dominant one is a bold in the center. In this way, the point that you are making is very clear, while at the same time they can see the secondary objectives of the slide visually in front of them.

4. You are going to be talking about these things in the idea is that you will finish on time. Give them 30 seconds for questions at the end. The idea is that you are making your points and remembering that is not just what you say that matters; you are being seen as a leader of the organization. It's how you tell the story that's going to be important.

Remember, when push comes to shove, you've got 10 minutes. You have the time to cover a 500 page book in 10 minutes, do you?ore you have to make a few basic points, not giving away the store but, at the same time getting all the major items.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Being Tested

Most of us have become immune to the idea that we are being tested. We act as though tests ended when we completed school when nothing could be further from the truth. We are constantly being scrutinized, measured against someone’s benchmark for the right performance. We know we do it with politicians and athletes. Heck! We do it with our commute! The train or bus is awful. That driver is terrible. Constantly, we critique and evaluate others and ignore that others do it to us, too. Amazing!

So, people go on job interviews knowing full well that they are going to be measured and critiqued for their performance and what do they do? MAYBE, just MAYBE, they do enough preparation to be bad, particularly those who manage or at Director levels. Why? Because they Being Testedthink they know what interviewing is about because they have hired people for themselves. They forget that other firms and other leaders have different expectations and assessment criteria than they do. As a result, what I measured in my 40+ years of work in search before moving into coaching is that managers and Directors, in particular, are the worst at interviewing no matter what the field or industry. So, like an inverted bell curve, managers and directors, people who should be performing at a high level because they know better. Their staff and their boss’ usually perform better than these middle management professionals who are relied upon.

What can you do?

1. Decide in advance the direction you want to take your career next.  Generalities won’t cut it for you when you are asked about your career aspirations and expectations. You need to prepare a truthful answer.

2. Conduct informational interviews. Test your hypothesis for your future with former managers, bosses, peers . . . anyone who might have perspective of you and your abilities plus the wisdom to be able to discuss it with you without giving you BS. Remember, you don’t know what you don’t know.

Being Tested3. Fix your deficiencies. It is up to you to improve. No one can do that for you, nor will they pay to have you upgrade your talents to take it elsewhere. You are kidding yourself if you think the next firm is going to write a check to train you to do something to make you qualified for the role you want. After all, why should they give that training to an outsider who they don’t know, rather than one of their existing staff

4. Practice interviewing past ugly to good or great.  My friend, Alain Hunkins, once described most public speakers as being people who practice enough to be “ugly.”In other words, they practice enough to be mediocre, rather than excellent. Folks, you need to practice past “ugly.” Step up your game!

5. Understand that interviewing is combat where you don’t know the enemy. The enemy is not HR or the hiring manager. It is not the applicant tracking system the firm uses or the junior person who is brought in by the manager to interview. It is “the unseen enemy” with whom you are competing. You need to annihilate them with excellence. As you know, good enough isn’t yet that is how you enter the arena.

6. Get clear about your value and don’t MSU. Most people “make stuff up” (MSU) when it comes to their value. Your company doesn’t give out $50000 raises in base salary yet you think the next firm will even though that will put you into a position that you are not qualified for in order to earn the money you want to earn. 

7. Practice Interviewing. You can’t coast into your next job based upon success in your current organization that no one in the next one has seen. You need to be ready to perform on the stage called a job interview knowing that there is a critique in the 7th row on the aisle who will be writing a review that will make or break your show.

 

Many years ago when I was at the midpoint of my career as a recruiter (I no longer do recruiting; I coach job hunters), I remember listening to a trainer talk about how to recruit someone effectively. His sales technique translated into, “The person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest or work the hardest . . . although those are great qualities to have. The person who gets ahead is the one who is alert to opportunity.” To which I add that sometimes those are internal to an organization; usually the are external.

I also add that this person needs to be “prepared and ready” when they hear a metaphorical knock on the door with an opportunity. Otherwise, the door will close quickly on you.

For more, read, “It’s Easier to Network Than You Think.”

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017       

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job SearchJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching with me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

 Connect with me on LinkedIn  

.

 

How Interviews and Applicant Tracking Systems Are Changing | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Job hunters refer to “the black hole” where their resume goes in and nothing comes out. Employers dislike that they are bombarded with more resumes than they can reasonably handle. They know that the 999th resume received is likely not to be responded to as well as the 1st if at all.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with Chip Luman of HireVue, an award winning candidate and interviewer recommendation engine, about the next wave of technology for employers to evaluate your credentials.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Knowing When to Shut Up (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

When I did recruiting, this mistake drove me crazy! It cost too many people way too many opportunities.

Summary

I have interviewed a lot of people in my career. When I worked in search, I'm not sure what it was just over three quarters of a million people that I interviewed. They were interviews that I conducted with people were I just want to put a bullet in my head. Why? Because this person just didn't know when to shut up. They just kept selling way too hard way too long, not knowing when they were scoring points with me and just feeling compelled to over-talk the situation. I will tell you, folks, if you've ever been on the same side is me in a situation like that, you know exactly what I'm talking about.

For you job hunters, consider the following: the attention span and most interviews is between 30 and 60 seconds. After that, most interviewers stop listening and start to "mentally channel surf." As a result, if you start talking for longer than 60 seconds, you're going to be putting them to sleep.

I encourage most people talk from no one than 45 seconds; for most of you that's close to the outer limit. If you are skillful with your voice and know how to pause at times, and you suggested you are thinking (or know how to fake that you're thinking of your answer), and you can be theatrical without being DRAMATIC (no one cares for hysteria in an interview), or uber drama . . . what they are looking for is answers to the question that demonstrates fit and be entertained in the process which is why you always hear about stories being affected but an interview.

Keep your answers down to about 45 seconds in life. AT TOPS, for skillful people, you go to 1 minute and 15 seconds. Otherwise, you're putting your foot in your mouth and kill your candidacy.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Following Directions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/11/stupid-interview-mistakes-not-following-directions

EP 832 This is a mistake that hangs too many people.

Summary

I wanted to discuss 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that you many people do. It's the notion of not following directions. The obvious places you have a job application and they tell you to do certain things with the application and you don't follow through. For example, I think 1 of the funniest things that I've ever heard of that someone did (a client told me about this 1) is the place of their application where it said, "Give us one word that describes your strengths." One word! Got that one? They wrote, "I'm very good at following directions."

Was that one word? Was that really one word? Of course, not. This person didn't pay attention.

You see, what happens to a lot of job hunters is that they go on autopilot. They don't really listen. They built so many interviews that what happens is that they think they know what the question is, but they don't do it. They don't answer the question. They anticipate with this person is really looking for without really knowing what they are looking for. That shows up on applications in that way. It also shows up as you "basking your own magnificence" as you answer questions.

I mentioned this will many times before, the person who went off on this lengthy answer that had nothing to do with my question, but it got to a point where I said, "By the way, do you member what my original question was?" The answer, which I thought was wonderfully honest, was, "No."

You just have to follow directions. He answer the stupid question that is presented to you, whether is on the application or on an interview. That's what they are looking for at that point. In the therapy business, is referred to as, "following the contact function." They are reaching out to you about something, they want to know that answer, you can guide them with your answer to the next part but the idea is just give them what they want. Do it in your particular way.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Nail The Interview & Land the Job | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 831 We all know how important it is to prepare for an interview yet so few people actually do it. This show was originally recorded for “Job Search Radio.”

Michelle Tillis-Lederman is the author of “Nail the Interview, Land the Job.” She and I discuss exactly what needs to be done to shine during an interview and set yourself apart from the crowd of people you are competing with.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Two Best Questions to Ask at a Job Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you two great questions to ask at a job interview and when to ask them.

Summary

Today, I'm going to talk with you about the 2 best questions you should ask on every interview, you go on and when you should ask them. Let me start by reviewing the way a typical interview goes.

You walk in. You sit down. The interviewer looks and you and in that certain voice says, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally." You answer. Then, they ask you some follow-up questions and you answer those. If you are in disciplines that require certain objective knowledge like in IT, engineering or accounting, they will ask you some questions to measure your knowledge. Eventually, they will say, "So do you have any questions for us?" You will say, "Tell me about the job," and they will do that. You will say, "Sounds great." They will say, "Terrific. We'll get back to you." That is a typical interview.

Let's do a different interview. You walk in and sit down and, as the 2 of you get comfortable in your seats, just as the 2 of you have your derrière reached the seat, I would like you to start talking. You start by saying, "Thank you for making the time to meet with me today. I remember seeing the position description but wanted to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help?" If you been scheduled by an agent, you might say, "I spoke with Jeff Altman about the job and he gave me a brief description but I wanted to get your take on the role. Could you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help you?"

What this does is take the question you would normally ask at the end of the interview and moves it up to the very beginning. My thinking is even if you seen a job description, even if you reply to in hand or spoken to her recruiter, what you're able to do now is by moving a question to the beginning is get the current thinking about the job and tailor your answers to what matters to them.

You see, even if you seen the job description, from the time they start interviewing until now, they may have changed their thinking about it. As a result, you want to get their current thinking about the job, get that information at the beginning of the interview so you can use it to your advantage.

What are you going to do? Not lie but talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. You see, most people talk about what they've done in the course of the interview, but they don't talk about what they've done in the context of what the employer is looking for because they don't know until the end of the interview what they actually are looking for.

So that's a great question to ask and I have told you exactly when to ask it. So, since we taken that question out of the end of the interview, you can't just simply re-ask the question. You have to substitute a different question. This is the question I'd like you substitute at the end of the interview when they ask you whether you have any questions for them.

"Let's say it's a year from now and it comes time for you to give me my review. I have a just a good job. I have a just a great job. I have done 1 of the best that you have ever seen. What what I've done during that year that would cause you to give that kind of review?"

1. You are giving the employer the idea that you're not going to think small, but are prepared to do great work.
2. You are going to get an idea of how realistic they are in the thinking about the job. If the role, if they talk about something that will be absolutely crazy for you to have accomplished, how could you ever do it?

The real thing is that you are planting a seed in their minds about your drive for excellence, you're getting them to talk about the job and some of the day to day stuff in the role, differently than they might otherwise with a great question that I believe will give you a lot of terrific information.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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