Stupid Interview Mistakes: Weak First Impressions (VIDEO)

In this video, I explain how they occur and easy ways to avoid them. Fir some reason, the first few second where I introduced myself didn’t record properly.

Summary

First impressions are critical. You only have a few seconds to create them and unfortunately, too many people make the mistake of creating a week 1st impression. Here's how it occurs and I will give you a few different scenarios.

You're getting a phone call out of the blue. Maybe someone and seen your LinkedIn profile; maybe they found your resume online. However, it occurred, it is a phone call that was unexpected. You're caught by surprise. You start to stumble and stammer; you sound uncomfortable because your meeting with people. The simplest way to respond to that is by saying, "I would love to talk with you but I made with other people. Can we speak it around 1:30 or 3:30 PM?" "Or I'll have time when I'm in the car driving home (or on my commute) at 5:30 PM. Does that work for you?" Offer a few different alternatives for them. If that doesn't work on their schedule and they say, "Why can't you talk right now," you just learn something about them that's really useful.

Try to schedule a time where you know you can speak. That's really the smoothest way to do it.

If you have a phone interview that has been scheduled, you want to be ready to roll right away. You can't sound uncomfortable if they are calling you. You have to sounded ease and, at the same time, have personality and be excited that they've reached you. The simplest way to do that, "Hey, thanks for making the call. I appreciate you being on time. I have a tight schedule today and let's get to work!" That's a fun way to do it instead of simply saying, "Oh! I didn't realize it was 2:30 PM." When you do that you make yourself seem like an idiot.

In the in person interview, what often happens is you are left waiting for a little while. You are in the reception area or in some conference room, waiting to speak with someone. The mistake people make is being too engaged in something else during the waiting period. Thus the retention is taken off of their upcoming performance and how to perform well in the 1st few moments of the interview and instead they're looking at the phone, their reading, they are on their laptop, pacing around looking at the 4 walls... There doing everything other than being mentally prepared..

During this time that you're waiting, you can do a quick review of how to answer certain interview questions, the stories that you have planned out that you're going to tell that are planned out to emphasize points that you expect they will ask you about. There's a lot that you can be reviewing in your mind, so that when someone opens the door or someone comes out to greet you and says your name, you can stand up and be ready to give them a great handshake, eye contact and, of course, a big smile.

When you are escorted into the interview room and sit down, you can start by proactively saying, "Hey, I really appreciate you making time to meet with me today." Then you can go into what I call The Single Best Question You Can Ask on Any Interview {I have a video about that. So not going to go into that now.). I just say that there is a lot that you can do to always appear ready. You always want to appear engaged and ready to seize the moment.

At the end of the day, this is your opportunity. You have no 2nd chances here. You have one opportunity to create the great 1st impression and the weak one won't do it. The weak one is going to let them know that you don't have a lot of confidence in your ability to talk about this stuff, or that you are in certain. They are looking for someone who could inspire confidence that you are the solution to a need that they have.

Unless you do that right out-of-the-box, you are missing a golden opportunity to lay the framework to convince them to want to hire you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Jeff’s Philosophy of Interviewing | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Another show from the archives. This one focuses on my early thinking about interviewing.

NOTE: Please disregard any of the jobs that I mention I am recruiting for. They are long gone and I no longer do search work.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How to Prepare for a Final Interview (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the basics of how to prepare for a final interview.

Summary

I've done lots of videos about 1st and 2nd round interviews; today I want to do a show about final interviews. In many respects final interviews a very easy AND there is a certain amount of pressure because you know you're competing with someone else, despite the fact that you are being told, "You're meeting with the director," or "You're meeting with the SVP. This is a formality." This is not a formality. I can't tell you the number of times the people said stupid things at the final interview and cause themselves opportunities.

The 1st thing I want to remind you of is THIS IS NOT A FORMALITY. This is a real interview where you can screw things up AND you need to win it.

The 2 basic things I encourage people to do is (1) relax. Be a leader in the meeting. Be self-confident. It is all about attitude. My philosophy is that 1 of the things that firms are looking for is someone else can inspire confidence that they are a solution. That's really about how you carry yourself and how you present yourself and your ideas. That's your presence. That step number 1.

Tip number 2 is to tell your story so it is congruent with what you said the previous times that you been there. I should go without saying, but it has to be said.

The final thing is having some good questions to ask. You or meeting someone a level up from your boss and they don't want to ever hear you name, except if it is review time. After all, if they your you name any time other than that, normally it's because you screwed up and there's a problem. Your job is to do nothing that's going to screw up and, if anything, inspire. A lot of that is demonstrated with intelligent questions.

One question to ask when he or she says, "So, do you have any questions for me," is, "What would you expect me to do over the 1st 90 days when I get on board? What problems will I need to address? What can I take off of everyone's plate that is going to allow me to hit the ground running?" Normally they will then talk about what their expectations are of you as you join. It's really a time when you want them to talk about getting settled into their environment getting acclimated to working with people there in a couple of basic tasks.

Here's the big one. I mentioned this in previous videos and podcasts, and this is the perfect time to ask. " It's a year from now and we are at review time. It's a year from now, 6 months from now whenever it is the organization has said it's going to be doing reviews. And I have just done a good job, I've done a spectacular job. As a matter of fact the job is done is amongst the best that you've ever seen. What what I've accomplished during that year that would cause you to write that review?"

This does a few things. The 1st thing it does is give you an idea as to whether they are going to be realistic with you. These are going to be performance measures that they are going to use to assess you and whether you are extraordinary or just average. The 2nd thing is that it does is give them the idea that you are thinking about being extraordinary which is a subtle thing when you're competing with other individuals who will be basically saying things like, "Tell me about the job. I want to know about the job." They've already heard it at least once or twice before. They are not going to say anything different. If anything, that is too boring a question. Talk about what you might've accomplished during the 1st year you're on board that would cause them to write a review that you are the best person that ever seen in this role or amongst the best goes a long way toward helping you stand.

Again, attitude, preparation, great questions... That's how you with the final interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Have You Seen My Resume? (VIDEO)


It amazes me that people ask this question. What gives you the idea that they haven’t seen your resume?

Summary

Another 1 of those stupid interview mistakes people make, so often. There is a mistake. You get a phone call, so was talking with you on the phone and they're going through your background. Then, you under those famous words, "Have you seen my resume?"

Okay, why do you think they haven't seen your resume? Or maybe your LinkedIn profile? Is there any clue in there that let you know that they doubt 10 numbers out of the blue and decided to talk to you? Of course they've see something about your resume or your LinkedIn profile. Or maybe they had an old resume in their system.

Ultimately, what the trying to get is a feel for you and your capabilities and how you express yourself. Understand, recruiters, whether they are third-party or corporate, don't flip resumes to hiring managers like they are burgers in a fast food restaurant. Ultimately what they are paid to do is evaluate and assess.

In asking you questions, what are they evaluating?

1. Whether you fit the role.
2. How they think, depending upon you have your personality comes across, you will get along with the hiring manager and with the team.
3. A sense of your oral communication skills. After all, you will be talking about the subject that you know intimately-- what you do. It's not all that complicated will recruiters do. Recruiters are there to evaluate and assess people.

Generally, less experienced people will ask this question. Occasionally, a more experienced person will. I say "occasionally," because experienced people sometimes forget that when they hire people for jobs on their staff, this is no expectation of what someone will do for them-- evaluating and assessing people prior to referring them.

Don't be foolish and make 1 of the stupid interview mistakes and ask, "have you seen my resume?" Of course they have seen your resume or your LinkedIn profile or an old copy of your resume where you did something that piqued their interest and thought that the client might be interested in your background.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

It’s Hard to Avoid This Interview Mistake | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 778 I point to one of the mistakes job hunters make when interviewing in person or doing a video interview.

Summary

I see a lot of mistakes that people make and this 1 is geared toward job hunters. It can occur in an in person interview and they can occur in a video interview. What you're doing when you make this mistake is tipping offices of nerves that you have that you want to disguise for better.

What I'm doing as I record this is sitting in a swivel chair and rocking from side to side. I'm actually feeling calm this morning, so this is quite a bit of an act for many people I talk with by Skype, some version of video interviewing whether it's FaceTime or some other way our talk to a person, I see them rocking in the chair a little bit. You not disguising you nerves. It's really that simple.

If you are doing a video interview, you want to have a basic chair. No swivel to it. If the role, if you are nervous. I don't want to be revealed this way. I would rather have you use you nerves with your hands so that you use your hands to emphasize things as you speak.

If you are sitting with me, my hands to be about waist high as I'm talking. But when were talking now, when speaking with your hands you want to use them to illustrate going point by point by point. You can illustrate that with your hands and I am flicking them as I would an interview.

You never want to cross your hands across her face. You may want to frame your face at times, or frame your body at times with your hands. Never EVER block your face because there was a signal and that about hiding... At least that the signal the people are trained to believe that the behavior indicate (I think it's a case of nervous energy, but this is again how people are trained).

At the end of the day, you always ALWAYS want to demonstrate being firm, certain, confident and rocking chair turns you back in the being a little boy your little girl back in public school sitting at a desk, maybe being brought up in front of the teacher... All that sort of nonsense. You don't need that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Why Does Every Employer Ask What My Current Salary Is? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 777 I discuss this mistake and offer ways that you can solve it.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why does every employer ask about my current salary during the job interview?" I want to give employers and recruiters a certain benefit of the doubt... And there's a 2nd reason the doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt.

The one that does is that it is a timesaver for everyone. After all (I would use ridiculous numbers), if you say you're looking for hundred $180,000 and the position is paying $130,000, why would they want to continue interviewing you if there is no way for the 2 of you to come together because they are not going to pay as much as you are currently earning?

Another reason is around salary expectations. Every organization likes to get a benchmark for where a person is and what they are looking for. So they might say, "So, what are you making?"

"I am making $130,000."

"What are you looking for?"

"$180,000."

Boing!!!

This is the one word is a lot less about you and more about them. You see, institutions have guidelines (which are really rules but not guidelines , but they call them guidelines) about the percentage increases that they will offer someone. I know there are exceptions with firms in the way they conduct themselves, but most large to mid-sized organizations work with percentage increases.

It makes a certain amount of sense and non-sales roles. After all, if you are a manager level and they are hiring you for a director level, you don't really have any experience in the role , but you want to be paid as a director, so the thinking becomes, "No compromise on salary so that they can get the experience and then we will increase their salary later on." There is that "non-subtle thing."

The real one is the latter one. It is about control. It is about being in a situation where they get a sense of what you are currently earning and what your expectations are realistic and can fit into their guidelines. It is not because of any altruism. It is a control thing that organizations do.

It makes perfect sense except when it affects you when they say, "Well, she's making $130,000. Our guidelines say that we will offer a 4% to 7% increase on top of base salary," but not look at your real value in a market.

That's were ultimately, you have the choice as to whether or not you accept the offer. They may have a 4% to 7% guidelines, your value may be $160,000, hold out. Find an organization that will pay you properly. Your goal is not to sell cheap but to sell value because, trust me, there will come a time where, regardless of whether you cheap or expensive, they will look around the room and go, "Okay. We have to cut some heads. We've got a layoff some people. Okay. Her. Him." What you're being paid will only help you because you've been able to bank some more money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Asking Great Questions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 776 I discuss this mistake and offer ways that you can solve it.

Summary

This is 1 of my shows in my is stupid interviews series that I've been doing. It involves not asking questions, will not be asking great questions.

Sometimes you walking completely unprepared and you are kind of frozen. Thus, when they ask, "So do you have any questions for us," you respond by saying (stupid voice), "No, you have done a great job of explaining everything to me." That's not the right answer. They want to make sure that you have insightful thinking, that you demonstrate a certain amount of care your questions, so is important to ask questions.

I just want to mention I have an e-book available on Amazon for, I think, $5 and that my website. It's called, "No BS Questions You Should Ask on Any Interview." It is a series of questions that you can ask on an interview.

So when they say, "So do you have any questions for us," they're not just asking them about the job. That's my advice to ask at the beginning of the interview, you should ask about the job before the interview really starts. So the end of the interview, I don't really what you're asking about the job because you will of the ready asked that question at the beginning of the interview and they have already covered it. I want to asking some of these questions.

I they got into these 2 into the book and I will add them shortly but, in the meantime, I want to make sure that you the best advice possible.

There are 2 great questions to start off with.

Some of the ask the question, you can step in and say, "Let's say you hire me and I come on board, what you expect I will be doing and need to accomplish during the 1st 30, 60 and 90 days after I join?" This is going to give you an idea of the acclimation process and how they are going to measure you at the beginning of your employment there. I think it is a great question… And now comes the greatest question you can ask.

"So it is a year from now and it is time to give me my review. I have a just a good job. I have done a spectacular job. As a matter fact, my work is been amongst the best that you have ever seen. What what I've accomplished during that year that would cause you to think that way?"

Ding ding ding ding ding! Home run question!

Don't just glide over the 1st one and go to the 2nd. You need to know, what they will be expecting from too.you at the beginning of your employment, Do the 1st question then go to the 2nd next. They use some of my additional questions from the book.

You will demonstrate that you are a great fit, that you are smart and will close out the interview very well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Cx5=PL: What Every Company Looks for When They Hire (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the key elements firms assess for when they interview.  This is an older video. Skip over the introduction and get to the meet.

Summary

I want to talk with you about what firms look for when they hire someone. I've distilled it down to a math formula – –Cx5=PL. it is really what every firm is assessing for when they hire someone.

The 1st "C" that they are looking for comes from the fact that they have developed a job description. They are looking for skills COMPETENCE. We all know from our own experiences that not everyone who gets hired is competent. There obviously some other attributes that come into play, too-- soft skills that firms look out for.

The 2nd "C" that firms look out for is self-CONFIDENCE. This is the ability to exude passion and enthusiasm for what you do, that causes them to believe that you can do what they need you to do.

The 3rd "C" is CHEMISTRY. This is how you fit into an organization. Generally, firms say that they want to hire individuals for staff roles who are "team players" as opposed to "lone wolves" or "Mavericks." I really have no idea how they assess for that. That is however what they say they are looking for.

The 4th "C" is CHARACTER. Do you have character? Are you a character? Do you demonstrate both to them at the time of your interview? Some jobs really want "a character." Some jobs require that they hire someone with character; other positions require someone with both. Firms will want to get a feel for that when they interview.

The 5th "C" in this formula is my personal favorite – – CHARISMA. Charismatic people always do better than non-charismatics. I can demonstrate that to you by pointing out that we look at a few of our recent presidents – – Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama. Completely different people with completely different policies. Yet America, love them all. Why? Objectively, it doesn't fit. In point of fact, it was just something about them that when they walked into her room, people love them.

All 5 of these "C's" all add up to PL. PERSONAL LEADERSHIP. This is the quality that says that you inspire confidence that you are the solution to a need.

When firms interview, it's not like they're going to turn around and say, "So, are you a leader?" "Yes. Great! That's the answer were looking for!" It doesn't work that way.

They look for behaviors that demonstrate congruence with the image of a leader. As such, is not just what you say that matters. It's how you carry yourself in the course of the interview and it's congruence with their image of how someone should conduct themselves the counts.

Every question they ask as a macro and micro component to it. The macro is the big picture of your background and how it is congruent with their image of someone who would be in this role. The micro is the minutia-- the answer to the question. Your behavior has to demonstrate you carrying yourself in a way that is congruent with someone in this job.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

The Mechanics of the Job Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 775 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter takes you through what you should be doing to be ready. 

Summary

I want to take you to the mechanics of the in person interview today from before you meet the interviewer to arriving at the building through their asking the 1st question.

60% of getting a job is already accomplished before you set foot in the door in that each of you believes that you have something of the other one wants. From there, 20% is involved with each of you convincing one another to what you been told about the other is true and the remaining 20% is purely subjective criteria. That is, are you the kind of person that can fit into their organization; do they seem like the kind of people and does it seem like the kind of job that is going to be of interest to you. Each of you needs to get an A in the course.

If you drive into the interview, give yourself some extra time to get there. There's nothing worse for you or for them than you arriving there late. Try to target get into the building about 15 minutes early. If you taking the subway or bus, or some other version of public transportation, you can take a dry run before hand. If you can't, do a dry run. Just give yourself adequate time to arrive to the building early.

If for some reason, it is extremely hot or extremely cold, I want you to take the time to warm up your hands if it's cold, or dry your hands of perspiration, dry your forehead or face of any perspiration if it's hot; there is nothing worse than shaking hands with a popsicle at the beginning of the interview or having sweaty palms when you are shaking hands with someone.

By getting there a few minutes early, it also gives you a chance to focus on what your objectives are for the interview. If the role, much as you may believe that you're going to have some great energy walk again with 1 minute to spare you are not could be as well prepared. Give yourself adequate time to get there and give yourself a few moments to prepare some of the points that you want to make again.

Let's assume that you got through security, you've gone upstairs because invariably it is an "upstairs" that you are to be interviewing in and now you're at the reception. Inevitably she will say, "So how can I help you?"

You'll say, "Hi! I have a 2:30 appointment to see someone so." They'll invite you to take a seat and maybe give you an application and you'll sit down. I want you to sit down at a point in the room facing the greatest number of entry points so that you can see someone approaching announce your name. I mentioned that because of something I saw happen years ago where I had an appointment with someone at the bank and there was someone there for an interview. It was a rainy day and they had a raincoat on, an umbrella, they were reading a copy of the New York Times. They had the raincoat folder on their lap, had a briefcase and were engrossed in their reading.

They didn't realize that the person was going to interview them was going to arrive in the reception area from the direction of your immediate right shoulder. Thus, when the person stepped out of the doorway and announce the name, I could see this person be visibly startled, have to pick up the raincoat umbrella briefcase, fold the New York Times, shake hands and they were startled so you knew that this interview wasn't going to start off well.

You have to understand that the 1st 10 minutes of an interview are the most important time because that's where each of you decides whether or not to pay attention during the remaining 30 or 40 minutes you might be talking. So it's important for you to get off to a good start.

Sit facing the greatest number of entry points to the room and thus, when someone comes out to greet you, although you may be reading, you will have adequate time to notice them (again, don't get so engrossed in the reading that you don't notice that someone is coming out to announce your name) and thus be prepared when they announce your name.

As soon as they do, walk over and give them a firm handshake and as soon as you do, immediately size them up as a person and deal with them as you presuppose them to be. Are they smart or not. Are they aggressive or not. What are they like as a personality. Do they seem like a friendly individual? Are they out type person? Are there aggressive person? What kind of individual are they? As I said, deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

Most people make the mistake of thinking that they can feel out the interviewer in the 1st few minutes. If you do that, unfortunately you're going to be paralyzing your personality while you feel out the interviewer. The mistake here, as I said, each of you decides within the 1st 10 minutes whether or not to pay attention to the remainder of the time. By hiding your personality, there is nothing for them to like. You want them to like you as a person.

As I mentioned earlier, the hardest part of getting a job is accomplished before you arrived. They are going to be making a snap decision about you just as you are going to be making about them. As I said, I want to encourage you to decide what this person is like as soon as you meet them. If the role, if you are in a social situation and you met some of the 1st time, 95% of the time your instincts about that person are going to be right.

Unfortunately, because it's an interview and you think it is important it is about a job in your career you really need or want this job, most people paralyze their personality behind it. I want you to trust your judgment. If the role, if you are at a casino in knew that you would win at craps 95 times out of 100, you wouldn't really worry about the 5% were you lost. If anything, you might get happy and excited. I'm going to encourage you to do the same thing. Size them up as a personality and deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

There going to escort you into an interview area or office; they may sit behind a desk with you on the other side, seated in a chair. Male or female, I want you to sit there comfortably with your arms on the armrests cross your legs in a position that is comfortable for you and before they say anything, before they have a chance to answer your 1st question, when I want to do is say this to them, "Thank you for taking the time to see me today."

If you were referred by a recruiter, you might continue by saying, "I spoke with, Jeff Altman about this role and he gave me a brief description but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the role as you see it and what I could do to help?"

If you are referred by a friend or you answered and ad, if it is a friend, you mentioned their name. If you saw an ad, you might start by saying, "I remember the position description I saw advertised and it seemed interesting, but I want to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

The reason I suggest this is very simple. Most of the time, it interview is like a karate match. They ask you a question in your reply. They start by saying, "Tell me about yourself," you do that. They going to more depth and you answer. Eventually, they get to the point where they ask whether you have any questions for them. You say, "Tell me about the job." They do that. You say, "It sounds great." And they tell you, "Terrific. We'll get back to you."

By asking the question at the beginning, you are getting information about the job at the beginning of the interview where you can use it to your advantage. I say use it because I want you to answer questions based upon what they tell you. I don't want to just talk about what you've done; I want to talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for.

Instead of droning on and on about things they don't care about, I want you to focus in like a laser on the points that matter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Storytime | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses stories from his own life where he was able to do something the experts said was impossible to make the case that you can change jobs despite what the experts tell you.

Whether it is selling his house in the middle fo the subprime mortgage crisis or running the New York Marathon, Jeff’s stories AND experience doing hard things is part of his making the case.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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