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Will A Company Reject A Candidate with Excellent Technical Skills But Lacking Social Skills?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/28/will-a-company-reject-a-candidate-with-excellent-technical-skills-but-lacking-so

EP 848 I think this is a great question that affects so many people, particularly those who work outside of their native land.  I give my typical no BS advice but a solution so that does not affect you forever.

Summary

The question I received was, "Will accompany reject a candidate with excellent technical skills but lacking social skills?" I know what you want the answer to be but the fact is what you want and what the reality is are different. I want to take it across the life-cycle of your career to explain why.

As a very junior person, you have a chance. However, if you stay static with having poor social skills you won't have a chance.

Before I go further, let me ask, "What are poor social skills?" Generally, that would be interpreted as poor oral communications and/or more written communications. Rude behavior. Ineffective behavior In group situations while working in meetings or with others.

Who would want to work with someone who is rude or sullen. You work with other people. Whether it is in the US or other countries There is the hope that people will get along with one another. You may be dedicated to your craft, but part of your craft involves relating to others. For example, you as a technical professional have to attend meetings where you communicate your ideas. If you cannot communicate ideas, you are not an effective craftsman. That's the reality to it.

It's kind of like an artist he doesn't know how to market themselves or a coach who doesn't know how to promote themselves. I could be the greatest coach in the world (by the way, I'm pretty damn good) But if no one knows about it,, I'm not can be coaching anyone am I? If you have poor social skills, and you are not allowed to attend meetings, How will anyone know that you have great ideas to improve their environment?

So, at the beginning phase of your career, you have a chance; However, is not going to last long because they are going to push you aside pretty quickly. As you get mid-level and higher level, you cannot get away with poor oral communications, poor writing skills, bad behavior with colleagues, Ineffective communications. Why? Because it becomes magnified even more.

You are expected to lead situations. You are expected to be the person who talks to people within the organization outside of the technical areas to elicit information about what they need & how you can go about serving them. You are supporting them; you're working on budgets for a group; you are hiring people. How do you do that with poor social skills? You can't.

Social skills can be improved on. Like technical skills, when you were 6-year-old girl or boy learning how to code, were you great at that time? No, but you had an aptitude a you learned. You had mentors, coaches and teachers who helped you become better. The same thing applies with social skills. You can learn to get better at those, too. I don't care what profession you are in, we are talking about technical profession now, you can get better at these things if you work at them.

I want to be clear that I am a big proponent that you emphasize your strengths as being the core of your background but you have to improve the secondary skills in order to have a career in the primary ones. They go hand-in-hand, but your energy should be focused on your technical skills.

Again, will you be rejected? Probably, Because they'll never know what you know because you can't communicate, right? It is in life are going to hand you a piece of paper or a tablet And say, "Take this test and if you pass the test you will be hired." Managers want to know that you understand what they are telling you AND that you have growth potential. Without those, you are not going to get hired.

So, again, you have a chance if you're the junior level however, as you become involved in the organization, you have no chance.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Apply Through Email or LinkedIn?


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Will My Own Project Help Me Land a Job? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers this question from Quora about whether a person Will have an advantage finding a job by doing a special project.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why Do Recruiters Ask You About Things They Can Find Out in Your Resume | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


There are 2 reasons why recruiters ask questions about things that they can already find out in your resume. Here, I lay them out simply for you.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why do recruiters ask about things they can already find out in my resume?"

This may be a shock to you and if it is, I apologize to you for sharking you.However, I always have to answer with "no BS." for why they do this.

The 1st reason is that people lie.They don't tell the truth. Thus, when you put them on the spot during an interview,, sometimes they give you information than what's on the resume.

Assuming that you are a "truth teller," and your 1st reaction was to groan about people lying, another thing that we are trying to do (Although I don't do recruiting anymore, I did for more than 40 years and have a good idea of the my thought process when I was doing this),I wanted to see if I want to hear how you tell the story Of what you did and how you went about doing it So that I would get a sense of how you interviewed.

For me, if I stumbled into someone who is trying to con me, that was a "bonus point."I am assuming that everyone is telling me the truth in the resume.In telling me the truth in the resume I'm moving onto the next thing, which is if I'm going to invest my time and energy in representing someone, how are they going to perform on an interview? Do I have a chance of earning a fee? If not, (buzzer sound) I delete the resume because it is a waste of my time, no matter how good you think you are. My client won't wind up hiring you. Do you understand?

We don't do things to "find you a job." You are paying nothing. What recruiters do is fill a position with a client and the client pays us.As a result, you are the person who will allow us to earn the fee… Or not and we are trying to figure that out.

In telling us what you've done and how you went about doing it, You are helping us to discern between different people because we can't submit everyone. We are not paid to submit resumes as though they are a burger at a fast food restaurant.What recruiters are paid to do is to deliver someone who the client has determined that they need because the person has a particular background and a particular personality type who will do the job and has particular skills that they have specified.

If you cannot interview well, if you can't interview well with the recruiter, (buzzer sound) they will hit the delete key because they have no chance of hurting a fee.

So take it seriously. Don't just simply question why they're asking you these questions and wasting your time because they aren't. You are wasting their time if you don't deliver wellAnd demonstrate that you have the required skills that their client is looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Should I Apply Through Email or LinkedIn? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Can I Ask About Work-Life Balance? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 850 I don’t believe you can ask about work-life balance directly.  I do believe you can get the answer your question indirectly.  Here’s how.

Summary

The question for today is:

Can I ask about work-life balance?

Before I give you a definitive answer, I'd want to define what an interview is used for.  From an employer's perspective, they are trying to evaluate and assess you in order to figure out whether you can do the job they need to have done.  From their standpoint, well, you know you're not supposed to ask about benefits at the 1st interview, right?  You also know that you want them to like you. 1st, in order to get them to want to move forward, right?

So, when you ask about work-life balance, employers hear that as, "What's the minimum amount of work I need to do in order for you to think that I'm doing my job?"  They are not fond of that thinking and that is how they interpret the question. You can get a better idea of what you want to know by asking a different question.

Let me give you a suggestion.  You know when they get to the part of the interview where they ask, "So, do you have any questions for us?"

I've covered a lot of different questions and different videos. I'm not going to repeat those.Here's the way to asked the question she can get the answer that you want.

"Describe a typical day for me from the time I walk in at what time do you expect me to walk in until the time I leave (tell me what time you expect me to leave).  I want to get a clear idea of what I'm going to be doing by working for you. You have given me a good broad brush stroke I what I would be doing.  Let's get into the weeds a little bit."

You'll get a good idea of what you will be expected to do and, notice, you getting a good idea of your arrival time and departure time, too.  If they expect that you will be working late hours, they'll be telling you that in the course of answering this question.  That, I believe, will help you solve the question of work-life balance.

Look, I don't know of many job hunters, I don't know of many American workers or foreign workers who want to do the least amount of work.  I believe that most people want to have some time for the rest of their lives, too.  They want to have a little bit of time for their family, to have a little bit of fun to do other things in their life, too.

I don't believe that you want to beef finding out about this mythical work-life balance thing.  You want to be finding out about what you're going to be doing and how many hours a day, you're going to be doing, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Should I Apply Through Email or LinkedIn? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/29/should-i-apply-through-email-or-linkedin/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

How Do I Successfully Pad My Resume?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Someone wrote to me with the question and this is my way of responding to them and the question is, “How do I successfully pad my resume?”

It seems that this person has a four year gap in the background during which time they took some college classes and dealt with some mental health issues and had been on disability. Actually, it seemed lies they are currently on disability the way it’s written.

So I’ll just start by saying it starts off with your own thoughts about yourself. You describe this period as “padding my resume” versus you had an illness and I’m well enough to return to work and would like to do so.

Now if you think you’ll be able to return at the same level, compensation, and a variety of other variables as existed 4 years ago, there you’re kidding yourself. You will not be able to do that. Firms are not going to suddenly assume that after 4 years you know exactly as much as he did before and you are is capable of you were 4 years ago.

If you did not drive a car for 4 years and got behind the wheel of one, it might feel little awkward . . . and the same id going to apply to you returning to the workforce. From their vantage point, it’s not about padding; it’s talking about what you did the last 4 years “I had an illness. I’m returning to work. It’s really that simple.

Are going to love that? No. Not every firm is going to be excited to interview you for obvious reasons, but the right firm will and that’s the most important thing I can say to you. The right firm is good be interested in your background despite the four year gap.

So stop referring to this this as padding your resume as though you are going to con someone into a job. Instead, think of it is as taking this issue straight on, knowing that some people are going to be pleased with what you explain to them; some firms will never be convinced; and the right firm will.

What’s My Problem? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 666 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question he saw on Quora from someone lamenting that he or she doesn’t know what they are doing wrong.

Summary

I saw a question on Quora today and wanted to respond to it. Here's the question will provide the answer to it: "if you've applied for many job interviews and had very little response, how do you know which aspect is the problem? The job market? The resume? The cover letter? Inadequate work history? Just dumb luck?"

They continue on talking about their personal experience. "For the last year, I've had phone interviews, in person interviews, but I only seem to get teased and nothing pans out. I don't know what went wrong or how to improve for future inquiries."

Here's a simple formula that you can use.

If you are sending out your resume and you're not getting responses, usually the problem is your resume.

If you're getting interviews but not getting 2nd interviews, you are not doing phone or in person interviews as well as you think you are. If you are not getting invited back for seconds or in-house interviews, you don't do phone interviews very well.

If you're getting through that and getting to finalists phase , but not getting job offers, you just can't do that part well.

Finally, if you get to that finalists phase, they have 2 people that they brought back and then talking with you about money, you may not do salary negotiation all that well.

You have to break down the process a little bit and clearly in this case, he or she doesn't interview all that well. I wouldn't blame it on the job market. I wouldn't blame it on the resume because the resume got them in the door. At the end of the day they got on the door for interviews and they're not getting past the screening round, the 1st level interview, so I can be very clear that this person just doesn't interview well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Stupid Networking Mistakes: Turning Down an Invitation (VIDEO)


“I got an email invite from CTO of a software startup that was recently acquired. He mentioned looking up my profile/works online and was interested to talk to me over a coffee. I am, however, not looking for a change in job right now. How do I politely decline him while mentioning that I would like to be in touch with him / or get in touch when I am actively looking.”

Summary

Here's a fun question!

"How do I turn down a coffee invite from the CTO of a successful startup?" They go on to say, "I got an email invite from CTO of a software startup that was recently acquired. He mentioned looking up my profile/works online and was interested to talk to me over a coffee. I am, however, not looking for a change in job right now. How do I politely decline him while mentioning that I would like to be in touch with him / her and be able to get in touch when I am actively looking." They live in the Bay area.

I want to take this into a broader range of an answer and talk about how you respond to an invitation for coffee from someone who might be interested in talking with you about you . . Or might be interested in talking with you about them.

It goes back to the basic idea about networking. Why do you network? It's to build up relationships of the time, we might actually need help, they know, like, trust and respect you. Maybe the trying to build up a relationship in order to find out if there's something in your organization. I don't know anything about your experience or your level professionally so it could go either way, but the likelihood is that they are going to be talking about trying to recruit you.

A long time ago, I learned a wonderful lesson. It is the notion that the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). The person who gets ahead is the one who remains alert to opportunities. Sometimes those are internal to the organization, but more often than not, they are external.

Whether you are changing jobs or interested in changing jobs right now or not, developing relationship with the successful individual, someone who is further along the road and you are, can always pay off. To decline an invitation is really a goofy response.

Yes, you are happy. Walk in there as a happy individual who likes his work. Consider that you might like your work even more if you are pay $25,000 more than you are now would receive more options. Isn't that possible? I would tell you to go on this meeting.

If you really do want to decline, do so politely , but start off by asking, ". But the subject would be of our conversation?" Make them explain what the purpose of the meeting is, discuss dates and times to meet, but they continue by saying, "I want to be clear, I'm not out there actively looking for position." This way, you're not leading them on in any way.

I want to keep encouraging you to get out there and keep talking to people. After all, your network is your net worth. Developing relationships with someone NOW when you are not actively looking can only be profitable to you at some point in the future.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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