How Do I Successfully Pad My Resume?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Someone wrote to me with the question and this is my way of responding to them and the question is, “How do I successfully pad my resume?”

It seems that this person has a four year gap in the background during which time they took some college classes and dealt with some mental health issues and had been on disability. Actually, it seemed lies they are currently on disability the way it’s written.

So I’ll just start by saying it starts off with your own thoughts about yourself. You describe this period as “padding my resume” versus you had an illness and I’m well enough to return to work and would like to do so.

Now if you think you’ll be able to return at the same level, compensation, and a variety of other variables as existed 4 years ago, there you’re kidding yourself. You will not be able to do that. Firms are not going to suddenly assume that after 4 years you know exactly as much as he did before and you are is capable of you were 4 years ago.

If you did not drive a car for 4 years and got behind the wheel of one, it might feel little awkward . . . and the same id going to apply to you returning to the workforce. From their vantage point, it’s not about padding; it’s talking about what you did the last 4 years “I had an illness. I’m returning to work. It’s really that simple.

Are going to love that? No. Not every firm is going to be excited to interview you for obvious reasons, but the right firm will and that’s the most important thing I can say to you. The right firm is good be interested in your background despite the four year gap.

So stop referring to this this as padding your resume as though you are going to con someone into a job. Instead, think of it is as taking this issue straight on, knowing that some people are going to be pleased with what you explain to them; some firms will never be convinced; and the right firm will.

What’s My Problem? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 666 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question he saw on Quora from someone lamenting that he or she doesn’t know what they are doing wrong.

Summary

I saw a question on Quora today and wanted to respond to it. Here's the question will provide the answer to it: "if you've applied for many job interviews and had very little response, how do you know which aspect is the problem? The job market? The resume? The cover letter? Inadequate work history? Just dumb luck?"

They continue on talking about their personal experience. "For the last year, I've had phone interviews, in person interviews, but I only seem to get teased and nothing pans out. I don't know what went wrong or how to improve for future inquiries."

Here's a simple formula that you can use.

If you are sending out your resume and you're not getting responses, usually the problem is your resume.

If you're getting interviews but not getting 2nd interviews, you are not doing phone or in person interviews as well as you think you are. If you are not getting invited back for seconds or in-house interviews, you don't do phone interviews very well.

If you're getting through that and getting to finalists phase , but not getting job offers, you just can't do that part well.

Finally, if you get to that finalists phase, they have 2 people that they brought back and then talking with you about money, you may not do salary negotiation all that well.

You have to break down the process a little bit and clearly in this case, he or she doesn't interview all that well. I wouldn't blame it on the job market. I wouldn't blame it on the resume because the resume got them in the door. At the end of the day they got on the door for interviews and they're not getting past the screening round, the 1st level interview, so I can be very clear that this person just doesn't interview well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Stupid Networking Mistakes: Turning Down an Invitation (VIDEO)


“I got an email invite from CTO of a software startup that was recently acquired. He mentioned looking up my profile/works online and was interested to talk to me over a coffee. I am, however, not looking for a change in job right now. How do I politely decline him while mentioning that I would like to be in touch with him / or get in touch when I am actively looking.”

Summary

Here's a fun question!

"How do I turn down a coffee invite from the CTO of a successful startup?" They go on to say, "I got an email invite from CTO of a software startup that was recently acquired. He mentioned looking up my profile/works online and was interested to talk to me over a coffee. I am, however, not looking for a change in job right now. How do I politely decline him while mentioning that I would like to be in touch with him / her and be able to get in touch when I am actively looking." They live in the Bay area.

I want to take this into a broader range of an answer and talk about how you respond to an invitation for coffee from someone who might be interested in talking with you about you . . Or might be interested in talking with you about them.

It goes back to the basic idea about networking. Why do you network? It's to build up relationships of the time, we might actually need help, they know, like, trust and respect you. Maybe the trying to build up a relationship in order to find out if there's something in your organization. I don't know anything about your experience or your level professionally so it could go either way, but the likelihood is that they are going to be talking about trying to recruit you.

A long time ago, I learned a wonderful lesson. It is the notion that the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). The person who gets ahead is the one who remains alert to opportunities. Sometimes those are internal to the organization, but more often than not, they are external.

Whether you are changing jobs or interested in changing jobs right now or not, developing relationship with the successful individual, someone who is further along the road and you are, can always pay off. To decline an invitation is really a goofy response.

Yes, you are happy. Walk in there as a happy individual who likes his work. Consider that you might like your work even more if you are pay $25,000 more than you are now would receive more options. Isn't that possible? I would tell you to go on this meeting.

If you really do want to decline, do so politely , but start off by asking, ". But the subject would be of our conversation?" Make them explain what the purpose of the meeting is, discuss dates and times to meet, but they continue by saying, "I want to be clear, I'm not out there actively looking for position." This way, you're not leading them on in any way.

I want to keep encouraging you to get out there and keep talking to people. After all, your network is your net worth. Developing relationships with someone NOW when you are not actively looking can only be profitable to you at some point in the future.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What LinkedIn Summary Should I Have to Attract Recruiters (VIDEO)


Recruiters are constantly scouring LinkedIn for candidates. What LinkedIn summary should you have to attract recruiters?

Summary

"What LinkedIn summary should I have to attract recruiters?" As is the case of most of these questions, the sender hasn't put themselves in the position of being a recruiter. I don't do that kind of work anymore but I did for more than 40; I have a good perspective on it.

The 1st part of the question is, "how to attract recruiters." From there, once you understand the recruiters are finding people on LinkedIn, it becomes clearer.

When someone is looking on LinkedIn to find someone to fill a job with the client, they do keywords in order to do a search. Thus, whether is your profile or specifically the summary area of your profile, it needs to be keyword rich in order to demonstrate a fit.

Now, I would think more in terms of your profile and then, from there, use the summary is a summary of what you will attributes are.

When I think of who might be writing this question, I think they might be a less experienced person. Thus, what you want to be doing is writing about what your background really is. That's because when you write your profile you want to write one That is all inclusive… A laundry list of stuff. You want to make your summary as concise as possible (I'm not talking about brevity, per se), but you want to create incident someone looking at your profile clearly understands what your strengths are. After all, you don't want to do pointless interviews, do you? Zero it in and let the rest of the profile be keyword rich in order to draw people to the page.

From there, what I always tell people to do, is put a phone number and email address in your summary. Why? Because LinkedIn charges about $11 per inMail to message you and you are not on LinkedIn all the time To respond to inMails and messages that you receive. The fastest way for recruiter to contact you is not by spending $11 or $12 waiting for you to go online, But, instead, calling you or emailing you.Putting this information in your summary makes it easier for them to contact you… That expedites it for them by making it easier for you them to contact you…That is what you said you wanted when you wrote, right? It isn't enough to just get the view page. You want to get them to contact you.

In addition, if you have a premium account of some sort,Just checking to see who looked at your profile and who hasn't contacted you. From there, what you do is reach out to them, Message them and simply say, "LinkedIn told me that you would look at my profile. Let's connect. Is there anything I can be doing to help you? Is there something you are looking for in my background that you didn't see which I can address in the conversation?" What this does is flush them out so that you have an opportunity to connect with them.

Again, use the profile for a lot of keywords and the summary area to summarize what a lot of your attributes are. If you are a more senior individual. This becomes even more important.

So, zero in In the summary, give them an easy way to contact with you And you will get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Call Recruiters Directly to Find Me a Job or Wait for Them to Call Me? (VIDEO)

Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job, or wait for them to call me?

Summary

The question for today is, "Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job or wait for them to call me?"

I'm not sure what you think recruiters do...When you are calling them up, are you paying them anything for this? And you expect them to "find you a job?" Seriously, when you say, "find you a job," you have the equation all wrong.

The equation for a recruiter, headhunter, any professional that is in the employment business is they are there to fill jobs and get paid for their efforts. They are not there to "find you a job" except coincidentally in that process. So, in terms of waiting for them to call you, (1) See if you can identify people who work in your field. Seriously. Don't just call recruiters up at random; see if you can find people who work in your field.

(1a) See if they have any jobs open that fit your background. They are not there to find the job for you. They are there to fill a job with you or someone like you. I say it that way because if you act like a jerk, There is someone there who is not going to act like a jerk who they are going to work with To fill this position with because they don't want to get embarrassed in front of their client. That's because the client is going to stop calling them If there are too many people that they refer who act stupid.

So, you always want to be in the position where recruiters are contacting you. That's because it is clear that they have a role open that might fit you. You can always look at job ads on job boards for local newspapers, websites and a whole host of other places to find individual recruiters who have positions open that fit your background. Again, I want to be clear – – "that fit your background." Don't spam your resume and send it like so much garbage. They don't have time for this. If you do that you are Being like the people who spam them with Viagra ads that landed in their inbox all the time. It is just a colossal waste of time! To call them up and simply say, "Hey! I'm looking for a job,," It is no different than spam.

However, I don't want you to be passive. If you are in a professional field, what I want you to do Is have a quality LinkedIn profile that is keyword optimized So that you attract recruiters who have positions open for someone like you. You want to have your resume on a job born because that can ask you pretty wide net to people who are looking for people like you. You want to have your resume on Indeed, SimplyHired and Other sites in order to draw people to you who have positions open AND you want to be setting up search agents on different job boards so that they notify you When positions get listed. You want to be out there networking.

If you're not in a professional field, networking can take a different form. For example, if you are a recent grad you can go on LinkedIn, go across the ribbon on the top and see alumni from your school who may be a year or 2 ahead of you and you network with them. In blue-collar work, you can network with people you have worked with previouslyAnd see if they know about a position.

However, to call up a recruiter out of the blue To find a job for you? You are just kidding yourself.

Also say that you need my help. If you think this is the way it works, I want to encourage you to join JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. I have curated information that will help you find work, PLUS You can ask me questions that will help streamline your process and make your search go faster.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

I'm Working. Can I Ask for a Weekend Interview?

I’m Working. Can I Ask for a Weekend Interview? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 648 A listener asks this question that I’m sure will resonate for many.

Summary

On episode 648, I continue with my no segments shows brought about by computer dammage brought about by water being spilled onto my computer.

This is a summary, rather than a transcript.

Is it OK to ask for a weekend interview?

It's OK to ask but would you want to work for a firm that would have staff work on weekends? Or have you work 24x7?

Would you want to work for a firm that would hire YOU and expect YOU to do the same thing for someone else?

Why not take 30 minutes on a lunch hour?

Also, why can't you make some time during a lunch hour or on your way into work or off hours?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Can No LinkedIn Profile Be a Problem? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether the lack of a LinkedIn profile Can cost someone an opportunity at a company.

No LinkedIn Profile.

Summary

This is a question I was asked recently:

Are you less likely to get hired and a large tech company. If you have no LinkedIn profile, but you have no problem providing links to a hidden code hosted website profile with some of your codes and links to some of your hidden projects indicating your availability?

The answer is a definite, “Maybe!” Let me give you perspective..

The 1st question is how this firm even find out about you if you don’t have a LinkedIn profile and the code is hidden? What is going to entice them to reach out to you? Now that’s in the circumstance where they are out there recruiting you. How did they even find out about you? 

Maybe it is on Github. Maybe they’ve seen some stuff that you have written. Maybe it is elsewhere. But you are talking about the fact that your best code is hidden away. They know that they should want to contact you?

On the other hand, if you are applying for a position, that is, submitting your resume through applicant tracking systems

or networking your way to other organizations, the absence of a LinkedIn profile may not be a problem.

I’m seeing that some organizations are asking for links to LinkedIn profiles at the time of submission. They are doing that in order to make sure that the profiles are consistent with what is on the resume. Understand, I look at a lot of LinkedIn profiles and there is often a disconnect between what a person says on the resume and what is on their profile. These firms are looking for a very simple baseline.

In the case that you are citing are they reaching out to you (in which case you are making it hard for them to do, and that begs the question why?  Why don’t you have the LinkedIn profile to begin with?),  You have to make it easy for organizations to find you  in order to get found and hired by them.Then, in the other cases when you are applying, in which case you can put a link to your code and have firm see it, then they may go looking for your LinkedIn profile, discover they can’t find it and ask you, “I went looking for your LinkedIn profile and couldn’t find it.  What is that about?” In this case you have an unnecessary question to answer under interview.

So, like I said, it is a definite maybe but it’s your choice as to how you want to live your life and manage your career.  I would just simply say get a LinkedIn profile done.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

%d bloggers like this: