Thank You Notes


Should you still send a thank you letter?

Summary

Thank you letters. Should you send a thank you after your interview?

The purpose of the thank you letter was originally exactly that – – thank you. The unintended benefit was that you put yourself in front of the firm one more time, put yourself in front of the employer one more time. It was a reminder.

The history of thank you letters is that you mail them 100 years ago. You mail them 10 years ago. Because they got there a few days after the interview it was one last reminder for the firm that was hesitating. These days, it doesn't work to mail a thank you letter. It's really about an email and if and when you should send it.

1 of the advantages of a thank you letter is that it communicates interest. You're going to go an extra step and express that and have a selling opportunity. That's really the key. If we were going to do is send a thank you letter that says, "I just want to thank you for making time today. I believe I agree qualifications for the role. I look forward to hearing from you about next steps," that's not a useful letter because it really nothing to sell you as being the solution to a problem.

If you sell yourself in this way, "I want to thank you for making time tonight. I was thinking about our conversation and I wanted to drive home a few points with you." Then you start selling yourself in the context of your qualifications for the role. If you start promoting yourself and your capabilities to solve the problem, "My mind is really been racing since our conversation thinking about different ways I could contribute. I was wondering if we might be able to get together next week for another conversation (another interview) and I can discuss some of those thoughts I've had." That is a useful thank you letter.

That works for certain types of positions. However, if you are an administrative assistant, if you are in a role like customer service, stick with the "enthusiasm approach" and reinforce that you are qualified to do the job. For example, if you work at a call center, you might say, "Thanks for making time to speak with me today. I just want to let you know how interested I am and I want to drive home a few points with you." Then you might list some things that were in your resume... "I handle 15% more calls than the typical call center person without escalation." If you're an accountant, you might say, "I have yet to miss a deadline in my time with my firm. I hope the organization save X amount of money by doing such and such. I'm the kind of person who thinks after hours about ways to improve operations..." On and on and on. You start emphasizing additional qualities about yourself that may have surfaced in the interview, but may not have surfaced of the interview that really allow you to differentiate yourself from others.

"I have a lot of enthusiasm for this kind of work. Would be possible for us to continue the conversation next Tuesday?" That becomes a way that you are making a suggestion and if they don't respond in a timely way, there is a message to it. The message may be that they are not interested or they may not be ready to move forward. Remember, it is 1 of those 2. After all, if they are excited, they leap all over it. Remember, it doesn't mean that they are not interested AND it could be that they are not interested. It may also mean that they're not ready because they have other people on the agenda to meet with.

Thank you letters can go a long way toward helping you IF YOU THINK OF THEM AS ANOTHER SALES DOCUMENT. If you think of them as an ordinary "thank you," then, they are really crap.

One more thing. They used to be mailed. You can't mail them anymore because they don't get there at any time before they make a decision because by the time they get there by mail, they already made a decision. You have to send it out the next day by email at the very latest. If you have a 9 AM interview, it has to go up by 9 AM the next morning. If you have had a 5 o'clock interview, it should really be sent by noon the next day. I know that's not 24 hours, but is still the idea that you are excited, you have been thinking about it, you want to reinforce of drive home some of the things that were said at the meeting or, based upon what they said, you start thinking about…" You get the idea.

Again, you state you letters as a sales tool. They will help you. Are they a guarantee that you're going to get hired? Of course, not. They can certainly separate you from the person who doesn't do anything, who doesn't want to communicate interest. 1 of the reasons that has that effect is that employers, when they get to the point of deciding that they want to make an offer, they want the offer to be accepted. They see someone who is excited as being someone who will join them versus the person who is cool and detached and may have great skills, but is less interested or expresses less interest. It's embarrassing to manager to extend an offer that gets turned down.

Get your thank you letter out start racking up some points.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Asking for More Money | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Summary

If you have watch my videos on salary negotiation, I try to cover a whole range of different options from the hardball to the softball. The show goes into the softer category which, frankly, I prefer for most of you because I don't think most of you can be hardball negotiators. In sales, it's different. There, I'm going to push you to be a tough negotiator because that is part of what they will be measuring you for. For most of you, however, softball, the gentle approach, not getting into arguments and confrontations, but presenting this as an "ask," and not a demand is far more effective.

When you get the offer, here is how you respond.

"WOW! That's terrific! Thank you so much. I'm so excited! But I must in all candor tell you that I love this firm the opportunity, but I have several other offers at the same salary level or in the same range." Then you shut up because the next thing that they're going to follow up with is, "So what do you plan on doing?"

"I need to sit with this a little bit. I'm hoping you could do a bit better to match my highest offer."

Understand that for most organizations, a 5 or $10,000 improvement is not going to break the bank. Even if they move by $2000. That's money in your pocket, not theirs, right? You don't want to get into arguments. You don't want to get into confrontations. You want to make it seem like you are agonizing a little bit.

"I have other offers in the same area. I was hoping you could match my highest offer." Understand, on your side, you need to be prepared to talk with them about what the number is and once they match and you have to be prepared to say, "Yes." There is no back and forth you anymore. It is done.

Also, understand that 5 or $10,000 is okay. $30,000, unless you are an executive level is not in the same ballpark. It is considered a wide difference in most organizations and their budget approach.

Recognize the difference here. Then, if they just increased by a little bit, you can respond by going, "I need to think about it. Can I get back to you later in the week?" When you get back to them, "this has been so hard. Is there any progress that you can make? Any improvement you can make?"

They may respond by saying, "No, that's it." Or, "that's really the best that we can do." Then you need to be prepared to give an answer.

No matter what, the approach is just to very simply give them the idea that you want to say yes, but they need to improve the offer. Then, be quiet. It's really that simple.


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. His work involves traditional life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

When To Schedule Your Next Interview

When To Schedule Your Next Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 872 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains when to schedule an interview for and when not to schedule an interview for.

Summary

Today, we're going to talk about the best and worst times of the day to interview. The premise I'm working with is these are for traditional 9 to 5 jobs; yes, I know, some jobs are 8 to 4; some are 10 27. Whatever it is it is a day job, rather than for someone who works off hours.

Premise number one is that you want to get in the door as soon as possible. Some people have the belief that you want to be the last person interviewed. Sometimes that works and sometimes it doesn't. The idea behind it is to let them see other people and let them get clear about what they dislike and what they really need by interviewing other people. Then, you'll speak with them at the end to get the job. It doesn't always work that way. Sometimes the first person in the door is the one that's hired because they are strong and set the bar for which other people have to compete.

To me, instead of playing the game of, "can I get in the door last," you want to get in as soon as possible. Now, if they call you up at 12 o'clock and asking you be here at 2 PM, that probably isn't going to work for you and your schedule. However, let's look at what is a reasonable amount of time.

What parts of the week are best and worst?

To me, Friday afternoon is usually a bad one. Another one to me is Monday morning. Invariably, on Friday afternoon, people are trying to get out early, particularly during the summer months. On Monday mornings, they usually have things to catch up on plus the usual office gossip.

"Hi, how was your weekend."

"Fine, thank you. How was your weekend?"

"It was good. What did you do on your weekend?" You get the idea.

Ideally, you would like to start Monday after lunch and, if you Karen, Tuesday is often the best day of the week for interviewing. There is a subtlety to it.

Why do I think Tuesday is a great day for interviewing? Because then they have a few days to contact one another and then get back to you after the interview about next steps. Friday, Thursday, sometimes replies go over the weekend and any positive feelings they may feel about you become dissipated with time.

Thus, to me, Tuesday and, secondly, Wednesday are ideal. I try not to recommend first thing in the morning because sometimes people walk into catastrophes and need to respond and while they are interviewing you, their mind becomes distracted about what they have to handle afterwards.

I try not to do things at the end of the day, if possible because people are trying to get off and go to other things. However, sometimes it's necessary because I do believe you try to meet with them as soon as possible.

So, to repeat the best day is Tuesday and, secondly Wednesday. You ideally would like to interview mid to late morning. You don't want to be interviewed on Friday afternoons or Monday mornings, if possible. But sometimes you have to do with them

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Do I Look Like a Job Hopper?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/14/do-i-look-like-a-job-hopper/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question as to whether someone looks like a job hopper.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The premise is that the person is concerned that the resume makes them look like a job hopper. The question goes like this, “I’m a software developer with a job that I’ve had since college. 1.5 years. 4 years. 2 years. 3.5 years. 2.5 years. I’m a year into my latest gig and started to think about switching industries like from going from finance to tech. How bad does this look?”

Great question. I think there is a more complicated answer to this. Let me start with the premise that I have the idea that some of these might be consulting assignments. Where that is the case, you can aggregate dates into one combined area that shows that you are a consultant during that period. Let’s say the 2 years and the 3 1/2 years were as consultants, aggregate the dates there. The reason I have the idea is your choice of the word “gigs”or, “gig” for that last position . I have the idea from not that you might be a person who is been a consultant. If that’s the case, aggregate some of those dates to demonstrate clearly.

More important than a tactic, is the bigger picture. You are not talking about career progression. You’re talking about how over 10 years as a developer. If my math is right, for 14 1/2 years, you are talking about yourself being purely a developer; do not talking about being a lead. You not talk about being an architect and you’re not talking about being a manager. You talking about being a developer.

That may have been a conscious choice of yours but some employers of the start looking down on you because you haven’t progressed in your career. That may be a bigger issue for you. Why are you still a developer? Why are people not give you the opportunity to get ahead?

If you’ve always wanted to be a developer, that’s going to be a real easy question to deflect. You’re going to have to address in the cover letter.
Again, I don’t see these dates as being intrinsically wrong. I just think the bigger issue is that at some organizations, and organizations that like fast-track individuals, they’re not going to see you as being fast-track. There going to see you on the slow road.

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: The Helium Balloon in the Car Brainteaser

 

EP 871 This is a hedge fund brainteaser that will stump quite a few of you.

Summary

The brainteaser for today is a fun one; it goes like this: "you are in a stopped car with a helium balloon floating in the passenger compartment. All the windows are closed. The car accelerates forward. With respect to the passenger compartment, does the blue move forward, backward, or stay stationary?"

The key to this is that air moves too. Got that?

The obvious answer is that the bullet would have a tendency to move backward in the passenger compartment , as would all the compact discs on the dashboard.

In fact, the blue moves forward in the passenger compartment because inertial forces air molecules back, creating low pressure up front into which the blue moves.

So, because the air starts moving backward, it creates a momentum that causes a low pressure up front , which moves to belong forward.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/20/whats-the-first-rule-of-negotiating-a-job-offer-2/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: The Helium Balloon in the Car Brainteaser

EP 871 This is a hedge fund brainteaser that will stump quite a few of you.

Summary

The brainteaser for today is a fun one; it goes like this: "you are in a stopped car with a helium balloon floating in the passenger compartment. All the windows are closed. The car accelerates forward. With respect to the passenger compartment, does the blue move forward, backward, or stay stationary?"

The key to this is that air moves too. Got that?

The obvious answer is that the bullet would have a tendency to move backward in the passenger compartment , as would all the compact discs on the dashboard.

In fact, the blue moves forward in the passenger compartment because inertial forces air molecules back, creating low pressure up front into which the blue moves.

So, because the air starts moving backward, it creates a momentum that causes a low pressure up front , which moves to belong forward.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The #1 Characteristic to Look for When Hiring Leaders | No BS Hiring Advice Radio


Sam Walker, author of,”The Captain Class” shares what he learned from researching the most successful sports teams of the last hundred plus years. This takeaway and how to evaluate for it is priceless for hiring managers.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

How Do I Deal With a Fly In Interview In The Future | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/14/how-do-i-deal-with-a-fly-in-interview-in-the-future-no-bs-job-search-advice-ra

EP 804 I respond to someone’s fly in interview gone terribly wrong.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I received a message today from someone who posed a scenario asked different opinion. He has done a phone interview and is told that it will is a technicality for the client wanting to meet him. The recruiter tells him he needs to pay the airfare and travel and that if he is offered the job and takes it, he will be paid back for the trip.
Let’s read between the lines. You lay out the money. If you get the job, I will pay you back. If you don’t get the job, you will get nothing.
When he asks about what happens if they don’t select me, the recruiter says that this is for sure them to stop talking negatively. Like I said, the recruiter is going to pay him back if he gets the job and if he doesn’t get the job, he is out of luck.
Everything sounds find any books a flight from one city to Atlanta and rents a car. The night before, he goes to a friend’s wedding and he is on a 3 AM flight the next morning. Let’s get practical. He knows the guy for long time. It’s a big decision to go to the wedding, but he is only 3 AM flight so his at the airport at [1:30] AM. He is sleep deprived when he lands; he has an interview going on for in the long and the short of it is, he doesn’t get the job. His body just wants to get to sleep and he didn’t perform on the interview.
He tells the recruiter what happens. I want to explain it to the company. “I don’t even care about the expenses.” The company doesn’t want to talk to him; the recruiter has no interest. The company doesn’t want to talk to him. At the end of the day, he asks this question, “Is it a good deal to go on these fly outs prepaid? Does it come across stronger to say that I want half the money up front? Is it worth taking the risk of the client not paying up front?” He is looking for a way to protect themselves.
Here’s my thinking.
1. If you have a wedding the night before, it isn’t like the wedding wasn’t on the schedule when the interview showed up, right? You knew about that before hand and you miscalculated. As a result, you will that going out sleep deprived. That has nothing to do with whether or not you are going to get paid back. That has to do with you making a mistake
2. The way you handle this in the future is that you don’t put yourself in the position where you are going to be sleep deprived and unable to perform. This is nothing to do with the money. This has to do with you.
You didn’t deliver the goods on the interview and who would want to pay for you to have an excursion to stink up the joint. At the end of the day, what you could’ve done is say, “I can’t do Monday. I can do Tuesday. I have plans on Sunday that I cannot change. Tuesday I can be there on an early morning flight.” Do you know what you could have also done? You could go out Monday afternoon for a Tuesday interview, get a good nights sleep in a hotel and then walk in refreshed.
Instead, you made a mistake. People make mistakes and you ask for my advice… I give no BS advice. In the future, don’t put it back to back like this on yourself. You’ve already demonstrated that you can’t deliver under these circumstances; don’t do it again.

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