Are You Interviewing? (VIDEO)

This is a variation on the question of, “Where have you been on interviews?”  Here. I explain what the intention is behind the question.

Summary

This is 1 of those questions is a variation on another one that I have addressed previously. This is the question of, "Are you interviewing?" It's a variation on the, "Where have you been interviewing," question. I want to speak to this 1 because really depends on who you're talking to as to what the intention of the question is.

Let me start off with third-party recruiters. With a contingency recruiting firm, you'll be asked this question for several reasons.
1. If you have been interviewing, they may turn around and say, "Where have you been on interviews so far?" They may be trying to find out have you been to the client, job leads of other organizations that are trying to hire so that you release that information to them and then they start reaching out to those firms to see if they can wind up being positions to work on and earn money from.
2. Another thing there trying to do is to see how far along you are in the process. So if you tell them that you have met with 14 firms, had 3 finals and you are close to 2 offers, they're probably going to hit the delete key on your resume when they are finished talking with you. That's because they will see any point in doing anything.

So one, shall we say, slimy approach to asking the question and the rest are pretty innocuous.

When an employer asks, they are obviously not good be contacting firms for job leads. What they are trying to do is (1) find out if you are aggressive job hunter. Companies have a bias against aggressive job. Their belief is that people who are actively looking for work are less attractive than those who, shall we say, are recruited. If they have contacted you and are asking this question, you might simply say, "I am not aggressively looking for work. But when you approach me, this is an interesting opportunity. Frankly, since the time you initially contacted me, 2 other firms have approached me as well" that you can talk about where you are with those firms.

Part of the reason that employer asks the question is to see how much time they might have before you have to make a choice, whether they can keep interviewing or, shall we say get off the pot and extended offer or move more quickly. You see, they like you (that's part of what the communication is), but they want to see if they can date others for a while before getting married.. You follow what I'm getting at here?

Recognize that their intent is to get a sense of how much time they have with you before they risk losing you. If you say that you have nothing else going on, they can sit back and relax a little bit, knowing that they can interview for a while. Let us know what's going on with you.,

"If anything changes, give us a call. We want to know. "

Most of the time when that happens, they have already seen a bunch of other people and never come back and make the offer.

However, if you say, "Since the time he reached out to me, a couple of other firms have reached out to me as well. I have had some really good interviews and there are some interesting opportunities out there," that will get them motivated to take more action.

Now, if you apply for job and submit a resume, this won't always work obviously, because you have indicated that you are an active job hunter. Thus, all, they are trying to do is see where you are in your process. If they are on a 1st interview and you are on a fifth interview somewhere, there are 1 of 2 ways that they might respond:
(1) accelerate the process
(2) hit the delete key because they know they cannot move fast enough.

I have found over the years that many firms where I mentioned to them that I had found this individual that really fits your role very well, but they are only 3rd or 4th interview and there are some folks who are interested, they never really move. So, caveat emptor. Recognize the impact of what you say and what the firm's motivation is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Second Interview Questions: Why Should We Hire You?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this important interview question.

Summary

This 1 is geared toward 2nd interviews. The question I want to offer up is, "So, why should we hire you?" This is been the meta-question that has been behind everything else that is taken place from your phone screen, your 1st in person and now this interview. They want to understand why it is they should choose you from all the other individuals whose resumes they have screened, who they have interviewed, who they are bringing back now on this interview.

To some degree, this is a pretty easy question... If you take a little bit of time to reflect on your previous interviews. That's because, at these interviews, they have given you cues about where their interest really piqued in your background, what they really zeroed in on the cause them to really get excited about you. They may have said something to you. They may have really gone in deep into that part of your background.

At the end of the day, that's what it's really all about. You have to deliver a message to them that really focuses in on their area of interest that causes them to say, "Yeah, that's right." All the stuff that they have signaled in the course of their previous interviews are really what you need to zero in on. You construct the answer by saying, "I'm sure you hear this all the time – – I really have a lot of passion for what I do. I love doing such and such. " Go into detail about that.

"But what really makes me stand out from others is..." You zero in on those qualities that they honed in on in your interview so that in this way, you're playing into what they believe your strengths are, confirm it for them and thus helping them choose you versus your competition. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: What Do You Look for When You Hire Someone?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/10/tough-interview-questions-what-do-you-look-for-when-you-hire-someone

EP 800!!!! I offer a textured answer to a more complex question than it seems.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How to Answer, “Tell Me About Yourself” (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers the most effective way to prepare for this question so you are never tripped up.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the classic job interview question, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally."

They may not use those exact words but you're probably going to ask you some general open-ended question that will allow you to take the ball and the other run with it or trip yourself up. To run with it, you need to be prepared with an answer that lasts about 30-45 seconds that speaks to the nature of the job that the trying to fill, as well as demonstrate that you can do it.

Here's a typical answer that question.

"Well, I've been in the field now for about (whatever the number of years is). For the last 2 years I been working for someone. So I've done this that this that." The listen that that you talk about is exactly what they're looking for (or pretty darn close). If they are trying to find a Java developer with certain skills, you tell them what you've done that relates to what you're looking for.

You see, they're not looking for some big overview. They're looking for fits into what they need to have done.

If your accountant, you might say something along the lines of, "I've been accountant for the last 5 years. For the past 3 years I been doing temporary assignments for different organizations where I have been involved with…" Then talk about what you've done the relates to what you're looking for. It's really that simple.

Once you give them this outline, once you've rehearsed it, instead of giving them this "winged answer," off the top of your head . . . You really should rehearse it . . . Once you have it rehearsed, if you are them, what follow-up questions would you ask in order to find out whether what you've done fits with what they're looking for? Once you have that in mind, you can be prepared with your follow-up answers to their follow-up questions. It's really pretty easy.

But most people go into interviews completely unprepared. They think they can just walk in and answer off-the-cuff (and they can) but they're not to get hired.

My encouragement to you is for the 1st 10-15 minutes of the interview is some variation on the question of, "Tell me about yourself," where you talk about what you've done. They want to find out what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. There are also going to ask you follow-up questions that you can also be prepared for.

Keep your answers to about 30-45 seconds in length. Why? You don't want to be droning on and on and on and on and on and boring them to tears so they are left mentally starting to channel surf (thinking about something else that they would rather be doing). You want to be giving your answers in 30 to 45 seconds in length so that the conversation becomes interactive. You engage them. They engage you. You are going back and forth in this is what you want to have happening at the stage of the interview.

So, again, "tell me about yourself," is a really simple question to answer if you have taken the time to prepare.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Tough Interview Questions: The Country Club Question

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers and he answer to this question that is designed to see whether you have self-confidence.

Summary

I have another 1 of those fun tough interview questions for you today. Here's how it goes: "You're invited to a party at the country club. As a matter of fact, you are 1 of over 200 people who has been invited. At the time you walk in the door, more than half the people are there. How do people react when you walk in?"

Isn't that a fun one?

The ideas that they want to get a sense of your self-confidence. So, certainly, the correct answer is NOT, I want to repeat, NOT to say, "No one is going to notice me because of very unimportant."

Instead, you provide an answer that demonstrates that you have self-confidence.

The correct answer is actually the honest one.

"Some people would see me and some wouldn't. After all, they are engaged in conversation. It's not like I am The Great Gatsby and people stop in their tracks and started dancing around me and music starts playing, and the party swings in my direction! It's nothing like that. There a lot of people would walk over to me and try get my attention and begin a conversation with me."

That's the most simple and fun way to respond to that question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Would You Like to Talk About Today?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this complex question.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: If You Had to Eliminate a State, Which One Would It Be?

EP 857 There is one way to answering this seemingly insane question.  I offer 3 choices.

Summary

This 1 I learned from John Kador who has written a book called, "Acing The Brainteaser Interview." Apparently, this is one that is asked of Microsoft. The question goes, "If you have to eliminate 1 of the 50 states, which one would you select?" Then, they ask you to get specific reasons why you chose the specific state that you did.

I want to start by saying that there is no right answer. There are lots of different ways that you can approach this. The idea is to come up with a logical explanation that doesn't make you sound like you want to be an assassin or mass murderer. For those of you in the South who hate Northerners or are insulting to people from a particular state for whatever the reason is, don't start talking about how you would REALLY ENJOY watching (I'll pick New York as an example). New York just disappear from the map. Or California in watching all those people die in an earthquake. Not real smart.

Think in terms of the style of how you answer will give you 3 ways that you can. Again, credits to the book here.

John suggests building up suspense by providing some logic 1st. Obviously, this is Microsoft to skip the state of Washington. If you are interviewing for a job in New Jersey, don't answer, "New Jersey isn't really valuable." Don't start over the state that you are in and eliminate that. You will annoy some people.

Instead, he suggests discussing the logic behind the choice and think out loud. Don't start with the name of the state but build some suspense by walking the interviewer through the logic and see where you end up. Humor, some tongue-in-cheek remarks, all work well.

He suggests, "I don't want to be responsible for eliminating actual people. I would eliminate the political entity of the state by ceding it to Canada. Maybe a state that shares a border with them like North Dakota or Vermont. What I still be able to visit?" That becomes answer number 1 , which involves ceding the state to Canada. You can do the same thing with Mexico. "Would anyone miss New Mexico? With the Mexicans be happy to have New Mexico as a part of Mexico?" See where that one works.

Another approach is calling for the elimination of estate by combining it with 1 of its neighbors. Maybe Connecticut could annex Rhode Island. North and South Dakota could be combined to form the state of Dakota.

Lastly, "I would eliminate the state of Wyoming." You talk about how Wyoming is the least populous state in the country and all this people to be relocated to a theme park on the Las Vegas strip. That takes the tongue-in-cheek approach.

Obviously, the 1st 2 are little bit easier to work with and you may not be comfortable doing "The Wyoming Dance." Understand again that there is no wrong answer. You may sit opposite someone who presents is completely humorless and the idea is to just walk them through the logical choice. That will help you win the answer to that question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tell Me Something Negative You’ve Heard About Our Company (VIDEO)


Here is a slippery question that some companies ask. There are very few good ways to do it; here, I offer several.

Summary

I worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years filling more than 1200 positions plus consulting assignment for my career. One thing I know is that people do damage to the candidacy when they are not prepared for interview questions.

On this podcast, I am spending all 2017 helping people prepare for how to answer tough interview questions. This is 1 of those questions are requested is kind of seductive. "Tell me something negative you've heard about our company," is the question.

If this firm is in the press, you can't say, "I haven't heard anything about your firm." You seem like a jerk. Sometimes the firm is looking for reconnaissance like, "What's the scuttlebutt about us?" When push comes to shove, there is no way of winning that one.

There are a few suggested ways.
1. If they are in the media for something negative, you can respond by saying, "I have read some press accounts… Who want to read these press accounts? They're all over the media these days. It's obvious that the firm has some struggles but that opens up some opportunities for someone like me to step up and make a difference." That's for someone in a leadership role. 1st, after all, you can do something similar. You can conclude by saying, "But it offers a challenge for me joy is the staff individual.. It offers a challenge to contribute and be a strong performer and change some of the public perception of the organization."
2. If there is nothing you are able to research about the firm online, you can say, "I have is anything current about your organization. It's not like them out there trying to say,' Okay, tell me everything bad you've heard about the firm.' I asked some friends who have some opinions about your firm, did a quick Google search. Everything seems to be in order. Nothing here to scare me or anyone else." Just let it go at that.

Going to any sort of detail, even if you have heard something from a friend or from a former employee, is a bad signal. They don't really want to hear it. All it does is make them concerned as to whether you accept an offer if they made it to you.

Skirt answering the question and do it in a very casual way. Avoid going into any sort of detail. You will do fine answering.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Is Your Greatest Success?


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers one of those classic interview questions and teaches a formula for doing so.

Summary

Today, I have an answer to 1 of those tough interview questions that are designed to make you squirm. This 1 is a real simple one because it's a posting question-- Tell me about your greatest achievement. Tell me about your greatest success. It's all the same question.

Here's the formula for answering. In previous videos and podcasts you may have heard me talk about how stories are so delightful for organizations to listen to and understand the circumstances and experience. I had someone rejected for job. He was on a final interview and they complained that he only talked about what he did and he didn't tell us any stories in answering your question. Ridiculous. But that is what firms like it is our obligation to give it to them. Here's the formula for doing.

You talk about the situation you are assigned and the task that you have to do in order to accomplish it. That leads to your accomplishments and what the result was. For example,, if I were talking about myself, "The client approached me about a particular search. They needed 37 positions filled within a particular period of time. " That's the situation I was asked to step into.

What was the test that I did? "I mobilize the team of individuals who are focused purely on doing that search with me coordinating them. I interviewed 25 people a day for 30 days until such time as the client was exhausted by resources. I presented people to them and they start to interview them. The client was absolutely delighted because I was able to get the long way before their required need. They were concerned that they need these 37 people on within 3 months and be too difficult a task to do. I got them on board with 2 1/2 weeks to spare. The e result was great client satisfaction, more opportunities to work on, revenue generated…" And I would give the milestones for what I accomplished.

The situation, the task I undertook, the accomplishments that you had and the results that you had.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Where Else Have You Interviewed?

Where Else Have You Interviewed?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/02/14/where-else-have-you-interviewed

Ep 655 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this tricky question so that you do not disqualifying yourself. 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about 1 of those tough interview questions that, on the surface, seems so easy but firms usually in an effort to trip you up. It is very seductive because you can answer the question. However, the answer tells them something about you.

Today's question is, "So, where else have you interviewed so far?" Sometimes it is asked as, "So where else have you applied so far?"

I remember when I was a rookie recruiter a hundred years ago and I asked someone this question and they went on to rattle off 20 some odd places they been on interviews. The message I took from that was, "20 places turn this person down. What's wrong with him?"

There are 2 ways to answer this question. If you're still working, and you are asked this question, you mention 1 or 2 places. You respond by saying, "I have interviewed with (never name the firm). 1 of the banks, a manufacturing firm." Whatever industry it is. They were interesting opportunities but, at the end of the day, they didn't seem superior to what I had."

Then, you may be asked follow-up questions. "What are you looking for? What's going to be important to you in the next job organization?" It may be some sort of follow-up question that allows you to talk with them about what you're looking for the next job. Be prepared for that question. It is very natural follow-up for a firm to know what it is that you are looking for so that they can figure out whether they can give it to you. That's real simple.

Here's the other condition. Let's say you've been out of work for a while and you are asked that question. You still don't rattle off 20 places like this person did. Instead, what you say is, "I've interviewed a couple of organizations. Initially, when I was laid off or quit my job, I took a little time off because I been working continuously for the longest time with very few breaks and and I figured (if you're in your 20s, you say). At this stage in life that would be very few opportunities for me to take some time off again. So I decided to take a break, playing with my kids, going to trip… Whatever it is."

If you're in your 30s, 40s, 50s, it's all a bit different. You might say, "I take a little time off to figure out what I want to do next. I have been back with a vengeance looking at opportunities because I'm looking for something very specific and, what I've heard about your organization, is that the…" Do you talk about a few the things you found that you research about them that appeal to you. "It seems like a great organization to work at."

Notice, you are not mentioning 20 places.

Keep your answer simple. Stay off the subject of's the specific places where you have interviewed and, if they ask the follow-up question of, "so, where have you actually interviewed," you can respond by saying, with a smile on your face, "I've interviewed a couple of organizations, one in banking…" And you rattle off a couple of industries and leave it at that.

The idea, again, is to talk with them but get off the subject. Switch it over to what you're looking for in an organization and that you are impressed by everything that you have heard about theirs.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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