Hedge Fund Brainteasers: The Three Knights

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this tricky brainteaser.

Summary

I love brainteasers. They suck during interviews because it is very easy to panic. That's often what a firm is looking for; that and the logic that you are using to dissect the problem. For me personally I enjoy the challenge. Here is 1 of the classics. I haven't done this 1 before but let's see if you can figure it out.

During medieval times when knights and barbarians for against each other, a man was captured and sentenced to death for allegedly befriending barbarians. The king however wanted to give him another chance and ordered him to his presence. He asked them to choose 1 of 3 knights who were present. 1 of the nights was the Knight of Life. He always tells the truth. The 2nd knight is the Knight Death and he always lies. The 3rd knight is the Knight of the Dungeon. He sometimes lies and sometimes tells the truth.

If the man chooses the Knight of Death, he will be executed before sunset. If he chooses the Knight of Life, he will be acquitted and set free right away; if he chooses the Knight of the Dungeons, you will spend the rest of his life in prison in the dungeon. This is the 1st time he's ever seen these 3 knights so we could recognize them and knew nothing about them. He is allowed to ask the knights one question each.

The man asked the redhaired knight, "What is the name of this blonde haired knight?" The reply was, "He is the Knight of Life." He asked the black haired knight, "What is the name of the blonde haired knight?" The reply was, "He is the Knight of Death." Then, he asked the blonde haired knight, "Who are you?" The response was, "I am the Knight of the Dungeon."

The man guessed correctly and let's see if you can.

Here's how to solve it. The redhaired knight said blonde was life. Red cannot be life. That would be a lie. The blonde haired knight said he was dungeon. He couldn't be life or that would be a lie. The black haired knight must be life. He said blonde is death which leaves red as dungeon.

That's the solution to the problem.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Why Does Every Employer Ask What My Current Salary Is? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 777 I discuss this mistake and offer ways that you can solve it.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why does every employer ask about my current salary during the job interview?" I want to give employers and recruiters a certain benefit of the doubt... And there's a 2nd reason the doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt.

The one that does is that it is a timesaver for everyone. After all (I would use ridiculous numbers), if you say you're looking for hundred $180,000 and the position is paying $130,000, why would they want to continue interviewing you if there is no way for the 2 of you to come together because they are not going to pay as much as you are currently earning?

Another reason is around salary expectations. Every organization likes to get a benchmark for where a person is and what they are looking for. So they might say, "So, what are you making?"

"I am making $130,000."

"What are you looking for?"

"$180,000."

Boing!!!

This is the one word is a lot less about you and more about them. You see, institutions have guidelines (which are really rules but not guidelines , but they call them guidelines) about the percentage increases that they will offer someone. I know there are exceptions with firms in the way they conduct themselves, but most large to mid-sized organizations work with percentage increases.

It makes a certain amount of sense and non-sales roles. After all, if you are a manager level and they are hiring you for a director level, you don't really have any experience in the role , but you want to be paid as a director, so the thinking becomes, "No compromise on salary so that they can get the experience and then we will increase their salary later on." There is that "non-subtle thing."

The real one is the latter one. It is about control. It is about being in a situation where they get a sense of what you are currently earning and what your expectations are realistic and can fit into their guidelines. It is not because of any altruism. It is a control thing that organizations do.

It makes perfect sense except when it affects you when they say, "Well, she's making $130,000. Our guidelines say that we will offer a 4% to 7% increase on top of base salary," but not look at your real value in a market.

That's were ultimately, you have the choice as to whether or not you accept the offer. They may have a 4% to 7% guidelines, your value may be $160,000, hold out. Find an organization that will pay you properly. Your goal is not to sell cheap but to sell value because, trust me, there will come a time where, regardless of whether you cheap or expensive, they will look around the room and go, "Okay. We have to cut some heads. We've got a layoff some people. Okay. Her. Him." What you're being paid will only help you because you've been able to bank some more money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Why Shouldn’t I Hire You? (VIDEO)


This is a question that’s designed to fry your circuits and have you confessed things to them you might not otherwise say. Here I offer snappy response instead.

Summary

Answering this question is tough because there is an awkwardly phrased question that is designed to fry your circuits. The question is, "Why shouldn't I hire you?"

Here, they are looking for you to reveal some deep dark secret because your circuits have been fried in the notion is that you are going to confess something that is going to talk you out of the role. On the positive side, consider that this is going to be a test of emotional intelligence and self-awareness.

The standard answer would have you talk about some sort of weakness without going to the pat 1 of, "I worked too hard," or, "I'm a perfectionist." The idea is to talk about something real as your answer and how you are working to overcome it.

For example, you have issues with self organization. What you have done is learn calendaring so that in this way, you are able to overcome that and you have something in your phone to remind you how you organize your day.

Here's another one that I think is better the more senior you are. The way to do it is to start by saying, "You know, anytime you hire someone into an organization there is a period of adjustment that goes on, not just simply for me but for the team as well. We have to learn to live with one another and overcome this insertion into the middle of the group. I'm certainly willing to take my side and work hard with it and run with it. Any input you can give me in order to adjust well to the existing team would be a big help. However, the team asked to adjust to me, too. We have to learn to live together. If you are comfortable with that, then we are good to go. This is something I think you need to be aware of about any person that you hire, let alone me."

I think this is a very savvy answer for a veteran individual because it makes them start to think a little bit and gets the focus off of you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do You Speak to Others Before They Speak to You? (VIDEO)


I discuss answering this question, usually asked of sales pros and people at a manager level and above.

Summary

I'm going to answer 1 of those tough interview questions and the question is, "So, do you like to talk to people first?" It is designed to see if you speak to others before they speak to you.

If you think of sales situations, in sales, they want to know if you are a "Hunter" or a "farmer." A farmer is someone who is going out and building on existing business; a hunter is someone who is going out and looking for new business.

In effect what they are asking you for is whether you are open to talking 1st or just wait there for someone to talk to you. What the try do is to get a sense of what they can really sell. It is 1 of those gentle questions that reveals a lot.

Now the place where it is particularly tricky is that you never want to come across as an arrogant SOB. Just be careful as you answer the question, and you might simply say, "Yeah, I have no problem talking to others. That's really the way I build my business. It's not like I wait for the phone to ring. I'm making lots of calls. I'm putting myself in the social situations where I'm getting to know people and their getting to know me and trying to build business that way."

It's really an easy and graceful answer to 1 of those questions,. It gets particularly tricky if they're asking you as a manager, a director or above whether this happens because the subtlety here is the try to find whether you wait for trouble to come to you or you are seeking it out.

You might speak about, "I like to manage by walking around and talking to my people. I see how things are going. I want them to know that I'm available for them to confess that they are having problems. If the not having problems, I'm not there to micromanage them. I just want them to know that the if they have a concern or an issue, I am available. So I put myself out there so that, number 1, they know that I care and, number 2, they can feel free enough to drop 1 of those little pearls that suggests that they are having a problem, but they don't say it directly. From there, I can speak with them privately, rather than in 1 of these walking around situations, be proactive and… I guess the answer is yes. I yes I do have no trouble talking to others. 1st, rather than waiting for them to come to me."

That's it in a nutshell; it's a fun little question but you have to understand what is behind it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What Makes You Think You Are The Most Qualified Person for This Job?

What Makes You Think You’re the Most Qualified Person for This Job? (VIDEO)


Are you coming up short on your interviews? Here I answer one of the more obnoxious questions asked on an interview.

Summary

Today, I will talk with you about 1 of those tough interview is that organizations are going to ask on interviews. The question goes something like this, "So, why do you think you're the most qualified person I've interviewed for this job?" Oooooooooooooooooh! Don't they seem real serious about this question?

It's a ridiculous question. We both know that. It works because most job applicants get nervous, they start pleating a case and fumble around with their answers, stammer… That's not the right way to answer it.

What you want to do, instead, is pause for a 2nd, act like you're thinking about it, looked him square in the eye and say, "I don't know if I'm the most qualified person that you met with, but what I've done is…" Then you list for 5 different things that you've done that relate to what they are looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Percentage of People Do You Think Have Taken $10 of Stuff from Their Employer? Why? (VIDEO)

[svp]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdTfV9_nUkE[/svp]
This is a fabulous and revealing question that hangs many people. What percentage would you think?

Summary

Great question I heard last night and I thought I would use it is my subject for today. The question is, "What percentage of people do you think had stolen $10 worth of stuff from their employer? Why?"

I want to understand the logic of the question. The logic is to admit that you really have no idea. So, what you're doing is projecting something on to the population that reflects you. In other words, if you say 70% or 80%, what are you saying about yourself and the likelihood of you taking something from your employer (and I'm talking about something more than just "the pens.").

Understand that the idea behind this question is to reveal something of yourself in the "why" follow-up it is really important. "I've just seen it happen all the time. People take stuff. I saw some of my last firm walk out with a carton of toilet paper!" Whatever it is, it is more about you than it is about others.

What you want to be doing is answering the question with a relatively low percentage. "Maybe 25% to 30%?"

"Why do you think that way?"

"I think that people basically want to do the right thing and, as such they know it hurts their employer and thus themselves if they take stuff. They try to be respectful and organizations instead of steal from them. Yes, I know there are exceptions and maybe I'm off on the percentages but I prefer to think that people would rather do the right thing." That becomes a far better way to answer it than saying 75% or 80%.

In sales, you might try something slightly different.

"The people I have worked with have been hard-nosed and determined, but they wouldn't do anything to pad their expense accounts or do anything to harm their employer. When push comes to shove, they are all trying to do a great job and that's the part…" You understand where I'm going with that, right?

There is a vulnerability that you revealing about yourself in how you answer the question. Thus, if you pick a high number, you are shooting yourself in the foot

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

So Why Should I Hire You? (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer that tough interview question, “So why should I hire you?”

Summary

Today I'm going to talk with you about that tough interview, "Why should I hire you?"

This is actually the core question that every employer an interviewer is asking themselves as they are trying to make a decision between their different choices. Even if they don't ask you this outwardly, I'm going to give you a tactic for introducing it in the interview at the very end.

"Why should I hire you?"

"Well, from what you told me about the position, you are looking for someone with such and such type of background. This is what I've done along those lines."

Then you review your experience for them that fits that description. Then, he continued by saying, "The other thing I bring to this job is the motivation and drive to succeed within your organization."

If you are in sales, you can add in how you as a salesperson, stepped into a dying function and help turn around. If you manage the sales function, you can talk about how you helped an organization achieve numbers that had never been achieved before within the organization.

If you are an operations oriented positions, you can talk about how you stabilize the organization and helped them make money or save money.

Often, it is not a question that is asked. However, at the end of the interview, you might be asked, "So, is there anything else?"Or, if they haven't asked that question, and they are about to wrap up, you can ask, "Would you mind if I covered one more thing with you?" They will say, "Sure!"

"The question is, I'm sure you're asking yourself is 'So why should I hire you? What is going to be different about you than the other people that I meeting with who, I'm sure, are quite qualified?' " Again, you review your background that fits the job as they've described it to you, and continue by saying, "And, I'm motivated." Then you talk about your motivation, how it is played itself out in previous organizations and how you felt that organization the past make money or save money and how much. Then, you talk about how you want to do it for this firm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What Would Your Current Manager Say You Need to Work On? (VIDEO)


A podcast listener wrote asking the question. I can’t believe I missed this one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do You Like to Be Managed? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 773 It isn’t that this question is so tough; it’s just that there are different in ways to answer it.

Summary

Someone forwarded a great question to me that reads, "How do you like to be managed?" That's a tough interview question for today. I suspect almost everyone knows what they are not supposed to do in answering this question. In doing so, I just want to make sure.

You don't want to be critical of the previous manager.

" I work with some great people but there was this 1 person-- she was abominable to me!" You don't want to go down that road. You don't want to make it seem like your manager is a snoop or a micromanager. You don't want to ever be critical of anyone from before AND at the same time on the opposite side of this, you don't want to seem like such a strong advocate for one position or another or one type of management style or another that you come across a little crazy.

"I really work well with people who are…" You don't want to go there either.

The 3rd thing is you also don't want to seem desperate. "Oh, I need a job. I can work with anybody." You don't want to go there either.

Here's what I want you to do and I want you to think of this from the standpoint of you are in real need of a job, or you are exploring of things and it really has to be the right thing.

If you really do need a job, maybe you been out of work for a while or, emotionally, you need to get back to work, you want to talk about the right style for you.

"I don't think anyone wants to work for a micromanager. At the same time, a person who manages has a responsibility to an organization to ensure that the people in their care are doing the right stuff. I understand. I work well with management who basically gives me an assignment in the sense of how they want me to do it, lets me go off and do it and was by to check in with them from time to time to ensure them on the right track and who I feel I can go to and ask for advice and input." That's a great approach that I think works well whether your staff individual or at a manager level and above.

The tricky thing is if you are anxious or you do need a job quickly, you might yet in something along the lines of, "If that's the style that, doesn't work for you, give me a sense of how you manage for you because, the fact of the matter is, I can adapt. " That's what you're trying to do is communicate that you're not so set in your ways that you are demanding something.

However you describe the management style (maybe it's different than the style that I laid out), if you want to describe something very different and you don't have a real need for a new position, I want you to be prepared to talk about it in more detail. I offered one framework, but you can offer your own that makes sense for you. You can look someone square in the eye and say, "This is what has worked very well for me in the past and that really for the gets results for me." Then leave it at that. You don't get on, "If that doesn't work for you, we can call it quits today. My feelings won't be hurt by suspect yours will be either." Don't go down the road.

Instead, what you do is lay out your case for the kind of style that works for you, how it is benefit you in the organization euphoric for the past and how you gotten great results from. And leave it at that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

How to Answer, “Tell Me About Yourself”

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers the most effective way to prepare for this question so you are never tripped up.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the classic job interview question, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally."

They may not use those exact words but you're probably going to ask you some general open-ended question that will allow you to take the ball and the other run with it or trip yourself up. To run with it, you need to be prepared with an answer that lasts about 30-45 seconds that speaks to the nature of the job that the trying to fill, as well as demonstrate that you can do it.

Here's a typical answer that question.

"Well, I've been in the field now for about (whatever the number of years is). For the last 2 years I been working for someone. So I've done this that this that." The listen that that you talk about is exactly what they're looking for (or pretty darn close). If they are trying to find a Java developer with certain skills, you tell them what you've done that relates to what you're looking for.

You see, they're not looking for some big overview. They're looking for fits into what they need to have done.

If your accountant, you might say something along the lines of, "I've been accountant for the last 5 years. For the past 3 years I been doing temporary assignments for different organizations where I have been involved with…" Then talk about what you've done the relates to what you're looking for. It's really that simple.

Once you give them this outline, once you've rehearsed it, instead of giving them this "winged answer," off the top of your head . . . You really should rehearse it . . . Once you have it rehearsed, if you are them, what follow-up questions would you ask in order to find out whether what you've done fits with what they're looking for? Once you have that in mind, you can be prepared with your follow-up answers to their follow-up questions. It's really pretty easy.

But most people go into interviews completely unprepared. They think they can just walk in and answer off-the-cuff (and they can) but they're not to get hired.

My encouragement to you is for the 1st 10-15 minutes of the interview is some variation on the question of, "Tell me about yourself," where you talk about what you've done. They want to find out what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. There are also going to ask you follow-up questions that you can also be prepared for.

Keep your answers to about 30-45 seconds in length. Why? You don't want to be droning on and on and on and on and on and boring them to tears so they are left mentally starting to channel surf (thinking about something else that they would rather be doing). You want to be giving your answers in 30 to 45 seconds in length so that the conversation becomes interactive. You engage them. They engage you. You are going back and forth in this is what you want to have happening at the stage of the interview.

So, again, "tell me about yourself," is a really simple question to answer if you have taken the time to prepare.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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