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The Companion Mistakes People Make with Their Resume | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/31/the-companion-mistakes-people-make-with-their-resume/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses mirrors mistakes people make with your resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Tell Me Something Negative You’ve Heard About Our Company


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/08/tell-me-something-negative-youve-heard-about-our-company

EP 798 Here is a slippery question that some companies ask.  There are very few good ways to do it; here, I offer several.

Summary

I worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years filling more than 1200 positions plus consulting assignment for my career. One thing I know is that people do damage to the candidacy when they are not prepared for interview questions.

On this podcast, I am spending all 2017 helping people prepare for how to answer tough interview questions. This is 1 of those questions are requested is kind of seductive. "Tell me something negative you've heard about our company," is the question.

If this firm is in the press, you can't say, "I haven't heard anything about your firm." You seem like a jerk. Sometimes the firm is looking for reconnaissance like, "What's the scuttlebutt about us?" When push comes to shove, there is no way of winning that one.

There are a few suggested ways.
1. If they are in the media for something negative, you can respond by saying, "I have read some press accounts… Who want to read these press accounts? They're all over the media these days. It's obvious that the firm has some struggles but that opens up some opportunities for someone like me to step up and make a difference." That's for someone in a leadership role. 1st, after all, you can do something similar. You can conclude by saying, "But it offers a challenge for me joy is the staff individual.. It offers a challenge to contribute and be a strong performer and change some of the public perception of the organization."
2. If there is nothing you are able to research about the firm online, you can say, "I have is anything current about your organization. It's not like them out there trying to say,' Okay, tell me everything bad you've heard about the firm.' I asked some friends who have some opinions about your firm, did a quick Google search. Everything seems to be in order. Nothing here to scare me or anyone else." Just let it go at that.

Going to any sort of detail, even if you have heard something from a friend or from a former employee, is a bad signal. They don't really want to hear it. All it does is make them concerned as to whether you accept an offer if they made it to you.

Skirt answering the question and do it in a very casual way. Avoid going into any sort of detail. You will do fine answering.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Apply Through Email or LinkedIn?


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about whether it is better to apply for a job through LinkedIn or via email.

Summary

"Assuming both options are available, is it better to apply for job directly through LinkedIn or via email? Why?"

What do you think? The answer for me is do it through email. Why? If you do it through LinkedIn, in most cases what LinkedIn wants you to do is submit your profile as the application.. Your profile isn't tailored for what the recruiter was looking for. That's true whether you're corporate or third-party recruiter. Instead, I would say submitted through email AND make sure your LinkedIn profile complements your resume so that they are congruent with what you're communicating of the resume.

Sometimes, information is absent in the profile that is added in the resume and from start to ask themselves why there is an inconsistency. Is this experience relatively trivial and they are trying to beef it up in the resume?

If someone has contacted you by inMail, you can send your resume as part of your response to the inMail (at least in LinkedIn Recruiter) but, when all is said and done, send it through email and then make sure that your profile has the same types of information (it doesn't have to be the same wording) in order to make sure that the profiles congruent with what you're saying on the resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.   Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Can I Ask About Work-Life Balance? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/29/can-i-ask-about-work-life-balance-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 850 I don’t believe you can ask about work-life balance directly.  I do believe you can get the answer your question indirectly.  Here’s how.

Summary

The question for today is:

Can I ask about work-life balance?

Before I give you a definitive answer, I'd want to define what an interview is used for.  From an employer's perspective, they are trying to evaluate and assess you in order to figure out whether you can do the job they need to have done.  From their standpoint, well, you know you're not supposed to ask about benefits at the 1st interview, right?  You also know that you want them to like you. 1st, in order to get them to want to move forward, right?

So, when you ask about work-life balance, employers hear that as, "What's the minimum amount of work I need to do in order for you to think that I'm doing my job?"  They are not fond of that thinking and that is how they interpret the question. You can get a better idea of what you want to know by asking a different question.

Let me give you a suggestion.  You know when they get to the part of the interview where they ask, "So, do you have any questions for us?"

I've covered a lot of different questions and different videos. I'm not going to repeat those.Here's the way to asked the question she can get the answer that you want.

"Describe a typical day for me from the time I walk in at what time do you expect me to walk in until the time I leave (tell me what time you expect me to leave).  I want to get a clear idea of what I'm going to be doing by working for you. You have given me a good broad brush stroke I what I would be doing.  Let's get into the weeds a little bit."

You'll get a good idea of what you will be expected to do and, notice, you getting a good idea of your arrival time and departure time, too.  If they expect that you will be working late hours, they'll be telling you that in the course of answering this question.  That, I believe, will help you solve the question of work-life balance.

Look, I don't know of many job hunters, I don't know of many American workers or foreign workers who want to do the least amount of work.  I believe that most people want to have some time for the rest of their lives, too.  They want to have a little bit of time for their family, to have a little bit of fun to do other things in their life, too.

I don't believe that you want to beef finding out about this mythical work-life balance thing.  You want to be finding out about what you're going to be doing and how many hours a day, you're going to be doing, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Do You Think It’s Age Discrimination? | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks to older workers about how to deal with age discrimination.

Summary

This is a podcast for older workers that stems from a conversation I had yesterday with someone who had been in his 50s and interviewing, not getting results that he wanted and not really sure what his problem was.

To start off with. I asked him to break down where he thought things were collapsing. Here's how the model works. If you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume. If you are getting it invitations for phone interviews but not in person interviews, you don't do a phone interview as well as you might like. If you're getting in person interviews but not being invited back for 2nd interviews,, you don't really interview as well as you think you do. We could go on and on.

I said to him, "When you stop and think about it, where is it breaking down for you? Where are the problems coming up in your search?" He came to realize it was his interviewing.

Once you identify this problem, I could feel his confidence build up because he had figured out that he really didn't interview as well as he thought he might have.

He has been a hiring manager no less. And, like most hiring managers, he had the belief that he knew how to interview because he had hired people. However, when you put people on the side of the desk, they often don't interview as well as they think they do. Then, they start to blame age discrimination as being the issue when their lack of preparedness is the real problem.

If you think is age discrimination. Most of the time, I'm not saying all of the time, most of the time it isn't. What it is is your lack of preparation is the real culprit. As a result, maybe it might be a resume… You haven't really studied how to write a resume. You're not getting them critiqued. If you are getting phone interviews, you think he can just kind of wing it through the phone interview and you haven't really rehearsed or practiced how to answer some of the questions you would be typically asked..

I want to encourage you to not fall prey to the self-pity trap of "I'm too old," or the assumption of age discrimination. Yes, there is but most of the time it is you. The lack of preparation and your lack of effort to get yourself ready is the real culprit.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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