How to Get More Interviews (VIDEO)

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to get more interviews when you apply for a job.

Summary

This show is about how to get more interviews after you submit your resume for a job. Let's look at this from the employer's perspective. I'm pretty sure my observations because I receive a time of resumes. As a matter of fact, as of the recording of this, I had over 5000 unopened emails in my inbox. Pretty amazing, huh?

I was just a guy doing recruiting. You can imagine what it is like in a major corporation!

How do you actually get someone to respond to your resume in a way that's going to get you the result that you want?

Generally, people sent 2 files to me. They send the resume file and a cover letter file. Step number 1. Don't do that. Don't send a cover letter file. No one reads cover letter files. It may be read if it is in the body of an email. Even then, there is no guarantee.
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If there is a reference to job, the 1st thing will do is mentally checking off how you fit against the requirements of the job. That's what all of us, whether a third-party recruiter or a corporate recruiter will try to do. We want to know if you fit the job that you selected for yourself. We opened up the resume and look and there it is… NOTHING! Nothing in your resume fits the job that you selected for yourself.

Here's what you do. It really isn't that difficult. Take the job listing that you saw, copy and paste information that you saw in the job description and make it the new page 1. The reason I suggest doing this when applicant tracking systems are reviewing resumes, they are looking for particular keywords in particular places in the resume. You are gaming the system by entering all those keywords onto page 1.

If you don't have experience with it, don't include it. Once you have a list of items that relate to the job description (that's in terms of the requirements and the function they want you to perform)... Let's say you list the set of skills that you want you to have, a list that set of skills. If there are functions you will be doing once you are on board, list those functions. Where you perform them next to it, you will put for example, "3 years, current." "2 years up until one year ago." Get the idea?

What you are doing is causing them to see very quickly how your background matches. Now, you have to go one extra layer. In the resume itself you have to include some of the data about what you did and how you went about doing it. That's if you are applying in the standard way for a job through an applicant tracking system.

On page 1 of your resume, show how you match up. Not in the cover letter because the applicant tracking system doesn't care about the cover letter and it doesn't care about a "cover email." Put it into the body of the resume as page 1. As you slide down putting more data about how you perform those functions and what your experiences with those particular skills and experiences that they are looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Job Search Mistakes–The Mass Blast | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the classic mistakes job hunters make–mass blasting a resume

Summary

He was some bad job search advice I found on the web. I just want to tell you not to do. The bad advice is to send your resume out to everyone. EVERYONE!

Let me ask you a question. Do you like getting Viagra or Cialis is in your inbox? Well, that is what your resume becomes – – spam. You are spamming people. What you doing is mass blasting folks saying, "Hi! This is my resume. Hire me!" Or "do you have anything for me?"

Of course they do not.

Don't just simply spamming resume and then wander around saying, "Gee. I said that so many resumes and I haven't gotten any results." You are not getting results because you're not doing the research to find the jobs that fit your background. Look, I have videos that deal with how to find people in the firm who are hiring and finding hiring managers. There's also lots of content about this on the web.

When all is said and done, do not just send out resumes willy-nilly. You are stealing time from people. If you are sending it to third-party recruiters, you may think that it is their job, but it isn't their job. Their job is to fill jobs. Their job is not the place you in a job. You aren't paying them.

Don't just spamming resume. Be focused. Try to get to organizations that interest you and approach them selectively, rather than just the mass blast that is so offensive to all of us.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

When Applying on LinkedIn, Should You Also InMail the Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

Before listening, answer the question for yourself and then learn the best way.

Summary

"When employing for a job on LinkedIn, should I also inMail the person who posted it as well?"

I go crazy when I hear the stuff because the answer was invariably come down to how someone would be perceived. They are seen as being savvy if they did this.  You must really like the company. If you follow up with an inMail.  Man!  This is all the propaganda that LinkedIn tries to put out and it isn't true! 

Here is what you want to do.  You see a firm that is advertising on LinkedIn. There is a name of their, right?  Don't go through the conveyor belt.  Don't get on the conveyor belt where your resume is delivered to the applicant tracking system.  Instead, here is what you do.

You call up the firm, get the extension of that individual or the direct dial number and you call them.  You say to them, "I was doing some networking and someone mentioned you might be trying to hire someone with…" And you describe the role.  "I don't know if that's true or not but if it is I would like to talk with you about the position and see how I might be able to be of help."  That's if you are taking the "semi-better way."  That is, generally, HR people run advertising on LinkedIn.

Here is the better way.  Try to locate the hiring manager at that firm.  How do you do that?  You try to figure out the title and go to the corporate page and see if you are connected to other people who might be at that firm.  Not connected on the corporate page?  There are chrome extensions that will help you.

For example, there is one called Prophet that will help you identify people and their email addresses.  By the way, with these, they will help you with email addresses. But what you also try to do is do Google searches to identify people at that firm because Google will search for public profiles of individuals.

Here is a simpler way.  There is a site whose address is LI-USA.info.  It is a Google custom search engine that only searches LinkedIn public profiles in the United States.  So you might just simply search by name of the company.  Then see if you might detect the title structure from the responses.  Let's say the person is with Facebook or Goldman Sachs or Centerville or whomever it is.  See if you can detect the title structure from the responses you start.  Then, from their used tools like PROPHET, Connectifier, Lusha… These are chrome extensions that will help you find people. Candidate.ai is another one.

What you are trying to do is to find the people within an organization who might be the hiring manager.  You might just simply say, "Hi!  I understand it might be a particular position open for a such and such. Would you happen to know who the hiring manager is?"  

"No, I don't know"

"Is there someone you might be able to point me to who might be able to help and give me an idea of who the right person might be?"

Again, what you are trying to do is find the right individual at that organization who can help with finding the person and network your way into her direct contact.  Yes, it involves some more work, but let's be practical.  If you get on the conveyor belt of the applicant tracking system, do you remember what that is called?  The black hole.  What is the point of going through that exercise?

Instead, follow through by trying to find the hiring manager and connecting with them, instead of going to getting on the conveyor belt to your resume's demise.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What Is The Best Day & Time of Day to Email a Resume and Cover Letter to a Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

My answer probably isn’t what you expect but it is the best answer.

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Summary

When is the best time and day to email a resume and cover letter to a recruiter?

That is the question for today. Let me start off by asking, why are you sending it to recruiter? Why not just try to find the hiring manager?

The hiring managers the actual decision-maker who's going to make the choice about whether or not you're actually going to be interviewed. Some recruiters may do that so why not go directly to the hiring manager? That's point number 1.

Point number 2 is, "But I can't find the hiring manager!"

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has some tips about how to do that.

3rd. If you insist upon sending it to the recruiter, I saw one opinion it's a Tuesday through Thursday night from 9 PM or later. Why? The opinion is because it is waiting in the inbox for the recruiter to say 1st thing in the morning when he or she walks in.

Maybe a sense of what happens from a recruiters perspective. This is a corporate recruiter for more well-known firm who spoke at an organization. They are well known, well regarded, well-liked, and I don't know what her day is like, but that 9 o'clock, email is pretty well buried in my inbox when I walked in the door.

I'm getting stuff sent to me all night long from people who are trying to get my attention. If there is someone sending it to me at 9 PM, is also summing sending it to me at 1 o'clock in the morning. At 2 o'clock in the morning. At 3 AM. At 4 AM. At 3:05 AM. At 3:07 AM. On and on and on until the next morning.

It is my suggestion. Instead of playing that game of being the 1st 1 in the inbox to be noticed, consider conceding that time because, in my case, let's say there are 50 messages I walk into on a Tuesday morning (it's actually more than that) or a Wednesday morning, I will start off with the top few of them and the one sent to me at 6 PM the night before… I won't see them right away. I'm not starting with the oldest 1 1st. I'm starting with the more recent 1 1st… I'm kind of working my way down.

Then new stuff comes in and I'm responding to, and then I'm going to the older stuff. Newer than older.

My thought is that instead of sending for a 9 AM arrival where we are playing that game, send it for a 10:30 AM or 11 AM arrival. Monday you could go later morning than that, like 11:30 AM, noon, or 12:30 PM arrival.

Or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday… Do it then. Don't do it for 9 AM. Do it for later in the morning where people have a chance to get caught up on some things. Mondays may be hard because they do on boarding, or they may have 3 days worth of emails (Friday after close of business, Saturday, Sunday or early Monday morning). You don't want to be competing with all those.

My thought is late mornings are ideal. It could even be late morning early afternoon on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday – – mid-to-late morning. Friday, do not send it in the afternoon. You are better using Outlook to delay the send of your resume and cover letter. By using delay/send, your preventing yourself from being caught up in the weekend emails but so that it arrives on the following Monday.

I get calls from people on Friday at 5:30 PM as though I'm waiting around to have a detailed conversation with someone Friday at 5:30 PM or 6:30 PM or 7:30 PM! It's bizarre! Are you sitting around waiting for recruiters to call you? Why do you think I'm so excited to be talking to you at those times?

Again, think of what it's like to be the recipient of your contact. Pick times that are relevant (which is what I've been suggesting here) and work within those frameworks.

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Don’t Waste Peoples’ Time | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 593 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not waste peoples’ time when you submit your resume.

Summary

So far today, I have been wasting my morning reading resumes that in no way, shape or form fit anything that are submitting them for.

There is one example. Resume I just received for an IT director’s job. The cover email they sent was terrific. I must say, this person writes a great cover letter.

The only problem is that the resume doesn’t back it up. So I write this cover letter, he tells me about all this wonderful work that is done at the last firm, and in the last industry he worked in. He has been consulting since then. Then, you open up the resume and discover that he has worked as a consultant for the last 10 years (that is absolutely fine). However, he summarized that last 10 years in 5 lines of which 2 of those lines were less than half of a line.

Let’s just say it is for lines to cover 10 years of experience.

Do you think my client will actually believe this cover letter? I know I don’t. I had a lot of smoke alone at me and my time wasted because this person is too lazy to actually give me some data about what he did, probably because he knows that will knock them out of consideration because it was nonsense work.

For you out there, be considerate of other people and their time. By being considerate I’m asking you not to spam your crap at me.

If you have the skills needed for the job, demonstrated the fit in your resume. If you don’t, don’t spam your resume. You are nothing more than a Cialis spammer at that point.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Should I Use “Apply With LinkedIn” When I Apply for a Job? | Job Search Radio

Do you think “Apply with LinkedIn” makes sense? Let me tell you my thinking.

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Summary

There is a feature on LinkedIn called, “Apply with LinkedIn.”  People asked me whether they should use this function to apply for job.

Let me walk you through what this recipient receives when they use this feature and let’s see if you can figure out my thoughts.

1st of all, it delivers your name.  It provides the recipient with your email address and phone number.  It provides the headline beneath your name.  They receive your employment, job titles (just the title), no details.  That includes both your current and past employment.  No details.

Your education, but just the names of the colleges or universities you attended.  Recommendations – – how many people have recommended you, but not details of what they said about your recommendation.

How many connections you have.  That is what is delivered to people.

Do you think that makes a case for your candidacy for most of the positions you apply for?  Personally, I don’t because there is no information there. Other than very very basic LinkedIn stuff.  Name, the line underneath your name, contact information, where you been working, where you have worked in the past, etc.  This does nothing for you.  It does nothing for the employer, either because it does nothing to tell them whether you can do the job that you’re applying for.

Like with. Indeed, it is a flawed service. It offers speed but it doesn’t really help you, because there’s nothing tailored to the presentation to demonstrate how well you can do the job that you’re applying for.  Even if they include the description under the job title, it would do much more for you than what they currently provide. But, to me, it is not enough.

Indeed does more, but it is inadequate.  It provides the same ease of submission, but it is the same resume that you uploaded to them that is sent out to every job.

Over and over and over again.

Like the broken watch that is right twice a day, it will accurately represent you… Sometimes.  However, more often than not, it will in accurately represent your candidacy because, the fact of the matter is, you are not just an accountant, for the sake of argument, who has done such and such.  There is a nuance that was well.

You are not just an engineer who has done such and such.  There are nuances that are required for each job.

Everything needs to be tailored when you send it to a hiring manager, to an applicant tracking system or to an HR person to demonstrate how your experience fits.  Apply with LinkedIn just doesn’t let you do it.  If anything, it causes employers to have to reach out to you and they just are too busy to do it.  They are going to respond by saying, “Thanks for submitting your profile.  Send me a resume.”  It defeats the purpose, right?

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Is It OK To Apply Directly? (VIDEO)


If a recruiter reached out to me about a job and I don’t hear back, is it acceptable to apply for the job myself?

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What Do I Put in the Subject of an Email When I Apply for a Job? (VIDEO)


What should I put in the subject of an email when I applied for a job? There are so many possibilities!

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Summary

The question for today is:

What should I put in the subject of an email when I applied for a job?

For most of you, you are seeing something on walling or seeing an ad of some sort, you are seeing something that the company or the recruiting firm has cast the net for and you are applying for positions that way.  The subject line might read something like the title of the position so that in this way the reader is clear about the job you are applying for before opening your resume file.

If the company is asking you to include a job code or some other indicator that helps them specify which job this is, include that as well.  For example, it might refer to job 2714 accountant and mentioned a line of business.

Thus, you are making it clear to the reader why you are sending them an email because, after all, you have to remember their inbox.  You are thinking of one email that you are sending. They are receiving a lot of them in the course of the day.  You are helping them do triage on their inbox so they can go, “Oh!  It is a resume for that job.”

There is the 2nd condition when people apply for job.  That is when you are referred by someone.  In that instance, the subject line says that you are referred by so-and-so.  Thus, they know that you’re not just a stranger submitting a resume for a job; you are someone who has an introduction to them.

Then, in both cases you use the body of the email to stake out why it is you are qualified to do this job.  It isn’t a hardliner but what you are trying to do is make it clear to the reader why you are there and why you are emailing.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do Recruiters Care When I Email Them?

It’s currently 2 a.m. and I got an email for a software engineering position earlier this afternoon. Do the recruiters take the time sent of the email into consideration before looking at the candidates resume?

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Summary

“Do recruiters care when I emailed them?”  

When I 1st read the question. I interpreted it as do they mind that I send them an email.  As I read further, I understood that what the person really wanted to know was about whether it matters at what time, I emailed them.  Let me read the complete original question.

Do recruiters care when I emailed them?  It is 2 AM, and I received an email about a software engineering position earlier this afternoon.  Do recruiters take the time sent of the email into consideration before looking at the candidate’s resume?

The short answer is, “No.”  It doesn’t matter.  Why?  You may think it indicates that you are excited/anxious… Things along those lines.  Remember, with “Delay Send,” in Microsoft, Outlook and other email clients, you can set up your email so that it is sent at any time of the day or night.  They do not actually know if you have sent it at 2 AM. All they know is that it is date and time stamp for them at 2 AM but you can set it up to send it at 7 PM.

It also doesn’t mean anything if your background does not fit.  After all, the most important variable for every recruiter is, “Does your background fit the job?”

Usually, this question comes from a less experienced person who may be stretching in order to try to get themselves considered.  After all, if you have the background, if you have the experience, there is no question that they will be in contact, right? If you don’t have the experience, you start to look at all these tangential things as being important.

What time you sent your resume is small stuff.  The most important thing you can do is demonstrate how your background fits the job.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Applying for Two Different Types of Jobs at the Same Company – Job Search Radio

Does applying to two different kinds of jobs at one company lower your chances of getting either one?

Summary

Does applying to two different jobs at one company significantly lower your chances of getting each one? I am interested in two different areas (and then they outline both of them). Would it be a bad idea to apply to both of them at the same company? How does the process usually work with processing applications?

Without outlining the specific jobs, I’m going to answer the specific questions.

As to whether reduces your chances by applying to more than one position, well, it depends. I interviewed someone for the show not long ago who was a corporate HR recruiter. He commented that his firm’s applicant tracking system was set up to recognize individuals who were, “frequent appliers.” In his firm which was a medical facility in the mid-Atlantic states, his firm would get applications from people for multiple positions that they weren’t qualified for. The system is set up to block them from applying because they are little more than a spammer to them.

“Yes,” you can think, “they may hit on one of them.” These people are not paying attention and don’t really care about the impact on the person reading the resume; they just want to work for the company. What firms look for our someone who can fill individual job. You can see the disconnect there.

Thus, multiple submissions can have an adverse impact unless you’re going to individual hiring managers. So, if you are applying through the applicant tracking system, you’re starting to lower your value to them. After all, even if there are two different recruiters handling the two different jobs, the system is going to recognize that you’ve applied through two different types of position. Even if they look at the resume, there recognize that it’s the same person applying for two different jobs, realize that you probably don’t fit either of these roles and reject your resumes.

Or they may look at them and think to themselves, “Spammer!” Or they may just simply say, “Huh,” and delete your resumes.

So, it can have an adverse impact, it can have a neutral impact, it can have a negative impact, at worst.

Let’s review the scenarios:

“Huh?” (rejected).

“Let’s consider him for this one, but delete the resumes for the other.”

“Spammer!”

There is no situation where they are going to say to themselves, “Fabulous! We received the resume for two different jobs!”

And the probability is that two different recruiters are coordinating two different jobs so there is going to be internal friction so they will have to figure out who is going to be the primary interviewer and who will be the secondary. Remember, corporate recruiters are now being evaluated based upon outcomes, too. Thus, it’s not simply you getting hired (which I know is all you really care about); for them, they have metrics they have to live up to and you will probably be wasting their time they could be better served elsewhere.

Continuing, how does the process work with applications? Would I be talking to the same recruiter? I’ve addressed that already.

The fact that you are submitting your resume to two different positions, involving two separate groups, demonstrates that you’re an amateur to them. As such, you are sending a signal to the employer that you don’t really have a career yet and are trying to sort things out. After all, in their thinking, you can be interested and qualified in one area, not the other. The fact that you’re  leaving it to the winds, to the ether to sort it out for you, sends messages to employers.

Even if the two jobs reflect an old paradigm and a new one, they say are themselves, “Ah! She’s trying to make a career change. She’s not good be happy doing this old work if we hire her for that.” You see, it’s not just as simple as whether it is going to one recruiter or two. It is the impact and that message that the recruiter or recruiters is left to interpret. Left to their own devices, recruiters pause, leave the window open and go on to something else. In their subconscious, they try to process the conflicting messages that you are sending by applying for two very different jobs.

Usually, when they pause, they hesitate for lengthy periods of time. When that happens, they come back and re-review the resume and don’t act on it then. Eventually, they reject the resume.

Can it turn out differently? Absolutely! How will it probably turn out? Not so good for you. You are far better off zeroing in on one thing you want that you are qualified for and going for that.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn going to,

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