What Happens to My Resume After It Is Submitted to a Job Posting? (VIDEO)


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Here’s how the sausage is made.

Summary

The question I received was, "What happens to my resume after it is received for a job post?" This is like the sausage and how it is made. It is really an ugly process.

Once you've submitted it to a job posting, there are now 2 possibilities. One is when you've submitted through an applicant tracking system; the other one is when it asked to the email a resume. Smaller firms might not have the systems in place and you are emailing a resume.

The applicant tracking system is a filter. It parses your resume and inputs data into their system and may or may not, depending upon the system, score your resume based upon your use of keywords to determine whether or not you are a POSSIBLE FIT. I want to be clear. POSSIBLE FIT.

It is not perfect, obviously, and depending upon the scoring system and how it has been set up, and how the dictionary of terms has been created to evaluate, you may or may not be passed on to THE FIRST HUMAN BEING. Often in corporations and with the search firm that person is representing that business area or that hiring manager who is attempting to fill the position. They are doing a visual scan. Again, if you came in through an applicant tracking system, some systems will never let you get that far because if they are seeing you doing "serial applying" as 1 of my guests on Job Search Radio described or you are applying to lots of different disparate jobs, they are just going to block you and never let that resume get through even if you might be qualified because they have identified that behavior as being reflective of (please excuse my language) bullshit artists.

Assuming that that is not you and you're getting to the 1st level human being who is there to check, with some organizations that could be the hiring manager. Most of the time, it is HR. With smaller firms, it is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes. That's the reality to it. It is whoever is "stuck" having to look at resumes because the owner was busy. "You look at the resumes and show me the ones of the people who think fit." That person makes a determination and passes it to the hiring manager or, if it is a search firm or an HR person, they are going to do the 1st screen.

Ultimately, systems are there to save time and, obviously, they are not perfect. They do a lot better as a time-saver then you as a job hunter would prefer that they do. You are applying to jobs because you think they are right.

Now, in some organizations, HR is not even going to interview you on till the hiring manager says to do so. "I want to talk to that person." You are dealing with the ladies all the time, because your resume is going from the applicant tracking system to HR to a hiring manager for home hiring is only 1 of their priorities; they have a job to do. As a result, they are not there sitting by their computer instantly giving responses. They are looking when they have some time. Sometimes that is on their commute. Sometimes it is when they need to take a break. Sometimes it is when they schedule something on your calendar to review resumes. They are trying to work it into their day when they have time that they can take away from their "real job." That is the way they think about. Taking time away from their "real job."

Your resume is an interruption. They may wait for the weekend to review a bunch of resumes. They may wait so the evening. They may wait for their commute. Whatever it is, they are not instantly looking at your resume.

That is what goes on behind the scenes from a process perspective. Some systems may send you questionnaires; some recruiters, both HR and agency recruiters, may send questionnaires to clarify particular parts of your background because your resume wasn't clear enough to them answer those questions because you are not going to get to the interview otherwise.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Should I Follow Up After I Submit My Resume? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
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Here’s a question from someone about whether or not to follow up on their resume after it is submitted through the applicant tracking system.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t Waste Peoples’ Time (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not waste peoples’ time when you submit your resume.

Summary

So far today, I have been wasting my morning reading resumes that in no way, shape or form fit anything that are submitting them for.

There is one example. Resume I just received for an IT director's job. The cover email they sent was terrific. I must say, this person writes a great cover letter.

The only problem is that the resume doesn't back it up. So I write this cover letter, he tells me about all this wonderful work that is done at the last firm, and in the last industry he worked in. He has been consulting since then. Then, you open up the resume and discover that he has worked as a consultant for the last 10 years (that is absolutely fine). However, he summarized that last 10 years in 5 lines of which 2 of those lines were less than half of a line.

Let's just say it is for lines to cover 10 years of experience.

Do you think my client will actually believe this cover letter? I know I don't. I had a lot of smoke alone at me and my time wasted because this person is too lazy to actually give me some data about what he did, probably because he knows that will knock them out of consideration because it was nonsense work.

For you out there, be considerate of other people and their time. By being considerate I'm asking you not to spam your crap at me.

If you have the skills needed for the job, demonstrated the fit in your resume. If you don't, don't spam your resume. You are nothing more than a Cialis spammer at that point.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Avoid Looking Like a Spammer | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


From the Archives (2011)

NOTE: Please ignore any jobs mentioned later in the show. I no longer do recruiting and the positions were filled years ago.

On this show, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter talks about resumes and few of his best pieces of advice and some details that will help you do a better job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do This Before Submitting Your Resume | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter demands that you do this before you send out any resume.

Summary

You are responding to an ad that you heard about. You heard something about a position open at a networking event you went to. Now you're going to send your resume in.

Before you send it out, read your resume carefully and look for this – – how is my resume actually demonstrate that I fit this role?

What in my background will come across In the resume that is going to cause them to say, "Ah! . This person can do the job!"

If you cannot answer the question, your resume needs a rewrite for this job. Otherwise, all you are doing is sending out spam. You know,, the broken watch is right twice a day-- maybe a work sometimes, maybe it doesn't. Most of the time it doesn't.

For you, just ask yourself the question. Don't give yourself a BS answer. Be forthright with yourself. How is your resume actually show that you fit the job and how far does someone have to read in order to find it? if you think it is on page 2, move it on to page 1.You have to use your cover letter to draw attention to it so that they know to read there.

Otherwise, it is a waste of time.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

How to Get More Interviews (VIDEO)

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to get more interviews when you apply for a job.

Summary

This show is about how to get more interviews after you submit your resume for a job. Let's look at this from the employer's perspective. I'm pretty sure my observations because I receive a time of resumes. As a matter of fact, as of the recording of this, I had over 5000 unopened emails in my inbox. Pretty amazing, huh?

I was just a guy doing recruiting. You can imagine what it is like in a major corporation!

How do you actually get someone to respond to your resume in a way that's going to get you the result that you want?

Generally, people sent 2 files to me. They send the resume file and a cover letter file. Step number 1. Don't do that. Don't send a cover letter file. No one reads cover letter files. It may be read if it is in the body of an email. Even then, there is no guarantee.
copy nd
If there is a reference to job, the 1st thing will do is mentally checking off how you fit against the requirements of the job. That's what all of us, whether a third-party recruiter or a corporate recruiter will try to do. We want to know if you fit the job that you selected for yourself. We opened up the resume and look and there it is… NOTHING! Nothing in your resume fits the job that you selected for yourself.

Here's what you do. It really isn't that difficult. Take the job listing that you saw, copy and paste information that you saw in the job description and make it the new page 1. The reason I suggest doing this when applicant tracking systems are reviewing resumes, they are looking for particular keywords in particular places in the resume. You are gaming the system by entering all those keywords onto page 1.

If you don't have experience with it, don't include it. Once you have a list of items that relate to the job description (that's in terms of the requirements and the function they want you to perform)... Let's say you list the set of skills that you want you to have, a list that set of skills. If there are functions you will be doing once you are on board, list those functions. Where you perform them next to it, you will put for example, "3 years, current." "2 years up until one year ago." Get the idea?

What you are doing is causing them to see very quickly how your background matches. Now, you have to go one extra layer. In the resume itself you have to include some of the data about what you did and how you went about doing it. That's if you are applying in the standard way for a job through an applicant tracking system.

On page 1 of your resume, show how you match up. Not in the cover letter because the applicant tracking system doesn't care about the cover letter and it doesn't care about a "cover email." Put it into the body of the resume as page 1. As you slide down putting more data about how you perform those functions and what your experiences with those particular skills and experiences that they are looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Job Search Mistakes–The Mass Blast | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the classic mistakes job hunters make–mass blasting a resume

Summary

He was some bad job search advice I found on the web. I just want to tell you not to do. The bad advice is to send your resume out to everyone. EVERYONE!

Let me ask you a question. Do you like getting Viagra or Cialis is in your inbox? Well, that is what your resume becomes – – spam. You are spamming people. What you doing is mass blasting folks saying, "Hi! This is my resume. Hire me!" Or "do you have anything for me?"

Of course they do not.

Don't just simply spamming resume and then wander around saying, "Gee. I said that so many resumes and I haven't gotten any results." You are not getting results because you're not doing the research to find the jobs that fit your background. Look, I have videos that deal with how to find people in the firm who are hiring and finding hiring managers. There's also lots of content about this on the web.

When all is said and done, do not just send out resumes willy-nilly. You are stealing time from people. If you are sending it to third-party recruiters, you may think that it is their job, but it isn't their job. Their job is to fill jobs. Their job is not the place you in a job. You aren't paying them.

Don't just spamming resume. Be focused. Try to get to organizations that interest you and approach them selectively, rather than just the mass blast that is so offensive to all of us.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

When Applying on LinkedIn, Should You Also InMail the Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

Before listening, answer the question for yourself and then learn the best way.

Summary

"When employing for a job on LinkedIn, should I also inMail the person who posted it as well?"

I go crazy when I hear the stuff because the answer was invariably come down to how someone would be perceived. They are seen as being savvy if they did this.  You must really like the company. If you follow up with an inMail.  Man!  This is all the propaganda that LinkedIn tries to put out and it isn't true! 

Here is what you want to do.  You see a firm that is advertising on LinkedIn. There is a name of their, right?  Don't go through the conveyor belt.  Don't get on the conveyor belt where your resume is delivered to the applicant tracking system.  Instead, here is what you do.

You call up the firm, get the extension of that individual or the direct dial number and you call them.  You say to them, "I was doing some networking and someone mentioned you might be trying to hire someone with…" And you describe the role.  "I don't know if that's true or not but if it is I would like to talk with you about the position and see how I might be able to be of help."  That's if you are taking the "semi-better way."  That is, generally, HR people run advertising on LinkedIn.

Here is the better way.  Try to locate the hiring manager at that firm.  How do you do that?  You try to figure out the title and go to the corporate page and see if you are connected to other people who might be at that firm.  Not connected on the corporate page?  There are chrome extensions that will help you.

For example, there is one called Prophet that will help you identify people and their email addresses.  By the way, with these, they will help you with email addresses. But what you also try to do is do Google searches to identify people at that firm because Google will search for public profiles of individuals.

Here is a simpler way.  There is a site whose address is LI-USA.info.  It is a Google custom search engine that only searches LinkedIn public profiles in the United States.  So you might just simply search by name of the company.  Then see if you might detect the title structure from the responses.  Let's say the person is with Facebook or Goldman Sachs or Centerville or whomever it is.  See if you can detect the title structure from the responses you start.  Then, from their used tools like PROPHET, Connectifier, Lusha… These are chrome extensions that will help you find people. Candidate.ai is another one.

What you are trying to do is to find the people within an organization who might be the hiring manager.  You might just simply say, "Hi!  I understand it might be a particular position open for a such and such. Would you happen to know who the hiring manager is?"  

"No, I don't know"

"Is there someone you might be able to point me to who might be able to help and give me an idea of who the right person might be?"

Again, what you are trying to do is find the right individual at that organization who can help with finding the person and network your way into her direct contact.  Yes, it involves some more work, but let's be practical.  If you get on the conveyor belt of the applicant tracking system, do you remember what that is called?  The black hole.  What is the point of going through that exercise?

Instead, follow through by trying to find the hiring manager and connecting with them, instead of going to getting on the conveyor belt to your resume's demise.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What Is The Best Day & Time of Day to Email a Resume and Cover Letter to a Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

My answer probably isn’t what you expect but it is the best answer.

clockface

 

 

Summary

When is the best time and day to email a resume and cover letter to a recruiter?

That is the question for today. Let me start off by asking, why are you sending it to recruiter? Why not just try to find the hiring manager?

The hiring managers the actual decision-maker who's going to make the choice about whether or not you're actually going to be interviewed. Some recruiters may do that so why not go directly to the hiring manager? That's point number 1.

Point number 2 is, "But I can't find the hiring manager!"

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has some tips about how to do that.

3rd. If you insist upon sending it to the recruiter, I saw one opinion it's a Tuesday through Thursday night from 9 PM or later. Why? The opinion is because it is waiting in the inbox for the recruiter to say 1st thing in the morning when he or she walks in.

Maybe a sense of what happens from a recruiters perspective. This is a corporate recruiter for more well-known firm who spoke at an organization. They are well known, well regarded, well-liked, and I don't know what her day is like, but that 9 o'clock, email is pretty well buried in my inbox when I walked in the door.

I'm getting stuff sent to me all night long from people who are trying to get my attention. If there is someone sending it to me at 9 PM, is also summing sending it to me at 1 o'clock in the morning. At 2 o'clock in the morning. At 3 AM. At 4 AM. At 3:05 AM. At 3:07 AM. On and on and on until the next morning.

It is my suggestion. Instead of playing that game of being the 1st 1 in the inbox to be noticed, consider conceding that time because, in my case, let's say there are 50 messages I walk into on a Tuesday morning (it's actually more than that) or a Wednesday morning, I will start off with the top few of them and the one sent to me at 6 PM the night before… I won't see them right away. I'm not starting with the oldest 1 1st. I'm starting with the more recent 1 1st… I'm kind of working my way down.

Then new stuff comes in and I'm responding to, and then I'm going to the older stuff. Newer than older.

My thought is that instead of sending for a 9 AM arrival where we are playing that game, send it for a 10:30 AM or 11 AM arrival. Monday you could go later morning than that, like 11:30 AM, noon, or 12:30 PM arrival.

Or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday… Do it then. Don't do it for 9 AM. Do it for later in the morning where people have a chance to get caught up on some things. Mondays may be hard because they do on boarding, or they may have 3 days worth of emails (Friday after close of business, Saturday, Sunday or early Monday morning). You don't want to be competing with all those.

My thought is late mornings are ideal. It could even be late morning early afternoon on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday – – mid-to-late morning. Friday, do not send it in the afternoon. You are better using Outlook to delay the send of your resume and cover letter. By using delay/send, your preventing yourself from being caught up in the weekend emails but so that it arrives on the following Monday.

I get calls from people on Friday at 5:30 PM as though I'm waiting around to have a detailed conversation with someone Friday at 5:30 PM or 6:30 PM or 7:30 PM! It's bizarre! Are you sitting around waiting for recruiters to call you? Why do you think I'm so excited to be talking to you at those times?

Again, think of what it's like to be the recipient of your contact. Pick times that are relevant (which is what I've been suggesting here) and work within those frameworks.

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Don’t Waste Peoples’ Time | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 593 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not waste peoples’ time when you submit your resume.

Summary

So far today, I have been wasting my morning reading resumes that in no way, shape or form fit anything that are submitting them for.

There is one example. Resume I just received for an IT director's job. The cover email they sent was terrific. I must say, this person writes a great cover letter.

The only problem is that the resume doesn't back it up. So I write this cover letter, he tells me about all this wonderful work that is done at the last firm, and in the last industry he worked in. He has been consulting since then. Then, you open up the resume and discover that he has worked as a consultant for the last 10 years (that is absolutely fine). However, he summarized that last 10 years in 5 lines of which 2 of those lines were less than half of a line.

Let's just say it is for lines to cover 10 years of experience.

Do you think my client will actually believe this cover letter? I know I don't. I had a lot of smoke alone at me and my time wasted because this person is too lazy to actually give me some data about what he did, probably because he knows that will knock them out of consideration because it was nonsense work.

For you out there, be considerate of other people and their time. By being considerate I'm asking you not to spam your crap at me.

If you have the skills needed for the job, demonstrated the fit in your resume. If you don't, don't spam your resume. You are nothing more than a Cialis spammer at that point.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

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