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Do What Recruiters Do (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to do what recruiters to when they are conducting a search.

Summary

Let's talk about what recruiters do that you are not doing.

If you look at the process of being a recruiter, there are 2 ways the recruiters find candidates. What is the classic "someone sends them a resume."
Really being a recruiter. A recruiter someone who goes out there, find someone in France them down for a particular client.

To do that what recruiter needs to be doing (I'll speak about my own experience doing recruiting) is start talking to people and asking for help. The classic question is, "Who do you know who…" You not necessarily going for the actual target right away. You're going for someone who can get you further along your goal of getting to that person. It requires asking for help , which I know culturally in the United States is very difficult for most people. However, asking for help is essential in your job search.

You see, the statistics are 70% of jobs are filled through networking. We all know that. However, 70% of the 70% involve people who you didn't know at the beginning of your job search. How do you get to those people?

Answer. Asking for help. That's because, at the end of the day, the things that you do by yourself will only carry you so far. You don't know what you don't know. You think you do, but you really don't. In networking, you are always asking for help. You are always asking for someone who can get you a little further along.

If you're not quite sure what to do, here's. What I am going to suggest you do (you're going to laugh)… Ask for help! Hire a coach. Get someone to give you advice. Ask questions. Learn what you don't know. Frankly, it's a lot easier someone is telling you the answers, rather than you having to figure it out.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Tough Interview Questions: Tell Me About a Time You Had to Deal With Failure.


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
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What are firms looking for when they asked this question? How do you demonstrate the right stuff?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The question for today is . . . It is a behavior interview question . . . “Tell me about the time you had to deal with failure.”

You know, when you hear this question what they are trying to do is find out about grit, determination, tenacity and being able to reflect on situations. You see, everything that you work on in life isn’t going to work out and it doesn’t matter whether you answer this question (although it’s ideal that you answer the question) about the workplace in situations where you failed there (not to the tune of billions of dollars obviously).

But you had a professional failure and what you learned from it and how you bounced back from it, taking that knowledge and taking the next step because, you know, trying to see tenacity, resilience, guts, courage . . . things along those lines.

So as you talk about your answer, think about, well, there’s a couple of different approaches to this.

Sometimes, the question is disguised . . . It is disguised as, “tell me about how you turned all dream into a reality,” and then they’ll follow up with “since he didn’t completely make it happen, what did you learn from the ‘incomplete’ on the course” or “tell me about the failure that you had when you tried to turn this dream into reality.”

Sometimes I’ll just be direct with it. “Tell me about the time you had to deal with failure,” which is why I’ve titled this as I did.

Ultimately, what they’re trying to do is what you learned from resilience, learned from the failure, how you’ve stepped up big or are going for in order to be the success that you are today.

Think about it folks. Not everything you do works and you are not looking to hire someone who’s going to whine, complain or moan. Particularly those of you have a senior level. What they’re looking for is someone who has had a failure (not failing is a failure according to Warren Buffett.

You can’t say that you have never failed because companies will judge that you have never taken a risk.

Firms like risk takers . . . calculated risk takers.

Firms like people who are willing to measure risk and take action. And sometimes it won’t work out, particularly for the senior people. They want to know that you can pick yourself up, dust yourself off and go from there because they’re being conditioned to believe that gritty people are the better individual to hire. Be prepared to talk about grit and determination.

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter?

No B. S. Job Search Advice: Getting Known on LinkedIn

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to become known on LinkedIn as a subject matter expert and explains how to do it.

Summary

I'm a big fan of the LinkedIn blogging platform. If you go to your LinkedIn profile and look at the search box across, not the very top, the one on your homepage, you'll notice a pen or pencil and if you click that, there is a place where you can write articles, post videos and podcasts... Articles, videos and audios that you want to share with people on LinkedIn.

When all is said and done, as I talked about this, a lot of you are saying to yourself, "I'm no good at this. Who is going to want to read my stuff?" There are people who are following you with whom you are connected who will want to read your stuff they want to get your ideas. Along with the idea of it being no good, frankly, it probably won't be at the beginning. As time progresses, you will get better. Like everything else you've done in your life and your career, the more you do it, the better you get.

You'll start reading other people's articles, watch their videos and listen to their podcasts and notice the ones that you like and don't like. You'll notice people who are influencers. LinkedIn is cherry pick them and you will see that they have tens of thousands of views and, sometimes, thousands of comments. Don't compare yourself to them.

What will happen is that they will people will start to follow you based upon what they say, who are not even connected with. They are going to be interested. The 1st time you write or publish, you may only get 10 or 20 people or 5 people reading what you wrote. The more you do it, the more people start noticing it and start reading it.

After you have written it, there is a place underneath the headline where you can share it on social media. Sharon on Facebook. Shared on Twitter. Sharon on Google+. On LinkedIn, there are 2 ways to share it. One way is to share it with your connections; another way is to share with the public. Start with your connections and, at the same time, share 2 groups that you remember. From there, come back and share it with the public. Share with the public several times over time because people log on to LinkedIn at different times and they may not see the 1st post because they were not light at that time. But they may see the 2nd 1 or the 4th 1. Don't do within 10 minutes of one another. Wait at least 6 hours before you re-share it.

At the end of the day, what you want to be doing is building a following of people who see you as a subject matter expert. At this point, my 1st level connections I think I have about 14,000. I have close to 16,000 were following me. That includes connections and other people who have chosen to follow me.

You can create the same momentum for yourself. My message about job search is a specific one. You are going to have one about something completely different. Get out there and get seen as a subject matter expert because, at the end of the day, opportunities are going to come to you because people see you as being an expert.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Being Memorable on LinkedIn

Become Memorable on LinkedIn


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests an easy way to become more memorable on LinkedIn as well as being yourself easier to connect with.

Summary

In an earlier video called, "Becoming Memorable on LinkedIn," I talked about changing your public URL from the ridiculous URL that LinkedIn administers when you sign up to something more memorable, easier for people to remember, easy for you to remember

The problem was a forgot to say one thing and that is you have to commit you URL the memory too. I am reminded of that because I have had a couple of guests on Job Search Radio recently. These are people who do recruiting, both corporate HR and third-party recruiting, and, as part of their sign off on the show, at the people, "how can people reach you," I realized that they didn't remember their LinkedIn profile URL.

So I want to remind you folks that part of what you want to do to connect with more people is give out your URL to your LinkedIn profile. And to do that in 2 ways.

One is conversationally and thus it's important to have a memorable LinkedIn address/LinkedIn URL not just simply for you but for them, (and of course commit it to memory) and, number 2, is add it to your signature files in Outlook and add it whenever you send the message on LinkedIn so that, in this way, people have a way of connecting with you.

Making your URL memorable to you and not just simply others, including it in signatures will cause people to want to connect with you because most people don't do this.

So, again, remember, your LinkedIn URL. Put it in signature files. Offer it to people orally as you talk with them. You will find that a lot more people will be connecting with you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

Employers Aren’t Only Looking for Competence


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/05/30/employers-arent-only-looking-for-competence

EP 759 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a few of the things employers are looking for when they interview someone for a job.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about what employers assess for when they hire. they may seem like a funny subject,, because your 1st reaction is to probably say, "Well, they want to know if I can do the job.." To me, that's translates into skills competence and, yes, they try to evaluate for that. There are other factors the firm start to assess for when the interview..

I was turned on to that notion years ago when I start the notice this 1 newspaper article reoccur from time to time that claimed that 20% of all positions were filled by individuals that in no way, shape or form fit the requirement that the client was looking for. But someone like them, trusted them and was going to give them a shot. This made me stop and think. I start to talk with my clients about what they hire for. Yes, competence is one variable but there are others as well.

Self-confidence is the 2nd what I want to mention. A person who is self-confident inspires confidence that they are the solution to a need. After all, would you trust someone more that they can do a job for you. If they seem passionate, enthusiastic and self-confident or nervous, frightened and timid? Of course you will choose the self-confident person. That's the 2nd criteria.

Character is the next one. Is this person. "A character," do they have character or maybe both? Some organizations like to hire people who have both. Some organizations want to ensure that you have character. Are you an individual who can fit in (that involves a cultural fit) into their organization?

So you have competence,, self-confidence, character, cultural fit in the next one is charisma. Charisma is 1 of those funny variables. Charisma is the quality that individuals demonstrate that allows people to just surrender their power and authority to someone because they fall in love. I want to give you an idea of how that makes a difference.

Let's look at 3 recent presidents. We have Barack Obama,, we are former Pres. Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan. 2 of them have fairly similar politics and the 3rd 1, Ronald Reagan, is very different. America loved all 3 of them. How does that work? Ultimately, there are qualities about each of them. They made America's stop, suspend some of their thinking and just falling in love. That's the quality of charisma.

Charismatic people always do better on interviews. They always do better on salary offers than non-charismatic people. How do you get charisma? That's good be for another time.

For today, I'm just going to say that competence is one quality the person has to have. Self-confidence. Character. Cultural fit.. Can you fit into this organization and group or not. Charisma. These are all qualities that translate into leadership.

Are you the kind of person that inspires confidence that you can be the solution to a need or you someone who makes them scratch their head and look further?

I want to talk with you today about what employers assess for when they hire. they may seem like a funny subject,, because your 1st reaction is to probably say, "Well, they want to know if I can do the job.." To me, that's translates into skills competence and, yes, they try to evaluate for that. There are other factors the firm start to assess for when the interview..

I was turned on to that notion years ago when I start the notice this 1 newspaper article reoccur from time to time that claimed that 20% of all positions were filled by individuals that in no way, shape or form fit the requirement that the client was looking for. But someone like them, trusted them and was going to give them a shot. This made me stop and think. I start to talk with my clients about what they hire for. Yes, competence is one variable but there are others as well.

Self-confidence is the 2nd what I want to mention. A person who is self-confident inspires confidence that they are the solution to a need. After all, would you trust someone more that they can do a job for you. If they seem passionate, enthusiastic and self-confident or nervous, frightened and timid? Of course you will choose the self-confident person. That's the 2nd criteria.

Character is the next one. Is this person. "A character," do they have character or maybe both? Some organizations like to hire people who have both. Some organizations want to ensure that you have character. Are you an individual who can fit in (that involves a cultural fit) into their organization?

So you have competence,, self-confidence, character, cultural fit in the next one is charisma. Charisma is 1 of those funny variables. Charisma is the quality that individuals demonstrate that allows people to just surrender their power and authority to someone because they fall in love. I want to give you an idea of how that makes a difference.

Let's look at 3 recent presidents. We have Barack Obama,, we are former Pres. Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan. 2 of them have fairly similar politics and the 3rd 1, Ronald Reagan, is very different. America loved all 3 of them. How does that work? Ultimately, there are qualities about each of them. They made America's stop, suspend some of their thinking and just falling in love. That's the quality of charisma.

Charismatic people always do better on interviews. They always do better on salary offers than non-charismatic people. How do you get charisma? That's good be for another time.

For today, I'm just going to say that competence is one quality the person has to have. Self-confidence. Character. Cultural fit.. Can you fit into this organization and group or not. Charisma. These are all qualities that translate into leadership.

Are you the kind of person that inspires confidence that you can be the solution to a need or you someone who makes them scratch their head and look further?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How Easy Is It to Lie To Employers on an Application That You Have?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
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How Easy Is It to Lie To Employers on an Application That You Have a college degree or great credit when you don’t have either?

Summary

The question I received was, "How easy is it to lie to to employers on a job application that you have a university or college degree and no credit problems despite the contrary?"

Now, it's very easy to lie. It's hard to get away with it. That's the real issue. You can lie and you can gamble. If a firm is concerned about a credit history, they are going to do a credit check on you. There no way to get away with it because the firm that they use to check your background Will discover the fact that you have a credit problem. Tthat one is absolutely impossible to get away with. With a university degree, it is likely a small company is not going to do a meticulous background check. It is likely a large firm will. The ones in the middle, it all goes into the category of "It depends."

If you really want to risk losing a job and explaining to your friends and family, your former colleagues, how you got fired for being a liar, go ahead and gamble! It your life. It's your career and it's your choices. But your question was how easy is the lie. Yes, you can lie. But getting away with it is always the challenge on this stuff.

Years ago I remember representing someone who was interviewing for a position at a very senior level with a large firm and telling him that the firm would do a meticulous background check. DO NOT I repeat do not lie to them on the application. They will find out and fire you I told him.

And what did he do?

He lied on the application about a trivial detail and he was fired at the end of the first week broad into the office of the corporate head of H.R. furnishing a role equivalent of the chief of H.R. role. He was confronted with the data; he admitted to it. He was handed a box with his possessions and sent on his way. Is that what you want to risk happening to you. Most of you will say, "no." You want a smooth path in life. But that was not smooth.

The fact of the matter it is if it's a large firm, it it is with most mid-level firms, lying about a degree is something that they will find out because they send information to your previous university to verify the data.

Since records our automated these days, it's very easy to find that out. With regard to your credit history, again, if they're asking, it matters to them. They will find out.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What's the difference between a manager and a leader?

To You, What’s The Difference Between a Manager and a Leader? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


I offer the standard answer as well as the advanced answer to the question.

Summary

So today's question is "To you, what's the difference between a leader and a manager?"

So, you know I did a Google search just to get their definition. They even have this boxed apart from the search results. The main difference between leaders and managers is that leaders have people follow them while managers have people who work for them. Then, they talk about a business owner in that they need to be a leader and a manager.

Now I am going to take that a little bit further and talk in terms of hello a manager it is someone who controls activities that requires people to conform to certain behaviors. A leader is someone who inspires individuals to follow them so that a leader is someone who may set the vision. The manager is going to be the individual who's staring at every bit of minutae that they do. . . That's really a micromanager.

They're are going to be watching their activities to make sure there's conformity. The leader may say, "You know, this is the result I want to get to. This is where I want to go. This is where we, as an organization, need to get to," and then draw out from people how they think the group can get there or how they think the organization can there. And by doing this, inspire faith, fidelity, belief that this is a person that can be trusted because they are motivated to help.

So, again, to me the leadership quality, yes, involves following but there's a way to follow. It's not by dictating (although, at certain points, you may have to manage). But, the leadership quality involves a desire to follow this person because you trust them and believe in them. When you're asked this or in interview, generally, this is asked of managerial or executive candidates, not the staff individuals.

And you know they're looking for examples of leadership here. They may also want to see that she could manage the process too. But here you need to be prepared with leadership examples that tell your story, that affirm how people joined with you. and went to hell and beyond to get to them.

So I hope you follow this advice. Emphasize leadership skills though don't neglect the the management part because at the end of the day, organizations may like to hire visionaries and I will use Steve Jobs as an example. The man was and incredible visionary. He also, at the end of the day, delivered on what the vision was. It involved managing process.

So, again, I think in terms of both. Don't neglect one for the other; then you'll tend to lose.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: How to Answer, “Tell Me About Yourself”

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers the most effective way to prepare for this question so you are never tripped up.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the classic job interview question, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally."

They may not use those exact words but you're probably going to ask you some general open-ended question that will allow you to take the ball and the other run with it or trip yourself up. To run with it, you need to be prepared with an answer that lasts about 30-45 seconds that speaks to the nature of the job that the trying to fill, as well as demonstrate that you can do it.

Here's a typical answer that question.

"Well, I've been in the field now for about (whatever the number of years is). For the last 2 years I been working for someone. So I've done this that this that." The listen that that you talk about is exactly what they're looking for (or pretty darn close). If they are trying to find a Java developer with certain skills, you tell them what you've done that relates to what you're looking for.

You see, they're not looking for some big overview. They're looking for fits into what they need to have done.

If your accountant, you might say something along the lines of, "I've been accountant for the last 5 years. For the past 3 years I been doing temporary assignments for different organizations where I have been involved with…" Then talk about what you've done the relates to what you're looking for. It's really that simple.

Once you give them this outline, once you've rehearsed it, instead of giving them this "winged answer," off the top of your head . . . You really should rehearse it . . . Once you have it rehearsed, if you are them, what follow-up questions would you ask in order to find out whether what you've done fits with what they're looking for? Once you have that in mind, you can be prepared with your follow-up answers to their follow-up questions. It's really pretty easy.

But most people go into interviews completely unprepared. They think they can just walk in and answer off-the-cuff (and they can) but they're not to get hired.

My encouragement to you is for the 1st 10-15 minutes of the interview is some variation on the question of, "Tell me about yourself," where you talk about what you've done. They want to find out what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. There are also going to ask you follow-up questions that you can also be prepared for.

Keep your answers to about 30-45 seconds in length. Why? You don't want to be droning on and on and on and on and on and boring them to tears so they are left mentally starting to channel surf (thinking about something else that they would rather be doing). You want to be giving your answers in 30 to 45 seconds in length so that the conversation becomes interactive. You engage them. They engage you. You are going back and forth in this is what you want to have happening at the stage of the interview.

So, again, "tell me about yourself," is a really simple question to answer if you have taken the time to prepare.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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