Do You Think It's Age Discrimination

Do You Think It’s Age Discrimination? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 643 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks to older workers about how to deal with age discrimination.

 

Summary

This is a podcast for older workers that stems from a conversation I had yesterday with someone who had been in his 50s and interviewing, not getting results that he wanted and not really sure what his problem was.

To start off with. I asked him to break down where he thought things were collapsing. Here's how the model works. If you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume. If you are getting it invitations for phone interviews but not in person interviews, you don't do a phone interview as well as you might like. If you're getting in person interviews but not being invited back for 2nd interviews,, you don't really interview as well as you think you do. We could go on and on.

I said to him, "When you stop and think about it, where is it breaking down for you? Where are the problems coming up in your search?" He came to realize it was his interviewing.

Once you identify this problem, I could feel his confidence build up because he had figured out that he really didn't interview as well as he thought he might have.

He has been a hiring manager no less. And, like most hiring managers, he had the belief that he knew how to interview because he had hired people. However, when you put people on the side of the desk, they often don't interview as well as they think they do. Then, they start to blame age discrimination as being the issue when their lack of preparedness is the real problem.

If you think is age discrimination. Most of the time, I'm not saying all of the time, most of the time it isn't. What it is is your lack of preparation is the real culprit. As a result, maybe it might be a resume… You haven't really studied how to write a resume. You're not getting them critiqued. If you are getting phone interviews, you think he can just kind of wing it through the phone interview and you haven't really rehearsed or practiced how to answer some of the questions you would be typically asked..

I want to encourage you to not fall prey to the self-pity trap of "I'm too old," or the assumption of age discrimination. Yes, there is but most of the time it is you. The lack of preparation and your lack of effort to get yourself ready is the real culprit.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunterhundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Aren’t You Overqualified for This Job? | No BS Job Seach Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 617 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter helps you answer the tough interview question about being overqualified on both the overt level and the covert level (aren’t you too old). 

 

Summary

Aren't you overqualified for this job?

This is one of those "fatal flaw" questions that I mentioned in a previous show and video where they think out loud and are telling you what the reluctance is. If you want to accept this statement as "the kiss of death," you can but it doesn't necessarily mean that. The overqualified question or "aren't you a little overqualified for this job" is an opportunity to really sell yourself and do it in a smooth and professional way.

I want to deal with. The question on an overt level first and then on a covert level. The over levels exactly what the question is. They are concerned that you are going to get bored in the job and that as soon as you find a better opportunity, you are going to leave.

The way to approach this question is when you are thinking about overtly is to say to them, "Look, the job market is what it is. You can look at it is being that I'm overqualified but the fact of the matter is, the market is tough right now is to be tough for quite some time. So the market is basically telling me that I need to adapt. I need to look at things from a different perspective. I could hold out for a job that was at my previous level and I can be out of work for a long time and I'm not really looking to do that. From your vantage point, I can understand your reluctance. Your concerns I would want to jump ship as soon as something better came along. The fact of the matter is I want to join an organization where I will enjoy the work. What I can do for you is, in addition to doing this role, where you wouldn't have to train someone to do it, you get the benefit of all my experience in this kind of role and I can be of help to you as you try to sort out other things. Or, I can just do the job addressing me to do and, frankly, I would enjoy doing that."

That's the over answer to the question of, "Aren't you overqualified?" The covert question is, "Gee, you look a little old. Could you really work for someone younger?" That's a little trickier. There, you can go on to say something along the lines of (this is a continuation of the other answer), "I have worked with people of all kinds of backgrounds. I work with people who are farmers more senior and younger than I. In all cases, we have gotten along beautifully. They've asked for help and I have been willing to give it. I want people to do very well. If they do well, I do well. " That becomes a very simple way of deflecting of ageism that shows up subtly in these kind of questions."

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Dealing With Ageism

 

This is a simulcast of No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio: Dealing with Ageism

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

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