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What Qualities Do You Look for in a Boss (Manager)? (VIDEO)

In this video, I discuss how to answer this typically second interview question?

Summary

I am 1 of those tough interview questions that is designed to ... I'm not sure what it's designed to do. But the fact of the matter is it's not that tough; however, in the heat of the 2nd interview, (occasionally, it is asked in the 1st), it surprises people because they are not prepared and there is nothing that gives them a context for the question... It kind of stumps them.

The question basically is, "What qualities do you look for in a manager (in a Boss)?" Things along those lines.

Again, not a tough question. Let's break it down.

You start off by going, "I work well with the manager who treats all all sorts of people with courtesy and respect. The manager who values ideas and input from the people. They don't necessarily have to follow those ideas but looks for the input, sorts it out and gives you the impression that matters to them what I think."

"I also work well with the manager is very clear about what is expected of me. What my responsibilities will be. What sort of boundaries exist, work. Someone who can streamline my area so that they remove roadblocks and barriers from doing my job.. Some of the trust me and thus things that I don't need a lot of supervision but also expects I'm going to come to them for advice or help or input or if I'm struggling. I also think availability is helpful." You get where I'm coming from? These are legitimate qualities anyone would expect from a manager. You give them back this kind of an answer.

The key thing is the sound like you are thinking of your answer and that is not rehearsed answer. If you make your answer sound like it is a checklist, is going to sound like you planned for this. If you listen to my answer, you'll notice that might sound a little bit reflective. That's really the key to it.

Then there's one more piece so don't think you're off the hook here. The extra piece is to flip the question and ask, "What is your style like?"

Let's be practical here. Do you think anyone is going to tell you, "I'm kind of abrupt and they don't really care what my people think. It's your problem to get rid of the barriers to your success and I don't really care what you think about or what your thoughts are." Do you think it was good to say that to you? Of course, not.

There going to feedback exactly what they have heard you say and that will help hook them into you. To say anything to the countries and make them feel defensive. If you shared what's important to you that something that they can mirror back.

Again, lack of preparedness is the biggest issue with this question. And forgetting to flip the answer to the manager or future boss and asking them what their style is like is the 2nd mistake. You always have to do that flip at the end. It will help nail the higher.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: What Do You Look for When You Hire Someone?


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I offer a textured answer to a more complex question than it seems.

Summary

The question for today is, "What do you look for when you hire someone?" It's an easy question and I think it there is a way to give it some texture. Here's how I would answer that question.

"It starts off of me having a clear idea of what I'm looking for because I know HR is going to take a previous job description and want to work from that. I'm going to want to edit it a little bit to really call attention to the qualities I'm looking for. The 1st is going to be that I would need to get clear about what I'm looking for and how I'm going to evaluate for it and how I want my team to evaluate for."

"You see, one thing I've learned over the course of time is that unless I have clarity, my hires are destroying as they could be. I need to get clear about what I'm looking for. Thus, when I'm evaluating someone, #1 is can they do the job? Can they do what I need them to do? #2 is, what are the internals to this person? Are they inspired or are they just doing your job? Does it matter to them? I want to know how that is going to show up for them and how I can support them and not frustrate them."

"Lastly, and this is a funny one, I want to get a sense of how they are going to interact with team. This is not so far as being a team player or fitting in. If anything, I like people who are 'squeaky wheels.' I like to have a certain amount of divergent ideas and backgrounds in order to really make sure that I'm covering all my bases. If I hire homogeneous team, and that such a simply from a diversity of skin color, race, sexual identity or any other orientation, I'm missing something. I also think of it in terms of the diversity of ideas and experiences that I look for in someone."

"So I'm not looking for cookie-cutter beyond simply the skills. What I'm looking for people who can think creatively and they test that a few different ways."

You see how I'm approaching this? I'm not just simply looking for square peg for square hole. I want to skills are obviously needed but all the personality stuff that involved with evaluating for them trying to get this hiring manager who is answering this question to talk about. Otherwise, they are just feeding me pablum and I don't want that. I want to get people who have unique qualifications.

That's the way I would approach the question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Final Interview Q&A for Employers and Job Hunters (VIDEO)


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Whether you’re an employer or a job hunter, being well prepared for final interviews is critical. Although focused on employers, these questions are very important for job hunters, as well.

Summary

But background was in executive search. I filled a lot of positions over the course of a 40 year career and now I coach, job hunters. I know also coach employers about hiring. Generally, when I do video, it's for one side or the other. Today, I thought I would do something is really geared toward both of you and talk about Q&A for final interviews. Although it is slanted toward employers, I think job hunters will get a lot of benefit from this as well. That's why I title this, "Final Interview Q&A for Employers and Jobhunters."

Here's what I want use an employer to do when someone comes in to meet with you. Whether you are bringing back 1, 2 or 3 people, I want you to say, "This is going to be our final interview. At the end of this process, I'm going to have a clear idea of who I'm going to say yes or no to. That's what my goal is. I want you to be completely transparent. " At the same time, Mr. or Ms. Employer, I want you to start working in different ways to get commitment from the job hunter so that you will have a choice of potential higher.

For you as a job hunter, I know you want to know would you stand with an employer, right? You don't want to feel like you're being left up in the year in their thoughts knowing that are going to be making a decision and it is not going to drag on for weeks is huge. If it does drag out for weeks, you've learned something about this employer and how they make decisions. They are always good find it difficult to make a choice. Employers, that is the message that you sent to people. I think is very useful for you to hear that.

Once you have done that, Mr. or Ms. Employer, I have a great starting with question for you. "Deep completely understand the job description?" I think that is a great question to start off with because I think there are always nuances a job hunter doesn't know that they can ask you about. Let's say, they say, "Yes." Here's the question to ask next. "Give me 3 reasons why you would be a great choice." Folks, if your job hunter, you need to have some answers to that question other than simply saying something like, "I would be a loyal employee," and acting like you would be a good puppy. You want to have 3 practical reasons that scientists job for why you would be a great hire for them.

From there, if you are an employer, I would ask, "What are your thoughts and concerns about the role?" This should always be some sort of a question mark or concern a job hunter has . You would expect them to walk in and say, "No! I understand everything! Every last detail!" That isn't being a human being. That's BS. At the kind of BS to job hunters of been trying to give. You want a real person, there with whom you can have a conversation of trust.

So you start off with, "Do you understand the job description," progress to, "Give me 3 reasons why you be a great choice," and moved to, "What are your thoughts and concerns?" Next, here is a, "left-field question" that I think is a good one. "Tell me about 3 people who you like and respect most and what it is about these 3 people." That is question is a character check because what you want to do is understand the values.

There are a lot of people for many reasons including cultural reasons will talk about their parents, their grandparents and you must respect that choice of theirs. Do not diminish it in any way. From there, listen to them. But what your listing to is the values that they place upon the choice, not who the person is. I want to listen past who the person is to the values that are represented. Job hunters, that is a huge piece for you-- understand what your values are. When you join in employer, it shouldn't be just about the money. You want to demonstrate yourself as a human being with character.

As an employer, you want to ask a person about their long-term goals. You want them to be forthright with you. If you seen some of my videos, you know that there's a question that I picked up from Reid Hoffman, "What do you want your next job today?" I think that's a great question to ask. This involves longer-term goals and it's the same question disguised in a different way. After all, employers, you know that they are not going to be there for the next 20 years. Let's get real. You're not good be there for the next 20 years . So why would you expect them to think in those terms? Employers don't allow people to do that for many reasons. Employers, I want you to ask job hunters want to be prepared to answer what your long-term goals are.

A variation is, "Let's say I don't choose you will be don't get together on this job, what would you plan on doing next? What sort of choices would you make for yourself? What would you be looking for?" What you are looking for are people who would deviate from the role that you have outlined for them. It's a little bit of a trick.

For example, I'm going to use a black-and-white scenario, if you are interviewing for a sales job in their next choice of options would be for a non-sales role, you would want to hire them, right? You're looking for those offbeat kind of choices that would signal to you that they are just doing this for the money.

Employers, you will lay out what your standards are for great performance. What are your expectations? Normally, that really isn't addressed. I wish it was but a lot of firms them to address it.

Finally, I think there is a question that you should ask as an employer that you, as a job hunter, need to be prepared for. "Do you want us to move forward? Why?" I think that those 2 questions together as your final questions will go a long way toward indicating whether or not someone is really interested in your role. I think a lot of people go to final interviews and/or really ambivalent. They want the offer but they are not completely sold on it.

When you look at these questions, whether you are an employer or job hunter, what they are designed to do is find out more about a person and their values, demonstrate that they understand what the role is and what your expectations of them are. Thus, when it is time to make a decision, you have a much more whole picture of who this person is and whether they could be a good choice.

Deciding between multiple people that are really close, that is a question for another time. I think these are great questions for you and employer to look at and for job hunters to be prepared to answer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Over 50 Job Search and Ageism (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a few rules to follow when you are job hunting and over 50.

Summary

The fact of the matter is, ageism exists. We can pretend it doesn't exist. But it is really helpful to pretend. Let's just acknowledge that it exists and, frankly, there's really very little that you can do about it. If people going to be stupid and bigoted because you're 50 or older, excuse my language, screw them. You have a lot more to offer and they just don't get it. Let's look at a few things that you can do that are within your control that will help you get hired for job that you want.

The 1st thing is don't fixate on your age. If you get turned down for a job, learn the reasons why you got turned down for the job because they may have nothing to do with age. So often, I listen to job hunters complained to me about how their age was the stumbling block in getting hired when, in fact, there are other factors that were involved were perfectly valid. So let's not focus on your age.

2. You have to think like you're self-employed. You are in business for yourself and you have to do your own career management. What do you do to ensure that you are marketable to the next organization, to this organization that you're trying to get hired by? Thinking like a business owner finding that lever that is going to connect you into their firm is almost more important than anything else that you can do. Again, look for that lever that is going to make you attractive.

3. Stop spamming your resume. I receive resumes are absolutely useless to me. "Hi! I'm looking for a job. I'm applying for this vice president of such and such and you haven't managed a person in the past 15 years." It is spam. No one is going to give you the shot to go back to what you did 15 years ago. You are what you are today.

4. Time to use your connections. That's really the strongest place we could take advantage of your assets-- your Rolodex. I will use the language of the Rolodex that I grew up with even though no one uses it anymore. You know what I'm talking about. You have connections . . And not talking with the people that you connected with on LinkedIn who you've never spoken with before in your life. I'm talking about the real connections-- the people who you've worked with. The people who you have worked for that you could really reach out to AND you really need to reach out to them to make sure that, at the end of the day, you utilize an asset that you could really take advantage of.

5. Talk to particular employers. Don't just simply respond to job bids. They confirmed to might be at someone like you. Start working your connections to see if you can get an introduction into the firm. See if the firm could be approached, but you could approach through your connections, ideally, and sell yourself.

I see that these factors will go a long way toward helping you land your next position rather than fixating on the, "Oh, woe is me," I am 50 and no one is going to hire me is useless.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You Need to Change Jobs to Get Ahead

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s critical for you to make strategic job changes periodically to get ahead.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the fact that you really need to change jobs from time to time. The system is set up to keep you in a tough position financially.

Think about it. If you stay in one organization, most people are going to get very modest salary increases. When you're the junior level, they may give you $5000 or $10,000. That may sound like a big percentage when you are making $50,000. They may say it is a 10% or 20% increase... But think about it. Archer costs going up even more? Isn't the government taking more in taxes? You are basically standing still.

When you become more experienced in the percentage increase comes down a lot (many individuals are getting 2%, 3% or 4% increases), even at that $50,000 level, haven't you noticed your insurance premiums have increased? Haven't you noticed that everything your bind cost a lot more than it used to? Movie tickets are going up?

Financially, the system is really set up to force you to change jobs. If you are getting that 3%, 4% or 5% raise, how do you get ahead financially?

Here's some simple math. If you change jobs as a $50,000 your person, and you change jobs for another $5000, if you didn't change jobs again, over the next 5 years receive the same modest increase of 3% or 4%, you probably be ahead by about $27,000 pretax. By changing jobs one time and staying there for 5 years, this is where you would pay.

If you change jobs one time and 3 years into your tenure with this 1 firm, you change jobs again, you would be $35,000 ahead pretax even though in the way that I've explained this you did not get a raise during that five-year period of time. I'm not saying that $5000 Is is a big increase. Obviously, it isn't.

But let's look at $10,000 or $15,000 increases and see what happens. If you get a $10,000 raise for changing jobs and stay there for 5 years, you would be about $53,000 ahead Given that modest 3% or 4% increase. If you changed jobs a 2nd time, you be about $74,000 or $75,000 ahead. How can you stay still at your current organization within give you a 3% decrease when they are just telling you that you are doing great work? That handshake they give you is not going to pay your bills when they start increasing!

My advice to you is to be smart.. Do what organizations do when they start establishing a budget. When things get tough, they do what's right for the stockholders and for the Board of Directors and they cut jobs, right? They look out for the business interests and, if that involves you, tough luck. You have to look out for the Board of Directors for your organization. "Atta boys," and, "Atta girls,"

"You're doing a great job. We're going to give you a promotion. You're doing great work."

I've got to tell you that other firms will have you do great work, too. AND you will make a lot more money.

My advice to you is to be smart and start looking for something else from time to time and if you just want to keep your profile up to date on LinkedIn and attract recruiters to it, think of it like a resume with keywords.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Avoiding Depression While Job Hunting

Avoiding Depression During a Job Search | Job Search Radio


I discuss several things you can do to keep yourself on point during your job search avoid the malaise and depression too many people slip into. I mentioned connecting with me via coach.me in the video. I no longer work with the service. Instead, reach out to me through www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Summary

Today's video is to help individuals who may be fighting depression in the middle of their job search.

Depression is insidious. It shows up in lots of different ways and the simplest way it becomes obvious is you find it difficult to do the things you know you need to do. And, as a result, it kind of feeds on itself and sends you into a spiral where nothing is getting done, you start to punish yourself for not getting things done and then criticizing yourself for not doing the things in order to get done. You get the idea.

So here's a couple of ways that I've learned over the years in my work as a recruiter and my training as a therapist to help people defeat the depression that comes with job search.

Because after all it wasn't just that you decided that you were being treated fairly or that you got laid off or fired from your employer. It's all the build up to that that may have wore you down.

So here's a couple of things to do.

First of all, establish a routine for yourself and maintain it. So, for example, if you are used to getting up at 6:30 to go on work, get up at 6:30 to start your job search. Go through the same routine you did in the morning. I'm not going to walk you through your normal routine. You know what you normally do and just continue on with them. When I was working from home many years ago when I was living in New York the one additional thing I did as part of my routine was I would go out to get a copy of The New York Times, come back, get into my jacuzzi and take a long bubble bath for a while. And I felt as though by going out in the morning and just getting a sense of the weather I just learned what other people were going through. It kind of got me connected with work. You'll find your version of a good routine but establish one.

From there, I want to encourage you to do some exercise. It doesn't have to be sweat and grunt exercise. You don't have to, If you haven't exercised before, go for a three mile jog. It's beyond reasonable to expect that. But even if it's as simple as going for a one mile walk, it's something that you can do that will get you out and invigorate you. Starting doing something like reaching out to people as part of your search just to check in with them, Say, "hi," chat a little bit, let them know that you are looking for work that can be part of the networking and just re-connect will with folks to help them and help yourself stay connected.Go to a support group. You know there are any number of networking groups out there that will help individuals make more connections and support with one another with leads and support one another with coaching. So get to a network support group or networking group and just chat up people and that will help you feel good.

You know, him and in there are things that you can do to volunteer or sometimes one day a week for an afternoon like a Friday afternoon. You might find a volunteer opportunity.

They'll give you motivation and inspiration to appreciate what you have, him .even though it's not going perfectly. I'm going to remind you of one of those qualities that served you very well which is perseverance.

You've always had a determination or been determined throughout your career. This is going to be another way that you're going to need to show that perseverance and determination.

Try a job search journal. Talk about some of the successes that you've had the positive feedback that you've received along the way. Just jot down some notes for yourself because there are times where you know the funk may get too profound and it becomes a good way to remind you of things that you can do that will inspire you because you've inspired others.

And I don't want to neglect the idea of getting some professional help. You know sometimes the rut or the depression becomes too profound and you need help. Don't skimp or scrimp on spending money to him take care of yourself. After all if you are depressed and you go to an interview feeling depressed, how motivated do you think others are going to be in hiring you?

So get some help. Often talking to your friends will be enough to take you out of the funk. But if it doesn't work. Definitely get some professional advice and support in order to help you break through.

Hope you found this helpful. Hope you visit my Web site which is www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There's a lot more that early watch, listen to or read to help you find work.

And if we're not connected on LinkedIn, send a connection request to www.linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter. I accept connection requests from people worldwide.
Finally, job search coaching.

I have coached people for years. Schedule time with me as a coach at TheBigGameHunter.us

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Hiding Your Personality | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


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EP 901 There are many mistakes that people make when they interview for jobs. Acting like a robot by showing no personality is 1 of the big ones.

Summary

Now we all know that companies mistakenly use "fit" as part of their hiring criteria. I say "mistakenly" because they really don't know what they're doing. I digress. Let me come back to you.

You want to take advantage of their behavior and, in doing so, not hide your personality. You see, one of the things that you don't want to do is just be another , "me-2 job hunter." By that, I mean just sell yourself on the basis of competence and not differentiate yourself in any way. You see, if you're like everyone else, and I must in all candor tell you that if you think you're the only competent one what you claim to be proficient at you're mistaken.

There are a lot of very competent people who do the exact same stuff that you do, some of who work for your firm. So, how do you distinguish yourself? How do you stand out and that is by revealing your personality.

Years ago I remember I was coaching someone who was number one or her class at a top grad school. She had exceptional grades, really the number one person in her master's program, her MBA program at this school. And she wasn't getting jobs. She had been on 10 or 15 interviews. It's been a while I don't remember the exact number. She did a lot of interviews and was getting nowhere. And we sat down together and I did a mock interview with her. And within three questions I said to her, " I've got the problem and she looked at me quizzically and said, " What am I doing which you figured it out in three answers?"

And the answer was, "Someone told you that firms only hire competent people. They hire people who are competent to do the job that they need to have done and hopefully they like them too because, well, they're going to have to live with them for years. That's their thinking.

So, they want to have someone in the group who will fit in well and they'll like to have around and you're only selling yourself on the basis of your skills. Loosen up. Relax. Let them like you as a person and you'll do better.

She called me a week later with three offers. She lightened up a lot and was happy with the fact that she'd gotten choices all because she became a human being and not an interview robot. That's really are when you only sell on the basis of your skills competence and professionalism.

So don't be a robot. Sell yourself. Be a human being. Have people know, like and trust you pretty quickly. And, from your knowledge, they'll learn to respect you very quickly as well. It'll help you stand out and this works so well, not just simply for job hunters. It also works extremely well for those of you who are self-employed.

There are a lot of vendors who can do the same thing that you do, right? In your market area, wherever it is, there are other people who do the same thing. Why do they choose you? Hopefully you haven't been on the race to the lowest price. If you have, that's a different conversation, but normally, there's something about this person that they zero in on. It's like they believe in you. That's the mistake that too many job hunters make. They don't let people connect with them as a human being.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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How Lucky Are You and Why?

How Lucky Are You and Why? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 887 I explain what the trick is in this question and how to answer it.

Summary

This is one of those fun trick questions. I have to say, "trick" because let me explain the trick to you because it suggests the answer and most people miss it entirely. The question is, "How lucky are you and why."

The key to suggesting the answer is the "and why" part because most people are going to go off on a tirade about an incredible luck lock luck or they have no luck. Pretty predictable answers.

Now, what the employer is suggesting with the question is that there are reasons why people are lucky and they want to know what your reasons are so it let's you know right off the bat they're thinking it isn't about luck afterall. Now, you might just simply start off by saying, "You know, luck is one of those funny things. You know, for example, there are musicians who are incredibly lucky but no one talks about the 25 years they've spent in the studio working up to the point where someone would notice them. Thus, they become the luckiest musicians on the planet because they've got the hit record. Or, you know, a variety of things. You can use movies as an example of that.

But, fundamentally, what employer generally wants to hear is, "Some people talk about karma and I've thought a lot of great things in my life that help to create circumstances where I receive good fortune. And thus you translate luck into good fortune. "But I don't want to make it seem as though these things happen by accident. I work incredibly hard to make my "luck" as you will to put myself in the position where I have the opportunity to have good things happen to me. You know I do the work. You know I drive the sales (You talk about the nature of work).

You know, in answering the question, you lay out a couple things that you do that helps make you "lucky" so that it is really about the luck. Most people don't know how much I've done up until this point to arrive at the stage. Where they think it's luck, I think it's the effort that's gone into it."

And then they'll ask you, "Can you give me an example of that? Can you talk about something from your history where people were amazed that you did something but you spent 20 years of my life working up to that point?"

Maybe it was how you came up with a solution to a problem where you'd seen something similar or in junior high school. On and on and on. You can use examples like that but you know the trick is not that it's a luck but that you've put effort into getting "luck" to put yourself in the position to be able to be lucky.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Will A Company Reject A Candidate with Excellent Technical Skills But Lacking Social Skills?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/28/will-a-company-reject-a-candidate-with-excellent-technical-skills-but-lacking-so

EP 848 I think this is a great question that affects so many people, particularly those who work outside of their native land.  I give my typical no BS advice but a solution so that does not affect you forever.

Summary

The question I received was, "Will accompany reject a candidate with excellent technical skills but lacking social skills?" I know what you want the answer to be but the fact is what you want and what the reality is are different. I want to take it across the life-cycle of your career to explain why.

As a very junior person, you have a chance. However, if you stay static with having poor social skills you won't have a chance.

Before I go further, let me ask, "What are poor social skills?" Generally, that would be interpreted as poor oral communications and/or more written communications. Rude behavior. Ineffective behavior In group situations while working in meetings or with others.

Who would want to work with someone who is rude or sullen. You work with other people. Whether it is in the US or other countries There is the hope that people will get along with one another. You may be dedicated to your craft, but part of your craft involves relating to others. For example, you as a technical professional have to attend meetings where you communicate your ideas. If you cannot communicate ideas, you are not an effective craftsman. That's the reality to it.

It's kind of like an artist he doesn't know how to market themselves or a coach who doesn't know how to promote themselves. I could be the greatest coach in the world (by the way, I'm pretty damn good) But if no one knows about it,, I'm not can be coaching anyone am I? If you have poor social skills, and you are not allowed to attend meetings, How will anyone know that you have great ideas to improve their environment?

So, at the beginning phase of your career, you have a chance; However, is not going to last long because they are going to push you aside pretty quickly. As you get mid-level and higher level, you cannot get away with poor oral communications, poor writing skills, bad behavior with colleagues, Ineffective communications. Why? Because it becomes magnified even more.

You are expected to lead situations. You are expected to be the person who talks to people within the organization outside of the technical areas to elicit information about what they need & how you can go about serving them. You are supporting them; you're working on budgets for a group; you are hiring people. How do you do that with poor social skills? You can't.

Social skills can be improved on. Like technical skills, when you were 6-year-old girl or boy learning how to code, were you great at that time? No, but you had an aptitude a you learned. You had mentors, coaches and teachers who helped you become better. The same thing applies with social skills. You can learn to get better at those, too. I don't care what profession you are in, we are talking about technical profession now, you can get better at these things if you work at them.

I want to be clear that I am a big proponent that you emphasize your strengths as being the core of your background but you have to improve the secondary skills in order to have a career in the primary ones. They go hand-in-hand, but your energy should be focused on your technical skills.

Again, will you be rejected? Probably, Because they'll never know what you know because you can't communicate, right? It is in life are going to hand you a piece of paper or a tablet And say, "Take this test and if you pass the test you will be hired." Managers want to know that you understand what they are telling you AND that you have growth potential. Without those, you are not going to get hired.

So, again, you have a chance if you're the junior level however, as you become involved in the organization, you have no chance.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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