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Hedge Fund Brainteasers: Which Plane is Closer to Paris? (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this elegant question.

Summary

Here is another 1 of those tough interview questions that confuses a lot of folks. Like most of them, it is very easy question... Today's question is, "Al plane is flying from Paris to New York at 500 mph. There is another plane that is flying from New York to Paris at 450 mph. They meet over the Atlantic Ocean. Which plane is closer to Paris?"

They are in the same place. They are equidistant from Paris.

After all, they MET over the Atlantic Ocean. They are in the same place. We aren't talking about a crash. They are in the same location over the Atlantic.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Do I Look Like a Job Hopper?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question as to whether someone looks like a job hopper.

Summary

The premise is that the person is concerned that the resume makes them look like a job hopper. The question goes like this, "I'm a software developer with a job that I've had since college. 1.5 years. 4 years. 2 years. 3.5 years. 2.5 years. I'm a year into my latest gig and started to think about switching industries like from going from finance to tech. How bad does this look?"

Great question. I think there is a more complicated answer to this. Let me start with the premise that I have the idea that some of these might be consulting assignments. Where that is the case, you can aggregate dates into one combined area that shows that you are a consultant during that period. Let's say the 2 years and the 3 1/2 years were as consultants, aggregate the dates there. The reason I have the idea is your choice of the word "gigs"or, "gig" for that last position . I have the idea from not that you might be a person who is been a consultant. If that's the case, aggregate some of those dates to demonstrate clearly.

More important than a tactic, is the bigger picture. You are not talking about career progression. You're talking about how over 10 years as a developer. If my math is right, for 14 1/2 years, you are talking about yourself being purely a developer; do not talking about being a lead. You not talk about being an architect and you're not talking about being a manager. You talking about being a developer.

That may have been a conscious choice of yours but some employers of the start looking down on you because you haven't progressed in your career. That may be a bigger issue for you. Why are you still a developer? Why are people not give you the opportunity to get ahead?

If you've always wanted to be a developer, that's going to be a real easy question to deflect. You're going to have to address in the cover letter.
Again, I don't see these dates as being intrinsically wrong. I just think the bigger issue is that at some organizations, and organizations that like fast-track individuals, they're not going to see you as being fast-track. There going to see you on the slow road.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

ff Altman Job Search and Career Lessons from The Movies: The Graduate

Job Search and Career Lessons from The Movies: The Graduate | Job Search Radio


I use the memorable quote from, “The Graduate” to offer advice for job hunting and your career.

Summary

I've got a job search and a career lesson all rolled up into one conversation from the movie "The Graduate."

Now, if you've never seen this movie, it will seem a little dated right now but it was a famous 1960s movie. It was the first major part for the young actor named Dustin Hoffman who road that movie to a very successful career. And there's a scene where there's a graduation party his parents have thrown and one of his parents' friends walks over to him and tries to offer this profound advice to him. Here is the way the dialogue goes.

So this is the parents' friend. He says, "I just want to say one word to you. Just one word."

"Yes sir."

"Are you listening?"

"Yes, sir."

"Plastics."

And, you pause for a second and this is an hysterical moment in the movie. Like what the hell is he mean and the parent' s friend is trying to offer career advice that Benjamin should get into plastics as his life's work.

Now, let's apply this and simply now. And simply say there is always one hot thing that's going on and particularly if you are younger and it's great to get involved at the beginning of the career curve, at the beginning of the product curve, at the beginning of the lifecycle curve when you could afford more risk.

Now, let's apply this to more modern times. Plastics isn't a thing. It might have been social media. Any number of product offerings have been out there where people rode the ascendancy of the product lifecycle into great careers and great financials.

I'll simply say that a lot of people have loved the work, some have hated it but, at the end of the day, if you can afford to put yourself in the position of being the front end of a life cycle and taking the risk, there is a huge payoff at the back end.

Now, let's also take this example from plastics. Any one think of that as a hot product any more? Of course, not. And the same thing is true with others that have taken place between plastics and today where people have been involved with different hot areas.

So Wall Street. Hot area. Less hot now. Now, Silicon Valley is clearly far stronger. The point I want to make here is there are things that will be hot one day and not hot, another. Remember myspace? Yes, it's still alive and it serves a very distinct niche. Well, you always want to put yourself in the position where you are getting off the curb before it starts it's dissent.

So ride it up. Get it out before it's commoditized and don't linger there because once it's commoditized, you are disposable. There's no unique value to you.

Had Benjamin follow that advice and gotten into plastics, I'm sure he would have been laid off three times by now easily and certainly he'd be past retirement. Is that really what you want to be doing is getting laid off three times?

Ride the waves up and get off before they hit the plateau and then move on from there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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