Nurturing Your LinkedIn Network | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers ways to nurture your network on LinkedIn.

Summary

Most of the time when I talk about networking I talk about in person networking and how important that is. LinkedIn, of course, is critical for networking, too. It should be the primary place to spend your time for networking, but it should be a significant place that you spent networking.

When you network on LinkedIn, there are a few ways to do it. You have people that you are already connected to-- post status updates so that they wind up seeing them. Create video, podcasts, you can write articles using the LinkedIn publishing platform.

Let me go one by one.

Status updates. It gives them information about you and what you think. Don't treat It like Facebook. Do professional status updates.

Join groups. Instead of being argumentative in groups as you might on Facebook about different things, like people's comments. Most polite responses that and on 2 things people say. If you disagree with the comment, no arguments. Politely offered difference of opinion and go from there. Learn from other people and you will start making connections.

Writing for LinkedIn. In the status update area. There is a clearly marked box that says, "Right and Article." Blog to LinkedIn. When you are offered the opportunity to share your article,, share it to twitter. Share it to Google+. Sure at 1st your contacts on LinkedIn and then pause. Later that same day, share to the public on LinkedIn. Notice the comments that you get. The likes that you. At the end of the article, offer a way that people can get in touch with you and encourage them to connect with you on LinkedIn and give them a link to your LinkedIn profile. You'll find that people will start connecting to you and following you on LinkedIn. That's what you really want to start having happened. When they start commenting on your article, give them a like and the response. Polite! Professional. Courteous. No ridiculous arguing like you might on Facebook. No hard comments. You can be direct, but nothing argumentative. From there, later that same day and for a few days afterwards. share it with the public as well. Why? Because not everyone will see it the 1st time or even the 2nd time. Don't do with your connections, just with the public. With your connections, they have it in their inbox.. So don't worry about.

With the public, they are not going to see it all the time.. She wanted to come out in pulse a few times and that will give them an opportunity to see it.

Start working with building your network on LinkedIn and once you find this job, don't let up. Continue to do this and make it part of your routine. As I've said many times, the next recession is coming. I don't know when but there was going to be another recession. You're going to need to have your network know you and be willing to support you. This is how you start building those relationships or continue to foster relationships that will serve you for many years to come.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

LinkedIn Groups for Executive Job Hunters (VIDEO)


Job hunting for executives is a but different than for the non-executive population. Here is a simple strategy for LinkedIn groups that will serve you well.

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about LinkedIn groups for executive job hunters because I think they can be a great part of what can be a strategy of putting yourself in the position to be found and located, instead of needing to be, "aggressive." After all, it's not like using executive can go out in mass mailing resume to the Western Hemisphere like junior people can (but shouldn't). That is the easiest way to embarrass yourself.

With LinkedIn groups what you have the ability to do is join groups in areas of your expertise, areas of your business knowledge, Jerry is where people might be looking for someone like you. For example, joining a group that deals with private equity or joining a group that deals with a line of business that you are in. From there, look for key people in that group to drop a note to, not instantly (you don't want to do it in the same day that you join). Wait a week or 2. Participate.

Drop them a note that says, "Were both part of this group. I thought I would drop you a note and see if there was a place where I can help you and, perhaps, start a professional relationship with you. They'll accept and from there you can start formulating your contacts with them or your relationship with them over the course of time.

LinkedIn groups is very powerful in this way and is extremely underutilized by executives. Private equity groups in particular are a homerun for executive job hunters because from your vantage point, because you want to be perceived as being out aggressively looking. You want to be in a position where someone is looking for someone like you.

For example, I've always encourage people to go out on the speaker circuit and do keynotes. Put yourself in the situation where you are seen as the expert in what you do and you are presenting as the expert. A fun thing that you can do you share a photo of yourself at Ted Talk with 1 of the speakers. Lo and behold it's like their halo transfers over to you (By the way, be careful with politicians. These days, we never know how someone will respond to them).

Use groups to reach out to individuals on LinkedIn and put yourself in the position of being noticed so that you could share information, folks can find you easily and you can start developing relationship with decision-makers and influencers within your field. It will really help you catch up.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Don’t Forget This LinkedIn Feature | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you not to overlook this feature on LinkedIn.

Summary

Let's talk today about another feature of LinkedIn that tends to be neglected. It should be an obvious one. It isn't.

We tend to focus on LinkedIn as a networking site. We talk about groups. We talk about profiles. We forget one thing – – it is also a job board. It works differently than the traditional job boards. So let's start off by talking about its functionality.

You can set preferences for location. You can send multiple locations for where you are open to looking for a job. It will pull from your job title firms that have openings in your area or specified area that fit that job title. You can always scroll down and look further to consider firms within your network that are hiring.

You can look at jobs in 2 ways. One is by positions available within your geographic area that are consistent with your job title as well as firms within your network that have openings.

Ostensibly, that doesn't necessarily fit but is designed for individuals who, shall we say, are trying to network within an organization to tap into a hidden job market or it is designed to correlate with organizations that you want to do some networking in so that you can work back channel so that perhaps there could be an opening created for you.

Don't neglect the jobs area. Don't make it your primary recruiting source or jobhunting source. Make the primary part of LinkedIn (the networking capabilities) your primary focus. But don't forget about this 1, too.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn
You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The New LinkedIn Profile (VIDEO)


LinkedIn has changed its profile page. How should you change yours?

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about the new LinkedIn profile because it is a little bit different and it requires you to think a little bit differently about the visuals on the page.

When you look at the new profile now your initial reaction may be that looks pretty similar to the old one. However, notice how the summary area is now part of the opening box. Notice how the screen is initially somewhat limited as to what you are able to see. What it tells me is (1) , your headline has to be particularly good. It's going to include the name of your current company, plus the University that you attended. It doesn't tell anyone about your degree, but it just displays your most recent university, where you're located and how many network connections you have. LinkedIn always limits the number that they display in terms of the number of connections. I am someone with 17,000+1st level connections and they say 500+.

Here is one change so I thought was interesting. The summary is that is displayed is initially limited to 2 lines. There was the drop down to see more and what you would come to expect in the summary area from LinkedIn now appears that you now have to click the drop-down. It's now saying that the 1st 2 lines of your summary are most important.

There's another thing that's a little bit different. It has access to your most recent media posts in one way or another, who has viewed your profile and the number of your shares, articles that you've written and then and there is something that is not obvious-- on the most recent experience, it is they are in full. Previous jobs require that you use the drop down for anyone to see what is there. Your. Most recent job is what is being emphasized. Then, there were the number of people who have endorsed you and what I saw initially (and it is not apparent right now), the profile now really emphasizes the 1st 3. I've open this up, but I saw before that the 1st 3 items are the highlighted areas. I'm going to make a few shifts you to move up a few things because I have a number of them that are more relevant as result of changing my career to coaching.

Then, LinkedIn displays a few of your recommendations, accomplishments, but notice that it is limited now. Only a few are listed on everything else is a drop-down. I just to use organizations for networking group I belong to… That is the one that is there. One certification. There the rest of my books. Drop downs are much more prevalent on the page in the new LinkedIn profile. There are a few the groups I am a member of listed.

What it is telling me is (1) your most recent job is most important. (2) if you look off to the side. They want me to change my photo. They seem as though they're going to ask for updates from time to time.

The biggest change seems to be how they are displaying the summary where they are showing the 1st 2 lines of it instead of the whole thing unless you use the drop down, I want you to think in terms of what the 1st want to lines of your summary say and how you can presented most effectively on the profile. Perhaps the 1st 2 lines of your summary are keyword rich in order to emphasize the fact that that is something that people are visually seeing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter?

How To Contact Recruiters on LinkedIn (VIDEO)


It’s very easy to contact recruiters if you know how. That’s true of both agency and corporate recruiters. Here are explain how to do it

CORRECTION: I INCORRECTLY SPELLED “LUSHA” forgetting to include the “H”.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Give Yourself an Advantage on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE EZINE IS NOW, “NO BS COACHING ADVICE.”


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an easy to follow strategy to help you stand out from the pack on LinkedIn.

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about this simple strategy to stand out from people on LinkedIn.

The hard thing to do on LinkedIn is differentiating yourself from others. There are so many hundreds of millions of people on LinkedIn right now. With so many recruiters both agency and corporate recruiters searching, they are going to LinkedIn to find talent. How do you stand out?

Obviously, you have to write a great profile; I'm not going to talk with you about that today. I'm going to talk with you about using the feature that will help you look good when someone finds your profile. The feature that I'm referring to is endorsements.

Endorsements are different than the testimonials that have been around for years. Testimonials of those long, long descriptions of how wonderful human being you are, written by someone who knows you very well. They are like LinkedIn's version of a traditional reference. If you have someone write a testimonial for you . Who doesn't know you very well, it stinks. You don't want to have anyone right one for you. Who doesn't know your work very well.

Endorsements, on the other hand, is a function where you or they can select the option that you possess that they believe you should be endorsed for. All they have to do is click the checkbox. What is the impression is created if someone has no endorsements? What is the impression created if someone has 150 endorsements? Or 500+ endorsements? Or lots and lots of endorsements for different attributes?

If you go to my LinkedIn profile, you can search for my name (the headline under my name now says, "Helping People and Companies Play Big! Let Me Coach You."), What you will see is a whole bunch of endorsements of people and given to me.

I know recruiters aren't thought very highly of and I did that kind of work for more than 40 years. When you see someone like me with lots and lots of endorsements, that is unusual. Don't you think I wanted more me than someone who might have no endorsements? Or 2? Or 12? Of course you do.

Both with my brand, The Big Game Hunter, and with strategic use of endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn and on my website.

What you want to be doing is asking people who you are connected to, you know you professionally and personally, to endorse you for something that you do or have done and have strong skills. You do this not once or twice but repeatedly, particularly when you're not actively looking for work, will cause you to stand out.

The truth is you want people to be reaching out to you, not when you are looking for a job, desperate, out of work and looking for work. You want people reaching out to you when you are a "happy camper."

Why do I say that? It's really simple. Employers have a bias toward people who are working and who they perceive are not actively looking for work. That bias causes them to value those people at a higher level than the person that they find the job board. Third-party recruiters think the same thing, too. It's amazing! I could go into detail about why it's ridiculous, but, the long and the short of it is, what you want to do is be found. You want to be found by organizations there looking on LinkedIn and thinking that you are not someone who is actively looking for work and thought a very highly. That "thought a very highly part" comes from endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn.

So, if you have friends, if you are connected to people who are willing to do you a favor, ask them to endorse you, not write a testimonial for you. You will start noticing that the number of people reaching out to you to connect will start to take off.

NOTE: THE NAME OF THE ZINE IS NOW, "NO BS COACHING ADVICE."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Give Yourself an Advantage on LinkedIn | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an easy to follow strategy to help you stand out from the pack on LinkedIn.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about a simple strategy to stand out from people by using LinkedIn. The hard thing to do on LinkedIn is differentiating yourself from others.

There are so many hundreds of millions of people on LinkedIn right now and when corporate and third-party recruiters are out searching, they are going to LinkedIn to try to find talent. How do you stand out?

Obviously, you have to write a great profile. I'm not good discuss that today. I'm going to talk with you about a feature that will help you look good to someone who finds your profile. That feature is endorsements.

Endorsements are different than the testimonials that have been around for years. Testimonials are those long long descriptions of how about how wonderful you are and how terrific employee, you are, and written by someone who knows you very well. If you don't have someone who knows you very well right one, frankly, they stink. As a result, you don't want to have anyone right one for you unless they know you and your work very well.

Endorsements is different. Endorsements is a function were either you or they can select the skills that you possess that they believe you should be endorsed for. All they have to do is a checkbox. Nothing else.

What is the impression that is created when someone has no endorsements? What is the impression that someone has created when they have 150 endorsements? Or 500 endorsements? Or lots and lots of endorsements for different attributes of their work? So if you go to my page at www.linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter what you'll find is a lot of endorsements That people have given to me. I know most recruiters aren't thought very highly of. So if you see someone with lots and lots of endorsements from people, don't you tend to think more of me than someone who has two? Or none? Or 12? Of course you do!

You become curious and that is become 1 of the ways that I drive people to me over the years is with my brand, The Big Game Hunter, and with the strategic use of endorsements and testimonials on LinkedIn and on my website, jeffaltman.com.

What you want to be doing is asking people who you are connected to, That you know professionally or personally, to endorse you for something that you have strong skills with. Don't just ask people once or twice, do it repeatedly, particularly when you are not actively looking for work, is going to cause you to stand out.

The truth is, you want people reaching out to you when you are not actually out there looking for a job, rather than when you are desperate and begging for a job. Why do I say that? Employers have a bias toward people who are working who they perceive are not actively looking for a job. That bias causes them to value those people at a higher level than the person that they find on a job board. 3rd parties think the same way, too, it's amazing! I can go into more detail about why it's ridiculous, but no long and short of it is what you want to do is be found. You want to be found by organizations that are looking on LinkedIn and thinking that you are not someone that is actively looking for work AND you are thought of very highly. That "thought of very highly" part is where endorsements and testimonials come in.

As I said, if you have friends, . If you are connected to people and they are willing to do you a favor. Have them endorse you, not write a testimonial for you. You will start noticing the number of people reaching out to you to connect with you is going to grow.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

7 DAY FREE TRIAL WHEN YOU JOIN

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The Most Underutilized Feature on LinkedIn (VIDEO)

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

FROM THE ARCHIVES

 

Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter offers advice about using the most underutilized feature of LinkedIn as part of your job search.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 1 of the most underutilized features on LinkedIn – – applications. But we're talking about applications. Were not talking about applying for jobs. We are talking about programs that are built into LinkedIn to provide additional services that are available for you to use for free. They may allow you to do something very simple-- put a resume on your LinkedIn profile. Put work samples or presentations that you've done. Useful information that people can pick up on on your LinkedIn profile.

Have you written a book? You can make reference to it on your LinkedIn profile. Applications are more than just things like this. It is a way that LinkedIn tries to be more social than their base product tends to be.

For your convenience, why don't have that presentation that you did 2 years ago, those powerpoints as part of your presentation, available on your LinkedIn profile to slideshare. Why not make it easier for people to find your resume by having it on your profile? They can actually see how you eat your backroom fits the job that they are recruiting for.

That's my reminder for today. Come over and look at LinkedIn profiles and spend some time playing around with the applications and see how they fit you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for most job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

When Applying on LinkedIn, Should You Also InMail the Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

Before listening, answer the question for yourself and then learn the best way.

Summary

"When employing for a job on LinkedIn, should I also inMail the person who posted it as well?"

I go crazy when I hear the stuff because the answer was invariably come down to how someone would be perceived. They are seen as being savvy if they did this.  You must really like the company. If you follow up with an inMail.  Man!  This is all the propaganda that LinkedIn tries to put out and it isn't true! 

Here is what you want to do.  You see a firm that is advertising on LinkedIn. There is a name of their, right?  Don't go through the conveyor belt.  Don't get on the conveyor belt where your resume is delivered to the applicant tracking system.  Instead, here is what you do.

You call up the firm, get the extension of that individual or the direct dial number and you call them.  You say to them, "I was doing some networking and someone mentioned you might be trying to hire someone with…" And you describe the role.  "I don't know if that's true or not but if it is I would like to talk with you about the position and see how I might be able to be of help."  That's if you are taking the "semi-better way."  That is, generally, HR people run advertising on LinkedIn.

Here is the better way.  Try to locate the hiring manager at that firm.  How do you do that?  You try to figure out the title and go to the corporate page and see if you are connected to other people who might be at that firm.  Not connected on the corporate page?  There are chrome extensions that will help you.

For example, there is one called Prophet that will help you identify people and their email addresses.  By the way, with these, they will help you with email addresses. But what you also try to do is do Google searches to identify people at that firm because Google will search for public profiles of individuals.

Here is a simpler way.  There is a site whose address is LI-USA.info.  It is a Google custom search engine that only searches LinkedIn public profiles in the United States.  So you might just simply search by name of the company.  Then see if you might detect the title structure from the responses.  Let's say the person is with Facebook or Goldman Sachs or Centerville or whomever it is.  See if you can detect the title structure from the responses you start.  Then, from their used tools like PROPHET, Connectifier, Lusha… These are chrome extensions that will help you find people. Candidate.ai is another one.

What you are trying to do is to find the people within an organization who might be the hiring manager.  You might just simply say, "Hi!  I understand it might be a particular position open for a such and such. Would you happen to know who the hiring manager is?"  

"No, I don't know"

"Is there someone you might be able to point me to who might be able to help and give me an idea of who the right person might be?"

Again, what you are trying to do is find the right individual at that organization who can help with finding the person and network your way into her direct contact.  Yes, it involves some more work, but let's be practical.  If you get on the conveyor belt of the applicant tracking system, do you remember what that is called?  The black hole.  What is the point of going through that exercise?

Instead, follow through by trying to find the hiring manager and connecting with them, instead of going to getting on the conveyor belt to your resume's demise.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How Can I Change My Location on LinkedIn | Job Search Radio

I am looking for a job out-of-state but I am being contacted by firms locally.

Summary

Someone asked this question of me:

"How can I tell LinkedIn. I am looking for work in another state?"  

"It always notifies me of jobs in my current state where I live and work.  I even get lots of recruiters contacting me for local work.  I want to have job show up from another state and have recruiters contact me for working in another state.  Other sites let me do this. How do I do it on LinkedIn?"

I want to start by saying people who have LinkedIn Recruiter accounts generally are not reading profiles.  They are running searches and the searches will indicate, just like a job board, where the person is,… You actually have to read the profile which a lot of people don't do.  They are just bulk email.  They're trying to reach out to people with particular skills and qualifications.  In addition, LinkedIn has its own search agents that are trying to forward jobs to you. You need to start changing the formula for your profile.

Just as an aside, in the summary area of your LinkedIn profile. I would include a statement that you are only looking for work in such and such area.  In addition, provide your phone number there.  Why?  For those who don't have a LinkedIn Recruiter account who who are using the free version or 1 of the lesser versions of LinkedIn to recruit people, at least you are trying to tell them.  If they choose to ignore you, you have no control over that.  Also, keyword the state, the city or cities that you are looking in, because once people are searching, they may be searching by a particular metro area.  For example, if you are looking for something in the New York area or Madison, Wisconsin. The bay area, LinkedIn has terms to refer to those places.  You may want to include those as part of the searches so that people will find you when they are doing a standard for research.

On the paved areas, you want to be attracted to people you go to the advanced search function set your location to, "located in or near" followed by the city or ZIP Code that you are looking for.  Using the example of New York, locate yourself in or near 10016.  That will take you to the heart of Manhattan and people will do searches (remember, this is how LinkedIn works) within a certain radius of that ZIP Code.  ZIP Code is always the preferable way, but because LinkedIn is having people search within a certain radius of the ZIP Code.  That's the easiest way to do it.  Again, just to repeat, use the advanced search function and set the location to located in or near followed by the ZIP Code, preferably you are looking for.

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

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