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Is It Normal? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the question as to whether a situation is normal when his employer extends someone and want them to verbally accept a job offer before they put the offer in writing. The offer mentioned on the show is no longer valid.
Summary

Is it normal for a company to refuse sending details of an offer by email before I verbally accept an offer?

This person is orally received an offer, they want to get an offer letter, there wondering why they don't have the letter as of yet. Is it normal for me to say yes and then have the letter sent?

The answer is, "Yes," it is normal. The reason is, why should they go through all the final approvals, have admin type something, send it to you only to find out that you are not going to accept the job offer? Isn't that kind of pointless from your standpoint? I sure know it's pointless from their standpoint.

While the offer letter does is confirm what you have already been told. You are going to be paid a certain amount, that you might be eligible for a bonus, the offer is contingent upon you successfully completed a background check, etc. etc.

If they lied to you, no one is asking you to quit your job until you have the offer letter. All the offer letter does is confirm what you have been told. If you were them, harnessing manpower/woman power or however you want to describe it to process this offer letter and you intend to turn it down, what was the point anyway?

They want to hear the acceptance from you 1st, then do all the mechanics to deliver a letter for you. It is completely normal.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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What Is The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview? (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what the best question is to ask for any interview and went to ask it.

Summary

I've referred to the single Best question you should ask on any interview and I did a Google hangout about it some time ago.The image isn't all that good (it was 1 of my 1st hangouts) so I decide to we do that video here.

What is the single Best question you should ask on any interview and when should you ask? Real simple. Let me start off with what the typical interview seems like. It starts with them going, "Tell me about yourself." Then you do. And then you play interview karate for a while. They throw up a question that you that feels like a punch and you have to block it away. They throw another one about you and you have to use I a hip check to throw them over your shoulder. Back and forth and back and forth..

If you are in a profession where there in-depth questions that could be asked, they will get to that until finally they will say, "So, do you have any questions for us?" You say, "Tell me about the job.." They do that.. You do that and say, "That's interesting!" They say, "Great! Will get back to you." That's the typical interview.

Let me tell you what the single Best question is and when to ask it. You walk in and sit down and as you lower your butt into the chair, Before they have a chance to speak, you say, "I appreciate that you made time to meet with me today. I reviewed the position description and it was really interesting to me. But I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

BOING!

What that does is, instead of waiting until the end of the interview to ask them about the job, you do it at the beginning of the interview before they get role in.. You do that because, at the end of the interview, there is really nothing that you can do with that information. But sometimes, even if you see the job description, they've often changed it a little bit, Your thoughts have morphed, they start looking at it differently and they've never change the formal requirements. So even if you got this description from a recruiter, it may be slightly different or even wrong.

Thus by asking this question,, "I took a look at the job description and was really interesting to me,, but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help you?" You get the information at the beginning when you can use it. Thus, every time they are asking you a question, you want to tailor your answer to what matters to them and not just talk about what you've done, but talk about what you've done that relates to what they are looking for from you.

This gives you a huge advantage from your competition which is sitting there like lumps waiting until the end to ask about the job. Now, you get this information at the beginning when you can use it.

Ah! There is one small problem. Now that you can't ask about the job at the end, you need to be prepared with questions to replace the one about the job, right? Here's what you do.

When they ask you, "So, do you have any questions for us here," you say, "The job seems great to me. I'm really interested. I do have a few questions. Is my 1st question: let's say I join, what would your expectations be, what would I be doing over the 1st 30, 60 and 90 days after I join?"

If you find out there are unreasonable expectations, isn't it better for you to know before you join? That's one question you can ask.

Here's the 2nd one that I have also shared in another video and podcast. "Let's say I join and it is a year from now. I have a just done a good job, It's been the best, or at least 1 of the best you have seen someone perform. What what I've accomplished during that year that would cause you to write such a review?"

BOING!

Right off the bat, It lets them know that you are interested in doing great work, not average work. Again, it's giving them an idea of you AND it's giving you the idea of what you are going to be doing over that 1st year that would cause you to be extraordinary employee.

It's a great question. I hope you like it. I hope you use these your interviews.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Hiring Someone? You and Your Team Don’t Know What You’re Doing.

Hiring Someone? You and Your Team Don’t Know What You’re Doing

When I worked in search, I filled more than 1200 positions plus consulting assignments. I interviewed clients about how they evaluated and assessed potential hires and did tens of thousands of post-interview debriefings with people who were interviewed. I also followed up with people who joined my clients to learn about disconnects between what they were told and what the reality was.

Here’s what we know.

Employee engagement rates are ridiculously low despite all of the effort that has gone into employee engagement. One statistic I saw indicated that half the workforce was actively disengaged with their work. The percentage of employees who were engaged with their work is Employee Engagementat 32% according to the most recent Gallup survey I found. That means that two thirds of the work force in the US is ambivalent or actively disengaged. And the US is the best in the world at this!

On the other hand, I have seen an interesting statistic about hiring managers and “buyer’s remorse.” Jeff Hyman from “The Strong Suit Podcast” and I discussed the fact that somewhere between 50% and 65% of hiring managers think they made a mistake hiring someone on their staff within the first year of the first year of a person joining (Jeff H stated it at 50%; I’ve seen it at 65%. You pick the percentage you want between those two percentages).

Why is hiring so broken?

Hiring is BrokenI think there are many reasons that when added together explain the problem. Starting off with

  1. Poor job descriptions. Job descriptions are pulled out of HR systems or copied from websites as the foundation for the approval process. That job description may be good enough to get an approval but may not be a clear depiction of what is needed to be qualified and succeed in the job. Thus, capable people screen themselves out of consideration because the job description doesn’t really accurately represent the job.
  2. Lack of clarity as to how to evaluate of skills competence. Have you ever been involved with an interview when your boss says, “I’ve got another 25 minutes on this call. Talk to them and tell me what you think.” Happens all the day. There’s one problem. The person covering may be told which job they are screening for (This is for Jerry’s replacement) but isn’t told what knowledge and experience their boss really wants.
  3. Everyone is putting on a good façade. We all know job hunters are selling themselves and their knowledge and presenting it in the best light We politely call that, “Exaggerating.” When we are impolitely, it is referred to as “lying.” We forget that hiring managers lie, too. No person being interviewed ever told me that, while on their interview, their future boss said to them, “You know, I just took over this position and the last three people who have held it were fired in the first 9 months. The last four people who interviewed for the job you are up? They quit within 120 days. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out that my butt is on the line and I need someone to help me save it!” No, they put on a happy smile button face and talk about how your predecessor quit for a better opportunity (Translation: Any opportunity would be better than this!) and that they want to hire someone exceptional, a team player (Translation: Someone who won’t question what I tell them and will be completely compliant) . . . Did I mention we’re like family? (Translation: Maybe a family like the ones we are shown in modern Thanksgiving and Christmas movies that want to remove one another’s lungs by sticky their hand down their throat). Yes, hiring managers (and recruiters) lie.
  4. They attempt to hire for fit. So we know job hunters are on good behavior and so are employers and their teams. How are you and the job hunter figuring out this person will fit? Have you administered profiling tests to your staff before you started interviewing? After all, they change and grow while working for you. You need to test them prior to hiring anyone in order to be accurate and not just rely on the test administered to them when they joined 4 years ago. You don’t do that? Oh! You’re trying to figure it out for yourself using little more than deciding that “I like them.”

 

Well, given that at best half of your hires engender buyer’s remorse, you could just save a lot of time and just flip a coin. After all, you have no training or expertise to do this. You are just “projecting qualities” onto this person based upon their “act” and deciding how they will fit in with your team or company.

And by being as phony as the job hunter, you and your team are hiring people who are ambivalent or actively dislike working for you and your company.

Here’s 5 things you can do.

  1. Get clear about what you are looking for. Stop being lazy about writing your job descriptions. Get clear about what people need to know and stop piling nonsensical criteria on top of your core requirements.Hiring Someone? You and Your Team Don’t Know What You’re Doing.
  2. Be clear about how you will evaluate and assess people. To avoid bias leaking into interviewing, create prearranged core questions everyone will be asked. Follow up questions make take you down a different road but the core questions have to be the same.
  3. Stop lying about the opportunity. The last person left because they were dead-ended. If statistics bear out, you won’t be there long enough to betray them because you are going to change jobs. Tell them that you want them there for 2 years. After that time, if they want to leave, you will open up your phone and start making calls to your network and help them get a more satisfying role. Until then, you want them “all in.”
  4. Stop hiring for fit. The numbers prove it. Employee engagement is terrible. Admit that you don’t know what you’re doing and just flip a coin.
  5. Tell people the truth about what they are stepping into. Tell them about the demands upon their time, emotions and health. Hide nothing. If they join, they knew what they were getting involved with.

 

HR organizations claim a science exists to employee engagement yet if this is science then I am Louis Pasteur (look him up). Employee engagement fails from the very first time an employee meets with your firm.

If you want a more effective model for evaluating people, read “It Starts With Courage.” 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017        

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search AdviceJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.  

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