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Tough Interview Questions: Hedge Fund Brainteaser: The Number of “T’s”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provide to another deflection brainteaser involving the number of “T’s.”

Summary

I've got a brainteaser for you! As I've said in previous videos,, I happen to enjoy deflection brainteasers and today I have one as a deflection twist to it. Here is the scenario.

Tommy Tucker took 2 strings and tied 2 turtles to 2 tall trees. How many "t's" are in that?

The 1st sentence is completely irrelevant. It is a deflection. It's the one that says, "Look at that hand, but don't look at the other hand." That's what a deflection brainteasers does. You see, the real question is, "How many "t's" are in that?"

The answer is two. There are 2 "t's" in that. That's how you answer the question.

Because of the set up for the question, there is a set up for a joke, the set up. Here the set up is the sentence about Tommy Tucker. All they care about are how many "t's are in that.

They are not using the word. They are just asking how many "t's are in that.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Appearing Needy

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Appearing Needy


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Interviewing is a lot like dating and this mistake shows up in dating and in interviewing.

Summary

This is about 1 of those stupid interview mistakes that people commit much too often. It's about "appearing needy." I pick that phrase intentionally; I could've said, "seeming desperate" by don't think it's quite the same as in the dating situations where desperation sets in. "I need to meet a man." "I need to meet a woman." "I'm just going to act desperate until I need someone."

It doesn't work in dating and appearing needy (which to me is a more gentle version of desperation that shows up in job search) doesn't work in interviewing either. The reason is that you're not inspiring confidence that you the solution that a firm is looking for when they are trying to hire someone. Let me explain.

When someone saw their game, when they have belief in themselves, they speak with the certainty and confidence that they know what they're talking about. They may be the biggest bozo on the planet but there is a certainty that they convey in their manner that often becomes believable. When you are needy, when you are desperate, you are talking a way that communicates your anxiety, there is a jumpiness to your matter that makes people nervous. No one likes to feel nervous. They want to feel like they are hiring the solution to their problem, not hiring someone else's headache. The result is that when you act needy, you turn them off because you don't make them feel confident and certain that you are the right choice.

Don't be foolish about this thing. If you need to do breathing exercises, do them. If you need to reduce your appearance of neediness by practicing more, that's best of all. I find it with the people that I coach, the more comfortable people are with the material that they are presenting or conveying to an audience, the more confident they are when they present and more desirable they are to the audience that there presenting to.

Do your homework. Do it for a while. You just cram for this exam and suddenly pull it off because you're going to know inside that you're not really on your game and that isn't how you want to be carried yourself.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: How Do You Get In The Zone (VIDEO)

I think this is a ridiculous question, but someone was asked her last week.  There’s more than one way to answer the question.

Summary

Almost every day, early like this, I go online to talk with people about some element of job search. That's because I believe jobs hunting doesn't have to be hard, difficult, painful or take a long time. To me, the skills needed to find a job are different than those needed to do a job.

Today, I thought I would answer 1 of those tough interview questions I get asked on interviews. If you're interested in hearing more of my answers, I'm doing a year of shows about interviewing on my podcast, "No BS Job Search Advice Radio." That's available in iTunes, stitcher and other podcast services.

The question for today is, "How do you get in the zone?"

I'll simply say that this is a dumb question. It would never be as to the senior person. It tends to be asked of staff level people. How do you get in the zone? It's really very simple. What you have noticed on your way in what's the energy like in the office that you are interviewing with. Is there a buzz? Is it loud? Or is a quiet? What is it like energetically?

If you haven't noticed it, you have to take a cautious approach. Again, if this is something that is true of you, you talk about, "I love working in place with high-energy." Or, "I love working in a quiet place. When I get in the zone, I'm really locked in and the distraction of other noise . . . "Do you see where I am going?

If you haven't noticed it on the way in, you say something all bit more ambivalent or wishy-washy for lack of a better term. It's basically hedging your answer.

The way you say it, is something along the lines of, "hey look, I have worked in a lot of different places and I had been able to key in very well and perform at a high level. What is my preference? I like working with smart people." Thus, you deflect off of working or talking about the energy level in the office and focusing on that.

Again, either mirror what you walked into. Or, you hedge, and that get you off the hook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Should I Get Another Degree?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question on Quora that was directed to him about whether to pursue an additional college degree.

Summary

"I am getting a BS, BA with a specialization in information systems technology with the goal of working in the tech sector. Should I specialize in finance, as well? What it is a great deal of value?" There is a small note between the question. "My goal of work in finance after graduation has changed."

I'm going to assume that the goal of working in finance has disappeared. The person has become more interested in working in tech, much more than working in finance.

What I will simply say is, "No. Don't go for the additional major." It is completely irrelevant for your goals. If finance happens to be something that really interests you, do it. However, I think there is a point where you hit overload and overkill. The idea of getting an education in things that are secondary, tertiary or unimportant to you is unnecessary.

Get to work on preparing yourself for your career after graduation. Work at getting yourself some great internships. Part of that is that the idea of testing out your beliefs about working in technology.

So often, students have fantasy ideas about what is really like to work and particular fields. You're better off using your internship to explore your notions and to see whether this is something that would really make sense for you.

Again, to answer succinctly, if your goal is not to work in finance, don't bother.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Answering “The Hypothetical Question” (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Hypothetical questions are a rat hole leading you into a trap. Here, I explain how to handle them.

Summary

Imagine that you are on an interview, you are talking with someone who is there to evaluate you, and they say to you those magic words, "What would you do if . . . "Then they paint some sort of scenario.

You and I both know that there was a lot more that they haven't told you that they can drop in your head like a bomb later once you've answered the question based upon what limited information they have given you. How do you not feel at this question?

I think the answer comes down to talking about the process. Start by saying, "I'm sure there is a lot more texture than what you have told me so far. As a result, I think what might be most effective is how it might go about evaluating how to figure out the solution rather than offer you an actual solution. As a result, what I want to talk with you about is (1) identifying the constituencies will be affected by this; (2) then go through the process of evaluation.

They may say, "No, it is as simple as what we've asked." Okay, and as you start to answer, and they start throwing in more grenades into the situation, you pause for a second and say, "This is why it is so important to engage in the process because I would need to flush up additional things that can surface in the course of discovery. "

"I know I've had people come to me who are on my staff and were complaining about someone else and they wanted me to resolve it. Or, I have a user that I support who is having a problem with someone on my staff and they want me to fix them because they are not doing their job. But what I have to do is understand what it is that is wrong and go into some detail and speak with that person and going to some detail and, then, from there, your perspective on from everyone side, including some of the ones who have been affected by the blows who are affected by the different parties involved so that in this way I can actually solve it."

"Answering 2 lines of 'what would you do if' doesn't really give me any texture; talking to everyone does. Talking to not just simply the ones that they recommend but some of the others will."

So that's how I would go about answering it. That's how I recommend you do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Tough Interview Questions: How Did You Learn To Think?

Tough Interview Questions: How Did You Learn to Think? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 882 This is a question that start ups and small organizations might ask to see if they are interviewing a creative thinker or just another employee. There is no one right answer.

Summary

This is 1 of those tough interview questions I enjoy helping people with. This 1 is a little unusual. Frankly, it's with a question I've only heard asked one time and I thought was a great question for today. The question is, "How did you really learn to think for yourself?"

Lord knows, if you grew up in the United States or India or many other countries where there is a lot of rote learning that goes on, frankly, you didn't learn to think in the school system. You learn to shut up, do what you're told regurgitate a bunch of stuff, do what you were told, deliver product... It's like you would trade for the workforce except you are in school. Those were the basic lessons of school. Then you get to University it's much the same thing. There is an implicit threat in the school system that you won't get into a good college. What you're good college, the threat is that you will get a good job. When you get the good job, the threat is that you will get fired in one day were fired anyway.

The systems are basically set up where there is a fear motivation. You've got to deliver products. That's not thinking. How did you learn to think? What's the story where you broke out-of-the-box or the cage and start to think on your own. I'm not saying you didn't take the frameworks you were given previously. But, think about it for second.. I know most of you haven't really been put into this position before.

Maybe was a mentor while you were at University. Maybe was apparent who, basically, instead of giving you an allowance, but you work for it. Whatever it is, you've got to tell that story and contrasted with how you now understand the school systems were trying to prepare you for the world of work.

A company that is going to ask this type of the question is more of a start up environment. It is not going to be a big monstrous bureaucracy because they like the conformity, right? I don't care if you are talking about the most successful investment firm known to mankind or a consumer products firm.. They tend to like this systems approach that you have been conditioned for.

But, think about it. For the startup with smaller organization, being asked how did you learn to say or how did you learn to think for yourself is really the pivotal question that many of them need to ask and you need to be prepared to answer.

I'm not an offer you a solution to this 1 because really needs to be a unique story for you. In answering the question,. You need to contrast Yorks current circumstances with the conditioning that you've received.
Using myself as an example, I would talk about, "I grew up in New York at the public school system. I was conditioned to be a nice conforming individual and they understood that. Along the way, I became involved with local politics. I start to think independently at that point. I saw to see the world for how it was not how I was being told it was."

I will continue by telling the story of how in the course of doing that work, in the course of being involved. I start to look at things in a different sort of way. I start to go crazy as I start to work in the search business and have basically where is being used for was finding nice conforming people for nice conforming jobs. You get where I'm coming from here.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Always Be on the Prowl Always be Looking for a Job (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of being in continual job search mode instead of lurching from one job search to another.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about something that really annoys me.  It should annoy you, too.

I have worked with people day in and day out for years who make a critical mistake with their careers.  That mistake is treating their careers as though they can lurch from looking for a job  in one year and then 3 years later looking for another job and not having done anything in the middle.

This may sound goofy to you but for me out.  It would be so much easier for folks if they treated their careers as having value and did things between cycles of changing jobs to prepare for that job change.

I remember in 2007 being home one day and listening to CNN use the term "subprime mortgage" heavily that day as the crisis started to unfold. I start toward people that they need to put their networks in place proactively because we were going to learn a lot more about subprime mortgages over the next 12 to 24 months.  I was more right than I could've imagined.

The people go out and start building networks.  At that time?   No.  Did I start to do things along those lines?  Yes, but not as much as I could have.  I tried though because I understood that things were going to change and I need to have a network in place to help me ride through what I knew would be a tough time.  Not as tough as it turned out, but still a very tough time.

You need to not lurch from one job change to another  and say,  "oh my God! I have to build the network!" You need to be working on your brand and ongoing network consistently So that people are thinking of you, so that recruiters are reaching out to you, so that you are seen as a subject matter expert all the time, not every 3 years, not every job change or However long that may wind up being, but all the time so that you are a go to person in your field.

I don't care what the field is.  You can make all the excuses in the world,, but there are people who are seen as experts in  low level jobs who firms will reach out to because they learn something about that person you can be doing that for your self..  And, because no one is ever going to look out for you is much as you do, you need to spend as much time looking out for yourself.  As the board of your big company does when it looks out for its firms, financial interests.

Think of yourself as being the chairman of the board of your organization.  Think of yourself  as having board members reporting into you; those Board members  are your family.Do you want them to worry? Do you want them to have  concern about the viability of your enterprise .  If the economy suddenly go south?  Of course, not.

You want to constantly be doing things to position yourself so that if you want to leave a firm  that you are working for or transfer internally, people are dying to try to hire you.

I was speaking with someone yesterday who works for a large technology firm.  He had a successful track record with that firm until one day the firm hired someone that he did not describe in favorable terms.  Other departments within the organization clamored to get him.   He chose an option only to have it taken over by the person he didn't have a lot of affection for when his hiring manager left for another opportunity.

He now has to go outside of his firm  in order to advance.  People know him.   Vendors to his firm are starting to clamber to hire him because they hold in high regard.

You should be in a position like he is where firms want to hire you because they know you.  Put yourself in a position to be found, not just simply  whenever you're changing jobs but all the time.   Get active..  Get involved with groups locally for your field.  Get involved with the Chamber of Commerce.  Do stuff.  Just get yourself out there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Sh*t Recruiters Say


More sh*t recruiters Say

The good stuff that will help you find work is located at TheBigGameHunter.us

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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