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Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | Job Search Radio

“Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I”m almost 60 and the options are slim?”

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of No BS Job Search Advice  and Job Search Radio” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search

Will My Own Project Help Me Land a Job? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers this question from Quora about whether a person Will have an advantage finding a job by doing a special project.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Bran or Bacon: Thoughts About Your Career AI and Machine Learning

Bran or Bacon: Thoughts About Your Career AI and Machine Learning

“One of the greatest handicaps is to fear a mistake. You have stopped yourself. You have to move freely in the arena, just not to wait for the perfect situation, the perfect moment . . . If you have to make a mistake, it is better to make a mistake of action than one of inaction. If I had the opportunity again, I would take chances.”

                                                                                                                                                                       ~Federico Fellini

 

I enjoy an occasional piece of bacon. I like sausage more but great bacon is something special for me. I live life as a bran guy and that shows up in how I have managed my career. I have been careful and cautious making very few jobs changes (5 companies in 40+ years) before moving into coaching.

That was a big change because it was all on me. I couldn’t lament that the firm that contracted for me was not providing adequate resources or that my co-workers were difficult. All choices are mine. But the funny thing is that they always were mine. I just wasn’t paying attention.

I was always pretty good at recognizing trends early. I bought my first computer in 1983 and included a modem to communicate with people in the pre-Internet days. I am LinkedIn member 7653 because I spotted something in the idea that was intriguing.

When I started my first search firm, I started to network with other recruiters in New York and did very well sharing fees Bran or Baconwith others. For those of you in IT, this was a time when “hot technology” was OS/COBOL and firms were starting to use CICS. Yes, it was a long time ago.

One of my affiliates called me one day and started to lament, “I’m going out of business. I have all these great OS/COBOL people and clients want them with CICS.” “Well, get them with CICS”

“But I have these great OS/COBOL people!”

“Who cares? Your clients sure don’t.”

He was out of business within 6 months of our call.

Folks, many of you have “safe careers” that will be replaced by AI.

How many of you have even considered the potential impact of artificial intelligence on your work?

I am pretty confident that even if you have thought about it for the 30 seconds or so most of you think about things, you have done nothing to start looking ahead to make plans for yourself and your career.

AI is still in its infancy and there is a lot ahead that will still need to be sorted out. Listening to a podcast recently, I heard one vendor firm discuss intelligence was now looking at videos to recognize truthfulness and confidence in what is being said. Decisions were being made as a result of this. Your answers to interview questions on video are being used to compare your answers with those of successful performers in their firm. You may delight in thinking that recruiters will be wiped out by this (they won’t) but trust me when I tell you that the same firms that sent jobs offshore (almost all) will be using AI to eliminate many of those jobs and yours.

If you are younger than 50, you need to be alert to the dynamics in your field because many of you will be obsolete in the next decade or so based upon AI/Machine learning.

Don’t think it can happen to you?

I remember having to go to a bank and stand online to hand a check to a teller who manually verified my signature byBran or Bacon looking at my signature card and deciding that it matched and then cashed my check. We now don’t like interacting with tellers, preferring the convenience of machines.

Being bran won’t help you be safe. Thinking bacon will. The choice shouldn’t be safe or sorry. There are other choices you have, too.

And don’t worry about professional cholesterol. You will wind up in the same place if you play it safe with professional bran instead of trying the sizzling professional bacon.

 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017    

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunterwork involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching from me?  Maybe you want me to critique your resume and/or LinkedIn profile or help you with a negotiation. Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

The Best Way to Research a Salary at a Firm | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/02/everyone-tells-you-to-research-your-value-but-no-one-tells-you-how-in-this-video-i-discuss-the-best-way-to-do-your-research/

Everyone tells you to research your value but no one tells you how. In this video I discuss the best way to do your research.

Summary

Do you know how people always tell you that you have to research your value before you start looking for a job? No one ever tells you how. They just tell you that you have to find out what your value is that it never teaches a method of doing it. So I want to teach you from modern times the best way to do it.

Back in The Stone Ages when I started out in recruiting, you would look at newspaper ads particular positions and will start noticing the salary ranges. We start to take an average of the salaries and discover what your value is. A lot of ants however no longer includes salary. Recruiter ads do but sometimes those numbers a little bit exaggerated. because they are trying to draw people in and then talk them down.

Here's what I want to suggest in this is, truthfully, the best way that you can do it. Let's say you have an interview scheduled that a large banking firm. Get into LinkedIn, look at people who are doing, for example, programming for a similar application to the one that you're doing now (or for the kind of work that you're being interviewed for who work for that firm), using keyword searches, and then, reach out to them directly (don't go to LinkedIn).

Just call and simply say, "Hi! Is this so-and-so? My name is such and such and frankly I'm interviewing for position. I get 4 minutes of your time to pick your brain about something? How do you like working there? Do you like working there are you wrestling with some things?"

Most of the time to tell you it's a great experience. "Terrific! Could I trouble you to ask, because you know what I interviewed to ask the salary that I'm looking for and have reached out to a few people... I'm not can it tell you who... Just try to be polite and maintain their confidentiality, I'm just very simply asking whether it's a good environment to work in and give me an idea of the salary that they are earning so that in this way, I don't shoot to Holly or should too low."

You will get a little bit of pushback because in the US, most people are uncomfortable talking about salary. If more more people do it, it's going to become more and more of a common practice and take away the power employers have by having the only knowledge of what pay scales are. That's really the corporate advantage. Let me tell you a quick story.

Yesterday, on Facebook, there was a corporate recruiter who put out a message to third-party recruiters. He was facing a dilemma where he was interviewing someone who seemed good for job, but they just wouldn't say the salary; they just wouldn't give it up. He "punted" to the hiring manager with her notes about her lack of flexibility.

I commended the guy initially for not following the traditional line of just rejecting the person. I recognize that, from his vantage point, he feels like he is in a bind because his job is to bring on some of the lowest level possible and the person's job is to get the highest amount possible. When you're doing your research, you want to take note of the ranges that people are earning and what the differences are in the work that they do. Just because one person is making $95,000 and another one is making $125,000 doesn't mean that you are worth the $125,000.

Look at what they do versus what you are being asked to do and see how a firm might value it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Tell Me About a Mistake You Made and What You Learned From It (For Recent Grads)

Tell Me About a Mistake You Made & What You Learned From It (for Recent Grads)

EP 883 “Tell me about a mistake you’ve made and what you’ve learned from it,” is one of those classic interview questions asked by interviewers.  Here, the answered is tailored for the recent graduate.

Summary

This is one of those classic interview questions that people are asked.

"Tell me about the mistake you made and what you learn, from it."
ir
Now the problem with this for recent grads is the just aren't a lot of choices, at least ones that you think of sound good to an interviewer.
.
So I wanted to give you a suggestion for answering this question . . . .and it's an easy one. It may not be truthful but work with me here!

"When I was in school or in high school and I really wanted to get into a particular school, I also wanted to have a lot of friends. So I made choices that weren't ideal for me to get those grades and boy did it hurt when I didn't get into (pick the name of the school) that would have really been happy with.

I really want to get you to give them the idea here that you learn from your mistakes and that you are not a whiner. It's not just enough to talk about the mistake that you made; it's important to talk about what you learned from it because that's the thing that they are fishing for are. Are you someone who's just a whiner and complainer or are you someone who learns from the experiences and takes the lessons in.

So I really wanted to get into the University of Chicago, Penn, Harvard, Stanford whatever and I really wanted to do that but in I was that stage in life is really in that stage of life where I want to have friends.

What I learned from that is to put my best effort in whatever I was doing.

I had this fantasy that I could can get in there without putting in the work and boy was I wrong. I really learned that if I want to get something I can go half effort into it. I have got to go at 100% effort. I have really got to give it my all in order to givemyself the best chance. Itis certainly possible that I might not havegotten to the schools but I will never know because I never really tried hard enough to in.

I didn't understand that I could lose. What I've learned is always, without a doubt, put my best effort into whatever I'm trying to do.

I have another video that talks about how to answer this question when you have more professional experience.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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