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6 Steps to Resigning Your Job (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the six steps to take to resign your job properly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Cover letters that stand out

Cover Letters That Stand Out (VIDEO)


I’m adding an extra twist to what you may be doing with your cover letter that will help you standout from the pack

Summary

Over the years, I've created plenty of videos about writing cover letters. I'm going to give you a quick rehash before I give you something new about them.

The typical cover letter might be in response to an ad.  It might be an introduction to a hiring manager.  The 1st paragraph should reflect that.

"I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was referred to you by Jeff Altman You told me you were trying to fill a position for such and such.  My understanding of the role is . . . You're looking for someone with . . . " You would then lay out in the left column what the skills were for the position (maybe you've seen a head or a job description that your friend has forwarded to you) and the functionality that is going to be performed.  In the right column, you would write down how long and how recently you can engage with it.

For example, flush left you would write

SOX compliance                                                                                                 5 years until 2015

User liaison                                                                                                         2 years current.

Manages people on-site and offshore                                                            3.2 years.  Current.

You make the fit seem obvious in this chart that you're creating for them.

Normally, I would say, "I believe you will see my background Matches up nicely for the role.  I look forward to hearing from you."

I want to encourage you to add an extra step in here.  That's the human touch.  This is a "miss" I want to acknowledge having had.  It is something I haven't encourage people to do often enough.

Like my advanced answer to the question, "Tell me about yourself," You might say something along the lines of, "I'm sure you see a lot of people and their resumes.  You say they have this background , but what makes me different is…" Then you going to some human characteristics that make you stand out.

Please don't say that you're hard-working or dedicated. Go to the humanity of the situation instead of the BS.  If you stay with hard-working or dedicated, people think to themselves, "Ugh!  Not again!"

The goal is to always differentiate yourself from others because if you are just another commodity, you're going to be paid a commodity's wage. If you are the best of the commodities you will be paid at the rate of the best of the range of the commodities. So, there's a range of salary; there is a law and there is a high.Yes, you will be at the higher point of the range, but so what?  You want to go past the range.  You always want to demonstrate that you are far superior to anyone that they say.

This does that by putting a human face on you, so that people can easily see how you stand out, instead of looking like another drone to them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Hedge Fund Job Interview Questions

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the questions, “How would you fight a bear,” and, “How would you kill a giraffe?”

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about 2 of the 2 of the tough interview questions I get asked on Wall Street by hedge funds, investment banks, and other organizations of people at different levels for different kinds of roles. Hedge funds, in particular, have a reputation for asking tough/obnoxious interview questions. Today, I thought I would start off with "the 2 animal questions."

The 1st 1 is, "How would you find a bear?" What this has to do with being an investment banker, I have no idea. However, I think symbolically, the question is so out of left field they want to watch on your face response and how your body responds to the stress of dealing with something that has nothing to do extensively with the job but has everything to do with them understanding your personality makeup.

The correct answer to how you would find a bear is climb up on the Bears back and grab it by the neck so that the pause couldn't get at you. It's pretty obvious; you wouldn't punch in the mouth, would you? You try to get on its back and find it. From that position where paws can get out you.

The 2nd 1 is, "How would you kill a giraffe?" Again, ostensibly it is a question is nothing to do with the job. However, it is so bizarre they want to watch how you think. The correct answer to that one is you try to get on the back, climb up the neck until your weight snaps the giraffes neck and takes it to the ground. Horrible death of giraffe.

The answer isn't in your answer; it is about how you appear to be processing the answer.

What you need to be doing is using a little bit of acting again. You might just simply pause, smile (these firms love arrogance) and go, "Great question! What I would do is..." And you go right into the answer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Networking Habit | Job Search Radio


​Everyone whose anyone in job search tells you that networking is the most effective way to find a job. No one tells you that networking while you’re happily employed is critical to making your next job search easier and your career plan implemented.

On this show, I speak with Andy Miller​ of Brainworks in New Jersey about the importance of networking while you’re a happy camper in your job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You Can’t Be Afraid to Negotiate (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

NOTE: In this video, I use an off-color expression

It is very expensive to act like a sheep and just accept what you are told. You can’t be afraid to negotiate.

Summary

This video could be for either employers are job hunters, but would spend more time on it for job hunters. It will cover the premise that you cannot be afraid to negotiate.

I know most people get you emotionally hooked in the process of interviewing. They cast out a line. You put your mouth on the hook. They reel you in. It is really the way that it is.

There is a point where you've invested a lot of time, effort and emotions into interviewing. They may make an offer that is low and you roll your eyes back into your head and you swallow hard and say, "yes," because you don't want to rock the boat.

Or, earlier on in the process, when they are telling you that you are not worth as much money as you think you are, you swallow hard and agree with them and keep going forward.

Everything is a negotiation in the interview process. Everything involves interview posturing for advantage. . . And they have to include agency recruiters in this. After all, third-party contingency recruiters, even executive search firms, everyone is posturing for advantage. It involves creating space in the job hunter's mind, in the employer's mind, for influence-- influence toward the ultimate goal of delivering a person into a job and them staying for a period of time.

For you as the job hunter, you are the ultimate fish here. That's because everyone is telling you that you are doing it wrong yet you have researched (that's really the key here your value from reputable sources. You haven't taken advice from 3 bozo friends of yours who know nothing about the market. ). You have actually done some pay scale research and determined your real value. Thus, when they are telling you that you are not worth it, you are letting it go by.

They might say something like, "Our range is only up to $110,000 or $180,000 or $275,000 or whatever the number is. And they tell you that you are not as strong as they believe warrants paying that number.

"Why are you interviewing me? What makes you come to that evaluation because what I see online and what I see my conversations with people is very different than your opinion. Perhaps, your opinion is incorrect. Because I see my value as being $310,000 or $195,000 or $135,000… Whatever the number is, it is very clear to me that given my numbers of years of experience and how a matchup with this role, it is not money number that is incorrect. It is your number."

You see, what they are trying to tell you is that you are wrong and you need to rethink your position.. Why aren't you turning this around and making it clear to them that perhaps in their opinion is incorrect?

"I'm talking to for other firms at this price point. Know what is batting in high and what I am saying to them. Have you considered that perhaps this number was conceived of (I use a vulgar expression here that translates into "without careful consideration of market realities.").

Don't be afraid. After all, the worst thing that can happen is that you interview someplace else that will give you the money. That place may not have the pretty offices. It may not have this specific team there. They may actually have a nicer set of offices and even better people and appreciation for you that these folks don't have.

Once a firm is trying to collapse your thinking so early, understand, that they're going to keep doing that while you are working there. Is that really what you want? You always want to be value properly and you always want to point out to them that their thinking isn't always correct. You certainly have opinions are worth listening to as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Pre-Interview Research

Pre-Interview Research | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 895 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses several ways to do pre-interview research so that you are well prepared for your interview.

Summary

Let's talk today about a different way to do research then where you been, probably doing ... Or different places, I should say.

Most of you, when you are doing your homework, you may go to a company's website, look around a little bit, it is kind of chaotic background checking, you've read some stuff on the site, you scan some things, you think you are done. Some of you may go the extra step of going on LinkedIn, seeing if you can find the profile of the person you are going to be meeting with. That can be difficult if your network is small. For me, it is pretty easy at this point because I have so many connections. My suggestion would be that if you do a Google search, site://www.linkedin.com and in quotation marks, put the person's name that may give you a shot if your network is small.

There are a few other places to do some research:
1. YouTube 

The firm you may be interview with might have some videos on YouTube. That may be even easier than searching the website.

2. Facebook. The company page on Facebook may be helpful to you.

3. The twitter feed for the person you would be meeting with may be extremely helpful to get an idea of what the thinking is like, the way they present themselves, you may see a photo of them there is all the more casual than what you see on LinkedIn… All this will give you more's rounded sense of them and their personality than you might underling to engage.

All in all, your job is to do some homework before the interview. So when they say, "So, what do you know about us," and not just simply sitting there going, "I don't know. Uh, I read some stuff. You are a good company." You don't want to come across in that way.

You want to come across as knowledgeable, competent, and present yourself with confidence because, to a real degree, what they are trying to do is get under your vernier, underneath the surface of you to see if there is something more there than the way you are packaging yourself.

One of the ways of deflecting that is to let them know that you are thorough. It is 1 of the most important things that a firm can learn about you is your thoroughness in preparation.

Again, research doesn't have to be hard, difficult, complicated, or take a long time. You can watch 3 videos on YouTube that a firm prepares, find the twitter feed for the person that you're interviewing with, read their company page on Facebook, go to the website, do a Google search… You can do a lot of things in 30 minutes and gotten far further along than you might have previously.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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