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3 questions to ask at the end of a job interview

3 Questions to Ask at the End of a Job Interview (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers three questions you should ask at the end of every single job interview.

Summary

I want to speak with you today about ending an interview extremely well and extremely powerful. In this particular approach, you will know very clearly how the firm sees you--whether they see was qualified or unqualified for the role. He will leave no mystery whatsoever. It also serves the purpose of leveling the playing field between you and the hiring firm.

Invariably, there is a section of the interview where they ask, "So, do you have any questions for us?" I have covered this in previous videos about how to best answer that question.

Now, is the interview is winding down there are a few more questions I want to encourage you to ask. This is past the point were you talking about the job or their assessment criteria once you are onboard; this is really at the wine down phase.

1. Do you see any gaps in my experience or employment that you believe I need to fill? Asking this will give you insights into how they judge you for this position.

2. Are there any reasons that you judge I'm not qualified for this role? This is the magic question because if you have any of that experience, you can cover this point by saying, "Oh! I'm sorry I didn't cover that in one of my earlier answers. This is what I've done related to that. Would you like to ask me more about that because I want to make sure you have all the information that you need."

3. Now that you've had a chance to interview me, are there any reservations that you have about putting me into this role? Again, this gives you an opportunity to address any concerns that they have so that, in this way, you have had a chance to take your "tennis racket" and send it back over the net to them, make them ask more questions, investigate more fully. You have to remember that, sometimes, the interviewer is not particularly skilled and has a finite amount of time where they are evaluating and assessing you. They miss things! This gives you ways of finding out there thinking at the end of an interview so that, at the end of the day, you know exactly where you stand.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.  

Final Interview With The Person Who Did the Job I Am Trying to Get


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

This can be the easiest or most difficult interviews you can imagine. After all, this person has done the job that you are contending for. How do you play it?

Summary

A question I received from someone painted an interesting situation and that is the final person they are scheduled to meet with is the former person who did this job and has since been promoted and thus this position reports to them.

How do you handle that situation where the person you're talking with, your future boss, is coming out of this job and you're going to be reporting them?

So it's a fun scenario. It may be the trickiest of any interview you can do because they have opinions. They were obviously successful in that role and, as a result, can really offer you insights into how you can be successful. So consider that a lot of your interview is going to be picking their brain, asking them for advice, about how to be successful in the role. So, for example, they may talk with you about your background and talk to you about how you handled situations in the past and you answer those questions.

You answer them the same way you happened previously because as because, as I've said in other interviews, you want to be congruent with everything that you've said before. But at the end of answering some of the questions, you might turn around and say, "Given your experience in this role with this be effective in this case? How did you do it with this user? How did they respond to it? Was it effective? How would you recommend I do it?" Do certain things to extract from them information that (number one) will be useful to you when you're in the role. Or more importantly treats them as an ally that lets them know that this is not an adversarial conversation, that lets them know it's not an adversarial conversation but one where you're taking input from them about how to be successful. After all, would they have been promoted if they weren't successful in this role? I don't think so.

So it can be tricky if you're not someone who you asks the follow up, who doesn't approach them for advice or input about how to be effective in the role. You might ask them about some of the misses that they have, some of the things that backfired in some way shape or form did not work. Emphasize the positive.

As an afterthought, later on, say, "You have given me a world of information and, I'm sure, not everything that you did worked. What missed? What didn't work with these folks so I don't step into it.

So that's the simplest way I would approach an interview with the former manager for the group.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Executive Presentation Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/11/the-executive-presentation-interview-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 801  I outline the 10 minute presentation and how to get ready for it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Choosing a Recruiter to Fill Your Positions (VIDEO)


It often seems like every Tom, Dick, Susan, Shailesh and Hao works for agencies. The phone calls seem incessant and the pitches seem the same. How do you choose between them?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. 

The Best Question to Ask at the End of an Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/10/15/the-best-question-to-ask-at-the-end-of-an-interview

EP 896  Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you the best question to ask toward the end of every job interview. 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about the best question to ask at the end of every interview.

To me, most interviews consists of 3 parts. The 1st part is that that opening The 3rd part of the interview is where they go, "So. Do you have any questions for us." Most of you are going to take the time to say so,, "tell me about the job," or some dressed up version of that.

For those of you who know my philosophy that's actually the wrong time to ask that question. You should be asking that question before the interview starts. Is the 2 of you are about to sit down and talk with one another, that's really the time to ask a question is designed to find out a bit more about the job that they are going to be talking with you about. And once you've taken that question out of the end of the interview, you have to replace it, right?

So at the beginning of the interviewer, before the interview starts, you are basically going tosay something alon lines of, "I spoke with Jeff Altman about the role. He gave me a brief description but I wanted to get your take on it. Would you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help you?" You asked that question if you're working with a recruiter. If you are doing this based upon an ad, you can say, "I recall the position description that I saw online, but sometimes these things change as firms interview. So could you tell me about your current thinking about the role and what I can do to help you?"

So that's the 2 approaches to take at the beginning of the interview, as the 2 of you are sitting down to talk with one another. So now you already know about the job, you can't ask about it later unless you looking for clarification. If you looking for clarification, you don't start off that 3rd section of the interview with the clarifying question. You start off with this, "So, let's say it's a year from now. I joined the firm. It's time to give me a review. You want to write, not just simply a good review, but the best review you have ever written for employee doing this kind of job. What would I have accomplished during that year that would cause you to write that review?"

What that does is real simple. Number 1 is you are getting an idea of what they are going to expect you to do during the 1st year you're working with them Secondly, (This is more most important for you) is get an idea whether that's realistic or not, whether their expectations of someone working in this job are realistic or unrealistic. That's important because if they're unrealistic, you are doomed to failure. And how would you ever get a good review if you are doomed to failure.

So that's my advice for you in terms of how to ask the question at the end of your your interview just repeat it, "So let's say it's a year from now and I joined the firm and I have been working with you for a year and you want to write, not just simply a good review, but the best review you've ever written for someone in this job. What what I have accomplished during that 1st year that would cause you to write such a review.

I hope you commit that want the memory. I hope it helps you get great results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Pick Up the Pace

Pick Up The Pace (VIDEO)


Take it or leave it. Too many firms are still operating with this recession era mentality and losing candidates to other firms.

On this show, I walk through some of the BLS numbers and point out some changes you need to make.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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