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Is It A Good Sign That I Got an Interview Within 24 Hours? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I sent in my application and got an interview within 24 hours! That’s a good sign, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Giving Your Resume To Someone


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2016/09/14/giving-your-resume-to-someone

Jeff Altman The Big Game Hunter explains why giving your resume to someone who works for a company you want to target may not be the best way to get an interview. 

Summary

Let's talk today about approaching the furniture interested in working for. Conventional wisdom says to give your resume to someone who works there and have them bring it to the hiring manager as though this is the magic bullet that can get you the interview and advantage you are getting hired.

It can, but the thing that most people don't do is find out how close this person is to the hiring manager. I give you an example. Someone contact me and says, "I know this terrific individual. They are phenomenal. They are swell. They are terrific." The person approaches me as someone I barely had contact with if. As a matter of fact, the last time I heard from them was only asked to connect with me on LinkedIn. How much do I really trust this individual? The same might also be true with the people you're giving your resume to.

The goal is and just to give it to someone who works for the firm, but to find someone within the firm who is well connected with the hiring manager.

Barring that, you are sending your resume to the black hole because the hiring manager has no reason to trust this individual anymore then I have to trust that person who says, "this person going to refer to you is terrific, colossal and swell," and they had nothing to do with anything I do recruiting for plus I don't know this person who was telling me how wonderful their friendliness.

There are times where it is better to work with a friend to send a cover letter that addresses that addresses some of the pain points a firm has in hiring someone for this job. It can also be better to use a third-party recruiter who has had a good relationship with his hiring manager to introduce you. Otherwise, you are giving your resume to a different version of the black hole.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Evaluating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/12/evaluating-a-job-offer/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses and it’s truly important criteria for evaluating a job offer.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

working 9 to 5

What Do You Do If You Work 9-5 and Are Looking for a New Job? (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what to do and helps you change your mindset.

Summary

Someone sent a question to me through Quora and I thought I would use this is my video for today. The question is, "What do you do if you work 9 to 5 and are looking for a new job? You leave work early for the interview? Well, if your job doesn't allow you to leave work early. . ."

Boy, I will tell you, I'm amazed by people sometimes. So let me start by saying this is really reflective of an industrial mindset where if you worked on the production line, you know, back in the early 20th century, they would dock your pay, your manager with threaten you. The owner of the factory would come down and yell at you. If you were sick, they wanted you sniffling and sneezing, coughing at work, because they needed your body working on the assembly floor. It was brutal back then. Today, that mindset still continues and we all have this notion of playing hurt, that we go to work and we do our best even when we're not feeling well.

How does this all apply to what the question is? This is easy. This is kind of reflexive of that industrial era mindset where a worker can't take any powersonal time to do something, that they always have to be at the job. You know, most people who are in professional roles no that they can take time off. And most companies, these days, are willing and often require a phone interview. So, scheduling the phone interview is easy. What you do is give them your mobile number and at a prearranged time, they're going to call you at that number. You just get the heck out of the building for a little bit. Or if you go to the lobby you know just make sure that there is a place where you can be comfortable speaking, where you are not really worrying about those around you. No distractions. Go to your car. Go for a walk. Be outside on a lovely day. Just enjoy yourself and do the interview with focused mental energy.

Now when it gets time for the in-person interview, real simple. That day, just simply say, "I've got an appointment this morning; I'll be out for a couple hours. I'll be in at… "Thus, you schedule the call the beginning of the day or at the end of the day or before work or after work. So, let's say, you finish at five, ask GGthem if they can do a six o'clock interview for you. Just simply say I've got a lot of things scheduled and I couldn't get there till 6. Does that work?

"No we need you during business hours."

We're back to that early in the morning. "Could we start before 9:00? This way, you're not missing as much time during the day.

"Can we start this at 12 o'clock? You know what it be possible for us to be complete.… Actually, the way you phrase it is "I'd like to do the interview over my lunch hour. I normally would do it at 12. How much time do you think you would need?" They'll tell you and you adjust your calendar accordingly.

You might tell your boss , "a friend of mine is in. and you him and would like to take a long time at lunch. I'll be back at . . . " to give them a sense of what time you'll be back in the office. It's really easy. But the biggest thing I picked up here was that mentality that says, " I'm just someone working on the factory floor and I'm not entitled to do anything."

Now, maybe you work in a country where that is the case, but for most industrialized places in the world you can take a small bit of extra time for yourself without any worries whatsoever. And if they will let you do it, if they are going to threaten you. There's a message you that. GET THE HELL OUT!

Oh forgot to mention one thing. And if, on the interview they ask you, "Gee, how did you take this time off," do not, I repeat, do not say, "I took a sick day," because that basically says , you will cheat them if they hire you too because, after all, you are not sick and are on an interview. Just tell them that you took some personal time that was coming to you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

The Music of Answering Questions | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 897 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the music of answering interview questions and why it’s important to end on a down note.

Summary

Let me talk with you today about one of those things that people do in interviews goes past the point of being annoying to being harmful to your candidacy.  Let me illustrate why.

I'm speaking with someone yesterday and asking them a question. Every time they answered the question for me, Instead of ending a sentence in a downtown,they would answer it with an up tone (Listen to the audio to understand what I mean). So I would ask them a question (up tone) and he would always answer in an up. If you listen to the audio.  You'll hear me illustrated a few times.

The impact of this is that employers when they interview someone and they ended and up find it harder to be convinced by the person they are interviewing because you just sound more uncertain and unsure. This air of uncertainty that you create by ending your phrases and sentences with an up tone makes you sound like you are unsure.

So, always end with a down tone on the last word.  If you have the habit of ending with an up tone, it is something to work on.  After all, the impact of this can be very expensive for you in lost salary and in lost opportunities.  After all, you just don't sound convincing as to what you believe when they ask you something.

Again, go for a down tone instead of an up.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

JobSearchAGram: Naming the Resume File


 

A short video to explain how to name the file for your resume.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Job hunting is a rigged game with you the mark.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Avoid Premature Negotiation and Other Negotiation Tips (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with a few salary negotiation tips to help you when you receive your offer.

Summary

When all is said and done, some people start negotiating from the get go. All that happens is you piss off the interviewers because all they think you are in there to do is negotiate, negotiate, negotiate while they are there to evaluate and assess you.

Your initial job is to make them fall in love because as I've said many times, no love, no money, no honey. You don't get the opportunity to go to work at these places. If, at the end of the day, you don't prove your value to them. . Thus, the 1st thing is to make them fall in love because then they are more willing to negotiate. That is step number 1. Avoid premature negotiation issues.

2. Once you get the offer, that's when the negotiating really should start. You wait until the offer has been made. Some people start negotiating, thinking that the economy is booming when it isn't or they stop negotiating when it is booming because they think it isn't. You have to know the climate that you are operating in in order to know whether you will have an opportunity to really move the needle on the salary part of the offer.

3. This is something that students are often told-- don't negotiate just for the sake of it. I respectfully disagree. I want you to try negotiating and see if you can up the number. Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." It is a very simple and gentle approach to negotiating that won't piss anyone off. That's the 2nd thing.

4. Don't forget that if you are negotiating with the small to midsize firm, there are benefits that you might be able to negotiate. For example, there is that Masters program that you want to take. See if you can negotiate tuition reimbursement as a part of your offer. Big companies won't negotiate this kind of stuff. It's either in their policies and procedures or not because, from their vantage point, they are trying to avoid lawsuits.

After all, just to use an example, if you are the white heterosexual male and they did for you, why did they not give this concession to the non-white heterosexual male and they gave it to you. It becomes a lawsuit in the making. Big firms don't negotiate. Small companies may in some midsize firms will if there policies and procedures are not completely in place. Don't forget to negotiate some of the secondary items and just focus on salary.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to answer a question for you? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

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