google-site-verification: googleb943d61bcb9cdbf7.html

They Might Check My Credit History?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers about the likelihood your credit report will be checked prior to being hired.

Summary

Someone wrote to me as part of researching an article that she was writing asking whether firms really use credit reports as part of the hiring process. The answer is that is generally restricted to firms in the financial services industry-- banks, credit card companies, investment firms, occasionally firms to provide services to those industries. Generally, his financial institutions that require this.

Why? If you look back at their history, people who were employed by them have access to people's money very easily and they were concerned that someone might be tempted to steal. The policies even carry through to these days with computers and automation and such because it is easier to steal in many respects. Can you imagine what would happen if you have stolen "grandma's life savings?"

They get a lawyer who presents the case very simply, "So you knew this person had bad credit. You knew they were in deep kimchi financially and you still hire them and still put them into a situation where they have access to people's money, right?"

"Well, they seemed so honest."

"Your judgment was faulty about that." The financial institution loses the case, their insurance company might not pay off on the claim and thus the bank (I use bank is the example, credit card company, whomever) is out-of-pocket and that is investor money. If you think that is the "1%" you may be the 1% with your IRA and 401(k).

When all is said and done, financial firms try to avoid hiring someone who they perceive is credit risks. If you are pursuing careers in that industry, it is important to maintain a pristine credit history so that you don't work hard to get a job that, at the end of the day you're not to get hired for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us
Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

If you are interested in a resume critique, a LinkedIn profile critique or a Job Search Makeover, find out more at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Finding the Firm That is Hiring

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to find out the name of the company that is hiring for that job when the Recruiter drops the ball.

Summary

I spent two thirds of my life as a recruiter. So talking about this, I will never suggest that you go around the recruiter because there are a lot of advantages that come with working with the search firm. But, if a recruiter drops the ball and you disagree with their opinion or action, I am offering a way to get at the hiring firm so that in this way, you have a chance to present yourself.

I want to help solve the puzzle that some of you have about finding a hiring firm. Here's a situation that happened to someone that I knew. I was coaching him and this happened a few years ago.

He saw a listing from a recruiter, contacted the person, but they didn't get back to him for 3 or 4 days. Even though they said they would get back to him the next morning. He called. No response. He called. No response. You really thought he fit the job. He asked me for advice. Here's what you do.

Sometimes, recruiters are little bit lazy. So they will copy and paste job descriptions and turn them into ads.. Why don't you do a Google search, taking some lines out of the job description and see if you can find the position. Sometimes a recruiter will change a few words in the description so you will start off with a broad statement, maybe in the 2nd sentence, or the 3rd sentence, not necessarily the 1st. You look at the requirements of the job and work with 2 or 3 bullet points. ESPECIALLY if there is lengthy text there. Enter into Google and see if something turns up for you.

You can try Indeed or SimplyHired and try the same thing but start with Google. That's what happened for this person. They were able to find the position and apply for the job (the firm didn't hire him). The recruiters judgment was correct. He wasn't really a fit.

However, if you believe you are and want to do this, this is the simplest way to find the firm involved . I see if you can find a third-party recruiter that is sufficiently lazy that they copy and pasted the job description that you can find it.

Remember, there is always the advantage of working through the recruiter. I want to be clear about that. If you can work through her recruiter, you are advantaged, the firm is advantaged, and there are lots of benefits to it for you, including (1) they are going to handle scheduling, (2) they are going to be the ones hocking the employer to see you, (3) they are going to be negotiating,. After all, they know the rough edges and have a relationship with the client. They can speak to those rough edges and handle them for you. There are lots of advantages to working with a recruiter.

However, if for some reason they dropped the ball, where they make a judgment that you disagree with, this is the way to find out about the job so you can apply directly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

re-applying for a job

Can I Re-Apply for a Job?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/31/can-i-re-apply-for-a-job/

I answer this great question from Quora.

Summary

I have a question I'm going to answer that was posed on Quora, the question and answer site. The question is a very simple but elegant one. "Can I reapply for a job?"

Of course, you can! However, it begs the question, "What's good be any different than the last time?" We miraculously have new information, new experiences, accomplish more things than what happened the 1st time? If you had a bid resume, what's going to make the employer believe that suddenly your experience is radically different? A note to them is going to cause them to question, "Was this person lazy and just send us a generic resume?"

Thus, excuse my language, is a half-assed way of responding.

Think about it. Someone comes to meet with you and there is nothing that indicates that the background fits which were looking for and they go away. They come back 3 days later and, lo and behold, they had that experience! How did that miracle happen?

Yes, you can reapply but, understand, you screwed up the 1st time. If you have the experience, why didn't you tell them? Why didn't you make it apparent instead of spamming the stupid resume to them. That's because the message that you are giving them is that you believe that good enough is (good enough).

But they are looking for is effort. You didn't show any effort.

Don't expect a different outcome. Yes, you can try again , but the probability of success is really small.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

ending the interview right

Ending the Interview Right! | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 912 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the way to end a job interview and leave a great impression.

Summary

Let's talk about ending the interview. You've been sitting with them for about 45 minutes to an hour, or you've finished a phone call but, more often than not, this scenario is going to come up in the in-person interview.

Let's say your meeting with one person on your agenda; let's say your meeting with five. Whoever the final person is, they are going to be prepared to usher you out the door. Your final words to this person need to demonstrate your interest in the role. Why? Often this is used as a tiebreaker in a hiring manager's mind.

Here's how it works. They had decisions to make and will decide between you and several other people. How will they choose? Skills, obviously, come into consideration. There are a variety of different attributes they are looking for and personality they are evaluating you for.

Often, there is a very fine line between people. One of the things that starts to happen is managers don't want to make offers that they are not sure are going to be accepted. So, one of the tiebreakers they use in their own mind (after all, it's not like are sitting there going through the checklist, but sometimes it is on the checklist), is whether they think this person will accept our offer if we make a fair offer? Are they interested in the job? Do they want to come to work for us

A manager doesn't want to go through interviewing people multiple times for a job; they just want to be in a situation that if they extended an offer is going to be accepted and they will be done with the job.

Thus, your goal at the end of an interview is to demonstrate interest. So, with the last person you meet, you have to make it clear to them that you are interested in the role. It could be saying something as simple as, "I just want you to know how interested in this role I am. I just it will be a great opportunity for me and I would love to work for you." Or end it by saying the same thing plus, "I would love to work for your organization."

These are words that demonstrate sincere interest. You can't say this like it is canned speech. This is one of these times were acting needs to be part of your delivery.

It can be something as simple as, "I just want you are interested I am in the position and look forward to hearing from you about next steps." Or, "I would love to work for you," or, "I would love to work with Suresh," or "I would love to work with Joe," or Sharon or whomever the first name is some of that you met with. "I think this would be a great opportunity. I would love to work for themI would love to work here.I think there is a lot I could do here."

A lot depends upon the role. If you're an executive, there is a different language that you might use.

"I think this offers a great challenge. I have a few ideas of things that like to do but that's for another day."

"My mind is racing." Like I said, there's a different language. You can't make it sound like a canned speech. Again, this is one of these times were acting is a part of what you are going to be doing in your delivery.

Leave them knowing that you are interested. You can go so far as to ask, "what standing between you and extended an offer? Is there any additional information you need for me?"

You can do this on your way out the door so it doesn't appear to be part of any formal interview. Just let them know that you are interested, asked them for the job so that you ended in a way that lets them know of your interest.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Frustrated at Work

Frustrated at Work

Frustrated: disappointed; thwarted: an announcer who was a frustrated actor.

Thwarted: to oppose successfully; prevent from accomplishing a purpose.

I do career coaching and often people ask me for advice about how to handle situations with colleagues. In this case, the situation presented to me was about how I might handle the “know-it all” who is doing something wrong and wants to be told that they are doing it right.

“I started to ask him about his use case when my boss stepped in and started to argue with them that they were doing it all wrong. All that happened is that I became frustrated as the two of them argued and nothing changed.”

In case you haven’t noticed, no one responds well to an argument that translates into “You’re wrong and I’m right.” The proof is in how many people were persuaded to change their minds about who to vote for (or against) in the last election.

After all the insults of political candidates, insults of people who supported a particular candidate, memes, etc., the number of people who changed their mind about who to vote for in the US could probably be counted on two hands. It is no different in the workplace or with your family. No one like to be told directly or indirectly something that translates into, “What are you stupid? What are you thinking? Where are your brains?”

All that happens is that one person or the other feels frustrated—thwarted in their desire to win. We expected to win because we were “right” in our minds. Their ideas have been held at bay.

What the words, “frustrated” and “thwarted” don’t address is how we emotionally respond as a feeling. What I have seen is that when we feel frustrated we become angry and direct that anger at ourselves because it would be wrong to direct it at the other person because there would be bad consequences.

Maybe you would be brought in for a meeting and told that what you did was wrong. Maybe it would affect your promotion, salary increases or bonus. Pretty quickly we learn that anger at others can’t be expressed at work so we still are still angry but hold it in and feel angry at ourselves.

There are many layers that people experience in episodes like this. Male know it all and female coworker. US born know it all not listening to non-US born co-worker who really just wants the best for him. Superior subordinate. White vs. non-white. Two white male superiors arguing and ignoring a female subordinate of a different nationality and race who only wants the best for the situation and actually knows better than either how to achieve it.

Lots of different subplots in the story that all lead to frustration. Anger. Anger held in. Anger that eventually becomes self-directed by three people.

How could it have been handled differently?

I think everyone could have approached it differently.

When dealing with a “know it all,” any questioning can be interpreted as criticism. Thus, when asked about a “use case,” this person sensed criticism was coming and put up his guard.

Better to have asked, “I’m curious, why did you take that approach? I would like to learn your thinking because I would have approached it differently and I need to learn from you.” Notice an acknowledgement that a difference would have existed and an invitation to explain choices.

Maybe “The Know It All” Does Know Better

After all, maybe, just maybe, the alleged “know it all” actually knows better that the supposed expert. Hasn’t that happened many times in the past? One side knows better than the supposed expert what they want and what needs to happen to satisfy them. Rather than demanding compliance with a structure that doesn’t work for the people who are forced to operate in it, it is better to hear them out and learn their point of view.

In addition, the playing field has been leveled between what are seeming combatants and there is an invitation to explain choices and reasons for decisions. The alleged expert can listen and learn as long as she is legitimately curious and acts like someone who wants to help them.

When her boss steps in and escalates the level of hostilities, she can say to him, “We are having a good discussion here and an opportunity to hear from someone who is affected by our work. Let me handle this and circle back to you if I need your expertise.”

Thus, she is able to defend the “know it all,” indicate that she is fine and, if her boss ignores her respond by saying, “I guess I’m not needed here,” and extricate herself from the warring armies having made an ally while respecting her boss’s authority.

Speaking to you who are managers, directors, VP’s, leaders in an organization, you need to learn to trust your people, rather than signal your distrust. A great response would have been, “Let me know if I can help.” That would have been inviting to both parties rather than turn things into a duel.

Who’s The Key Person in This Story?

We all know that not everyone is reasonable and that we all have days when we are “off.” When you think about this situation, the key person here is the SME, the real expert, who has to practice taking charge of situations and not allow herself to be run over by deflecting the attack into a legitimate desire to help while acknowledging that she would have approached the solution differently.

Why not ask questions, be quiet and listen. It might actually work in some family situations, too! 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2017   

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” “No BS Job Search Advice,” and “Job Search Radio.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Subscribe to the “No BS Coaching Advice” podcast.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

Hedge Fund Brainteasers: You Are Shrunk to the Size of a Nickel


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/30/hedge-fund-brainteasers-you-are-shrunk-to-the-size-of-a-nickel

EP 851 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with an answer to this old time Google interview question

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Indicate My Availability in My Resume


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/18/should-i-indicate-my-availability-in-my-resume/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains whether you should indicate your availability in your resume.

Summary

The question reads, "should I include date of availability in my resume?"

This is something that would apply to both students and consultants as well as temporary workers, so I'm going to texture my answer given the circumstances.

For the student, of course, it depends on when you are writing this or sending a resume. If this is November at the time before graduation, you might, in the resume, indicate your expected degree date and when that would be. Let's say it's made or June of the following year, that sends a clear signal to them as to when you're available. If this is March and you have an expected degree date I had, they have an idea as to when you are available, right?

If you are a consultant in the assignment is going to complete in 3 months, what are you sending a resume now? You are way early in the process. I might start to or 2 1/2 months before TOPS. For a consultant, really just send out the resume earlier than that is just a waste of people's time. It's not like they're going to save it and come back to it and say to themselves, "You know that guy who is going to be available in 3 months? Now is the time!" No, it is just going to go to their system and that little bit of data is not going to be remembered or saved. It's a time waster to send it out to early.

For students, the indication of expected degree date is important. If you have an internship that is going on they might allow you to (wink wink) give people the idea that you are working full time, it really depends on when you can start. If the ideas that you be willing to start within those last few months before graduation, that's one layer and I would indicate that I would explain in the cover email. That's in the body of the email to which your resume is attached.

Beyond that, keep it simple. Leave it in the resume as to what your expected degree date is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Answering “The Hypothetical Question” | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/18/answering-the-hypothetical-question-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 808  Hypothetical questions are a rat hole leading you into a trap. Here, I explain how to handle them.

Summary

Imagine that you are on an interview, you are talking with someone who is there to evaluate you, and they say to you those magic words, "What would you do if . . . "Then they paint some sort of scenario.

You and I both know that there was a lot more that they haven't told you that they can drop in your head like a bomb later once you've answered the question based upon what limited information they have given you. How do you not feel at this question?

I think the answer comes down to talking about the process. Start by saying, "I'm sure there is a lot more texture than what you have told me so far. As a result, I think what might be most effective is how it might go about evaluating how to figure out the solution rather than offer you an actual solution. As a result, what I want to talk with you about is (1) identifying the constituencies will be affected by this; (2) then go through the process of evaluation.

They may say, "No, it is as simple as what we've asked." Okay, and as you start to answer, and they start throwing in more grenades into the situation, you pause for a second and say, "This is why it is so important to engage in the process because I would need to flush up additional things that can surface in the course of discovery. "

"I know I've had people come to me who are on my staff and were complaining about someone else and they wanted me to resolve it. Or, I have a user that I support who is having a problem with someone on my staff and they want me to fix them because they are not doing their job. But what I have to do is understand what it is that is wrong and go into some detail and speak with that person and going to some detail and, then, from there, your perspective on from everyone side, including some of the ones who have been affected by the blows who are affected by the different parties involved so that in this way I can actually solve it."

"Answering 2 lines of 'what would you do if' doesn't really give me any texture; talking to everyone does. Talking to not just simply the ones that they recommend but some of the others will."

So that's how I would go about answering it. That's how I recommend you do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Jerry Maguire

Job Search Lessons from The Movies: Jerry Maguire


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/30/job-search-lessons-from-the-movies-jerry-maguire/

EP 422 I discuss a huge job search lesson from this 1996 blockbuster . . . and no, the advice is NOT, “SHOW ME THE MONEY!”

Summary

Now, Jerry is fired in the movie. He is presented as a top agent as a sports management firm and is fired from his job. He wants to go and start his own management firm and no one wants to join them.

There is a point where he needs help. There is a time where he needs support. There is Renée Zellweger as his support and her family. Jerry is able to come back from "the dead" and rise up because he is the support of people who care about him, and are willing to help him.

That is the lesson for you.. You are looking for a job, you may or may not be out of work. You don't have to do everything by yourself. You can get advice and you can get help and you should put support someplace in all of this.

Support takes a lot of different forms. Family is a great place for support if it is the right family. If it is the wrong family, they are going to be torturing you. "When are you going to get an interview?" You don't need this. You don't need a guy looking over your shoulder telling you that you doing it all wrong. You don't need your wife, husband or partner lashing out at you for not doing enough..

What you need to do is put a supportive system in place. It can be friends. It can be clergy. You can get coaching.

When all is said and done, you need to think outside of yourself and get help early so that, in this way, you don't go through weeks of depression. You don't go through weeks of frustration. You learn your lessons before you make mistakes, rather than after them by working with individuals who know more than you about job hunting and can help you navigate in the right direction.

I do coaching. I want to simply say the good coach is going to teach you what you need to know when you need to know it so that you can work your way through your job search without making mistakes or making fewer mistakes. We can't control what you do in the interview , but we can prepare you for interviewing. We can prepare you for salary negotiation. We can look at your resume and recognize, "You know, it needs some work. It's not as good as you think it is."

We can encourage you that even if you get a job you be worthwhile few to be doing some training to get your career untracked.

There are a lot of things that a good coach can do from their experience.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

How to transfer an interview

How to Dress for an Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 911 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of appearance on income and offers suggestions about what you can do.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast this morning on Freakonomics radio there was about the impact of appearance on income. I know this and impact of appearance on hiring, too.

The show started off by talking about earnings of NFL quarterbacks (for those of you outside of the US, they are referring to American professional football). It is clear from the show that the income of the NFL quarterback who look better than the average was much higher than the income of the average or, shall we say, less attractive quarterback. There is one exception of a relatively junior quarterback who, because of the pay structure in the NFL, is unable to earn market value as of yet.

How does this relate to interviewing?

In the society at large there is a bias toward better looking people. Before you men think you have it better than when, you are absolutely wrong. Statistically, the bias is more profound with men than with women.

With women, the show reports, that they are more aware of the impact of their appearance on everything that they do. Thus, they are very focused on that. In the statistics for men, those who were less handsome or "didn't look as well," earned 8% less then better looking people. There was one exception (one that I consider it humorous one) and that was with thugs where being downright ugly was a professional advantage for them.

For most of us, however, being average looking has a financial impact upon us. Now to be clear, I'm not suggesting that all of us go out and get plastic surgery.

However, particularly from then, who habitually undervalue this, it is important to present yourself extremely well. It is about your wardrobe, your grooming, and everything else that peripherally relates to your presentation and not your competence.

Unfortunately too few people do enough about this.

Now, to be clear I am not suggesting that you go out and buy a $10,000 suit unless you can afford it. I'm not suggesting that you get plastic surgery. There are grooming things and, I know women are going to laugh as they listen to this, that you can no longer be oblivious to.

You know the shined shoes, the dirty fingernails, the ear and nose hairs, your wardrobe, of course .... There are a whole host of things that take people away from paying attention to what is really important (whether you can helps them or not).

As one of my guests on Job Search Radio said, there are people who are very well dressed for the 1990s.. You need to update your wardrobe to look proper for the times.

When all is said and done, if you can afford to forget about 8% of your income, by all means ignore these suggestions. However, over the course of your career, that's a very expensive decision you've made. After all, this translates into several hundred thousand dollars . . . Unless of course you're independently wealthy and can afford to forget about all that money.

So do the things to take care of your grooming and appearance. Take care of yourself. Try to keep your weight down, especially if you're out of work. Stay out of the refrigerator. Don't do things that are going to put pounds on you and cause your wardrobe to look poorly on you. You don't want to wear clothing that doesn't fit properly on you do you? You don't want people to look at you and think you are grotesque.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

%d bloggers like this: