Tough Interview Questions: What Do You Look for When You Hire Someone?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/10/tough-interview-questions-what-do-you-look-for-when-you-hire-someone

EP 800!!!! I offer a textured answer to a more complex question than it seems.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Sounding Like a Mexican Song

EP 853  There is a very dumb mistake that people make on interviews that I find reminds me of someone singing a Mexican song,

Summary

Here, I'm going to talk with you about 1 of those stupid interview mistakes; I use a goofy title for it but you will recognize a pretty quickly. I call it, "Sounding like a Mexican song." When they ask you a question about what you did for your firm or what you do for your firm, this is what you sound like--" I, I, I, I." All you do is talk about yourself. You don't put yourself into the context of how you work with your coworkers. You don't give people a bigger picture of where you fit in.

For example, let's say you are a staff level individual. You are answering the question like, "So, what you do for your firm?"

"I work as a team that is responsible for… The overall group does such and such. My piece of that is .. This. As such, I work with a small subset of individuals that has a budget of X number of dollars that is responsible for... blah blah blah blah." Do you get weren't coming from?

You don't say, "I do this. I do that." You don't just simply say, " I, I, I, I"

The idea is to always contextualize yourself. The people of the picture of where you fit

If you're in executive, you can say that you took over responsibility for a group that is responsible for. You can also say "I manage a slice of business that does such and such. As such, I have responsibility for a budget of $500 million. I have a staff of X number of people that is broken up by.." They you start defining your department. "I have some really talented people working for me who have really helped me look good. Obviously, I provide leadership for this group. But the fact of the matter is that I've hired some very good people and they are individuals who understand what I want and go out and deliver. My job is to really understand what is needed so I interact with people in the business unit so they feel attended to..." Again, do you get weren't coming from here

It is not just about "I I I I." It is about giving people a picture of where you fit in, which are role responsibilities are, size of the budget, size the department... It's all about giving people a sense of size and scope.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What Are Your Hobbies? (VIDEO)


Although this may not seem like a tough interview question, it is a subtle one with subtle intention. Here, explain how to answer it.

Summary

The question for today is (I know you're not gonna think this is a tough interview but I'm going to explain why am going to include this), "What are your hobbies?"

What the trying to do is to connect with you in some way and at the same time, you something to evaluate you with to see if you are an A performer or your someone who goes to the job, goes home and forgets about everything. They're not looking to find out if you're a member of "the resistance," or a member of the Republican National Committee as part of your part-time or volunteer work. What the trying to do is to see if there is something that can be translated into work-related stuff.

I know there are things in terms of organizing that can translate but you open up the possibility of being rejected based upon politics or faith, or other things. When you bring in religious organizations, when you bring in political activism… Stuff along those lines that I don't think really serve you. It may be true. Which would you rather be someone who is right or do you want to look at something a little bit differently and get the result?

What I suggest people do proactively is think about the things they do outside of work and tell the story of being actively involved so that you demonstrate something that's congruent with the work that you do. For example, the obvious case is, "What I do (this is a sales person's story) is competing martial arts. I work with the sensei, we test regularly, it is fabulous for my "edge" to be in a situation where I am constantly competing." You understand why that story works and, yes, I could've gone into this big elaborate story here, but I just want to make the simple point that there are things that you do in your personal life that demonstrate the right tone for answering this question.

If you think being a mom doesn't show that you can be well organized, that you have empathy and care for people that you are interacting with, you're missing the point of all this. This is a situation where you can bring out a great quality that employer wants to see in a new hire, brings a right to the surface in a very subtle way so that it is a part of your life and you demonstrate authenticity all in answering this question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL him

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

 

Two Second Interview Questions and Answers

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer two tricky questions that are often asked on second interviews.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about two questions the rest on second interviews pretty regularly. They aren’t difficult but, because of the stress and tension that is often associated with a second or third interview, people sometimes panic and blow the questions.

The first one is, “What have you learned about us so far?”

This requires a certain amount of good preparation for you because it will help coalesce your thoughts and opinions of this firm before the interview. You may be on a second or third interview. Each interview, you probably have spoken with different people or different groups of people that give you impressions about the job and the organization. You may have visited the website at some point before the interview.

Answer by starting off with an overview of the position as it is been discussed with you. When you get to the end of your description, pause and say, “Have I described it accurately because if I haven’t, I want to get the correct description of the position.”

Then talk about each of the people you’ve spoken with so far, what your sense of the personalities is and how they presented themselves to you ALWAYS IN COMPLIMENTARY TERMS, of course. Speak about the firm, what it’s standing is in its industry, what it does. That will come from the website and any other research that you’ve done.

So, that’s the easy question to handle. Then, there is the follow-up, “how would you proceed if you were hired for the role?”

Some people talk about it beginning from day one. I suggest talking about a firm before day one.

You receive the offer; you accept the offer; you give notice. You speak with your future manager about what their expectations are starting the role. You do that right after you give notice. In this way, you can lay out some plans, perhaps schedule some meetings not long after you come on board. Perhaps they have an idea of what your early schedule will be like, but it is best to talk about this proactively before you start, rather than beginning with your first day.

“On my first day, what will wind up doing is walking in and… ” Whatever

these are very simple questions but because of the stress associated with second or third interviews, you want to demonstrate that you have done your homework well.

And the second question (the one about preparing for when you start), that one is an easy one because what you are doing is showing that you are go-getter, aggressive, you are hardcharging and that you are getting yourself prepared even before you start.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

%d bloggers like this: