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What Qualities Do You Look for in a Boss (Manager)? | No BS Job Search Advice


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/25/what-qualities-do-you-look-for-in-a-boss-manager-no-bs-job-search-advice

EP 815 In this video, I discuss how to answer this typically second interview question?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”
Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.
Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.
Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.
You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”
Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Answering “The Hypothetical Question” | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/18/answering-the-hypothetical-question-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 808  Hypothetical questions are a rat hole leading you into a trap. Here, I explain how to handle them.

Summary

Imagine that you are on an interview, you are talking with someone who is there to evaluate you, and they say to you those magic words, "What would you do if . . . "Then they paint some sort of scenario.

You and I both know that there was a lot more that they haven't told you that they can drop in your head like a bomb later once you've answered the question based upon what limited information they have given you. How do you not feel at this question?

I think the answer comes down to talking about the process. Start by saying, "I'm sure there is a lot more texture than what you have told me so far. As a result, I think what might be most effective is how it might go about evaluating how to figure out the solution rather than offer you an actual solution. As a result, what I want to talk with you about is (1) identifying the constituencies will be affected by this; (2) then go through the process of evaluation.

They may say, "No, it is as simple as what we've asked." Okay, and as you start to answer, and they start throwing in more grenades into the situation, you pause for a second and say, "This is why it is so important to engage in the process because I would need to flush up additional things that can surface in the course of discovery. "

"I know I've had people come to me who are on my staff and were complaining about someone else and they wanted me to resolve it. Or, I have a user that I support who is having a problem with someone on my staff and they want me to fix them because they are not doing their job. But what I have to do is understand what it is that is wrong and go into some detail and speak with that person and going to some detail and, then, from there, your perspective on from everyone side, including some of the ones who have been affected by the blows who are affected by the different parties involved so that in this way I can actually solve it."

"Answering 2 lines of 'what would you do if' doesn't really give me any texture; talking to everyone does. Talking to not just simply the ones that they recommend but some of the others will."

So that's how I would go about answering it. That's how I recommend you do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Tell Me About a Crappy Job You’ve Had | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/06/tell-me-about-a-crappy-job-youve-had-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 826 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the intent behind this question and how to answer it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Tough Interview Questions: Tell Me About a Time You Had to Deal With Failure.


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

What are firms looking for when they asked this question? How do you demonstrate the right stuff?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The question for today is . . . It is a behavior interview question . . . “Tell me about the time you had to deal with failure.”

You know, when you hear this question what they are trying to do is find out about grit, determination, tenacity and being able to reflect on situations. You see, everything that you work on in life isn’t going to work out and it doesn’t matter whether you answer this question (although it’s ideal that you answer the question) about the workplace in situations where you failed there (not to the tune of billions of dollars obviously).

But you had a professional failure and what you learned from it and how you bounced back from it, taking that knowledge and taking the next step because, you know, trying to see tenacity, resilience, guts, courage . . . things along those lines.

So as you talk about your answer, think about, well, there’s a couple of different approaches to this.

Sometimes, the question is disguised . . . It is disguised as, “tell me about how you turned all dream into a reality,” and then they’ll follow up with “since he didn’t completely make it happen, what did you learn from the ‘incomplete’ on the course” or “tell me about the failure that you had when you tried to turn this dream into reality.”

Sometimes I’ll just be direct with it. “Tell me about the time you had to deal with failure,” which is why I’ve titled this as I did.

Ultimately, what they’re trying to do is what you learned from resilience, learned from the failure, how you’ve stepped up big or are going for in order to be the success that you are today.

Think about it folks. Not everything you do works and you are not looking to hire someone who’s going to whine, complain or moan. Particularly those of you have a senior level. What they’re looking for is someone who has had a failure (not failing is a failure according to Warren Buffett.

You can’t say that you have never failed because companies will judge that you have never taken a risk.

Firms like risk takers . . . calculated risk takers.

Firms like people who are willing to measure risk and take action. And sometimes it won’t work out, particularly for the senior people. They want to know that you can pick yourself up, dust yourself off and go from there because they’re being conditioned to believe that gritty people are the better individual to hire. Be prepared to talk about grit and determination.

Tough Interview Questions: How Do You Get In The Zone (VIDEO)

I think this is a ridiculous question, but someone was asked her last week.  There’s more than one way to answer the question.

Summary

Almost every day, early like this, I go online to talk with people about some element of job search. That's because I believe jobs hunting doesn't have to be hard, difficult, painful or take a long time. To me, the skills needed to find a job are different than those needed to do a job.

Today, I thought I would answer 1 of those tough interview questions I get asked on interviews. If you're interested in hearing more of my answers, I'm doing a year of shows about interviewing on my podcast, "No BS Job Search Advice Radio." That's available in iTunes, stitcher and other podcast services.

The question for today is, "How do you get in the zone?"

I'll simply say that this is a dumb question. It would never be as to the senior person. It tends to be asked of staff level people. How do you get in the zone? It's really very simple. What you have noticed on your way in what's the energy like in the office that you are interviewing with. Is there a buzz? Is it loud? Or is a quiet? What is it like energetically?

If you haven't noticed it, you have to take a cautious approach. Again, if this is something that is true of you, you talk about, "I love working in place with high-energy." Or, "I love working in a quiet place. When I get in the zone, I'm really locked in and the distraction of other noise . . . "Do you see where I am going?

If you haven't noticed it on the way in, you say something all bit more ambivalent or wishy-washy for lack of a better term. It's basically hedging your answer.

The way you say it, is something along the lines of, "hey look, I have worked in a lot of different places and I had been able to key in very well and perform at a high level. What is my preference? I like working with smart people." Thus, you deflect off of working or talking about the energy level in the office and focusing on that.

Again, either mirror what you walked into. Or, you hedge, and that get you off the hook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Tough Interview Questions: What Do You Look for When You Hire Someone?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/07/10/tough-interview-questions-what-do-you-look-for-when-you-hire-someone

EP 800!!!! I offer a textured answer to a more complex question than it seems.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Sounding Like a Mexican Song

EP 853  There is a very dumb mistake that people make on interviews that I find reminds me of someone singing a Mexican song,

Summary

Here, I'm going to talk with you about 1 of those stupid interview mistakes; I use a goofy title for it but you will recognize a pretty quickly. I call it, "Sounding like a Mexican song." When they ask you a question about what you did for your firm or what you do for your firm, this is what you sound like--" I, I, I, I." All you do is talk about yourself. You don't put yourself into the context of how you work with your coworkers. You don't give people a bigger picture of where you fit in.

For example, let's say you are a staff level individual. You are answering the question like, "So, what you do for your firm?"

"I work as a team that is responsible for… The overall group does such and such. My piece of that is .. This. As such, I work with a small subset of individuals that has a budget of X number of dollars that is responsible for... blah blah blah blah." Do you get weren't coming from?

You don't say, "I do this. I do that." You don't just simply say, " I, I, I, I"

The idea is to always contextualize yourself. The people of the picture of where you fit

If you're in executive, you can say that you took over responsibility for a group that is responsible for. You can also say "I manage a slice of business that does such and such. As such, I have responsibility for a budget of $500 million. I have a staff of X number of people that is broken up by.." They you start defining your department. "I have some really talented people working for me who have really helped me look good. Obviously, I provide leadership for this group. But the fact of the matter is that I've hired some very good people and they are individuals who understand what I want and go out and deliver. My job is to really understand what is needed so I interact with people in the business unit so they feel attended to..." Again, do you get weren't coming from here

It is not just about "I I I I." It is about giving people a picture of where you fit in, which are role responsibilities are, size of the budget, size the department... It's all about giving people a sense of size and scope.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

What Are Your Hobbies? (VIDEO)


Although this may not seem like a tough interview question, it is a subtle one with subtle intention. Here, explain how to answer it.

Summary

The question for today is (I know you're not gonna think this is a tough interview but I'm going to explain why am going to include this), "What are your hobbies?"

What the trying to do is to connect with you in some way and at the same time, you something to evaluate you with to see if you are an A performer or your someone who goes to the job, goes home and forgets about everything. They're not looking to find out if you're a member of "the resistance," or a member of the Republican National Committee as part of your part-time or volunteer work. What the trying to do is to see if there is something that can be translated into work-related stuff.

I know there are things in terms of organizing that can translate but you open up the possibility of being rejected based upon politics or faith, or other things. When you bring in religious organizations, when you bring in political activism… Stuff along those lines that I don't think really serve you. It may be true. Which would you rather be someone who is right or do you want to look at something a little bit differently and get the result?

What I suggest people do proactively is think about the things they do outside of work and tell the story of being actively involved so that you demonstrate something that's congruent with the work that you do. For example, the obvious case is, "What I do (this is a sales person's story) is competing martial arts. I work with the sensei, we test regularly, it is fabulous for my "edge" to be in a situation where I am constantly competing." You understand why that story works and, yes, I could've gone into this big elaborate story here, but I just want to make the simple point that there are things that you do in your personal life that demonstrate the right tone for answering this question.

If you think being a mom doesn't show that you can be well organized, that you have empathy and care for people that you are interacting with, you're missing the point of all this. This is a situation where you can bring out a great quality that employer wants to see in a new hire, brings a right to the surface in a very subtle way so that it is a part of your life and you demonstrate authenticity all in answering this question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL him

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

 

Two Second Interview Questions and Answers

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer two tricky questions that are often asked on second interviews.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about two questions the rest on second interviews pretty regularly. They aren’t difficult but, because of the stress and tension that is often associated with a second or third interview, people sometimes panic and blow the questions.

The first one is, “What have you learned about us so far?”

This requires a certain amount of good preparation for you because it will help coalesce your thoughts and opinions of this firm before the interview. You may be on a second or third interview. Each interview, you probably have spoken with different people or different groups of people that give you impressions about the job and the organization. You may have visited the website at some point before the interview.

Answer by starting off with an overview of the position as it is been discussed with you. When you get to the end of your description, pause and say, “Have I described it accurately because if I haven’t, I want to get the correct description of the position.”

Then talk about each of the people you’ve spoken with so far, what your sense of the personalities is and how they presented themselves to you ALWAYS IN COMPLIMENTARY TERMS, of course. Speak about the firm, what it’s standing is in its industry, what it does. That will come from the website and any other research that you’ve done.

So, that’s the easy question to handle. Then, there is the follow-up, “how would you proceed if you were hired for the role?”

Some people talk about it beginning from day one. I suggest talking about a firm before day one.

You receive the offer; you accept the offer; you give notice. You speak with your future manager about what their expectations are starting the role. You do that right after you give notice. In this way, you can lay out some plans, perhaps schedule some meetings not long after you come on board. Perhaps they have an idea of what your early schedule will be like, but it is best to talk about this proactively before you start, rather than beginning with your first day.

“On my first day, what will wind up doing is walking in and… ” Whatever

these are very simple questions but because of the stress associated with second or third interviews, you want to demonstrate that you have done your homework well.

And the second question (the one about preparing for when you start), that one is an easy one because what you are doing is showing that you are go-getter, aggressive, you are hardcharging and that you are getting yourself prepared even before you start.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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