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Job Search Lessons from “Game of Thrones”

If you have not been watching HBO’s series, “Game of Thrones” you have been missing an exceptional series on HBO. As I write this, I am still catching up and have not seen the final episode of the series yet. It is well written, engrossing and has multiple plot lines working concurrently in this medieval story of competition between different houses of the realm for control of the kingdom.

Like “The Sopranos” before it, there is a lot of intrigue and many betrayals (if you have been watching the series, you know I am being very gentile in describing it).

Here are a few lessons you can learn from the show that you can apply in your job search and in your career:

1. Never let yourself get talked into a job you know you don’t want. By far the biggest lesson offered, Lord Stark is persuaded by his friend, King Robert, to accept a role as “The Hand (like being chief of staff with the full authority to act as The King). Lord Stark never wanted to the role but did it as a favor to his great regret.

2. Be careful with choosing your allies when you join. As you would expect in a series like this, there is much intrigue at court and many people betraying others to gain power and influence that are not immediately apparent to Stark. By gambling that honesty and honor will b powerful enough to win the day, Stark places his life and that of his family at great risk. This leads to our third point.

3. Not everyone will be completely honest with what they tell you. Whether it is the HR person who has been in meetings to plan layoffs, the hiring manager who seems perfectly nice but is in fact a micro-manager or the recruiter who seems nice enough but is about to be fired unless she “closes a deal in the next two weeks,” every person you may meet when being interviewed may have an ulterior motive and not your interest at heart.

4. Have an exit strategy in place. Without a plan, Lord Stark is trapped by his principles. Abandoning them at a particularly important moment at the encouragement of one of his daughters, he and his daughter learn that when you trust a tyrant, you will eventually be crushed. Never trust a tyrant to keep their word!

5. Sometimes being lucky is a good thing. One of the characters is the outcast son of the patriarch of “the evil family.” He is forced to be in the vanguard of the soldiers sent into battle with “the good family.” A dwarf (or as he is sometimes referred to in the show, “an imp,” he gives a rousing speech to the men he will be joining and as the rush to battled, he is knocked unconscious by the club one of them is carrying to fight with. Although almost all of the these soldiers are slaughtered, he lives.

Watch the series on HBO or the DVD’s when they are available. It’s hard to explain but completely engrossing tv.

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2013
Frustrated at Work

Frustrated at Work

Frustrated: disappointed; thwarted: an announcer who was a frustrated actor.

Thwarted: to oppose successfully; prevent from accomplishing a purpose.

I do career coaching and often people ask me for advice about how to handle situations with colleagues. In this case, the situation presented to me was about how I might handle the “know-it all” who is doing something wrong and wants to be told that they are doing it right.

“I started to ask him about his use case when my boss stepped in and started to argue with them that they were doing it all wrong. All that happened is that I became frustrated as the two of them argued and nothing changed.”

In case you haven’t noticed, no one responds well to an argument that translates into “You’re wrong and I’m right.” The proof is in how many people were persuaded to change their minds about who to vote for (or against) in the last election.

After all the insults of political candidates, insults of people who supported a particular candidate, memes, etc., the number of people who changed their mind about who to vote for in the US could probably be counted on two hands. It is no different in the workplace or with your family. No one like to be told directly or indirectly something that translates into, “What are you stupid? What are you thinking? Where are your brains?”

All that happens is that one person or the other feels frustrated—thwarted in their desire to win. We expected to win because we were “right” in our minds. Their ideas have been held at bay.

What the words, “frustrated” and “thwarted” don’t address is how we emotionally respond as a feeling. What I have seen is that when we feel frustrated we become angry and direct that anger at ourselves because it would be wrong to direct it at the other person because there would be bad consequences.

Maybe you would be brought in for a meeting and told that what you did was wrong. Maybe it would affect your promotion, salary increases or bonus. Pretty quickly we learn that anger at others can’t be expressed at work so we still are still angry but hold it in and feel angry at ourselves.

There are many layers that people experience in episodes like this. Male know it all and female coworker. US born know it all not listening to non-US born co-worker who really just wants the best for him. Superior subordinate. White vs. non-white. Two white male superiors arguing and ignoring a female subordinate of a different nationality and race who only wants the best for the situation and actually knows better than either how to achieve it.

Lots of different subplots in the story that all lead to frustration. Anger. Anger held in. Anger that eventually becomes self-directed by three people.

How could it have been handled differently?

I think everyone could have approached it differently.

When dealing with a “know it all,” any questioning can be interpreted as criticism. Thus, when asked about a “use case,” this person sensed criticism was coming and put up his guard.

Better to have asked, “I’m curious, why did you take that approach? I would like to learn your thinking because I would have approached it differently and I need to learn from you.” Notice an acknowledgement that a difference would have existed and an invitation to explain choices.

Maybe “The Know It All” Does Know Better

After all, maybe, just maybe, the alleged “know it all” actually knows better that the supposed expert. Hasn’t that happened many times in the past? One side knows better than the supposed expert what they want and what needs to happen to satisfy them. Rather than demanding compliance with a structure that doesn’t work for the people who are forced to operate in it, it is better to hear them out and learn their point of view.

In addition, the playing field has been leveled between what are seeming combatants and there is an invitation to explain choices and reasons for decisions. The alleged expert can listen and learn as long as she is legitimately curious and acts like someone who wants to help them.

When her boss steps in and escalates the level of hostilities, she can say to him, “We are having a good discussion here and an opportunity to hear from someone who is affected by our work. Let me handle this and circle back to you if I need your expertise.”

Thus, she is able to defend the “know it all,” indicate that she is fine and, if her boss ignores her respond by saying, “I guess I’m not needed here,” and extricate herself from the warring armies having made an ally while respecting her boss’s authority.

Speaking to you who are managers, directors, VP’s, leaders in an organization, you need to learn to trust your people, rather than signal your distrust. A great response would have been, “Let me know if I can help.” That would have been inviting to both parties rather than turn things into a duel.

Who’s The Key Person in This Story?

We all know that not everyone is reasonable and that we all have days when we are “off.” When you think about this situation, the key person here is the SME, the real expert, who has to practice taking charge of situations and not allow herself to be run over by deflecting the attack into a legitimate desire to help while acknowledging that she would have approached the solution differently.

Why not ask questions, be quiet and listen. It might actually work in some family situations, too! 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC 2017   

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” “No BS Job Search Advice,” and “Job Search Radio.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Subscribe to the “No BS Coaching Advice” podcast.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

Giving Your Resume To Someone


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2016/09/14/giving-your-resume-to-someone

Jeff Altman The Big Game Hunter explains why giving your resume to someone who works for a company you want to target may not be the best way to get an interview. 

Summary

Let's talk today about approaching the furniture interested in working for. Conventional wisdom says to give your resume to someone who works there and have them bring it to the hiring manager as though this is the magic bullet that can get you the interview and advantage you are getting hired.

It can, but the thing that most people don't do is find out how close this person is to the hiring manager. I give you an example. Someone contact me and says, "I know this terrific individual. They are phenomenal. They are swell. They are terrific." The person approaches me as someone I barely had contact with if. As a matter of fact, the last time I heard from them was only asked to connect with me on LinkedIn. How much do I really trust this individual? The same might also be true with the people you're giving your resume to.

The goal is and just to give it to someone who works for the firm, but to find someone within the firm who is well connected with the hiring manager.

Barring that, you are sending your resume to the black hole because the hiring manager has no reason to trust this individual anymore then I have to trust that person who says, "this person going to refer to you is terrific, colossal and swell," and they had nothing to do with anything I do recruiting for plus I don't know this person who was telling me how wonderful their friendliness.

There are times where it is better to work with a friend to send a cover letter that addresses that addresses some of the pain points a firm has in hiring someone for this job. It can also be better to use a third-party recruiter who has had a good relationship with his hiring manager to introduce you. Otherwise, you are giving your resume to a different version of the black hole.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Bran or Bacon: Thoughts About Your Career AI and Machine Learning

Bran or Bacon: Thoughts About Your Career AI and Machine Learning

“One of the greatest handicaps is to fear a mistake. You have stopped yourself. You have to move freely in the arena, just not to wait for the perfect situation, the perfect moment . . . If you have to make a mistake, it is better to make a mistake of action than one of inaction. If I had the opportunity again, I would take chances.”

                                                                                                                                                                       ~Federico Fellini

 

I enjoy an occasional piece of bacon. I like sausage more but great bacon is something special for me. I live life as a bran guy and that shows up in how I have managed my career. I have been careful and cautious making very few jobs changes (5 companies in 40+ years) before moving into coaching.

That was a big change because it was all on me. I couldn’t lament that the firm that contracted for me was not providing adequate resources or that my co-workers were difficult. All choices are mine. But the funny thing is that they always were mine. I just wasn’t paying attention.

I was always pretty good at recognizing trends early. I bought my first computer in 1983 and included a modem to communicate with people in the pre-Internet days. I am LinkedIn member 7653 because I spotted something in the idea that was intriguing.

When I started my first search firm, I started to network with other recruiters in New York and did very well sharing fees Bran or Baconwith others. For those of you in IT, this was a time when “hot technology” was OS/COBOL and firms were starting to use CICS. Yes, it was a long time ago.

One of my affiliates called me one day and started to lament, “I’m going out of business. I have all these great OS/COBOL people and clients want them with CICS.” “Well, get them with CICS”

“But I have these great OS/COBOL people!”

“Who cares? Your clients sure don’t.”

He was out of business within 6 months of our call.

Folks, many of you have “safe careers” that will be replaced by AI.

How many of you have even considered the potential impact of artificial intelligence on your work?

I am pretty confident that even if you have thought about it for the 30 seconds or so most of you think about things, you have done nothing to start looking ahead to make plans for yourself and your career.

AI is still in its infancy and there is a lot ahead that will still need to be sorted out. Listening to a podcast recently, I heard one vendor firm discuss intelligence was now looking at videos to recognize truthfulness and confidence in what is being said. Decisions were being made as a result of this. Your answers to interview questions on video are being used to compare your answers with those of successful performers in their firm. You may delight in thinking that recruiters will be wiped out by this (they won’t) but trust me when I tell you that the same firms that sent jobs offshore (almost all) will be using AI to eliminate many of those jobs and yours.

If you are younger than 50, you need to be alert to the dynamics in your field because many of you will be obsolete in the next decade or so based upon AI/Machine learning.

Don’t think it can happen to you?

I remember having to go to a bank and stand online to hand a check to a teller who manually verified my signature byBran or Bacon looking at my signature card and deciding that it matched and then cashed my check. We now don’t like interacting with tellers, preferring the convenience of machines.

Being bran won’t help you be safe. Thinking bacon will. The choice shouldn’t be safe or sorry. There are other choices you have, too.

And don’t worry about professional cholesterol. You will wind up in the same place if you play it safe with professional bran instead of trying the sizzling professional bacon.

 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017    

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunterwork involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching from me?  Maybe you want me to critique your resume and/or LinkedIn profile or help you with a negotiation. Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

A Really Cool Negotiating Tactic | Job Search Radio

EP 333 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers up a fun and really easy to implement salary negotiation tactic.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Summary

I just want this speak with you and say that if you're working with a recruiter, I know this may be hard, but you just have to trust them to do the job. That job and I'm speaking of is to do the negotiation for you.

You get to the point where you have the offer or on the run up to the offer. There are 2 different approaches – – one from the contingency side, the other from the retained search side.

I think the retained search side finds it less difficult to do the negotiation. On the contingency side, there is a certain panic involved because there is that much more money that is involved in the way of a commission. Often, with a contingency recruiter, the relationship may not be as strong as it is with the retained recruiter. Again, knowing the relationship that your representation has with the client is going to be a big help to you.

Let's assume it is a contingency recruiter and you are on the run up phase and they ask, "So, how much are you looking for, again? I want to make sure I have the numbers right." By now, you should have an idea of how much you be looking for based upon what you know about the job, what you know in the way of comparables for people like you... I'm not talking about those broad salary ranges (just to pick arbitrary numbers) like $200,000-$275,000. Everywhere there's a $275,000, knowing here's the $200,000 and so they know your here's all the numbers in the middle. Recognize that that is a pretty broad range. You want to get more targeted.

When the recruiter starts to talk you down as often, they will try to do, that may be a signal that they already know what the hiring firm is going to propose. You can cut right through. "Have you spoken with the firm? What's the number they are talking about? Let's just go right to it." This way, you can start working for the case as to why they have to up the number and why they have to represent you to up the number.

When push comes to shove, you may already know that they offer $245,000, you will take it. They don't need to know that. You have to push for the biggest number because at this point, what they are trying to do is squeeze you into that pocket that your client has been trying to wedge you into and that may not necessarily serve your needs.

Again, given the idea that you're going to do this and is going to generate this amount of money. Save this amount of money. At the end of the day, the client may not necessarily shift AND you may go directly to the client. Initially, following the old Nixon proverb, trust but verify. You have to do a certain amount of trust because they represent you up until this point, you want them to represent you, across the finish line.

If you get to a point where the client hasn't budged asked them to schedule one more conversation for you. They will ask, "What's the intention?".

"I would just like to talk with them before I make my decision. It's a tough choice for me; it's important choice for me. I want to make sure I have all the information I need to make my decision."

Notice how noncommittal that is? You don't want to necessarily give the idea to the contingency recruiter that you will take the offer if the client doesn't budge. You want to get them to move a little bit And get them a little bit more flexible.

On the retained side, like I said, you can lay out the case more directly because they tend to be more forthright because they have less money at stake. Again, because of how you present it, you're always driving to the highest number. You don't have to be "nice." At this point, in the run up phase, they may have an idea of the number that is being proposed; they may not. Normally they will. Just go right to it.

"What's the number that they are talking about?"

You can respond by saying, "That's not going to be enough for me. I'm going to need them to make that 2nd number a such and such," and work from there. Start working through them and then again, go directly to the firm for one conversation. The ideal is if you walk in, but often that is not appropriate.
Skype, FaceTime, a phone call... However, works for you and them, set up one less conversation and then go for the close.

However, in situations where there is a retained search firm involved, be prepared to say yes or no on the spot. You don't want to let it dangle one because often offers are rescinded.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Feeling Trapped? Time to Do a Career Pivot | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice about what to do if you feel trapped or stuck.

Summary

You're working in a job, you have been doing the same thing for a long time. It has gotten to feel stale and old. What can you do? What can you do to bring some life and vitality to your work life?

Many of you feel trapped because you haven't really what to do next. What is the next stage or platform for your career? I want to help you think a little bit differently and to encourage you to reinvent yourself.

I am in my 60s at this point. Many of you in your 30s, 40s and 50s. You're feeling the same thing so many people do. Is this all there is? This has gotten boring. I'm not just happy doing what I'm doing and I want to do something differently. Maybe of a new manager who you reporting to who doesn't really know your work. What can you do?

Reinvent yourself. Take the skills that you have and think creatively about them. After all, if statistics bear out, many of you going to live to into your 90s. Why would you put up with this for so long?

Instead, think of how you can import your skills to something new. Think about how you can approach life differently and how you can approach your career differently. Maybe it is about going into business for yourself. Maybe it's about doing something on the side and what you do business as a part-time gig while you are working full time.

No matter. Think about how you can get out of the trap that you feel that you are in. It is not simply about changing your attitude. You feel trapped. Maybe this isn't the right career for you. Start working at doing something differently.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Using Twitter To Build Your Network | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter lays out a strategy for you to use Twitter as part of your networking.

Summary

Twitter is such an underutilized resource for you, as a job hunter, and I want to remind you that it is 1 of the easiest places to engage through in order to reach people that you want to connect with. You may find out who they are on LinkedIn and you may have a lengthy conversation with him on LinkedIn. If you are someone who is not job searching now and you have a target firm that you want to gain entrée into, twitter may be a more effective way to go beyond the connection request on LinkedIn to start building the relationship, having the conversation through and, from there, at the time that you are looking, be able to use your connections to use your connections from twitter to gain entrée to jobs.

Why do I say that? Because LinkedIn is such an aggressive job-search platform; people don't really have conversations there like they once did. Yeah, sometimes they do them in groups, but they don't do it in the social way. Yes, you can do information gathering kind of stuff. You can do something like an informational interview through LinkedIn. For the real personal relationships, consider going to twitter 1st. After all, you're not out there trying to find something right away; what you're doing is working to build relationships with people so that the time that you are looking, you can use them for leverage to get entrée into a firm.

For example, you can start by retreating posts that they have on their twitter feed. That's not too difficult, right? If you been following for a while, you reach out to them start of a conversation with. People been doing this with me for years; you notice them.

Don't be hesitant to reach out on twitter while you are a "happy camper" where you are. If the role, it's a networking you do when you're not looking for work that really pays off in your career. Don't be hesitant to reach out to twitter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

Can I Avoid Becoming Obsolete? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/17/can-i-avoid-becoming-obsolete/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone who wants to know how to avoid becoming obsolete.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

C Suite? Directors Looking to Advance? The Smart Way to Get Discovered. | Job Search Radio

Everyone knows the smart way to advance your career is by being discovered. In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a smart technique for being discovered.

Summary

As you have already discovered, if you follow the path that you used while you are a junior employee (applying to job ads), you will be wasting your time. What you want to be doing is getting yourself found in discovered by organizations. Yes, you can do that with a great LinkedIn profile , but that is only a small piece of what you should be doing. You should also be looking at putting yourself out publicly so the people discover you, your knowledge, your competence and have a positive impression of you so that they want to reach out to you about jobs and opportunities.

I'm in the process of researching the book now. I'm getting contacted by publicists for people, not just simply try to get their author on my podcast but as a result of researching a book for how people can make a certain level professionally, but publicists are reaching out to me in order to get their executive in front of me as part of the book.

For you who may be aspiring or you who is already in the role, a publicist can play a big part in your career progression. Don't neglect publicity with think that is for someone else because it then will be for someone else and they will get the job. They'll get the contact. They will hear about the opportunity that you don't.

Again, see if you can research publicists. I'm not to recommend any because I don't want you to think of getting a commission for recommending a particular publicist. I want to recommend the concept to you. Research them on your own. Start with Google. Ask friends or family. Start looking for people who can advance your career by getting you into media, getting you into conferences, getting you in front of influential writers who will be happy to quote you and happy to put you out there as part of their articles.

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

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