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How to Get a Job With Zero Experience

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains several ways to find a job with no experience.

Summary

Right off the bat, I want to encourage you to realize that you are going to be perseverance. This is not an instant strategy. There is no instant strategy for finding work unless mom or dad walks you in the door of the firm and you are hired because of them. That strategy works 100% of the time.

Assuming you are not born with a silver spoon in your mouth, this is the way to really do it.

There are 3 strategies.
1. Try to have someone introduce you to hiring manager. I need the quip about mom and dad, maybe it is an alumni from your school, who provides an introduction. Want to find some of those alumni that you don't really know? Go to LinkedIn and there are series of drop downs along the top. Locate the one that says, "Find Alumni." It will connect you with former students from your school and they can provide information about they found work at their organization and introductions.

2. You might try doing something related to what you do. You may not get hired as a teacher, but you might get hired as a teacher's aide. You may not be hired as an accountant at the firm that you want to join but that could be related position at that big 4 firm that could be a steppingstone to accounting. Maybe you have to temp at that firm before they consider hiring you. If you do temper the firm, make sure there is no noncompete in the temp agencies contract before you commit to joining.

3. This is "the guts one. " This is the one we are going to need to have some income to pay for this while you are doing it. Find the individual that is a leader an organization that you want to work for in the role that you wanted to do. Reach out to them an offer to do pro bono work. In turn. Be an assistant. Volunteer to do stuff for he or she. In doing that, what you will be doing is building a network of relationships within the firm because you will wind up in situations where you will be there assistant. Obviously, you have to do great work. If your intention is to do half-assed work and expect them to hire you, this is not a strategy for you.

However, if you put your effort and make connections, if you reach out to this person while you're working there, and ask "Please give me a sense of how I'm doing and what I can be doing better.' Again, you have to make some money elsewhere. You see were coming from with this? You're doing free work in order to get attention, a network, which, when you're coming out of school, you may not really have.

Building that relationship with an individual order two becomes a way that your entrée into an organization where some of you might notice you and poach you to their project or team.

These are 3 great ways in order to find positions (plus of course the 4th 1 which, of course, is, Mommy or Daddy get you the job.)

I hope you have the courage to not download stores and build those relationships because it will make all the difference to you, not just simply in this job search, but in every single one from this point on.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You Need to Change Jobs to Get Ahead (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s critical for you to make strategic job changes periodically to get ahead.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the fact that you really need to change jobs from time to time. The system is set up to keep you in a tough position financially.

Think about it. If you stay in one organization, most people are going to get very modest salary increases. When you're the junior level, they may give you $5000 or $10,000. That may sound like a big percentage when you are making $50,000. They may say it is a 10% or 20% increase... But think about it. Archer costs going up even more? Isn't the government taking more in taxes? You are basically standing still.

When you become more experienced in the percentage increase comes down a lot (many individuals are getting 2%, 3% or 4% increases), even at that $50,000 level, haven't you noticed your insurance premiums have increased? Haven't you noticed that everything your bind cost a lot more than it used to? Movie tickets are going up?

Financially, the system is really set up to force you to change jobs. If you are getting that 3%, 4% or 5% raise, how do you get ahead financially?

Here's some simple math. If you change jobs as a $50,000 your person, and you change jobs for another $5000, if you didn't change jobs again, over the next 5 years receive the same modest increase of 3% or 4%, you probably be ahead by about $27,000 pretax. By changing jobs one time and staying there for 5 years, this is where you would pay.

If you change jobs one time and 3 years into your tenure with this 1 firm, you change jobs again, you would be $35,000 ahead pretax even though in the way that I've explained this you did not get a raise during that five-year period of time. I'm not saying that $5000 Is is a big increase. Obviously, it isn't.

But let's look at $10,000 or $15,000 increases and see what happens. If you get a $10,000 raise for changing jobs and stay there for 5 years, you would be about $53,000 ahead Given that modest 3% or 4% increase. If you changed jobs a 2nd time, you be about $74,000 or $75,000 ahead. How can you stay still at your current organization within give you a 3% decrease when they are just telling you that you are doing great work? That handshake they give you is not going to pay your bills when they start increasing!

My advice to you is to be smart.. Do what organizations do when they start establishing a budget. When things get tough, they do what's right for the stockholders and for the Board of Directors and they cut jobs, right? They look out for the business interests and, if that involves you, tough luck. You have to look out for the Board of Directors for your organization. "Atta boys," and, "Atta girls,"

"You're doing a great job. We're going to give you a promotion. You're doing great work."

I've got to tell you that other firms will have you do great work, too. AND you will make a lot more money.

My advice to you is to be smart and start looking for something else from time to time and if you just want to keep your profile up to date on LinkedIn and attract recruiters to it, think of it like a resume with keywords.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Salary Negotiation Mistake of Acting from Impatience and Anxiety

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake of anxiety and impatience and how to overcome them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Going Against the Advice You're Getting

​Going Against the Advice You’re Getting | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/11/02/%e2%80%8bgoing-against-the-advice-youre-getting/

EP 425​ Maybe you’ve gotten advice from friends to do or not do something. Maybe your parents are threatening you. Here I talk about how to process they input and how to respond.

Summary

For some of you older professionals, you may not think this applies to you, but it does because there are times where you're going to go against the wishes of a mentor, an advisor, your friends, your wife, husband or partner and you are going to confront this sort of issue.

That's because the one thing I do know is that everyone has opinions and everyone knows what you should do, but they don't really know or act on what they should do.

So, with parents, this may be more applicable for younger professionals, often, there are threats associated with it because you are still dependent upon them for financial assistance or because you feel hooked in and require their support. The threats are overwhelming.

With other people who know better than you what's right, there is just "the dismissal factor." They start to act as though they are dismissing you and your opinions.

I was encourage people to take a step back for a 2nd and take the emotional charge out. Even if you have to take a day off from the decision, remove the charge. Then, from there, let's start breaking down what they are really telling you.

If it is the threat about you disappointing the family, if it is the threat that basically translates into, "you are going to fail and you are a loser," answer the question, "Why?" What do they think you're going to fail and that you are a loser? What are you going to be someone who can't succeed when you are following through on something you really want to?

Ultimately, what you need to do is sit down with yourself and go, "Why is it that I want to make this change?" If the answer is, "This is the work that I love. There's a market for it. There is something here that will give me the opportunity to really feel satisfied," by all means, I think you should do it and let others down gracefully.

With friends, is often easier to say, "Hey! Thanks for the input. I really appreciate it. I think I'm going to go ahead with this because if it fails, it fails! I'll pick up and do something else. If I succeed, it is a homerun for me and I will love doing what I'm doing."

Often, with family, it's harder because parents always treat you like someone who's under their thumb. I know my parents did and judging by what I read from people who message me at different times or come to me for coaching, it happens more often than not.

What you need to do is figure out what is right for you and, if you make a mistake, you make a mistake. It is not the end of the world. You'll make a different decision and, come to a different conclusion after you have experienced this. However, when push comes to shove, it's your life. It's your choices. You've received input. It doesn't resonate for you. Go to it at 150% and really push yourself to make it work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Finding the Firm That is Hiring

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to find out the name of the company that is hiring for that job when the Recruiter drops the ball.

Summary

I spent two thirds of my life as a recruiter. So talking about this, I will never suggest that you go around the recruiter because there are a lot of advantages that come with working with the search firm. But, if a recruiter drops the ball and you disagree with their opinion or action, I am offering a way to get at the hiring firm so that in this way, you have a chance to present yourself.

I want to help solve the puzzle that some of you have about finding a hiring firm. Here's a situation that happened to someone that I knew. I was coaching him and this happened a few years ago.

He saw a listing from a recruiter, contacted the person, but they didn't get back to him for 3 or 4 days. Even though they said they would get back to him the next morning. He called. No response. He called. No response. You really thought he fit the job. He asked me for advice. Here's what you do.

Sometimes, recruiters are little bit lazy. So they will copy and paste job descriptions and turn them into ads.. Why don't you do a Google search, taking some lines out of the job description and see if you can find the position. Sometimes a recruiter will change a few words in the description so you will start off with a broad statement, maybe in the 2nd sentence, or the 3rd sentence, not necessarily the 1st. You look at the requirements of the job and work with 2 or 3 bullet points. ESPECIALLY if there is lengthy text there. Enter into Google and see if something turns up for you.

You can try Indeed or SimplyHired and try the same thing but start with Google. That's what happened for this person. They were able to find the position and apply for the job (the firm didn't hire him). The recruiters judgment was correct. He wasn't really a fit.

However, if you believe you are and want to do this, this is the simplest way to find the firm involved . I see if you can find a third-party recruiter that is sufficiently lazy that they copy and pasted the job description that you can find it.

Remember, there is always the advantage of working through the recruiter. I want to be clear about that. If you can work through her recruiter, you are advantaged, the firm is advantaged, and there are lots of benefits to it for you, including (1) they are going to handle scheduling, (2) they are going to be the ones hocking the employer to see you, (3) they are going to be negotiating,. After all, they know the rough edges and have a relationship with the client. They can speak to those rough edges and handle them for you. There are lots of advantages to working with a recruiter.

However, if for some reason they dropped the ball, where they make a judgment that you disagree with, this is the way to find out about the job so you can apply directly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Don’t Kid Yourself. Promoting Yourself Is Critical

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the importance of branding and building a reputation for your career.

Summary

Branding. I know you don't like that term. You roll your eyes up. "What am I talking about branding for? What even care about this kind of stuff?"

The fact of the matter is no one I know has been raised to believe that branding is important. The idea that you need to promote yourself, just like you are a box of detergent or a cereal has any meeting to you.

Yet, when you stop and think about it, for career management purposes, branding is the most important thing that you will be doing over the next 5 years if you are my age, 25 or 40 years if you are younger.

Let me give you different word to think of. Reputation. Reputation is based upon your past. How you delivered when the chips were down. How many people knew about it and what they knew about your contribution to this when the chips were down. Let me offer a few examples.

If you're not is the person who did such and such, and everyone in your organization, every last person you corporation knows, how many people is that really? If you're the major American corporation, that can be 1/4 of a million people. But the likelihood of all of those people knowing about your contribution is next to nonexistent.

Let's say it is all the people your department and it is a large firm. Abby people do you think that might be? 50? 100? 500? 1000? And again, the likelihood of all those people knowing about your specific accomplishments is very very small. If you're the small firm, and everyone at the firm knows about you, 50, 75 people, 100 people! 300 people know about you and what you have done. And who else?

Part of the notion of branding requires self-promotion. People outside your organization know what you have done and open what you think about. LinkedIn is now a great tool for that in a variety of different ways. You are not restricted to LinkedIn as a venue for self-promotion. Think in terms of press releases, articles that you write, a blog, a whole host of avenues where the notion that your ideas and your contributions have meaning becomes incredibly important.

I do a want to promote myself, whether it's with videos, podcasts, e-zines, a blog, a whole host of ways where I do things so that people know about me. I know I know a lot do. But, even then, it is not enough. I am working on new venues to promote myself.

You need to think creatively for yourself and what you can do to speak at the conference, for example, on your contribution to something or your thoughts about something. If you are a beginner or a to your person, that might be a club related to or a trade group related to your industry or your area of specialty.

No matter, it is important that you get out there and create an image for yourself a brand for yourself, an expectation for yourself that others will know about. Otherwise, you may just get stuck in a rut and be another wage slave for the rest of your career.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What to Do When the Head Hunter Calls (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice about what to do when a head hunter calls you.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about working with recruiters and what you need to know and say and NOT SAY when you are working with a recruiter. Let's work with the assumption that this is NOT 1 of those calls were you send a resume in and that instead, you are getting a call out of the blue. The call might sound something like this, " My name is Jeff Altman. I'm a professional recruiter. I heard some nice things about your work and want to get acquainted with you in the context of the search time doing. Is this a good time to talk or would be better if we spoke another occasion?"

That's a pretty standard phone call for people to get. Often, people start off by making the mistake of trying to put the recruiter on the defensive. "Who gave you my name," are the 1st words that come out of their mouth.

Why? What difference does it make who gave them your name or how they found you? They found out about you. They might've had a research group that found out about you online and found out about you… There any number of ways that people could learned about you. It really doesn't matter how they found you, even if it came from your boss! Your boss doesn't want you around, right? Pay attention to the phone call and give up this notion of finding out who it was who gave them your name.

Most of the time when I would call someone, 1 of the few things might have happened.
1. We did research and found this person.
2. Someone was kind enough to point me in your direction.

Those are the 2 basics all the time. What difference does it really make to you where it came from? If it came from a friend, you still have to qualify. The friend doesn't know everything about you; you still have to qualify. Start listening and answering questions. Listen to what the recruiter tells you about the job.

They'll usually turn around and ask, "Is this a good time, or would it be better if we spoke another occasion?"

"It would be better if I call you back in 10 or 15 minutes. Does that work for you," if it's not a good time. If it is a good time, great! "Tell me about the role that is involved." Let them talk with you about the job. You'll learn 2 things from this. The 1st is that you will learn something about the job. The 2nd is that you learn something about the recruiter.

Listen to how the recruiter tells the story. Do they seem competent or they tell you a whole bunch of generalities that don't mean anything? Are they talking with you about (super excited voice) this great opportunity where you have an opportunity to be Emperor of The Universe! You know I'm being facetious here, but so often, recruiters, in their youth in their enthusiasm and in their inexperience, start talking about "the great opportunity."
.
STOP THEM! They told you something about themselves. They're going to try and sell you some sizzle; stick with the content for now. What is the job? What do they need someone to have done? What will be the expectations of you? What is the compensation like?

If the money isn't right or the job isn't right, you can politely say, "This role isn't really for me. I am earning more (or the job is really interesting). Let me tell you little bit about myself." Then, you can tell them about the work you actually do and give them a sense of the compensation level. Do it in a professional way. Don't try to put this recruiter on the defensive.

Why? All they did was try to get you a better job.. They made one phone call. Maybe it lasted 2 minutes in length. What's the big deal? Be courteous. After all, you never know when someone in recruiting will put you on a list to never call you back again. I used to do that. I don't need to have my time wasted by people who are discourteous. They also involve the institutional customers who I fired regularly.

1. Find out about the job.
2. Answer their questions. This doesn't just mean answer their questions. It means answer their questions in the context of what they are trying to find. Sell those elements of your background that relate to the job that is involved.
3. Once you've done that, talk with them about what their background is. Yes them, whether they have submitted any people for this role. How old is this search? It is brand-new and just opened up or is it one that has been open for a while? It's hard to win. If you're 1 of the 1st people walking in the door, right?

Let me also say that if it's 3 months into the search, they may be close to exhausting the pool of people to consider. They may have people on 2nd or 3rd interviews. Why get involved then? If they don't have anyone coming back on 2nd or 3rd interviews, why get involved? The other don't know what they're looking for. They don't know how to interview or evaluate people.

Find out about the status of the search and ask about the recruiters background as well. I will let you in on a secret. Most recruiters don't have 40 years of experience like I did. They live in tell you that they have 10 years of experience. That's why listing at the beginning of the conversation tells you a lot about them.

Are they experienced will do they seem amateurish? Do they sound like they know what they're talking about or are they saying a whole bunch of "stuff" to you that comes out of the recruiters playbook of "fabulous opportunity," "great job,", "you really need to talk to them," "you've got nothing to lose." The amateurs use all those clichés. If that is the case, thank them for making the call, asked him to send you some information and move on.

You can decide to listen to some youthful recruiter speakers may not have their people behind them that will actually be quite competent. Inexperienced recruiters is not someone that you really want to talk to. You might ask, "Are you coordinating the search for are you doing legwork for someone else?" Really simple questions tells you a lot about the competence of the recruiter.

The most important thing I could tell you the is to listen. Listen to what they have to tell you, and listen between the lines to learn about their competence. Sell to them because even if it's not this job. It could be another one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter?

No B. S. Job Search Advice: Getting Known on LinkedIn

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to become known on LinkedIn as a subject matter expert and explains how to do it.

Summary

I'm a big fan of the LinkedIn blogging platform. If you go to your LinkedIn profile and look at the search box across, not the very top, the one on your homepage, you'll notice a pen or pencil and if you click that, there is a place where you can write articles, post videos and podcasts... Articles, videos and audios that you want to share with people on LinkedIn.

When all is said and done, as I talked about this, a lot of you are saying to yourself, "I'm no good at this. Who is going to want to read my stuff?" There are people who are following you with whom you are connected who will want to read your stuff they want to get your ideas. Along with the idea of it being no good, frankly, it probably won't be at the beginning. As time progresses, you will get better. Like everything else you've done in your life and your career, the more you do it, the better you get.

You'll start reading other people's articles, watch their videos and listen to their podcasts and notice the ones that you like and don't like. You'll notice people who are influencers. LinkedIn is cherry pick them and you will see that they have tens of thousands of views and, sometimes, thousands of comments. Don't compare yourself to them.

What will happen is that they will people will start to follow you based upon what they say, who are not even connected with. They are going to be interested. The 1st time you write or publish, you may only get 10 or 20 people or 5 people reading what you wrote. The more you do it, the more people start noticing it and start reading it.

After you have written it, there is a place underneath the headline where you can share it on social media. Sharon on Facebook. Shared on Twitter. Sharon on Google+. On LinkedIn, there are 2 ways to share it. One way is to share it with your connections; another way is to share with the public. Start with your connections and, at the same time, share 2 groups that you remember. From there, come back and share it with the public. Share with the public several times over time because people log on to LinkedIn at different times and they may not see the 1st post because they were not light at that time. But they may see the 2nd 1 or the 4th 1. Don't do within 10 minutes of one another. Wait at least 6 hours before you re-share it.

At the end of the day, what you want to be doing is building a following of people who see you as a subject matter expert. At this point, my 1st level connections I think I have about 14,000. I have close to 16,000 were following me. That includes connections and other people who have chosen to follow me.

You can create the same momentum for yourself. My message about job search is a specific one. You are going to have one about something completely different. Get out there and get seen as a subject matter expert because, at the end of the day, opportunities are going to come to you because people see you as being an expert.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Cutting the Line to Get Ahead

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a strategy for you to get ahead once you have your next job.

Summary

So many people believe in making incremental job changes and doing the slow, working your way up the ladder thing. That may work for some people but a lot of you can be doing much more.

I want to remind you, using Barack Obama as an example, there is someone who is in assemblyman who became US Senator and immediately began running for president. Maybe you sat in the Senate for less than a year before she went out campaigning. He wound up working the system in a way that served him many of you believe it serve the country and if you don't. This is not about politics. However, I am to look at him from a career perspective as being someone who made quick enormous jumps that allowed him to advance.

This is an easy work and it certainly wasn't for him. Certainly it would be for anyone is able to take advantage of this.

If you're out of work trying to find something, this isn't a strategy for you. However, if you or someone who has something right now, this is the time to start looking for that next big leap so that you're not changing jobs incrementally for the $2000 raise, the $5000 raise. You are going for the big jumps. You're going for the big moves... And you have the experience to back it up.

In politics, is pretty common for presidents to be younger than senators or congressmen , but in business. We look at our progression as being one slow step up the ladder to another, until, eventually, we are supposed to hit the top. It doesn't work that way, doesn't it?

Let's not kid ourselves. You are not going to incrementally work your way up the ladder. You may need to start a business. You may need to take advantage of your connections and keep building networks after you have landed in order to take this big leap. However, you do it, you just gotta do in order to get that to the top faster, rather than on that slow boat.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Three Job Search Questions to Ask Yourself (VIDEO)


It is a lot easier to drive from Dallas to Montreal with a map, design a system with with written specifications, or play a game knowing its rules, right?

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Summary

I'm going to ask you a group of questions now that I believe are going to be helpful to you in framing your job search. The 1st 1 I'm sure you'll have an answer for but most people I speak with don't have a clue about the answer to the 2nd or 3rd.

Let's start over that 1st question – – What you want to achieve in your career? What are your goals? What are you trying to get you professionally? At the end of all this work you're going to be doing, what's the outcome that you want to be getting to? Most people I talk to will give me an answer that's plausible.

When I test a little bit further with the next question which is, "Do you know what you need to know/the steps you need to take in order to get there?" They start to fumble a little bit and get nervous. You can tell that they are winging it in answering the question. They haven't thought about it at all.

Here's the 3rd question: "What's your plan?" How are you going to get there from here? What are you going to do? What kind of work are you going to do? What training you need to get? Who will be your mentor? What kind of departments will you need to work it? What kind of training objectives will you need to have in order to accomplish that?

That's why everything breaks down for most people because their objective is really to get a promotion to replace the work and work their way up the ladder, changing jobs every once in a while and leading a relatively mundane existence.


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

 

NOTE: THE WEBSITE MENTIONED AT THE END OF THE SEARCH IS DEFUNCT. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN 1 ON 1 COACHING TO HELP YOU MOVE ALONG PROFESSIONALLY, EMAIL ME AT  JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us. In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

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