Leaving a Message? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an important tactic for leaving a message when you are networking.

Summary

If you are out there trying to find work, you're probably out there trying to network with people. How are you doing it? Your emailing. Hopefully, you are also calling not just simply hiding behind email and expecting that to do all the work for you. The hopefully not hiding behind LinkedIn and not just simply sending inMails to folks. Instead, if you are going to be calling someone, I want you to think about the message that you are to leave for them proactively.

I had a few calls recently were people left messages that were absolutely awful. It was clear that they were thinking of what to say on the spot and, as a result, 1 of them did leave a phone number, another one forgot to give me any way to get a hold of them... It's ridiculous.Just be clear about what you want to say when you call someone.

If you are networking, simply say, " I wanted to reconnect with you. It is been a long time. Please give me a call back at ..." In very simple ways, leave messages that are clear about what you are trying to accomplish AND MAKE SURE THAT YOU TELL THEM HOW TO REACH YOU!

By the way, follow-up with an email just because folks are busy, the more likely to get the email if they are in meetings and act on it quickly . Then they might with a phone call. Leave a voicemail but follow-up with an email.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Why Interviews Die.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why interviews die and what you can do to avoid t him him him hat from happening.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about why interviews die.

You know, you're sitting with the employer and you just have that sinking feeling like this is a huge fail.

There are number of reasons why they fail. The 1st 1 is because the hiring manager reviewed your resume and interpreted something you wrote that you didn't intend it to say. That mistake is from the employer standpoint. That's not your fault. Sometimes, they read things into your resume and wish and hope and think and pray that maybe you have that particular experience. And, you know, within 5 minutes. Everyone knows that you don't have the background that they are looking for.

Another reason is that is your fault. Sometimes, you overstated skill or experience or success, and, if you desire to get that interview, you oversold yourself. That's your fault.

You wasted your time. You wasted someone else's time. I have that happen in resumes all the time. People send resumes and they really don't have the experience that the resume suggests I can tell within 2 minutes at that is the case. I just get them off the phone fast.

Don't overstate what you can do. By the same token, don't understated. Just be accurate.

Sometimes , "fail because, frankly, the interviewer gets lost in the thought. They have other things on their plate and interviewing is 1 of 25 things they may have, to contend with on a given day. So, for whatever the reason, the timing wasn't right for the interview. You are stuck sitting there or trying to talk with them and realize pretty quickly that you've lost them attention.

Finally, this 1 is your fault, you are boring. They ask you a question, you never organize your thoughts around this topic and you go off and drone on and are absolutely awful and how you present your ideas. You give long-winded answers to questions that need to be answered in 35 to 45 seconds.

What can you do to avoid this? The easiest thing is to ask them about the role that you're going to be interviewing for. Just don't accept the interview. Asked him to talk with you about the job and exploring a bit. This way, if they are projecting experience onto you that you don't have, you can investigate further and say, "I really haven't done what you're looking for. This is what I have done. Does that work for you?" If they say, "no," you save everyone a bunch of time.

Another thing you can do is don't exaggerate. Lay out exactly what you know and what you've done. Exaggeration just put you in the position of wasting a lot of folk's time.

If you get a sense that the interviewer is often thought (if you're in a phone interview this is a really easy one), this is one trick – – cough. Doing a quick cough will jolt them back to attention. If you are in an in person interview, shift your position a little bit and that will get them back.

To avoid droning on, pay attention. Here the question if you are in person and stay on point. If you're doing this over the phone. Very simply, shut down the question on a slip of paper (you do have your resume in front of you for a phone interview, don't you). Johnson notes down on your resume and let that remind you how to stay on point.

Finally, keep your answers to 30 to 45 seconds. Where possible. What I found is that when people go over 45 seconds. The interviewer starts to mentally "channel surf" and start thinking about other thoughts other than you. Keep your answers brief and to the point and. You'll find that you not going to wind up losing them.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about why interviews die.

You know, you're sitting with the employer and you just have that sinking feeling like this is a huge fail.

There are number of reasons why they fail. The 1st 1 is because the hiring manager reviewed your resume and interpreted something you wrote that you didn't intend it to say. That mistake is from the employer standpoint. That's not your fault. Sometimes, they read things into your resume and wish and hope and think and pray that maybe you have that particular experience. And, you know, within 5 minutes. Everyone knows that you don't have the background that they are looking for.

Another reason is that is your fault. Sometimes, you overstated skill or experience or success, and, if you desire to get that interview, you oversold yourself. That's your fault.

You wasted your time. You wasted someone else's time. I have that happen in resumes all the time. People send resumes and they really don't have the experience that the resume suggests I can tell within 2 minutes at that is the case. I just get them off the phone fast.

Don't overstate what you can do. By the same token, don't understated. Just be accurate.

Sometimes , "fail because, frankly, the interviewer gets lost in the thought. They have other things on their plate and interviewing is 1 of 25 things they may have, to contend with on a given day. So, for whatever the reason, the timing wasn't right for the interview. You are stuck sitting there or trying to talk with them and realize pretty quickly that you've lost them attention.

Finally, this 1 is your fault, you are boring. They ask you a question, you never organize your thoughts around this topic and you go off and drone on and are absolutely awful and how you present your ideas. You give long-winded answers to questions that need to be answered in 35 to 45 seconds.

What can you do to avoid this? The easiest thing is to ask them about the role that you're going to be interviewing for. Just don't accept the interview. Asked him to talk with you about the job and exploring a bit. This way, if they are projecting experience onto you that you don't have, you can investigate further and say, "I really haven't done what you're looking for. This is what I have done. Does that work for you?" If they say, "no," you save everyone a bunch of time.

Another thing you can do is don't exaggerate. Lay out exactly what you know and what you've done. Exaggeration just put you in the position of wasting a lot of folk's time.

If you get a sense that the interviewer is often thought (if you're in a phone interview this is a really easy one), this is one trick – – cough. Doing a quick cough will jolt them back to attention. If you are in an in person interview, shift your position a little bit and that will get them back.

To avoid droning on, pay attention. Here the question if you are in person and stay on point. If you're doing this over the phone. Very simply, shut down the question on a slip of paper (you do have your resume in front of you for a phone interview, don't you). Johnson notes down on your resume and let that remind you how to stay on point.

Finally, keep your answers to 30 to 45 seconds. Where possible. What I found is that when people go over 45 seconds. The interviewer starts to mentally "channel surf" and start thinking about other thoughts other than you. Keep your answers brief and to the point and. You'll find that you not going to wind up losing them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

If You Must Use The Applicant Tracking System (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to format your resume if you must apply through the applicant tracking system.

Summary

If you have to apply, if you choose to apply to an applicant tracking system, don't do these things:

1. Don't send the PDF. Applicant tracking system still have a standard way of deciphering the PDF so that they try to do is extract information from the document and provide a summary that suggests who they would choose the interview. With PDFs being in a typical format for many systems, they will be making mistakes. When they make mistakes, you are at risk of being rejected. Don't use a PDF

2. No tables. No graphics. Again, because it is an atypical format there are issues with how a table or graphic can be processed. It "hurts" and thus you are risk of being rejected.

3. The base resume as you like but, recognize that what you did back in The Stone Ages isn't important to employers. Yes, the data may be there. But even when you get in front of the person, you may be rejected based upon this being old information. If you have to take the resume and make it more thorough, not longer but thorough, do it. But, recognize that the older the information is , the less attractive it is to employer.

4. I'm told that the way you label your experience on your resume should be as "Work Experience," because systems like that language because it is a key to them as to what to look for. "Professional Experience" is not the language that they want; they want, "Work Experience."

5. This is a formatting thing for the systems. The way you format it is with employer name, your title and date. You don't do title then date off to the side and that employer name underneath it. You want to start off with employer name because the system is looking for that, your title and then date. The system can extracted very easily.

If you have to apply it through an ATS this is how you do it. If you insist on doing it your way, you're making a big mistake.

I also have a video that talks about dealing with applicant tracking systems and defeat the ATS by making your real experience clear.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Is Rigged Against You


Let me explain how recruiters set you up.

Summary

If you are in the United States and you decide to buy a house, they make you sign a document that says you understand that there is a sellers agent and the buyers agent and that you understand that at times the realtor is going to operate in both capacities.

Why do they do that? Because the realtor has a financial interest in the transaction and that depending upon who they represent it by different frame from yours. If you are a sellers agent for a combined agent, your interest is with the seller because they are the ones paying you.

If they are the buyer's agent, they are representing you and have your interests at heart

In the recruiting there is nothing comparable explain to you or offer to you. They are always the agent of the employer; they are never your agent.

Why do I say that? Who's paying? Where do they earn their money from? As a result of that quote unexplained relationship" that exist between a recruiter and the employer, you always need to look at this person, this recruiter as, "can I trust this person to speak for me." How are they trying to manipulate me? How are they trying to change my mind, my beliefs, in order to accommodate an employer? How am I being "finessed" or manipulated into doing what the employer wants me to do at the lowest possible price?

I believe it's important for you to get unbiased representation. You can't always go to the immediate sources or resources (recruiters or employers) because they are looking out for their interests.

If you go to friends, family, wife, husband, partner, former managers, you may be getting advice from someone who knows as little as you do about job hunting. After all, my experience with former managers is that they think they know more about job hunting than they actually do. They deceive themselves because they think that because they hired someone in the past (or many people in the past) that makes them qualified to get advice about job hunting. Seeing them is job hunters as often as I do, I know how wrong they are. Most know less than nothing about job search.

Many of the people that you might seek out for advice are as uninformed as you are. You need to find someone who if you quality advice throughout your job search, who can guide you all the way through the process and represent you and your interests, who is not beholden to an employer.

I do that kind of work and I'm sure others do it as well. I to it with great content jobsearchcoachingHQ.com and I do with coaching where you hire me to answer your questions and concerns. I'm not be hired by an employer to place you in a job; I'm there to help you find your next position.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

What Do You Have To Lose (VIDEO)

 

Have you ever finished second on a job interview? Here’s an idea for something that you can do and maybe you’ll win it later!

Summary

I have a great idea can be helpful to many of you.

Never lose our job? You were beaten out. The manager agonized, but chose the other person. It happens. Have you really wanted that job? Yeah, and it's a disappointment when you lose out. Here's my idea.

It's not like you are incompetent. It's not that you are a loser. I just of the other person market themselves better than you. Maybe they interview better. Maybe they presented better.

Sometimes, there is a single buyer's remorse where an employer winds up deciding a few months later, "I really wish I had that other person."

2 months after you the job has been closed down, after you been turned down, put a little reminder on your calendar and contact the recruiter who presented you (if you are present. The buyer recruiter) or contact the manager directly.

Say, "I! How are you? How's the new person working out?" You keep your mouth shut. "They are doing great!" "I just want to know how much I enjoyed meeting with you and how interested I was in that role. I took a chance that maybe this person wasn't working out so I thought I would reach out to you." It's a great tactic

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

A Really Cool Negotiating Tactic (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers up a fun and really easy to implement salary negotiation tactic.

Summary

Let's say hypothetically, you are someone who is looking for salary the hundred $150,000 And they came in at $140,000. I don't want to respond by saying, (in a whiny voice), "This is very disappointing. I had $150,000 in mind. (Sobbing)." Were some of the behavior like that because they don't care. Here's what I want you to do.

As you are speaking to the hiring manager who is made the offer to you, I want to respond by saying, "Wow! That is really fabulous! I am so looking forward to joining you. I think there are a lot of things I can do right out-of-the-box that will really go a long way toward proving my value to you. Can we set the start date on…" And you set up the start date.

They start lowering their guard a little bit and then you turn and say, "I have one small thing I need to resolve with you.. That 2nd number needs to be up a little bit. Instead of before, it needs to be a 5. That I can clearly walk in the door." They may respond by saying, "No," but what you are going to do is pay that image of you walking in the door 1st by saying, "I am so looking forward to joining. It's such a great opportunity. Thank you. This is such a great offer. I really think I can…" You have a sense of how I'm playing this?

"But I need to set fixed one thing here. That 2nd number needs to be a 5 and not a 4. I will be there very quickly."

What you're doing is committing to joining and basically accepting the offer but you are saying it has to be up a digit. It is a very subtle approach. It is very enthusiastic and sucks the man and making them feel as though they have hired you and then you are dropping the hammer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Taking a Top-Down Approach (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take a top-down approach to your job search.

Summary

Most of the time, you're going out of your way to apply for jobs. I get it. There's a job opening out there and you're trying to talk to people and apply for that job. Here's a different approach; I'm not telling you replace that technique with this one; I want to encourage you to add this 1 to your toolbelt.

What I want to do is start reaching out to people that you want to work for; you can find them on LinkedIn and a host of different ways. Then, correspond with them. To be clear, I'm not telling you to stalk them.

For example, if you are an executive there are things that you've written and done that they relate to something that interests them. Forward that to them. Indicate that you're interested in working for them and for their organization; this is a sample of your work that they might find interesting; Hope to be able to meet them at some point soon. Leave it at that.

Follow-up a day or 2 later, just to confirm that they received it. Maybe you get through. Maybe you don't. The idea that was to correspond with executives about executive roles. Don't just simply apply for jobs. Network your way to these people as well. Kind of box them in/surround them with communications so that they get to know you and know your ideas. Knowing your ideas will go a long way toward getting their attention.

I want to be clear. Nothing works all the time and this will be another example that. If all you're doing is applying for jobs, if all you're doing is circuitous networking or informational interviews, you're missing out on approach with this 1 that will help you pick up some more interviews and perhaps that job that you're looking for.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Job Search When I Work in an Open Area (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about how to job search when you work in an open space floor plan.

Summary

I'm here with the question for a job hunter designed to help them, help you with your job search.

The scenario they present is very simple. They work in office with an open floor plan and, unfortunately, if you take the call or even respond to email, there are a bunch of people around them. How do you do a job search. When you work in an open space?

The answer is actually pretty easy , but I understand the fear involved of being caught. I used to work for an agency where, whenever someone wore suit, the joke would be, "Where is the interview today?" If someone walked off on their mobile phone to take a phone call, the assumption was that they were looking for another job. I know it sounds crazy but that's the mentality the recruiters have and frankly the mentality of a lot of people in their fear that someone is going to detect them.

Here are 3 things to do the really very easy.
1. Have email only sent to your personal account. Never have it sent to an office account.. Make sure that account exists on your phone. This way, you can respond to messages on your phone and is not going through the firm's server.
2. If phone calls are coming to your personal phone, never take the call when it comes in. That so you never have to say to someone, "Would you hold on for 2nd so I can walk to can speak privately." That statement basically tells everyone that is a call from recruiter or someone about a job. Instead, let the call going to voicemail and, from there, you want to be able to respond to that call before lunch and before 5. That's so that you respond to every message within 24 hours. You always want to be able to respond within that amount of time. Remember, you are competing with other people were also looking at being evaluated for these jobs. Put yourself in a position where you responding quickly but not instantly.
3. If you mistakenly take a call from someone, always respond by saying, "I would like to speak with you. But now really isn't a convenient time. Can I call you at____." then you suggest an alternate time. Sometimes, we make a mistake. We take the call. This is the perfect way to respond when it is at your convenience you can walk to that office to have the conversation, you can leave the building to have that conversation and not be caught.

Texting should only be used when scheduling something. If you're responding to someone you have their mobile number . But, at the end of the day, I would suggest avoiding text for initial contact. Once you have the relationship the other person, simply tell them, "I work in an open space and sometimes it is hard to speak freely. Is it okay if I text you?" Get their mobile number and start texting them you scheduling things.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Explaining Employment Gaps in Your Résumé (VIDEO)

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to explain how to discuss the gap in your employment history.

Summary

Today, let's talk about how to deal with that gap in your resume . . . You know, that time in your background were took you 5 months, 8 months, 7 months . . . whatever it is to find a new position 3 years ago. How do you deal with that interruption your experience?

Some people have this silly idea that they are supposed to lie and cover it up. I must in all honesty tell you it doesn't work anymore. Employers are cooperating with one another and do background checks post-employment (after you join their firm). They will send a note to your previous employer and say, "So, Jane told us in their application that you work for your firm for such and such period of time. Does that seem somewhat accurate?" If they find inconsistency in your job application, it is grounds for termination. They can't keep you on board because, frankly, lying can get them into trouble.

Imagine for a 2nd that you are employed by them and commit some sort of crime. For example, you work on Wall Street and trade grandma's life savings down to zero. Can you imagine what happens when a lawyer gets a hold of the firm and asks, "you knew he lied on his employment application and you still kept them on board!" How do you think that would play out in the courts?

Employers have a very simple policy. They will terminate you. They will terminate you without any warning whatsoever. What they will do is meet you at your desk with security and hand you a box with your personal things and send you on your way. You don't want that to happen. Here's how you deal with it.

When you have a gap in your background, you use the cover email that you send your resume in (these are like the old cover letteyrs people use to mail the resume with. Today, that is the message area of your email) to sell yourself.

You might write in the cover email, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was recommended by so-and-so, you told me that your position for such and such." Or, you might say, "I saw your ad on such and such site that told me that you trying to hire such and such type of person. "

The 2nd paragraph my talk about your qualifications and how your background fits the role. The 3rd 1 might say something like, "you may notice my job history that for years ago I was unemployed for 6 months. During that time, the on the economy was terrible and they found it difficult to find work. Ultimately, I was able to land a job with another organization. "

Or, you might just simply say, "I had an injury at that time. I was in a car accident and had surgery. It was impossible for me to work." Or you might talk about how you assisted your dying mom during the last 6 months of her life. These are pretty common stories that employer hears.

Another one that they here is, "I took a package to leave my organization. I decided that I had not had a lengthy vacation since I was in college and decide to take 4 months to travel in China before coming back and resuming my career." What ever it is, do that in the 3rd paragraph and then come back and sell yourself in the remainder of the cover email.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in your background. Then, you have to remember what you told them in your email. So when you meet with them in person and raise the subject, they are looking for consistency. Thus, if you talk about that vacation that you took, you say, "I know a lot of people would find it difficult to believe, it was 1 of the great 4 months of my life. I love my work, but it was an opportunity to travel. I had money in the bank and decide to take advantage of this time." You just speak to them in a way that sounds absolutely sincere.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in the background.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Wanting It Too Much

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the biggest mistakes job hunters make. This is a mistake that consistently costs you money.

Summary

This is a mistake the job hunters make all the time by falling in love with the job and falling in love with the work. The impact of doing this is that for many of you, you lose all your negotiating savvy.

Imagine for second that you walk into a house And say, "I love this place! Oh! This is fabulous!" What happens to your negotiating power? At that point the realtor knows that your sucker for a price. If the sellers there, they know that you want this house. If there are 2 of you walking in and one person is doing that, the other one is over a barrel. There is no walkaway capability.

A lot of you make that same mistake with job search. You reveal way too early on that you like the job you do to people like me, you do it to the firm that is hiring, and the impact of that is they think that they have you over the barrel.

1 of the things you always need to be prepared to do is walk away. I know we bought a house a few years ago, my wife liked it, but wasn't in love with it and she said, "This decision is yours.." I made the decision to buy. I negotiated my particular way. .. I got of the lowest price that I could and we are very happy with the house that we put money into it.

When you're negotiating with the company for job, you can't let them in on the secret that you love this job because then, they know you don't have the ability to walk away because most people don't. At that point, most people are overcommitted and the result once it being that you get less money when they offer to you.

You always need to walk in prepare to leave and not loving the idea of the job so much that you will take it for less than what you are deserving of getting it for.

I don't care with the company's budget is because the budget, at the end of the day, is irrelevant to you. What your value on the market is should be what is important to you. Don't overcommit and show that you are in love with the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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