The Two Best Questions to Ask at a Job Interview (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you two great questions to ask at a job interview and when to ask them.

Summary

Today, I'm going to talk with you about the 2 best questions you should ask on every interview, you go on and when you should ask them. Let me start by reviewing the way a typical interview goes.

You walk in. You sit down. The interviewer looks and you and in that certain voice says, "So, tell me about yourself and what you been doing professionally." You answer. Then, they ask you some follow-up questions and you answer those. If you are in disciplines that require certain objective knowledge like in IT, engineering or accounting, they will ask you some questions to measure your knowledge. Eventually, they will say, "So do you have any questions for us?" You will say, "Tell me about the job," and they will do that. You will say, "Sounds great." They will say, "Terrific. We'll get back to you." That is a typical interview.

Let's do a different interview. You walk in and sit down and, as the 2 of you get comfortable in your seats, just as the 2 of you have your derrière reached the seat, I would like you to start talking. You start by saying, "Thank you for making the time to meet with me today. I remember seeing the position description but wanted to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help?" If you been scheduled by an agent, you might say, "I spoke with Jeff Altman about the job and he gave me a brief description but I wanted to get your take on the role. Could you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help you?"

What this does is take the question you would normally ask at the end of the interview and moves it up to the very beginning. My thinking is even if you seen a job description, even if you reply to in hand or spoken to her recruiter, what you're able to do now is by moving a question to the beginning is get the current thinking about the job and tailor your answers to what matters to them.

You see, even if you seen the job description, from the time they start interviewing until now, they may have changed their thinking about it. As a result, you want to get their current thinking about the job, get that information at the beginning of the interview so you can use it to your advantage.

What are you going to do? Not lie but talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for. You see, most people talk about what they've done in the course of the interview, but they don't talk about what they've done in the context of what the employer is looking for because they don't know until the end of the interview what they actually are looking for.

So that's a great question to ask and I have told you exactly when to ask it. So, since we taken that question out of the end of the interview, you can't just simply re-ask the question. You have to substitute a different question. This is the question I'd like you substitute at the end of the interview when they ask you whether you have any questions for them.

"Let's say it's a year from now and it comes time for you to give me my review. I have a just a good job. I have a just a great job. I have done 1 of the best that you have ever seen. What what I've done during that year that would cause you to give that kind of review?"

1. You are giving the employer the idea that you're not going to think small, but are prepared to do great work.
2. You are going to get an idea of how realistic they are in the thinking about the job. If the role, if they talk about something that will be absolutely crazy for you to have accomplished, how could you ever do it?

The real thing is that you are planting a seed in their minds about your drive for excellence, you're getting them to talk about the job and some of the day to day stuff in the role, differently than they might otherwise with a great question that I believe will give you a lot of terrific information.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Blogs You Should Be Reading (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points you to blogs and websites that offer great info to help you with your job search . . . other than mine, of course.

Summary

Today, I want to be talking with you about learning what it takes to be effective in your job search. A lot of job hunters believe (and they really do believe) that if you do your job well that immediately translates into being able to find a good job. To some degree there correct, but they are missing a big point. The people who believe this miss the point that job hunting, in and of itself is a skill and it has rules and requirements to it that people need to learn. I want to talk with you about how you can get more the information that you need to be effective in your job search.

Let me start by saying there's a lot of great information on my website, jeffaltman.com or thebiggamehunter.us and visit the blog, you will find many articles, podcasts and videos that will help you with your job search. You can sign up for complimentary subscription to my e-zine and receive it twice a month.

(The Free Job Search Guide is no longer available).

CareerRealism.com also great information to help job hunters.
BrazenCareerist.com
Ask The Headhunter
LindseyPollak.com
JobMob.co.il
CareerRocketeer.com

All the sites are going to provide you with information. What you want to be doing is reading with their advice, learning, practicing the advice that you get from them so not just purely selling yourself based upon your skills, but you're actually selling yourself. Your selling yourself in your knowledge and experience in a way that audiences will find acceptable to them. It'll be much easier for you to find work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

It Isn’t Just Networking (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you that networking is only one part of the process. There is a lot more you need to do while you are networking.

Summary

This 1 really isn't the quick fix. This is really a career strategy for you that you need to adopt in order to really land positions all the time that will leverage your skills and move you forward.

Is what I want to tell you. It isn't just networking that's important. Everyone is out there networking these days. The bums, the losers, the mediocre people are all out there networking, too.

What are you going to do in order to stand out?

Standing out isn't about doing it in your job search. It is about doing it every day in your career. How to be the leader? How to be the person who is the best? I do certain things to stand out in how I present myself. I do with my videos. I do with my podcasts. I do with my e-zines… A whole host of different ways that job hunters and hiring managers get a sense of how I think and how I operate. That has really profited me.

In your career, what can you do to stand out in your workplace? How can you be the leader in your organization, even if you are a staff person? How can you demonstrate your leadership and commitment to excellence that allows you to stand out from the losers and the bums and the mediocre people so that people will go, "Hey! This person is really good!"

That's really the strategy for you when you're networking. It isn't just simply about doing it between job searches; it's a career objective. Where can you write? What trade groups can you become a part of and contribute to. Where can you be the leader in your life that is going to cause you to stand out from the mediocrity that exists out there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What to Do When the Head Hunter Calls

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice about what to do when a head hunter calls you.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about working with recruiters and what you need to know and say and NOT SAY when you are working with a recruiter. Let's work with the assumption that this is NOT 1 of those calls were you send a resume in and that instead, you are getting a call out of the blue. The call might sound something like this, " My name is Jeff Altman. I'm a professional recruiter. I heard some nice things about your work and want to get acquainted with you in the context of the search time doing. Is this a good time to talk or would be better if we spoke another occasion?"

That's a pretty standard phone call for people to get. Often, people start off by making the mistake of trying to put the recruiter on the defensive. "Who gave you my name," are the 1st words that come out of their mouth.

Why? What difference does it make who gave them your name or how they found you? They found out about you. They might've had a research group that found out about you online and found out about you… There any number of ways that people could learned about you. It really doesn't matter how they found you, even if it came from your boss! Your boss doesn't want you around, right? Pay attention to the phone call and give up this notion of finding out who it was who gave them your name.

Most of the time when I would call someone, 1 of the few things might have happened.
1. We did research and found this person.
2. Someone was kind enough to point me in your direction.

Those are the 2 basics all the time. What difference does it really make to you where it came from? If it came from a friend, you still have to qualify. The friend doesn't know everything about you; you still have to qualify. Start listening and answering questions. Listen to what the recruiter tells you about the job.

They'll usually turn around and ask, "Is this a good time, or would it be better if we spoke another occasion?"

"It would be better if I call you back in 10 or 15 minutes. Does that work for you," if it's not a good time. If it is a good time, great! "Tell me about the role that is involved." Let them talk with you about the job. You'll learn 2 things from this. The 1st is that you will learn something about the job. The 2nd is that you learn something about the recruiter.

Listen to how the recruiter tells the story. Do they seem competent or they tell you a whole bunch of generalities that don't mean anything? Are they talking with you about (super excited voice) this great opportunity where you have an opportunity to be Emperor of The Universe! You know I'm being facetious here, but so often, recruiters, in their youth in their enthusiasm and in their inexperience, start talking about "the great opportunity."
.
STOP THEM! They told you something about themselves. They're going to try and sell you some sizzle; stick with the content for now. What is the job? What do they need someone to have done? What will be the expectations of you? What is the compensation like?

If the money isn't right or the job isn't right, you can politely say, "This role isn't really for me. I am earning more (or the job is really interesting). Let me tell you little bit about myself." Then, you can tell them about the work you actually do and give them a sense of the compensation level. Do it in a professional way. Don't try to put this recruiter on the defensive.

Why? All they did was try to get you a better job.. They made one phone call. Maybe it lasted 2 minutes in length. What's the big deal? Be courteous. After all, you never know when someone in recruiting will put you on a list to never call you back again. I used to do that. I don't need to have my time wasted by people who are discourteous. They also involve the institutional customers who I fired regularly.

1. Find out about the job.
2. Answer their questions. This doesn't just mean answer their questions. It means answer their questions in the context of what they are trying to find. Sell those elements of your background that relate to the job that is involved.
3. Once you've done that, talk with them about what their background is. Yes them, whether they have submitted any people for this role. How old is this search? It is brand-new and just opened up or is it one that has been open for a while? It's hard to win. If you're 1 of the 1st people walking in the door, right?

Let me also say that if it's 3 months into the search, they may be close to exhausting the pool of people to consider. They may have people on 2nd or 3rd interviews. Why get involved then? If they don't have anyone coming back on 2nd or 3rd interviews, why get involved? The other don't know what they're looking for. They don't know how to interview or evaluate people.

Find out about the status of the search and ask about the recruiters background as well. I will let you in on a secret. Most recruiters don't have 40 years of experience like I did. They live in tell you that they have 10 years of experience. That's why listing at the beginning of the conversation tells you a lot about them.

Are they experienced will do they seem amateurish? Do they sound like they know what they're talking about or are they saying a whole bunch of "stuff" to you that comes out of the recruiters playbook of "fabulous opportunity," "great job,", "you really need to talk to them," "you've got nothing to lose." The amateurs use all those clichés. If that is the case, thank them for making the call, asked him to send you some information and move on.

You can decide to listen to some youthful recruiter speakers may not have their people behind them that will actually be quite competent. Inexperienced recruiters is not someone that you really want to talk to. You might ask, "Are you coordinating the search for are you doing legwork for someone else?" Really simple questions tells you a lot about the competence of the recruiter.

The most important thing I could tell you the is to listen. Listen to what they have to tell you, and listen between the lines to learn about their competence. Sell to them because even if it's not this job. It could be another one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Cx5=PL: What Every Company Looks for When They Hire (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the key elements firms assess for when they interview.  This is an older video. Skip over the introduction and get to the meet.

Summary

I want to talk with you about what firms look for when they hire someone. I've distilled it down to a math formula – –Cx5=PL. it is really what every firm is assessing for when they hire someone.

The 1st "C" that they are looking for comes from the fact that they have developed a job description. They are looking for skills COMPETENCE. We all know from our own experiences that not everyone who gets hired is competent. There obviously some other attributes that come into play, too-- soft skills that firms look out for.

The 2nd "C" that firms look out for is self-CONFIDENCE. This is the ability to exude passion and enthusiasm for what you do, that causes them to believe that you can do what they need you to do.

The 3rd "C" is CHEMISTRY. This is how you fit into an organization. Generally, firms say that they want to hire individuals for staff roles who are "team players" as opposed to "lone wolves" or "Mavericks." I really have no idea how they assess for that. That is however what they say they are looking for.

The 4th "C" is CHARACTER. Do you have character? Are you a character? Do you demonstrate both to them at the time of your interview? Some jobs really want "a character." Some jobs require that they hire someone with character; other positions require someone with both. Firms will want to get a feel for that when they interview.

The 5th "C" in this formula is my personal favorite – – CHARISMA. Charismatic people always do better than non-charismatics. I can demonstrate that to you by pointing out that we look at a few of our recent presidents – – Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama. Completely different people with completely different policies. Yet America, love them all. Why? Objectively, it doesn't fit. In point of fact, it was just something about them that when they walked into her room, people love them.

All 5 of these "C's" all add up to PL. PERSONAL LEADERSHIP. This is the quality that says that you inspire confidence that you are the solution to a need.

When firms interview, it's not like they're going to turn around and say, "So, are you a leader?" "Yes. Great! That's the answer were looking for!" It doesn't work that way.

They look for behaviors that demonstrate congruence with the image of a leader. As such, is not just what you say that matters. It's how you carry yourself in the course of the interview and it's congruence with their image of how someone should conduct themselves the counts.

Every question they ask as a macro and micro component to it. The macro is the big picture of your background and how it is congruent with their image of someone who would be in this role. The micro is the minutia-- the answer to the question. Your behavior has to demonstrate you carrying yourself in a way that is congruent with someone in this job.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

Become an A Player Again (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from taking it easy and encourage you to become an A player again.

Summary

I don't know how it happens but there was a point for most of us in the US where we start thinking about getting along and being average rather than being extraordinary. You hear the words, "Take it easy," enough times that I think it has an influence. I think there is a part of us that doesn't want to stand out because, at least for some people, they think they'll be chopped down at the knees by the other people and, on the other side, there is a part that basically says, "Maybe I'm not good enough."

I'm not going to be a therapist here. What I want to say is start thinking differently. Think about becoming "A" performer, not the average performer. Average performers get paid average money. Exceptional performers, ones that developed the habit of being extraordinary, whether it's with the firm that you're working for now or the next firm that you go to, they pick up on your ability to be extraordinary. They seek being the best and firms want to pay you for.

Stop being average. Go back to really pushing yourself. After all, I would say to you many times over the next few months,... At the end of the day, you want to be paid like a top performer. You don't want to be paid an average wage do you? The way to be paid more is to be extraordinary and to create more value for yourself and your work..

If your firm is it want to compensate you for it , I'm sure that there is another firm that will. But, it all starts with you. It starts with your attitude. It starts with your effort. It starts with you trying to be the best, instead of being just 1 of the pack.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Preparing for The Inevitable Layoffs (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you need to do to prepare for that inevitable change in skills employers demand.

Summary

I saw to statistic in the book I was reading that I thought was really interesting. The 1st 1, in 2008 to 2009, when so many millions of Americans were laid off, 2.8 million in 2008, and another few million in 2009, the unemployment rate for individuals earning over $100,000 per year was approximately 1%. What does that tell you?

It tells me that there are experience and skills that firm's value for that compensation level that you need to develop.

The 2nd statistic. When you look back in time, the American population worked primarily in agriculture 100 years ago. 80% of Americans worked in agriculture 100 years ago. Now it is less than 2% who work in agriculture. They feed, not only the United States but a good part of the world as well. It tells me that skills need to be adaptable. You can be working in agriculture and listening to this podcast. That's great. Agriculture today is very different than what it was 100 years ago.

For you working in certain white-collar or even blue-collar skill areas, you need to constantly be looking at what is going to be needed going forward. 1 of the new skills that you need to build on or to build into your portfolio in order to be marketable? When I start recruiting in the early 1970s, there were 2 hot skills-- COBOL and BAL. OS/COBOL. OS/BAL. DOS/COBOL. DOS/BAL. 4 basic areas that you could recruit for. If you are trying to fill IT positions.

These days, who cares? No one is looking for the skills. There were times when C# and Java developers were incredibly valued; now they become commoditized, becoming the COBOL of the current era. I would expect that the need for people with those particular skills is going to decline.

Regardless of whether I'm right or wrong about that, you need to think in terms of what's going to cause you to be marketable going forward. You need to constantly be adapting to the new realities.

"I don't want to do that.
'
That's the reality of things. Markets are dynamic. Firms needs are dynamic. You want to place your self in the position, like those people in 2008 and 2009. Who knew that they got laid off, they could find work easily.

It is going to be another recession. That's the reality of things. You you want to put yourself in the position where your skills are going to be valued in the market.

What's it going to take? What would you need to know? Are you in the peak area now or are you in a tangent area that may not necessarily be marketable? Are you using some obscure technology that may cause you to be marketable? Do you have an obscure skill that a few firms use that make you highly desirable? I don't know, but you need to think this through. You need to take time in order to sort out what you're going to need to know so that if you are laid off, you are not going to be caught short and that you have time to prepare, constantly be looking ahead because you are responsible for your career, not your employer. You're responsible. If you have to write a check, write the check to do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

 

Job Search Mistakes– Only Relying on Recruiters (VIDEOS)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another mistake job hunters make too often – – only working with recruiters.

Summary

If you don't know me personally, you don't know that I'm a recruiter for a living. That's why make most of my income.

However, I want to say something to you very bluntly, in your job search, don't rely on recruiters. There are the statistics:

20 to 22% of all positions are filled by recruiters. Thus, 78% are filled by other means. Why are you spending all your time working with search firms or recruiting firms or agents or headhunters?

Being blunt, when I'm doing a search to fill the position, you are not paying me anything. The client is paying me to find someone. If you don't fit that job, you go into "inventory." Then, you get frustrated because you are counting on me and I never made that commitment to you, either explicit or implicit , and you think I'm supposed be working to find YOU a job? Respectfully, how much skinned you have in the game?

Zero. All you have is a lot of wishing and hoping and thinking that you are qualified and you are not. You're not from my clients anyway at a given time.

So the fact of the matter is, that is true when you are working with other recruiters. The recruiter that's giving you lots of time, the one who is rewriting your resume, or telling you what they think about your LinkedIn profile is a green kid who doesn't know squat.

Just recognize how the business works. Whether it is a retained firm or contingency firm, recruiters are paid to fill openings. We are hired by a firm that has made a promise to pay us, either partially a retained basis or entirely on a contingency basis when we identify someone who they decide to hire, So why do you think we work for you? We don't!

You are responsible for your own career. Don't sacrifice your search to a third party who says, "I'm going to find you a job," because they are not. They are going to fill a job with YOU. That's different.

Maybe they can and you know, the statistics for yourself. They are probably not.

Because you are spamming your resume all over the place hoping recruiters pick up on it. We work for companies don't rely upon address exclusively. You have a lot of other tools to use in order to find work. If you don't believe me, I have more than 800 other videos (in fact, more than 2000 other videos) that can teach you how to find work more quickly.

Start learning what you need to. Get to work on finding work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Going Behind the Recruiter’s Back (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you from going behind a recruiter’s back to contact the client directly.

Summary

There are some recruiters that are terrific; there are many that aren't. The 1st and will remind you of his to not paint them all with the same brush. You have to evaluate and assess each person individually in much the same way as if you are being being evaluated, you want to be treated individually, not as part of one group of individuals who works in a particular company painted with the same broad brush stroke that someone else is. You want to be standing on your own. Why you expect recruiters to be any different than you. So the 1st thing is to evaluate and assess people individually.

One tip about working with recruiters... You have a recruiter who has scheduled you for an interview and you are not hearing back right away and you contact the client directly. WHY? This person has a relationship with the client. Yes, you haven't heard anything and it is very likely that they haven't heard anything. If they had good news, don't you think they would've told you already? Of course! See you call the client and that makes no sense.

Trust that there is good news they are going to leap all over and get in touch. If there is no news or bad news, there is a message and a lack of communication, be patient with them. There is no reason to contact the client directly; they are busy folks, too. Just because you are impatient don't make it their problem. Just simply reach out to the recruiter and send them an email or text and say, "Have you heard anything yet?"

If they say that they haven't, accepted at face value. Do you think you can bang on the client store and say, "I want to know what is going on," because that is how they take that phone call, you think anything good is going to come of that? It won't. All that you're going to be doing is going over the head of the recruiter and piss them off. It's going to make them less likely to represent you. I know you don't care about that but the fact of the matter is you should. Recruiters have a pulse on the market that you will never have.

I want you to hear that again.

Recruiters have a pulse on the market that you will never have. You need them. You may not think you do. But you need them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

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If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

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