Why Interviewing Is Broken

By Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Why Interviewing Is Broken

Congratulations. You have gotten through the funnel of the applicant tracking system. Maybe you have already made it past the recruiter screening. Maybe you have networked or been referred to the hiring manager. However, you have gotten there, you are now speaking with or meeting with hiring manager or talking with someone from the team who will be evaluating you. You have the skills they say they want. What can go wrong?

Oh! You want proof that something is wrong!

According to the Society for Human Resources Management, half of all hourly workers resign within the first four months of a new job, and half of senior hires crash within just 18 months. Hiring managers have a similar perspective of buyer’s remorse after a hire, reaching almost 60%.

  1. Everyone is on good behavior. We all know that job applicants are on good behavior but we forget that hiring managers are on Why Interviewing Is Brokengood behavior, too. I did recruiting for more than 40 years and never heard of a hiring manager ever say to a job hunter, “We have problems here. The last 4 people hired for your job quit. In addition, the last two people who sat in my seat were fired and it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that my butt is on the line and need to hire someone to help me save it from a similar fate.” Instead, companies put on these charades of happy smile button faces where they talk about “career opportunities,” and “a terrific team of people,” lots to learn . . . “Did I mention we’re like family here?” It mirrors the old saw from recruiting, “They all lie. Employers. Candidates. Recruiters.”
  2. 2. People try to screen beyond their abilities. When staff try interview for skills competence, hiring managers are rarely clear about what they want this person evaluated for. It is not enough to say, “interview them for Java skills,” or “Find out what they know about . . . .” Managers need to be specific with their teams about the very thing they want critiqued and how they want it screened for.” I remember people I represented being impressed or turned off by fringe questions that someone might need to know once every 18-24 months. Anyone ever hear about Google?
  3. Managers want people who “fit.” People have made it through the sausage maker of the applicant tracking system. You talk with them on the phone or in-person. You are on good behavior and so are they. How can you tell that someone fits? Tell me about your credentials to evaluate for fit. Tell me about how you have administered personality profiles to your existing staff before you began interviewing in order to assess how the new hire’s personality would mesh with theirs. Even when a potential hire is personality tested, the staff is never retested hence using old data to work with. People change from when you hired them to when you are interviewing for new people based upon the environment they work in and other factors in their lives. You never go back and check for that. Hence hiring managers are left to whim to assess for fit, rather than data. In doing so, bias creeps into the process. That bias can include educational bias (I like people with degrees from this school or who have particular degrees, rather than those who have online degrees from the same universities), class bias (they live where? They don’t have a degree or achieved it at night because their family could not afford a particular university), race or gender bias (need I say more about these), national origin (immigrants have it harder than people born in a nation, even though they may have the same knowledge). There are many more biases that show up including the bias of only hiring people who agree with us.
  4. Different constituencies in the organization may have different opinions as to what is needed. When I still did recruiting, I remember being asked by a midwestern firm to speak with an executive within the firm about a search they wanted me to do. I listened to the usual canned presentation, started to narrow them down and asked about the interview process and whether business units being served by this role would participate in the hire (they would). I asked, “Do they agree with the qualifications you’ve out lined to me?” Met by silence, I was soon told that they didn’t and had a very different view of the role. How do you hire someone when the participants disagree about what is needed? You enter into “The Land of Perpetual Interviewing.” Suffice it to say, I did not accept the search.
  5. People on the assessment team disagree about who the best hire is. A firm I recruited for ten years ago would fly people in for “meatgrinder” interviews. 4 hiring managers plus HR. 30 minutes per manager. Put them in a car. Fly them home. The managers would meet afterwards and decide who to hire. People disagreed forcefully about who to hire. Why? If everyone is clear about the criteria to be used, a person either has the knowledge and has already successfully engaged in the work to be done or not. It is very simple. But comments often included the ever popular, “too light,” “too strong” and “I’m not sure they would fit in.”

 

The result is that by the lowest measure imaginable, employee engagement (employees are engaged in their work), there is a 22% employee engagement rate in the US . . . and that is high by international standards.Why Interviewing Is Broken

In other words, you are either picking the wrong people for your jobs (and/or you are picking the wrong company to join) or employees are being turned off by your firm, their manager or their work.

Does that sound like good decisions are being made? Remember, almost 4 out of 5 employees are DISengaged.

Here’s what you can do instead.

  1. Give up the idea of their being “the perfect hire” or “the dream job.” Folks, we are human beings with foibles. We make mistakes, some of them pretty stupid mistakes. The country smokes, overeats and eats foods that are remarkably unhealthy. Given our national history of making bad choices, is it any wonder this extends into the realm of work, too?
  2. Get clear about the qualifications of the job and how you will assess for them. If you are a hiring manager, it is not enough to create a list of qualifications without creating a list of measures for how you want these qualifications evaluated for. Otherwise, too much freedom is given to staff (and yourself) to ask arbitrary questions based upon unrecognized biases,
  3. Stop evaluating for “fit.Only evaluate for qualifications. Admit that you are incompetent to assess for fit and are making arbitrary decisions where you are rationalizing projections (projecting thoughts, feelings, emotions, opinions or judgements onto someone else, rather than admitting to having these thoughts, feelings, emotions, opinions or judgements) as to what a person is like. You are on good behavior and so are they. You have no real idea about what they are really like.
  4. Start to “overshare.” I left one interview having decided to reject an offer when I was told that there was nothing wrong at the firm. People failed because of themselves. Nonsense. There is always something wrong at an organization, just as you as a job hunter or you as a human being have flaws. Employers need to start to “overshare” their flaws as do job hunters.

 

Let’s stop lying to one another and start to join organizations and hire people based upon honesty, not BS. I bet your staff retention and hiring manager remorse will improve.

 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2017

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Job Search is Rigged (VIDEO)

Let me prove how you are being set up to be nice docile sheep.

Summary

If you are in the United States and you decide to buy a house, they make you sign a document that says you understand that there is a sellers agent and the buyers agent and that you understand that at times the realtor is going to operate in both capacities.

Why do they do that? Because the realtor has a financial interest in the transaction and that depending upon who they represent it by different frame from yours. If you are a sellers agent for a combined agent, your interest is with the seller because they are the ones paying you.

If they are the buyer's agent, they are representing you and have your interests at heart

In the recruiting there is nothing comparable explain to you or offer to you. They are always the agent of the employer; they are never your agent.

Why do I say that? Who's paying? Where do they earn their money from? As a result of that quote unexplained relationship" that exist between a recruiter and the employer, you always need to look at this person, this recruiter as, "can I trust this person to speak for me." How are they trying to manipulate me? How are they trying to change my mind, my beliefs, in order to accommodate an employer? How am I being "finessed" or manipulated into doing what the employer wants me to do at the lowest possible price?

I believe it's important for you to get unbiased representation. You can't always go to the immediate sources or resources (recruiters or employers) because they are looking out for their interests.

If you go to friends, family, wife, husband, partner, former managers, you may be getting advice from someone who knows as little as you do about job hunting. After all, my experience with former managers is that they think they know more about job hunting than they actually do. They deceive themselves because they think that because they hired someone in the past (or many people in the past) that makes them qualified to get advice about job hunting. Seeing them is job hunters as often as I do, I know how wrong they are. Most know less than nothing about job search.

Many of the people that you might seek out for advice are as uninformed as you are. You need to find someone who if you quality advice throughout your job search, who can guide you all the way through the process and represent you and your interests, who is not beholden to an employer.

I do that kind of work and I'm sure others do it as well. I to it with great content jobsearchcoachingHQ.com and I do with coaching where you hire me to answer your questions and concerns. I'm not be hired by an employer to place you in a job; I'm there to help you find your next position.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Job Search Blogs You Should Be Reading (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points you to blogs and websites that offer great info to help you with your job search . . . other than mine, of course.

Summary

Today, I want to be talking with you about learning what it takes to be effective in your job search. A lot of job hunters believe (and they really do believe) that if you do your job well that immediately translates into being able to find a good job. To some degree there correct, but they are missing a big point. The people who believe this miss the point that job hunting, in and of itself is a skill and it has rules and requirements to it that people need to learn. I want to talk with you about how you can get more the information that you need to be effective in your job search.

Let me start by saying there's a lot of great information on my website, jeffaltman.com or thebiggamehunter.us and visit the blog, you will find many articles, podcasts and videos that will help you with your job search. You can sign up for complimentary subscription to my e-zine and receive it twice a month.

(The Free Job Search Guide is no longer available).

CareerRealism.com also great information to help job hunters.
BrazenCareerist.com
Ask The Headhunter
LindseyPollak.com
JobMob.co.il
CareerRocketeer.com

All the sites are going to provide you with information. What you want to be doing is reading with their advice, learning, practicing the advice that you get from them so not just purely selling yourself based upon your skills, but you're actually selling yourself. Your selling yourself in your knowledge and experience in a way that audiences will find acceptable to them. It'll be much easier for you to find work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Finding a Summer Job (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter turns his attention to helping those of you who will be looking for summer jobs.

Summary

Today, I'm not good be talking about finding a job as "big game." I'm going to be talking to those of you who are looking for summer jobs. This is not my normal market. But folks need help and admittedly take a little bit of time to try to help.

Finding a summer job isn't radically different than finding a full-time job. There is a lot of competition for them. You have to go through a lot of steps in order to find work. The steps aren't fun. As a matter of fact, most of them are pretty tedious. They are boring. They are annoying. They are going to make you not want to work. But you want a summer job and this is what you've got to do.

The 1st thing to do is get your working papers in order. If you are under 18, it's pretty common to need working papers. Look up on the web where in your city or will reduce state you need to go get working papers. Go through the steps to get done. Don't procrastinate. Just do it. It's boring. It's stupid. You just need to get it done.

While you're working on that, start writing the basic resume. Were not talking about an adult looking resume. He would talk about where you've gone to school, what you've done at school, whether you've worked anywhere before and what your responsibilities were. If you have any references from the these jobs, great! Don't put them on the resume. Have them available in case they are needed. It's important to talk about what you did, where you did it, how long you did it, what you liked about your job, don't say anything critical about the people that you worked for. Just say it was a great learning opportunity, and you have a lot of fun, you helped a lot of people I just talk about what your basic job was like. No one is expecting you to have been ruler of the universe at these jobs. They just want to know that you worked.

Next, get some help. If you're in high school or college there is an office at the school that can help you find work. They may mumble to you about how hard it will be in the will take a big effort to find the job. You already know this; it's not like they're telling you anything you don't know. If they say this to you nod your head and then ask, "what do you have for me?"

"We don't have much."

"What you have for me?" Go about the steps to finding a job. Go to those firms. Fill out applications. Do that kind of stuff. You may not be hired for the 1st job that you apply to but let's get out there and start talking to people so that you can practice what you might say on an interview. Like I said, you are going to fill out applications. You don't want to have crappy handwriting. If you are visiting a company in person, you want to dress properly for the interview, even if what you're doing is filling out application. If the role, there might be a receptionist here is taking note of how you act and how you behave and they are reporting back to whoever it is that is getting that application to see if you act like a jerk or look like a jerk, you look weird… Stuff along those lines. You want to act like an adult when you're filling out application.

Again, go to places where you might like to work-- amusement parks, restaurants, retail stores – – get out there and start talking to firms.

Network. The simplest way to network as a high school or college kid is to tell everyone that you know that you're out looking for a job. If they ask you what kind of work you want to do, if you're in college and they have an idea of what you like to do, mention it, but don't be so inflexible that you are not willing to consider other alternatives.

Networking can be just as simple as reminding your parents to ask their friends if they are hiring. See if they are friends' friends will ask someone they know if they are hiring. Stuff along those lines may not work the 1st time and it may not work the 21st time, but you just need one.

I also remind you that for those of you don't find the job at the beginning of the season, college kids another. Sometimes cut out before the end of the summer because they have to get back to school. That camp or that business may still need someone for tourist season so don't be reluctant that if you miss out on the 1st hiring wave to go back there to go back there toward the end of the summer season when those who were ahead of you and God jobs may have walked out and you can pick up with the jobs were.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Mistakes: Wanting It Too Much | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the biggest mistakes job hunters make. This is a mistake that consistently costs you money.

Summary

This is a mistake the job hunters make all the time by falling in love with the job and falling in love with the work. The impact of doing this is that for many of you, you lose all your negotiating savvy.

Imagine for second that you walk into a house And say, "I love this place! Oh! This is fabulous!" What happens to your negotiating power? At that point the realtor knows that your sucker for a price. If the sellers there, they know that you want this house. If there are 2 of you walking in and one person is doing that, the other one is over a barrel. There is no walkaway capability.

A lot of you make that same mistake with job search. You reveal way too early on that you like the job you do to people like me, you do it to the firm that is hiring, and the impact of that is they think that they have you over the barrel.

1 of the things you always need to be prepared to do is walk away. I know we bought a house a few years ago, my wife liked it, but wasn't in love with it and she said, "This decision is yours.." I made the decision to buy. I negotiated my particular way. .. I got of the lowest price that I could and we are very happy with the house that we put money into it.

When you're negotiating with the company for job, you can't let them in on the secret that you love this job because then, they know you don't have the ability to walk away because most people don't. At that point, most people are overcommitted and the result once it being that you get less money when they offer to you.

You always need to walk in prepare to leave and not loving the idea of the job so much that you will take it for less than what you are deserving of getting it for.

I don't care with the company's budget is because the budget, at the end of the day, is irrelevant to you. What your value on the market is should be what is important to you. Don't overcommit and show that you are in love with the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Become an A Player Again (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from taking it easy and encourage you to become an A player again.

Summary

I don't know how it happens but there was a point for most of us in the US where we start thinking about getting along and being average rather than being extraordinary. You hear the words, "Take it easy," enough times that I think it has an influence. I think there is a part of us that doesn't want to stand out because, at least for some people, they think they'll be chopped down at the knees by the other people and, on the other side, there is a part that basically says, "Maybe I'm not good enough."

I'm not going to be a therapist here. What I want to say is start thinking differently. Think about becoming "A" performer, not the average performer. Average performers get paid average money. Exceptional performers, ones that developed the habit of being extraordinary, whether it's with the firm that you're working for now or the next firm that you go to, they pick up on your ability to be extraordinary. They seek being the best and firms want to pay you for.

Stop being average. Go back to really pushing yourself. After all, I would say to you many times over the next few months,... At the end of the day, you want to be paid like a top performer. You don't want to be paid an average wage do you? The way to be paid more is to be extraordinary and to create more value for yourself and your work..

If your firm is it want to compensate you for it , I'm sure that there is another firm that will. But, it all starts with you. It starts with your attitude. It starts with your effort. It starts with you trying to be the best, instead of being just 1 of the pack.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Job Search Mistakes– Only Relying on Recruiters (VIDEOS)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another mistake job hunters make too often – – only working with recruiters.

Summary

If you don't know me personally, you don't know that I'm a recruiter for a living. That's why make most of my income.

However, I want to say something to you very bluntly, in your job search, don't rely on recruiters. There are the statistics:

20 to 22% of all positions are filled by recruiters. Thus, 78% are filled by other means. Why are you spending all your time working with search firms or recruiting firms or agents or headhunters?

Being blunt, when I'm doing a search to fill the position, you are not paying me anything. The client is paying me to find someone. If you don't fit that job, you go into "inventory." Then, you get frustrated because you are counting on me and I never made that commitment to you, either explicit or implicit , and you think I'm supposed be working to find YOU a job? Respectfully, how much skinned you have in the game?

Zero. All you have is a lot of wishing and hoping and thinking that you are qualified and you are not. You're not from my clients anyway at a given time.

So the fact of the matter is, that is true when you are working with other recruiters. The recruiter that's giving you lots of time, the one who is rewriting your resume, or telling you what they think about your LinkedIn profile is a green kid who doesn't know squat.

Just recognize how the business works. Whether it is a retained firm or contingency firm, recruiters are paid to fill openings. We are hired by a firm that has made a promise to pay us, either partially a retained basis or entirely on a contingency basis when we identify someone who they decide to hire, So why do you think we work for you? We don't!

You are responsible for your own career. Don't sacrifice your search to a third party who says, "I'm going to find you a job," because they are not. They are going to fill a job with YOU. That's different.

Maybe they can and you know, the statistics for yourself. They are probably not.

Because you are spamming your resume all over the place hoping recruiters pick up on it. We work for companies don't rely upon address exclusively. You have a lot of other tools to use in order to find work. If you don't believe me, I have more than 800 other videos (in fact, more than 2000 other videos) that can teach you how to find work more quickly.

Start learning what you need to. Get to work on finding work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Being Foolish with a Recruiter (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the foolish things people do when they are interviewed by a recruiter.

Summary

It happened so often that I have to mention it..

I'm interviewing someone over the phone, and I'm asking questions about the work. Eventually I am asked something that translates into, "Didn't you read my resume?"

Well, don't you understand what a recruiter does? Recruiters pay to evaluate and assess people on behalf of their institutional customers. We may have read, skimmed or not read your resume. Anything is possible.. But what we are trying to do is get an idea of how well you will interview. How you present your ideas. How cogently you discuss them. Whether your voice sounds flat or animated.

Are you someone that we would risk putting in from the client, knowing that at the end of the day if you do a terrible job it affects our relationship with the firm. When we evaluate and assess, we want to know how you are telling your story.

Thus, when you ask that question, "Didn't you read my resume," you are showing that you are a moron. You are showing that you don't know how the system works. Although I encourage people to make the system work for them, think about it for 2nd. This person is going to be paid somewhere between $20,000 and $100,000 to refer you and you are being argumentative with them.. They have a point to doing everything that they do.

Why would you be confrontational? It makes no sense. Understand, again, they are being paid to evaluate and assess people and refer someone who is going to be hired by the client. They just want this to work like clockwork.

Act like a jerk, you show your jerk. Don't do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Show Some Product Knowledge! (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to prepare questions that demonstrate your product knowledge.

Summary

I want you to start off that section of the interview where you normally ask about the job with a question that makes them want to talk about what. They want you to accomplish during your 1st year with the firm, during the 1st 90 days of the firm… Stuff along those lines.

I also want to think a little bit further and going to a little bit more detail. This 1 of the scenarios I want to ask you, in terms of your preparation.

If you interview for a job with Facebook and you never use the product, do you think you might qualified? You could come up with all sorts of rationalizations but you really wouldn't understand how the business works and what they really do and stuff like that. How about if you interview with Google and it never done a Google search before. Again, it's a complicated scenario. Maybe there are some jobs you will be qualified for the not a heck of a lot. Same thing when you interview with a lot of other organizations.

Why not ask informed questions about the firm, its business and how you fit in? You work for car company and are interviewing for design role. Our design decisions made? You drive up to Ford in a Mazda? Probably not. Do you interview at Pepsi and bring the Coke product? Probably not. Do you do things that might ask about how design decisions are made, indicate your curiosity about particular curves in the line of the car that really got you excited and how that got created? Yeah, you do stuff like that!

You put a twinkle in your own as you talk about these things. Maybe it's a car accessory and you speak in a way that shows your passion for cars and your curiosity about the product... Whatever it is, going extra layer that demonstrates some product knowledge as well.

Don't think it at the time of the interview; actually take some time to prepare for this because they will pick you apart otherwise and find that you are a bullsit artist. Don't be goofy about this.

I think is very helpful when you interview to show some product knowledge, and some product curiosity, rather than just appear ignorant.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Yoga for Job Hunters | Job Search Radio

EP 304 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what he calls the yoga of job hunting.

Summary

If you stay in your comfort zone talking to the same people over and over again, applying to the same jobs you find online over and over again, you are going to wind up in a small confined area. Instead, you want to be thinking like yoga, which is about the stretch and doing slightly more all the time in order to grow your muscle, become more limber and feel better.

Too often, we as adults (I include you millennials) start to think in terms of the rules you have been taught and systems that you have been taught to believe in that, frankly, are just self-limiting beliefs that others are imposing upon you.

As a guest of mine on Job Search Radio said a while back (his name is Chance Taureau), we are the product of all of our habits. If our habit is to second-guess ourselves and to work in small confined areas, we are constantly going to be having doubt and second-guessing ourselves. What you want to be doing is constantly going to the stretch. I'm not going to be stretching out for you now; I did that earlier today. I'll simply say that what's important is to stretch a little bit, to get to that place where you go a little bit more every day and discover that you can do more.

I remember going to a yoga class some years ago and the teacher said, "STRETCH all the way possible." That was great. Then they said, "STRETCH a little bit further." Remember, with stretch all the way possible and lo and behold we were able to go further. It's the same way with job hunting. It's the same way with networking.

When all is said and done, your self-limiting beliefs are what is probably holding you back from reaching out and connecting with that person that you really admire or can really help you. It's time to change the behavior and stretch just a little bit more every single day in order to get what you want..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

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