Making Your Job Search More Confidential


Everyone is concerned about privacy on Facebook but forgets about privacy and confidentiality when job hunting. Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests how to make your resume more confidential and how to set your Linkedin settings for better privacy when job hunting.

Summary

Let's talk today about confidentiality in the job search. Most people don't want their boss to find out that they are looking for work yet they do a lot of things that will expose themselves to their boss finding out that they are looking for work.

Let's start with talking about your resume in a way where is actually visible on the web. You don't think employers are looking for resumes and job boards in order to see which of their employees is looking for work? They do. Many firms look for resumes of their staff on job boards in an effort to find out who is looking, who was leaving and not to be caught short by resignation. When you stop and think of it, it is pretty smart on their part is? , What you've done is plant the seed of doubt in your mind that you are someone that they can trust.

As a result, if you post your resume on 1 of the major job boards, pay for a confidentiality future. It is not expensive and NOT USING IT can become very expensive for you.

I'm not making you money from this or any other recommendation on making today. I'll simply say that you should pay for the confidentiality feature; what it will do is encrypt your name in some long and ridiculous looking email address. It is worth it to you.

The 2nd thing is that you're smart to use LinkedIn in your job search, but are goofy for not changing some of your privacy settings. We also the think of Facebook and privacy because there been any number of situations where Facebook has changed its rules and made privacy an issue. We don't think about LinkedIn.

There are places where LinkedIn is broadcasting to connections of yours some of your actions. Do you really want that boss of yours with a colleague of yours to know that you're looking for job by see you all the recruiters that you are connecting with are seeing all the firms that you are now following on LinkedIn. The way to deal with your privacy settings is to go to your page on LinkedIn and look in the upper right for your name. Click on it and you'll see your settings there. Go to the privacy settings page and limit who can see your postings.

Turn off your activity broadcasts, select who can see your activity feed and select what others can see when they view your profile. Select who can see your connections. Like I said, you want your boss to see that you are connecting with a bunch of recruiters?

These are a few places that with privacy changes you can become a little bit more secretive about your behavior and confidential in your search using LinkedIn.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Being Foolish with Recruiters


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/04/10/being-foolish-with-a-recruiter/

Ep 281 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the foolish things people do when they are interviewed by a recruiter.

Summary

It happens so often that I have to mention it..

I'm interviewing someone over the phone, and I'm asking questions about the work. Eventually I am asked something that translates into, "Didn't you read my resume?"

Well, don't you understand what a recruiter does? Recruiters pay to evaluate and assess people on behalf of their institutional customers. We may have read, skimmed or not read your resume. Anything is possible.. But what we are trying to do is get an idea of how well you will interview. How you present your ideas. How cogently you discuss them. Whether your voice sounds flat or animated.

Are you someone that we would risk putting in from the client, knowing that at the end of the day if you do a terrible job it affects our relationship with the firm. When we evaluate and assess, we want to know how you are telling your story.

Thus, when you ask that question, "Didn't you read my resume," you are showing that you are a moron. You are showing that you don't know how the system works. Although I encourage people to make the system work for them, think about it for 2nd. This person is going to be paid somewhere between $20,000 and $100,000 to refer you and you are being argumentative with them.. They have a point to doing everything that they do.

Why would you be confrontational? It makes no sense. Understand, again, they are being paid to evaluate and assess people and refer someone who is going to be hired by the client. They just want this to work like clockwork.

Act like a jerk, you show your jerk. Don't do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do You Avoid Self Sabotage and Find a Job?

 

Self-sabotage is an interesting thing for a job hunter to identify as their issue. Here, I address it head on and offer a strategy I’ve seen work many many times.

Summary

I got a great question today and thought I would use it for my video. The question is, "How do we avoid self sabotage and get a job?"

I think the answer to this question is in two parts. The first one is that someone gave you this psychological label that I think is absolutely useless. Self sabotage--like you are intentionally going into the interview and trying to screw things up or you have adeep-rooted psychological issue is causing you to make these mistakes that are so costly!

It's not necessarily self-sabotage. It may be simply that you don't have a lot of experience interviewing and are not well-prepared and need to improve.

What has happened in modern times is that there are a lot of labels that are thrown around conveniently that traumatize people. I think self-sabotage is one of those labels. It causes people to think the problems are deep-seated when, in fact, solving them is very simple.

After all, the simple solution to messing up on interviews is practice. How many times that you practice for your last interview? When you think of practice and the impact of lack of practice, that's the big issue!

We have all heard of the 10,000 hour rule yet most job hunters have about a half hour MAYBE of experience writing your resume, or interviewing, or answering specific tough interview questions or using LinkedIn or negotiating compensation.

Most job hunters go on an interview and think they can wing it and, of course, screwup, and on the next one, and the next one, and the one after that. Suddenly, they have label! Self-sabotage!

I want to encourage you to get some experience. Work with friends. Join JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and practice answers to the interview questions we have there. You will go a long way toward eliminating being inexperienced, amateurish (I have to say amateurish because professionals practice).

Don't believe me? Look at every athlete that was at the Olympics. Every professional athlete, no matter what sport they are in. All of them are successful and they practice… And you aren't.

So that's the big issue. It's not some deep-seated psychological problem that is causing you to mess up. It's that you don't have experience doing this and your amateurish behavior tells you you don't have to do this.

So wake up. Start practicing. You'll start getting results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

Sabotaging Your Job Search: Lukewarm References | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another way that people sabotage the Job Search – – mediocre references. He also offers a way to get around a mediocre reference at a particular employer.

Summary

I worked in recruiting for a long time and I've seen it time and time again. Job hunters sabotaging their search by just making stupid mistakes. I'm continuing on with the series on sabotaging your search and talking with you about some of the ways the people do it.

Here is one that I can't believe happens but it happens all the time -- giving it references the don't just sing your praises, they may not be completely lukewarm but they come across as being disinterested and ambivalent.

When you are giving a reference, this is your opportunity to get across the finish line. Firms are going to decide whether or not to give you that great job offer, they have been thinking about or continue on looking. On occasion, they will make a lukewarm offer and just move on with it. Often, the neutrality of the reference causes them to pause. If the role, this is completely in your control. You are giving out the references. You can choose any 1 of the world to give them some reference you give them this person who gives you a halfhearted disinterested reference.. That is your fault.

Before you give out references, even at the beginning of your job search, as you're trying to get leads from places to go to, as you are trying to get out and about, start talking with the people who you are considering is a reference.. Just simply say, "I would love to give you is a reference. Would you feel comfortable with doing that I would you sing my praises to the rafters and let people know how wonderful it was?"

If you were a mediocre employee, you have to find those people who will support you because those people who will claim that they are only allowed to give out name, rank and serial number, type of references (your dates of employment and whether you are eligible for rehire), those are useless references. It is better to go to a former employer or to someone who is already left the organization who is not handcuffed by the policy (or I have to say, "alleged policy" because everyone finds a way around that if they care). Find someone who used to work with that that employer who will say wonderful things about you.

Again, don't give out lukewarm references. Find exceptional people who give an is will and will later so exceptional reference..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

"Any Given Sunday"

Job Search Lessons from The Movies (VIDEO)

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter looks at the movie, “Any Given Sunday” and pulls out a great quote to motivate you to prepare.

Summary

This 1 that comes from an old Al Pacino movie, not 1 of his better ones, called, "Any Given Sunday." He plays a football coach and in it, there's a lesson that I think is very applicable. It's something I stress but I've never said quite as directly as this line.

"You find that life is a game of inches. So is football. That's because in either game, life were football, the margin for error is so small, I mean, want to have a second too late or too early and you don't quite make it. One half second to slow, too slow, too fast and you don't quite catch it."

This is about all the preparations. I encouraged my videos and podcasts, and articles that are designed to help you understand the importance of preparation. You can go out there and wing it but, at the end of the day, you want to rely on luck and good fortune or would you rather be like a professional athlete or college athlete and betrayed that had a muscles honed so that you can can execute perfectly at the time of combat?

I think that's really where you want to be. It's only amateurs to go out there and try to figure it out on the fly. Amateurs miss out on things that they could've gotten. A professional, a great amateur, what is it be ready for those moments from all that time in preparation.

This is being recorded in March, 2015 where we are at the Final 4 of the NCAA tournament. These teams been practicing for the entire season and beyond to get ready for this time and ultimately to compete for the championship. There going to be small differences between one's human another that the preparation is invoked in this quote makes a difference for.

Don't just rely on luck. Don't rely on good fortune, your charm, your personality. Those are skills that you have developed over the course of a lifetime. Prepare your answers and prepare a plan. 2 things to get yourself ready. You will do much better.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

 

How to Sabotage Your Job Search Part II | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another way job hunters sabotage their job search.

Summary

I find it incredible that people take so much time to write resumes and find jobs to apply to. Although applying for jobs not the ideal way to find the job, is a path a lot of people take. That isn't the way that you're sabotaging your search. Here is how you are doing.

Again, you write a resume, you look for places that are positions for you, you send the resume out, you get a phone call and you never call back! It is incredible somebody how often I make a call to someone after receiving a resume or send an email to someone with a few questions and I get no response. Help me understand how that makes sense.

At the end of the day, you are trying to find work. You found the position that you think your background fits, you submit a resume and you don't respond.

That is another way to sabotage your job search.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​
Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​

How and When to Follow-Up After An Interview (VIDEO)

 

How to follow up after an interview

Summary

The subject of this 1 is when to follow-up and how to follow up.

There is a pretty common school for that is correct about sending a thank you note immediately after the interview. However, to me, the follow-up really starts at the end of your interview when they are about to wrap it up and they say something like, "any final questions?" Or, you know the interview is Andy and 1 of your questions needs to be, "When do you expect to finish this round of interviews?" The can always be a delay but you are getting a sense of their timeline.

"You're the 1st person were meeting with that we don't have anyone else scheduled."

"I understand but when do you expect to be following up on this round?"

Or they might say, "We have 3 or four more people scheduled. We should be done by the end of next week."

"Terrific. Do you mind if I check back with you after that?"

"No. No problem at all."

"Great!"

After the interview, send a thank you note that thanks them for making the time to speak with you. Don't just simply send it to one person for a group. Send it to each individual person who you met with. Tailor it slightly differently for each person. Email it, don't US mail it. Don't go to your car, write it out, and delivered back to their reception desk. It seems cheesy.

My suggestion is to get a card from everyone that you meet with as you are finishing up. If they don't have a card, call reception, call the main number and indicate that you want to get an email address for someone that you interview with. I'm sure you'll be able to get it. If not, you can get from LinkedIn or do a Google search. It's not a big deal.

Send a thank you note to each and once the date approaches, and you haven't heard anything, I know the convention is to stay in touch by sending an article but like that idea because of her from too many managers who said to me, "Are they sending this to me for? I don't get this." It becomes a turnoff to them. That's obviously not what you want to do.

You get to the point we were expecting to hear (if you are working as a recruiter, contact the recruiter; if your cup working directly with the firm, contact the firm), if the recruiter is in getting back to you. Maybe that's a single with the firm wasn't interested or that he or she doesn't know yet. Give it a day and then contact the firm directly.

When all is said and done, the message that you might lead with is, "Hi! When we met, you indicated that you would be done with your round of interviewing around now. I haven't heard anything. Have things been delayed at all?"

Wait for them to call back; if they don't, take it is the signal of rejection because if they were interested, there by trying to keep you warm while the process extended itself.

Again, from a process perspective, find out timeline at the interview, send a thank you note to each person that you met with afterwards, from there, follow-up, not on the day, but the day after they told you that the interview cycle would be done just to check in.

"Hi! I just want to see where you stood on your interviewing has there been a delay?" Then wait for them to call or not. All the while, you continue to interview so that you are not depending on this 1 firm for whether or not you are going to be landing a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

A Really Cool Negotiating Tactic (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers up a fun and really easy to implement salary negotiation tactic.

Summary

Let's say hypothetically, you are someone who is looking for salary the hundred $150,000 And they came in at $140,000. I don't want to respond by saying, (in a whiny voice), "This is very disappointing. I had $150,000 in mind. (Sobbing)." Were some of the behavior like that because they don't care. Here's what I want you to do.

As you are speaking to the hiring manager who is made the offer to you, I want to respond by saying, "Wow! That is really fabulous! I am so looking forward to joining you. I think there are a lot of things I can do right out-of-the-box that will really go a long way toward proving my value to you. Can we set the start date on…" And you set up the start date.

They start lowering their guard a little bit and then you turn and say, "I have one small thing I need to resolve with you.. That 2nd number needs to be up a little bit. Instead of before, it needs to be a 5. That I can clearly walk in the door." They may respond by saying, "No," but what you are going to do is pay that image of you walking in the door 1st by saying, "I am so looking forward to joining. It's such a great opportunity. Thank you. This is such a great offer. I really think I can…" You have a sense of how I'm playing this?

"But I need to set fixed one thing here. That 2nd number needs to be a 5 and not a 4. I will be there very quickly."

What you're doing is committing to joining and basically accepting the offer but you are saying it has to be up a digit. It is a very subtle approach. It is very enthusiastic and sucks the man and making them feel as though they have hired you and then you are dropping the hammer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Forgotten Job Search Strategy | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you of this wall but forgotten job search strategy, particularly if you are in sales.

Summary

The strategy is START KNOCKING DOWN DOORS, DAMN IT!

Don't just sit behind LinkedIn. Don't just sit behind your computer screen. Call people. Reach out to them! Don't just simply sit back passively and apply to jobs to applicant tracking systems.

You may leave a voicemail message for them. You may leave for messages for them. The fact of the matter is, particularly if you are in sales, is the single best representation of your persistence and determination that is going to attract you to employers.

In a lot of other fields, if you wait for the applicant tracking system to refer you to the hiring manager for them to see your resume and not get weeded out by it, you are making a huge mistake.

Start banging on doors and demanding to be seen. Not rudely. Not saying things like, "YOU MUST SEE ME! YOU MUST INTERVIEW ME!" Make your presence felt.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Job Search When I Work in an Open Area (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about how to job search when you work in an open space floor plan.

Summary

I'm here with the question for a job hunter designed to help them, help you with your job search.

The scenario they present is very simple. They work in office with an open floor plan and, unfortunately, if you take the call or even respond to email, there are a bunch of people around them. How do you do a job search. When you work in an open space?

The answer is actually pretty easy , but I understand the fear involved of being caught. I used to work for an agency where, whenever someone wore suit, the joke would be, "Where is the interview today?" If someone walked off on their mobile phone to take a phone call, the assumption was that they were looking for another job. I know it sounds crazy but that's the mentality the recruiters have and frankly the mentality of a lot of people in their fear that someone is going to detect them.

Here are 3 things to do the really very easy.
1. Have email only sent to your personal account. Never have it sent to an office account.. Make sure that account exists on your phone. This way, you can respond to messages on your phone and is not going through the firm's server.
2. If phone calls are coming to your personal phone, never take the call when it comes in. That so you never have to say to someone, "Would you hold on for 2nd so I can walk to can speak privately." That statement basically tells everyone that is a call from recruiter or someone about a job. Instead, let the call going to voicemail and, from there, you want to be able to respond to that call before lunch and before 5. That's so that you respond to every message within 24 hours. You always want to be able to respond within that amount of time. Remember, you are competing with other people were also looking at being evaluated for these jobs. Put yourself in a position where you responding quickly but not instantly.
3. If you mistakenly take a call from someone, always respond by saying, "I would like to speak with you. But now really isn't a convenient time. Can I call you at____." then you suggest an alternate time. Sometimes, we make a mistake. We take the call. This is the perfect way to respond when it is at your convenience you can walk to that office to have the conversation, you can leave the building to have that conversation and not be caught.

Texting should only be used when scheduling something. If you're responding to someone you have their mobile number . But, at the end of the day, I would suggest avoiding text for initial contact. Once you have the relationship the other person, simply tell them, "I work in an open space and sometimes it is hard to speak freely. Is it okay if I text you?" Get their mobile number and start texting them you scheduling things.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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