The Nuances to Writing a Resume | Job Search Radio


Debra Mastic and I spend time helping you understand how a resume navigates a hiring pipeline and how to write a great resume.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching throughout your search, interview coaching or help with a salary negotiation?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line. In the body of the email, tell me what you would like help with.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Another Job Search Lesson from “The Godfather” (VIDEO)


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers another pearl of wisdom from “The Godfather” to teach you about loyalty to your employer.

Summary

This is a quote from the 1st movie where the oldest son, Santino, talks to Michael is about to enter the military.  I think this is the scene where he gives in a noogy.  This is the quote: 

"Your country aint your blood.  Remember that."  It is not in typical James Caan fashion.

The lesson here is going to pertain to job search.  It isn't about your country. It's about the company you work for.  

A lot of the way you've been trained to think about employers is propaganda from the employer's perspective.  The training you to be loyal.  It's about working hard for the organization and rising up through the ranks.

"Don't change jobs too often.  After all…" Lots of cautionary tales that basically tell you to keep your mouth shut and go to work.

The lesson here is really what do employers do on their side?  They do whatever is necessary to stay afloat.  Most firms will do that ethically; on occasion, there are some firms that will do it unethically and sometimes, illegally.  With regard to how they deal with employees, frankly, employees are disposable.  They use you as long as they can. If they don't need you, you are gone.  If economic circumstances change, your gone.

You need to conduct your career in much the same way, too.  You can't just sit there waiting patiently for some of the tapping on the shoulder and say, "I think you're ready for that promotion to program her grade level II."  (I just use that as an example of 1 of those stupid institutional titles that employers sometimes use)

Instead, think in terms of what is going to advance your career.  What is going to help you get ahead?  That can be internally or externally.  As I've said many times, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those are great qualities to have).  The people who get ahead are the ones who are alert to opportunity.  Sometimes those are internal to their current organization. But, more often than not, they are external to it.

When you're tapped on the shoulder for an internal opportunity, is normally as a result of the patient, slow ascent up through the ranks.  When you're tapped on the shoulder externally, it is because someone sees something in you that they want.  They believe they need.  They think you have it.  

That is a halo that allows you to leverage that situation much more aggressively.

Isn't that really what is about?

It isn't about rising through the ranks slowly because the think you're ever going to get to the point where the 65 years old and retiring from these firms? Of course not. They will get rid of you way before then, or make the conditions untenable for you way before that.

You need to think of your career as being a series of steps, up through the ranks. Sometimes, you will make mistakes. You want to be in a position where you are in charge of your life, not your employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why You Don’t Even Get The Interview. (VIDEO)


Simulcast of No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio: Why You Don’t Even Get The Interview

Summary

I was coaching someone yesterday who is up a position and in the course of the conversation, he reminded me of something in his circumstances that I thought would be helpful to you as well.

What he reminded me of was paying attention to the language that is used in the job description or the questions that are asked by HR that signal certain things that may not be obvious. For example, in his case, he was told by HR that the next interview was with someone who is trying to 4X growth within the particular business unit.

We were working on language to use that illustrated his experience with that. The language that we came up with was his background with "aggressive growth." Instead of using the usual metrics of percentages, their language was to talk in terms of "times." He was involved with almost 3X growth in the previous situation.

Recognize that there are signals that are used in job descriptions or in the questions that HR asks that can be a signal to you of how to communicate with them and the kind of information they are looking for.

Another thing that came up in a different conversation was concerned that one firm had about someone where they perceived his background was more internally oriented, rather than externally oriented. He was savvy enough to pick up on that and said, "I just want to be clear about my background. I've had 5 years of internal experience and and, of those 5, 3 of them were taking internal programs and bringing them to customers and converting them from internal systems to external systems, thus, of my 20 or 22 years of background, 17 of them really related to external customers."

Notice one going with us. You always want to be listening for cues that are coming in job descriptions or in interviews that signal the real interest that the firm has because job descriptions are a list of qualifications that they look for. You are looking for what you can do for them. You are looking for ways that you can demonstrate that you as a professional, with your staff level individual or in the C suite, have the capacity to deliver what it is that they want. As you know, sometimes these job descriptions and sometimes their questioning is a little obtuse.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

How to Get a Job With Zero Experience | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains several ways to find a job with no experience.

Summary

Right off the bat, I want to encourage you to realize that you are going to be perseverance. This is not an instant strategy. There is no instant strategy for finding work unless mom or dad walks you in the door of the firm and you are hired because of them. That strategy works 100% of the time.

Assuming you are not born with a silver spoon in your mouth, this is the way to really do it.

There are 3 strategies.
1. Try to have someone introduce you to hiring manager. I need the quip about mom and dad, maybe it is an alumni from your school, who provides an introduction. Want to find some of those alumni that you don't really know? Go to LinkedIn and there are series of drop downs along the top. Locate the one that says, "Find Alumni." It will connect you with former students from your school and they can provide information about they found work at their organization and introductions.

2. You might try doing something related to what you do. You may not get hired as a teacher, but you might get hired as a teacher's aide. You may not be hired as an accountant at the firm that you want to join but that could be related position at that big 4 firm that could be a steppingstone to accounting. Maybe you have to temp at that firm before they consider hiring you. If you do temper the firm, make sure there is no noncompete in the temp agencies contract before you commit to joining.

3. This is "the guts one. " This is the one we are going to need to have some income to pay for this while you are doing it. Find the individual that is a leader an organization that you want to work for in the role that you wanted to do. Reach out to them an offer to do pro bono work. In turn. Be an assistant. Volunteer to do stuff for he or she. In doing that, what you will be doing is building a network of relationships within the firm because you will wind up in situations where you will be there assistant. Obviously, you have to do great work. If your intention is to do half-assed work and expect them to hire you, this is not a strategy for you.

However, if you put your effort and make connections, if you reach out to this person while you're working there, and ask "Please give me a sense of how I'm doing and what I can be doing better.' Again, you have to make some money elsewhere. You see were coming from with this? You're doing free work in order to get attention, a network, which, when you're coming out of school, you may not really have.

Building that relationship with an individual order two becomes a way that your entrée into an organization where some of you might notice you and poach you to their project or team.

These are 3 great ways in order to find positions (plus of course the 4th 1 which, of course, is, Mommy or Daddy get you the job.)

I hope you have the courage to not download stores and build those relationships because it will make all the difference to you, not just simply in this job search, but in every single one from this point on.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

After The Interview (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what to do AFTER the interview. If there is a reference to any jobs on recruiting for, these positions were filled years ago.  I no longer do recruiting.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Employers Aren’t Only Looking for Competence

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a few of the things employers are looking for when they interview someone for a job.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about what employers assess for when they hire. they may seem like a funny subject,, because your 1st reaction is to probably say, "Well, they want to know if I can do the job.." To me, that's translates into skills competence and, yes, they try to evaluate for that. There are other factors the firm start to assess for when the interview..

I was turned on to that notion years ago when I start the notice this 1 newspaper article reoccur from time to time that claimed that 20% of all positions were filled by individuals that in no way, shape or form fit the requirement that the client was looking for. But someone like them, trusted them and was going to give them a shot. This made me stop and think. I start to talk with my clients about what they hire for. Yes, competence is one variable but there are others as well.

Self-confidence is the 2nd what I want to mention. A person who is self-confident inspires confidence that they are the solution to a need. After all, would you trust someone more that they can do a job for you. If they seem passionate, enthusiastic and self-confident or nervous, frightened and timid? Of course you will choose the self-confident person. That's the 2nd criteria.

Character is the next one. Is this person. "A character," do they have character or maybe both? Some organizations like to hire people who have both. Some organizations want to ensure that you have character. Are you an individual who can fit in (that involves a cultural fit) into their organization?

So you have competence,, self-confidence, character, cultural fit in the next one is charisma. Charisma is 1 of those funny variables. Charisma is the quality that individuals demonstrate that allows people to just surrender their power and authority to someone because they fall in love. I want to give you an idea of how that makes a difference.

Let's look at 3 recent presidents. We have Barack Obama,, we are former Pres. Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan. 2 of them have fairly similar politics and the 3rd 1, Ronald Reagan, is very different. America loved all 3 of them. How does that work? Ultimately, there are qualities about each of them. They made America's stop, suspend some of their thinking and just falling in love. That's the quality of charisma.

Charismatic people always do better on interviews. They always do better on salary offers than non-charismatic people. How do you get charisma? That's good be for another time.

For today, I'm just going to say that competence is one quality the person has to have. Self-confidence. Character. Cultural fit.. Can you fit into this organization and group or not. Charisma. These are all qualities that translate into leadership.

Are you the kind of person that inspires confidence that you can be the solution to a need or you someone who makes them scratch their head and look further?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

what are you tolerating?

What Are You Tolerating? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Summary

I was doing a coaching call yesterday with someone and we got to a point in our conversation where he said something wonderful. What he said (and I think it is very relevant for you as a job hunter), he asked himself the question, "What am I tolerating?" I asked the question of you-- What are you tolerating? What are you putting up with, what was he putting up with, what was he putting up with in his current job that he knew he didn't like, but you just grown so numb to it where he grew to tolerate the condition?

For you as a job hunter, particularly when you get to the counteroffer phase or the resignation phase, which may lead to the counteroffer, it is important for you to be conscious of the things that you are putting up with work that just really don't serve you. That's because when you get to the point when you resign and your employer says, "What is it going to take? What is it going to take to keep you," and they start selling you about the money, is not just the money that is been driving you out the door. It is the things that you been putting up with for the longest time there really forcing you to look at other choices.

So, again, write down the things that you are tolerating, the things that you're putting up with that you really don't care for were there making you emotionally numb rather than conscious and passionate and loving everything about your work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Explaining Employment Gaps in Your Résumé (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to explain how to discuss the gap in your employment history.

Summary

Him him him him

Today, let's talk about how to deal with that gap in your resume . . . You know, that time in your background were took you 5 months, 8 months, 7 months . . . whatever it is to find a new position 3 years ago. How do you deal with that interruption your experience?

Some people have this silly idea that they are supposed to lie and cover it up. I must in all honesty tell you it doesn't work anymore. Employers are cooperating with one another and do background checks post-employment (after you join their firm). They will send a note to your previous employer and say, "So, Jane told us in their application that you work for your firm for such and such period of time. Does that seem somewhat accurate?" If they find inconsistency in your job application, it is grounds for termination. They can't keep you on board because, frankly, lying can get them into trouble.

Imagine for a 2nd that you are employed by them and commit some sort of crime. For example, you work on Wall Street and trade grandma's life savings down to zero. Can you imagine what happens when a lawyer gets a hold of the firm and asks, "you knew he lied on his employment application and you still kept them on board!" How do you think that would play out in the courts?

Employers have a very simple policy. They will terminate you. They will terminate you without any warning whatsoever. What they will do is meet you at your desk with security and hand you a box with your personal things and send you on your way. You don't want that to happen. Here's how you deal with it.

When you have a gap in your background, you use the cover email that you send your resume in (these are like the old cover letteyrs people use to mail the resume with. Today, that is the message area of your email) to sell yourself.

You might write in the cover email, "I'm forwarding my resume to you because I was recommended by so-and-so, you told me that your position for such and such." Or, you might say, "I saw your ad on such and such site that told me that you trying to hire such and such type of person. "

The 2nd paragraph my talk about your qualifications and how your background fits the role. The 3rd 1 might say something like, "you may notice my job history that for years ago I was unemployed for 6 months. During that time, the on the economy was terrible and they found it difficult to find work. Ultimately, I was able to land a job with another organization. "

Or, you might just simply say, "I had an injury at that time. I was in a car accident and had surgery. It was impossible for me to work." Or you might talk about how you assisted your dying mom during the last 6 months of her life. These are pretty common stories that employer hears.

Another one that they here is, "I took a package to leave my organization. I decided that I had not had a lengthy vacation since I was in college and decide to take 4 months to travel in China before coming back and resuming my career." What ever it is, do that in the 3rd paragraph and then come back and sell yourself in the remainder of the cover email.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in your background. Then, you have to remember what you told them in your email. So when you meet with them in person and raise the subject, they are looking for consistency. Thus, if you talk about that vacation that you took, you say, "I know a lot of people would find it difficult to believe, it was 1 of the great 4 months of my life. I love my work, but it was an opportunity to travel. I had money in the bank and decide to take advantage of this time." You just speak to them in a way that sounds absolutely sincere.

This is the easiest way to deal with the gap in the background.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

The Mechanics of the Job Interview


From before you arrive for your job interview to their first question,

Summary

I want to take you to the mechanics of the in person interview today from before you meet the interviewer to arriving at the building through their asking the 1st question.

60% of getting a job is already accomplished before you set foot in the door in that each of you believes that you have something of the other one wants. From there, 20% is involved with each of you convincing one another to what you been told about the other is true and the remaining 20% is purely subjective criteria. That is, are you the kind of person that can fit into their organization; do they seem like the kind of people and does it seem like the kind of job that is going to be of interest to you. Each of you needs to get an A in the course.

If you drive into the interview, give yourself some extra time to get there. There's nothing worse for you or for them than you arriving there late. Try to target get into the building about 15 minutes early. If you taking the subway or bus, or some other version of public transportation, you can take a dry run before hand. If you can't, do a dry run. Just give yourself adequate time to arrive to the building early.

If for some reason, it is extremely hot or extremely cold, I want you to take the time to warm up your hands if it's cold, or dry your hands of perspiration, dry your forehead or face of any perspiration if it's hot; there is nothing worse than shaking hands with a popsicle at the beginning of the interview or having sweaty palms when you are shaking hands with someone.

By getting there a few minutes early, it also gives you a chance to focus on what your objectives are for the interview. If the role, much as you may believe that you're going to have some great energy walk again with 1 minute to spare you are not could be as well prepared. Give yourself adequate time to get there and give yourself a few moments to prepare some of the points that you want to make again.

Let's assume that you got through security, you've gone upstairs because invariably it is an "upstairs" that you are to be interviewing in and now you're at the reception. Inevitably she will say, "So how can I help you?"

You'll say, "Hi! I have a 2:30 appointment to see someone so." They'll invite you to take a seat and maybe give you an application and you'll sit down. I want you to sit down at a point in the room facing the greatest number of entry points so that you can see someone approaching announce your name. I mentioned that because of something I saw happen years ago where I had an appointment with someone at the bank and there was someone there for an interview. It was a rainy day and they had a raincoat on, an umbrella, they were reading a copy of the New York Times. They had the raincoat folder on their lap, had a briefcase and were engrossed in their reading.

They didn't realize that the person was going to interview them was going to arrive in the reception area from the direction of your immediate right shoulder. Thus, when the person stepped out of the doorway and announce the name, I could see this person be visibly startled, have to pick up the raincoat umbrella briefcase, fold the New York Times, shake hands and they were startled so you knew that this interview wasn't going to start off well.

You have to understand that the 1st 10 minutes of an interview are the most important time because that's where each of you decides whether or not to pay attention during the remaining 30 or 40 minutes you might be talking. So it's important for you to get off to a good start.

Sit facing the greatest number of entry points to the room and thus, when someone comes out to greet you, although you may be reading, you will have adequate time to notice them (again, don't get so engrossed in the reading that you don't notice that someone is coming out to announce your name) and thus be prepared when they announce your name.

As soon as they do, walk over and give them a firm handshake and as soon as you do, immediately size them up as a person and deal with them as you presuppose them to be. Are they smart or not. Are they aggressive or not. What are they like as a personality. Do they seem like a friendly individual? Are they out type person? Are there aggressive person? What kind of individual are they? As I said, deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

Most people make the mistake of thinking that they can feel out the interviewer in the 1st few minutes. If you do that, unfortunately you're going to be paralyzing your personality while you feel out the interviewer. The mistake here, as I said, each of you decides within the 1st 10 minutes whether or not to pay attention to the remainder of the time. By hiding your personality, there is nothing for them to like. You want them to like you as a person.

As I mentioned earlier, the hardest part of getting a job is accomplished before you arrived. They are going to be making a snap decision about you just as you are going to be making about them. As I said, I want to encourage you to decide what this person is like as soon as you meet them. If the role, if you are in a social situation and you met some of the 1st time, 95% of the time your instincts about that person are going to be right.

Unfortunately, because it's an interview and you think it is important it is about a job in your career you really need or want this job, most people paralyze their personality behind it. I want you to trust your judgment. If the role, if you are at a casino in knew that you would win at craps 95 times out of 100, you wouldn't really worry about the 5% were you lost. If anything, you might get happy and excited. I'm going to encourage you to do the same thing. Size them up as a personality and deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

There going to escort you into an interview area or office; they may sit behind a desk with you on the other side, seated in a chair. Male or female, I want you to sit there comfortably with your arms on the armrests cross your legs in a position that is comfortable for you and before they say anything, before they have a chance to answer your 1st question, when I want to do is say this to them, "Thank you for taking the time to see me today."

If you were referred by a recruiter, you might continue by saying, "I spoke with, Jeff Altman about this role and he gave me a brief description but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the role as you see it and what I could do to help?"

If you are referred by a friend or you answered and ad, if it is a friend, you mentioned their name. If you saw an ad, you might start by saying, "I remember the position description I saw advertised and it seemed interesting, but I want to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

The reason I suggest this is very simple. Most of the time, it interview is like a karate match. They ask you a question in your reply. They start by saying, "Tell me about yourself," you do that. They going to more depth and you answer. Eventually, they get to the point where they ask whether you have any questions for them. You say, "Tell me about the job." They do that. You say, "It sounds great." And they tell you, "Terrific. We'll get back to you."

By asking the question at the beginning, you are getting information about the job at the beginning of the interview where you can use it to your advantage. I say use it because I want you to answer questions based upon what they tell you. I don't want to just talk about what you've done; I want to talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for.

Instead of droning on and on about things they don't care about, I want you to focus in like a laser on the points that matter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Don’t Waste Peoples’ Time (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not waste peoples’ time when you submit your resume.

Summary

So far today, I have been wasting my morning reading resumes that in no way, shape or form fit anything that are submitting them for.

There is one example. Resume I just received for an IT director's job. The cover email they sent was terrific. I must say, this person writes a great cover letter.

The only problem is that the resume doesn't back it up. So I write this cover letter, he tells me about all this wonderful work that is done at the last firm, and in the last industry he worked in. He has been consulting since then. Then, you open up the resume and discover that he has worked as a consultant for the last 10 years (that is absolutely fine). However, he summarized that last 10 years in 5 lines of which 2 of those lines were less than half of a line.

Let's just say it is for lines to cover 10 years of experience.

Do you think my client will actually believe this cover letter? I know I don't. I had a lot of smoke alone at me and my time wasted because this person is too lazy to actually give me some data about what he did, probably because he knows that will knock them out of consideration because it was nonsense work.

For you out there, be considerate of other people and their time. By being considerate I'm asking you not to spam your crap at me.

If you have the skills needed for the job, demonstrated the fit in your resume. If you don't, don't spam your resume. You are nothing more than a Cialis spammer at that point.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

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