Another Salary Negotiation Mistake | Job Search Radio

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

Summary

Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/06/30/salary-negotiation-advice-for-executives/

EP 338 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Summary

I just want this speak with you and say that if you're working with a recruiter, I know this may be hard, but you just have to trust them to do the job. That job and I'm speaking of is to do the negotiation for you.

You get to the point where you have the offer or on the run up to the offer. There are 2 different approaches – – one from the contingency side, the other from the retained search side.

I think the retained search side finds it less difficult to do the negotiation. On the contingency side, there is a certain panic involved because there is that much more money that is involved in the way of a commission. Often, with a contingency recruiter, the relationship may not be as strong as it is with the retained recruiter. Again, knowing the relationship that your representation has with the client is going to be a big help to you.

Let's assume it is a contingency recruiter and you are on the run up phase and they ask, "So, how much are you looking for, again? I want to make sure I have the numbers right." By now, you should have an idea of how much you be looking for based upon what you know about the job, what you know in the way of comparables for people like you... I'm not talking about those broad salary ranges (just to pick arbitrary numbers) like $200,000-$275,000. Everywhere there's a $275,000, knowing here's the $200,000 and so they know your here's all the numbers in the middle. Recognize that that is a pretty broad range. You want to get more targeted.

When the recruiter starts to talk you down as often, they will try to do, that may be a signal that they already know what the hiring firm is going to propose. You can cut right through. "Have you spoken with the firm? What's the number they are talking about? Let's just go right to it." This way, you can start working for the case as to why they have to up the number and why they have to represent you to up the number.

When push comes to shove, you may already know that they offer $245,000, you will take it. They don't need to know that. You have to push for the biggest number because at this point, what they are trying to do is squeeze you into that pocket that your client has been trying to wedge you into and that may not necessarily serve your needs.

Again, given the idea that you're going to do this and is going to generate this amount of money. Save this amount of money. At the end of the day, the client may not necessarily shift AND you may go directly to the client. Initially, following the old Nixon proverb, trust but verify. You have to do a certain amount of trust because they represent you up until this point, you want them to represent you, across the finish line.

If you get to a point where the client hasn't budged asked them to schedule one more conversation for you. They will ask, "What's the intention?".

"I would just like to talk with them before I make my decision. It's a tough choice for me; it's important choice for me. I want to make sure I have all the information I need to make my decision."

Notice how noncommittal that is? You don't want to necessarily give the idea to the contingency recruiter that you will take the offer if the client doesn't budge. You want to get them to move a little bit And get them a little bit more flexible.

On the retained side, like I said, you can lay out the case more directly because they tend to be more forthright because they have less money at stake. Again, because of how you present it, you're always driving to the highest number. You don't have to be "nice." At this point, in the run up phase, they may have an idea of the number that is being proposed; they may not. Normally they will. Just go right to it.

"What's the number that they are talking about?"

You can respond by saying, "That's not going to be enough for me. I'm going to need them to make that 2nd number a such and such," and work from there. Start working through them and then again, go directly to the firm for one conversation. The ideal is if you walk in, but often that is not appropriate.
Skype, FaceTime, a phone call... However, works for you and them, set up one less conversation and then go for the close.

However, in situations where there is a retained search firm involved, be prepared to say yes or no on the spot. You don't want to let it dangle one because often offers are rescinded.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

The Second Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the second easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself. In the video, I refer to the easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself.

Summary

Let's assume that you tried my easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself and they said no. At that point, you reveal the fact (just do a quick review, easiest way to negotiate a higher salary is to start by saying, "Wow! That's a pretty good offer. I'd like to think about it a little bit." In their mind, they start getting nervous. You then try to get them to do "a touch better." There's a detailed presentation, if you watch the video.)

The 2nd easiest way is responding to their rejection of the easiest way, if you do, this is when you reveal that you have another offer. If you don't, and you're planning on turning this down anyway, you can still talk about having another offer because you have nothing to lose. If you have nothing, it's up to you as to whether or not you want to bluff

If this isn't good enough for you, bluffing incurs no loss. Bluffing, if you were to take the offer, can't risk them saying, "okay, take the other offer." And you grasping to get the offer back. And they go away and you look like a fool .

The 2nd easiest way is revealing that you have another job offer, it is for X number of dollars, you prefer their job to that one. "Why do you do that? Can't you be flexible?" The other one is a good job with a good firm, too . But, at the end of the day, when I go to the bank, they want me to have enough money to live on. They don't want me going into debt. The result ones of being. I do have to take money into consideration in their offer is. About $7500 more than yours.. Could you at least match that one?"

Often there to make it seem like a big deal and will be so hard that the earth will need to apart and working you need to get a lot of OKs from different people. "That's okay, because the other firm wants a decision by…" You tell them a date 2 days out. "They have been waiting patiently. They understand I have an interest in this job but they are starting to put pressure on me and I have stalled them for 2 more days. When you believe you can get back to me? Because if I don't have a decision in 2 more days I am to take the other offer."

What that does is turn everything around so it's no longer on you and it's on them. If they match that number or match the number you told him you will accept, whatever it is, you take the job.

So the text 2nd best way is to reveal that you have another job offer at just the right moment.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

A Really Cool Negotiating Tactic (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers up a fun and really easy to implement salary negotiation tactic.

Summary

Let's say hypothetically, you are someone who is looking for salary the hundred $150,000 And they came in at $140,000. I don't want to respond by saying, (in a whiny voice), "This is very disappointing. I had $150,000 in mind. (Sobbing)." Were some of the behavior like that because they don't care. Here's what I want you to do.

As you are speaking to the hiring manager who is made the offer to you, I want to respond by saying, "Wow! That is really fabulous! I am so looking forward to joining you. I think there are a lot of things I can do right out-of-the-box that will really go a long way toward proving my value to you. Can we set the start date on…" And you set up the start date.

They start lowering their guard a little bit and then you turn and say, "I have one small thing I need to resolve with you.. That 2nd number needs to be up a little bit. Instead of before, it needs to be a 5. That I can clearly walk in the door." They may respond by saying, "No," but what you are going to do is pay that image of you walking in the door 1st by saying, "I am so looking forward to joining. It's such a great opportunity. Thank you. This is such a great offer. I really think I can…" You have a sense of how I'm playing this?

"But I need to set fixed one thing here. That 2nd number needs to be a 5 and not a 4. I will be there very quickly."

What you're doing is committing to joining and basically accepting the offer but you are saying it has to be up a digit. It is a very subtle approach. It is very enthusiastic and sucks the man and making them feel as though they have hired you and then you are dropping the hammer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Negotiating an Above Average Salary Offer

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to negotiate an above average salary offer from the get go.

Summary

There is a lot of advice that you get talking about researching the salary range for position like yours. I will work with some general things; please understand I'm just using this as an example.

Let's say that the salary range that you're looking at is $100,000-$125,000. If you are entering into a negotiation, and you quote that figures to them, the employer is immediately going to zero in on $100,000 and, in point of fact, you are zeroing in on $125,000.

I'm not going to tell you to shave the numbers for them and take out that $100,000 and switch it to $115,000-$125,000. The same problem will occur. I want you to go directly at it and very simply say, "if you do some research, you'll see a whole host of numbers. A few of them mention $100,000. Most of them talk about a higher range, probably closer to one $125,000. I want to be clear with you. I'm not an average performer. I am clearly up an above average performer. As a result, these average numbers are below what my expectations are. I'm looking for something from you that shows me that you really see my value because, as I have done before, I can do for you, too, or better."

Notice what I've done? I acknowledge the average numbers. I will also say, "I'm not average. I'm above average. I've done it before. I want to do it again and do it for you." And you are not settling.

You don't want to be seen as the average. You always want to be seen as the above average. Remember, at the end of the day, you can always cave-in, right? And you can always say no. Initially, when you doing the salary negotiation or if you're being interviewed and they are starting to think in their minds what your value is based upon your previous earnings, they are always going to zero in on lower numbers and you always want to be pushing them at the earliest point to higher numbers.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Here, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Summary

I want to talk with you today about negotiating compensation because it is probably 1 of the most under talked about aspects of the job search. The reason for that is pretty clear. the big boys, the big girls, when they are negotiating compensation have all sorts of ways to play the game.for the little guy, the small person you may be in a blue-collar job working for a small business where someone is paying them out of their own pocket...there is no negotiating there.the basic form of negotiation there is, "Were making you an offer. You have 2 choices. Leave it or take it."

Then there is the average person, perhaps a professional or white-collar worker, small or big company… It doesn't really matter. when offer comes in someone's trying to improve upon it, again, there are limited strategies for what you can do. again, the big boys and big girls have a pretty easy. they are all going to have big-time agents and they are not covered by the same rules. the average person is really stuck because, if you working for a public corporation, for example, they cannot really do side deals because they are subject to litigation. if they do a side deal with you (I will use myself as an example) for some additional benefit, they can be sued because, after all, why did they give it to this white guy and not give it to this individual who is not a white guy? Why did they give it to the heterosexual guy it not the gay guy? we live in a litigious society and that affects the way the negotiations done.

I want to give you the simplest negotiation strategy that you can use. it doesn't always work but often it does.it requires very little strain or stress on your part. for the average individual, here is the basic negotiating tactic:

If they hit your number, you can go, "YIPPEE! I'M GOING TO TAKE THE OFFER! YAY!!!" If you told them a particular number and they hit it or more, it isn't really right if you ask for more. after all, what does that really say about you. You told him one thing and now you want even more? it kind of makes you look like a pig.

however, if an organization hasn't hit the number that you been negotiating with them for or they know you been looking for because your agent or you have told him about it during the interview, here is the simplest strategy.

(Best listened to)

Step number 1 . "Huh (said as though you are pondering)." you will make it sound too uncomfortable but you want to pause a little bit then give them something.

"I've got to tell you I really love this firm but I think the offer is a touch low. I need to think about this a little bit. Can I get back to you tomorrow?"

Right off the bat, what that does is make them nervous. . You haven't said no. You put them in limbo. you given them the carrot of saying, "I love the job. I love the organization," but you hesitated. They know it's the money.

When you get back to them the next day, I want to be prepared for them with a number of points.

"Other than the money, is there anything that is in question for you?" Then you ask those questions.then you get to the real one… The money. By the way, with the other stuff, you need to know in your own mind what you're ready to walk away from. Not everything should be life and death on the secondary issues. when you get to the money part of the conversation which is what they're really waiting for, and you want to say yes to the firm,now it's just money standing in the way.

Pause.

Look them square in the eye

Whether you doing this in person or over the phone, you have to sound a little introspective and uncomfortable. like you are thinking (even though this is all planned and rehearsed).

You say, "I'm a little disappointed in the money. I know we spoke earlier about it being such and such in this, obviously, is less."

At this point, you pause again and allow them to respond to it. Or, you pause and they don't respond to it and then you say, "Could you do attach better?" Then you stay silent for a little bit. don't break the silence. Wait for them to respond 1st.

They may ask, "How much more?"

"I would really like the money I was talking with you about. I would like more but I would really like the money I was talking with you about."

"We can't go that high."

"Could you do a touch better? Could you meet me in the middle?"

The 1st option obviously is to go to her asking for. option number 2 is to go for the middle ground somewhere. Just get them to improve the offer somewhere above where they extended it.

Obviously, the 3rd option is that you can turn down their offer. Be prepared to do that because if you going to that negotiation with the attitude of being prepared to take whatever they give you, then, obviously, we going to the conversation little bit differently.

If they turn you down on improving the offer, you can always sigh and ask whether they can improve the review policy a little bit.instead of an annual review, can I give you a six-month review so that you have the possibility of getting a raise sooner.

Then, you are quiet again.

"There is no guarantee that you will get an increase but I think we can get your review in 6 months."

"Thank you. That I can say yes to. I can accept the offer."

Or, you say no based upon what you hear from them. if there unwilling to be flexible, there could be business reasons for that. they could be paying one individual less than what they are offering you who they are bringing in from the outside and they are afraid they might lose the other person. in theory, you should be concerned about that, but in practice, you should because it could impact you as well.

again, to do a quick review, step number 1 is to say, "I would like to think about it." step number 2 is covering all the other things you need to cover 1st and then getting "sincere" with them when you talk about the money (follow the advice above). they will often raise it, but if they won't. They may say, "we can't. This is the max in our budget." then, you ask if they can do a different review policy for you. Whatever the right answer is, you need to know going into the conversation what you are prepared to do, including walking away.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Avoid Premature Negotiation and Other Negotiation Tips | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides you with a few salary negotiation tips to help you when you receive your offer.

Summary

When all is said and done, some people start negotiating from the get go. All that happens is you piss off the interviewers because all they think you are in there to do is negotiate, negotiate, negotiate while they are there to evaluate and assess you.

Your initial job is to make them fall in love because as I've said many times, no love, no money, no honey. You don't get the opportunity to go to work at these places. If, at the end of the day, you don't prove your value to them. . Thus, the 1st thing is to make them fall in love because then they are more willing to negotiate. That is step number 1. Avoid premature negotiation issues.

2. Once you get the offer, that's when the negotiating really should start. You wait until the offer has been made. Some people start negotiating, thinking that the economy is booming when it isn't or they stop negotiating when it is booming because they think it isn't. You have to know the climate that you are operating in in order to know whether you will have an opportunity to really move the needle on the salary part of the offer.

3. This is something that students are often told-- don't negotiate just for the sake of it. I respectfully disagree. I want you to try negotiating and see if you can up the number. Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." It is a very simple and gentle approach to negotiating that won't piss anyone off. That's the 2nd thing.

4. Don't forget that if you are negotiating with the small to midsize firm, there are benefits that you might be able to negotiate. For example, there is that Masters program that you want to take. See if you can negotiate tuition reimbursement as a part of your offer. Big companies won't negotiate this kind of stuff. It's either in their policies and procedures or not because, from their vantage point, they are trying to avoid lawsuits.

After all, just to use an example, if you are the white heterosexual male and they did for you, why did they not give this concession to the non-white heterosexual male and they gave it to you. It becomes a lawsuit in the making. Big firms don't negotiate. Small companies may in some midsize firms will if there policies and procedures are not completely in place. Don't forget to negotiate some of the secondary items and just focus on salary.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to answer a question for you? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

 

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/02/20/another-salary-negotiation-mistake/

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

Summary

Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com . We donate it to charity.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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Your Best Position for Negotiating Salary (VIDEO)

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to put yourself in the best position for a salary negotiation.

Summary

You need to understand that with most organizations, they have salary guidelines that HR and hiring managers works with. It's not like they can take you from making $80,000 per year and give you $160,000. No matter how good you are, it just doesn't work that way.

With big companies, the basic strategy is always that you should get two offers. Not one but two. You have to time this out around the same time so that in this way, there's a certain amount of pressure on the employer. After all, from their standpoint, they have spent a lot of money interviewing and assessing candidates and deciding that you are the right one.

What you want to be doing is getting two firms in play. They're not going to bid aggressively against one another. It's not like they're going to say, "We're going to offer you $120,000."

"We are going to offer you one $130,000."

"When you change your mind and we're going to offer you $140,000!"

They will work to exceed something; don't talk with you about some of the benefits that they offer you. They may "goose" certain things but when push comes to shove in the big company market, normally, the lowball bidder tries to match the highball bidder. They can go back to the highball firm and say, "I have 2 offers at the same level. I prefer yours. Can you do a touch better?"

Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate A Higher Salary for Yourself." What that technique will do is get them to boost the offer little bit more so that you up the ante.

Now, at small companies, you get two offers, a big company and a small company, often the small company will do a little bit better, but they will never really match the big company. The big company just has deeper pockets. Maybe you'll get more benefits, more stock options, more things along those lines that will turn you on.

Recognize that a small company or a start up, sometimes their reaction is to go, "You know, if you are considering that another firm, you are not our kind of person." You have to be cautious with small firms when you are doing small company versus big company competing situations.

Two small companies. 2 startups. They get into (excuse my language) pissing wars with one another where they are beating down the other firms ideas, where they are talking with you about how good they are. You really need to bring them back to the money.

"I really appreciate more options here."

"Well, this is what we give out to people."

"I know. AND I would like more options here. I would like to get more money."

Do something that pushes them. Whoever comes in a little bit higher, that's the one you go to.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Your Worth (VIDEO)

Establishing your worth is more the most Important things that you can do in business and in job search. In this video, I walk through a simple technique that anyone can do.

Summary

This video is entitled, "Your Worth." Your worth is consistently 1 of the things that people undervalue and they do so for one very simple reason – – they don't understand their value. They go into the job market and decide they are looking for a certain percentage increase over what they currently earn without making any comparisons.

Comparisons have value and I understand that employers attempt to value you based upon previous salary. After all, they are not going to take a $65,000 per your person and pay them $135,000, or are they? Not unless they go into consulting 1st and establish themselves as earning $65-$90 per hour . In which case, at $65, they are earning $130,000 per year and at $90 per hour they are earning $180,000 per year. Then, they will try to drop you down.

What can you do to establish your value?

The 1st thing you need to do is to establish it in your own mind. You need to understand how you compare with others. You are not going to find that out online. You're going to find out by talking to hiring managers and other organizations to get a sense of how they would value you and your skills without telling them necessarily that you are looking for job but you just want to try get a sense of how they would evaluate you. For example, don't tell them what you are currently earning; just asked him to give you a sense of what your capabilities are and how they would assess you. That's a more valuable benchmark for any online survey you might ever read.

After all, the surveys are very limited. They may offer a job title; they may offer skill set. There is no depth in that. For example, if you are in IT and it says, "Java developer," what does that really say? There are tons of different tools to go along with that.

How do you get that sense? The 1st place is internally so that in this way, you are persuasive with someone else. Then, from there, I think the 2nd places during the waiting. A lot of job hunters do things that devalue themselves and often that occurs during the waiting process. They become anxious they REALLY want it. Their desperation comes across and kind of like the guy or girl in a dating situation who is waiting by the phone pining for that person to call them to the point where they turn into a stalker who called for 5 different times in a short period of time to try to flush out that person they were out with, you don't want to come across as being desperate. Desperation doesn't work, does it?

You will like it. After all, if you walked into a car dealership and the salesperson tried to push you into buying a car or they were selling life insurance and they try to push you into a policy, employers don't like it and hiring managers don't like it. So why do you act desperate?

You have to control yourself and the best way to do that is to go out on more "dates." By dates, I'm referring to interviews. By doing this, you get a sense of your value. You get a sense of how others perceive you and how that engenders more interesting you. The more interest you get, the better you will feel, the more value you will have and the more persuasiveness you will deliver when talking about your value to others.

You see, it's not just enough that you know your value. That's the starting place. You need to convince other people of your value in the 1st way to do it is with YOUR attitude. Your attitude says a lot to the employer. It says, "Hey, look, I would love to work for you, but there are other fish in the sea, too." That's the same as what they communicate to you, right? "Hey, we'd love to hire you, but were to talk to 25 more people before we circle back and maybe, ask you out again." You have to have your equivalent as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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