What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Asking for More Money | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The Five Question Salary Negotiation (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to negotiate your job offer with just five questions.

Summary

On him

Let's talk about negotiating salary. You've got the offer. Everything seems great but you want to do a bit more negotiating. Here is the 1st thing you do: if you feel comfortable about what is been proposed but you just want to increase a little bit, here's the idea.

You'll be asking a few questions but I don't want you doing it right away. I want you to say, "I'm thinking favorably. Can I come back to you in a day or so to have a couple of questions answered. I just want to make sure I do this 1 time so that were not going back and forth. He give me a day here to think about it and circle back to you?"

Think of it from the hiring manager's perspective. He or she thinks right away that you're going to be coming back about money. As a result, when you come back to them, the 1st question that you ask is NOT about money. It should be about anything BUT money.

Consider asking when you get into the 401(k). When you become eligible for benefits. Something softball that will cause them to relax a little bit and think for a 2nd, "Ah! This isn't going to be so tough!" Then, the next question is going to be about reporting relationships. Who are you going to report to? What are they like? If I'm reporting to you, who do you report to? Who do we service? Things along those lines.

The 3rd question is always a big one. You want to go to your most important question 3rd. I prefer you not deal with money here and keep that for a little bit later in the conversation. Here, you might ask about whatever your critical issue is. Maybe, is that you will be taking a trip and it is prescheduled and you want them to know about it in advance. Maybe it is about bonus eligibility... Whatever it is, covered 3rd.

Then, you circle back and asked him another softball question. Do I work on a Windows device or Mac? Isn't that a softball question?

Now, for the money question, you have been building up to this one, see would say something like, "You know, I've been really thinking favorably about this opportunity. Could you do a touch better on the offer?" Normally, they will do 1 of 2 things; they will either increase it by a few dollars. The 2nd thing they might say is, "This really is our top number." You'll be able to tell if it's true by the sincerity of their voice. Whether that is true or not. You'll be able to use your "acute BS detector" to determine if that is the case. The 3rd response is to say, "I will have to get back to you. Is that a deal breaker for you?"

You can say no or yes; that will be your choice. Ultimately, if this is a dealbreaker for you, he or she is going to work that much harder to get the number or or say, "Forget it." It is all over at that point.

Assuming that it is not a dealbreaker, tell them that at the point. You're interested in joining, other firms been talking about more money with you, you have another offer at that price point, could they do a touch better?

That's the theory behind what I call, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." That's 1 of my YouTube videos. Watch it. It is about 10 minutes in length, and I think it is very helpful.

But I wanted to stage salary negotiation for you here. Kudos to my friend Ellis Chase. He did this in a Forbes article very well. If you go to Forbes and search for Ellis Chase, he lays out this formula nicely,

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​​

No BS Coaching Advice

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

On this show I discuss exactly that–the easiest way to get an employer to increase their job offer.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about negotiating compensation because it is probably 1 of the most under talked about aspects of the job search. The reason for that is pretty clear. the big boys, the big girls, when they are negotiating compensation have all sorts of ways to play the game.for the little guy, the small person you may be in a blue-collar job working for a small business where someone is paying them out of their own pocket...there is no negotiating there.the basic form of negotiation there is, "Were making you an offer. You have 2 choices. Leave it or take it."

Then there is the average person, perhaps a professional or white-collar worker, small or big company… It doesn't really matter. when offer comes in someone's trying to improve upon it, again, there are limited strategies for what you can do. again, the big boys and big girls have a pretty easy. they are all going to have big-time agents and they are not covered by the same rules. the average person is really stuck because, if you working for a public corporation, for example, they cannot really do side deals because they are subject to litigation. if they do a side deal with you (I will use myself as an example) for some additional benefit, they can be sued because, after all, why did they give it to this white guy and not give it to this individual who is not a white guy? Why did they give it to the heterosexual guy it not the gay guy? we live in a litigious society and that affects the way the negotiations done.

I want to give you the simplest negotiation strategy that you can use. it doesn't always work but often it does.it requires very little strain or stress on your part. for the average individual, here is the basic negotiating tactic:

If they hit your number, you can go, "YIPPEE! I'M GOING TO TAKE THE OFFER! YAY!!!" If you told them a particular number and they hit it or more, it isn't really right if you ask for more. after all, what does that really say about you. You told him one thing and now you want even more? it kind of makes you look like a pig.

however, if an organization hasn't hit the number that you been negotiating with them for or they know you been looking for because your agent or you have told him about it during the interview, here is the simplest strategy.

(Best listened to)

Step number 1 . "Huh (said as though you are pondering)." you will make it sound too uncomfortable but you want to pause a little bit then give them something.

"I've got to tell you I really love this firm but I think the offer is a touch low. I need to think about this a little bit. Can I get back to you tomorrow?"

Right off the bat, what that does is make them nervous. . You haven't said no. You put them in limbo. you given them the carrot of saying, "I love the job. I love the organization," but you hesitated. They know it's the money.

When you get back to them the next day, I want to be prepared for them with a number of points.

"Other than the money, is there anything that is in question for you?" Then you ask those questions.then you get to the real one… The money. By the way, with the other stuff, you need to know in your own mind what you're ready to walk away from. Not everything should be life and death on the secondary issues. when you get to the money part of the conversation which is what they're really waiting for, and you want to say yes to the firm,now it's just money standing in the way.

Pause.

Look them square in the eye

Whether you doing this in person or over the phone, you have to sound a little introspective and uncomfortable. like you are thinking (even though this is all planned and rehearsed).

You say, "I'm a little disappointed in the money. I know we spoke earlier about it being such and such in this, obviously, is less."

At this point, you pause again and allow them to respond to it. Or, you pause and they don't respond to it and then you say, "Could you do attach better?" Then you stay silent for a little bit. don't break the silence. Wait for them to respond 1st.

They may ask, "How much more?"

"I would really like the money I was talking with you about. I would like more but I would really like the money I was talking with you about."

"We can't go that high."

"Could you do a touch better? Could you meet me in the middle?"

The 1st option obviously is to go to her asking for. option number 2 is to go for the middle ground somewhere. Just get them to improve the offer somewhere above where they extended it.

Obviously, the 3rd option is that you can turn down their offer. Be prepared to do that because if you going to that negotiation with the attitude of being prepared to take whatever they give you, then, obviously, we going to the conversation little bit differently.

If they turn you down on improving the offer, you can always sigh and ask whether they can improve the review policy a little bit.instead of an annual review, can I give you a six-month review so that you have the possibility of getting a raise sooner.

Then, you are quiet again.

"There is no guarantee that you will get an increase but I think we can get your review in 6 months."

"Thank you. That I can say yes to. I can accept the offer."

Or, you say no based upon what you hear from them. if there unwilling to be flexible, there could be business reasons for that. they could be paying one individual less than what they are offering you who they are bringing in from the outside and they are afraid they might lose the other person. in theory, you should be concerned about that, but in practice, you should because it could impact you as well.

again, to do a quick review, step number 1 is to say, "I would like to think about it." step number 2 is covering all the other things you need to cover 1st and then getting "sincere" with them when you talk about the money (follow the advice above). they will often raise it, but if they won't. They may say, "we can't. This is the max in our budget." then, you ask if they can do a different review policy for you. Whatever the right answer is, you need to know going into the conversation what you are prepared to do, including walking away.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

Should I Tell Them What I Earn? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

ep. 685 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses whether to disclose your salary during an interview.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TO JOBSEARCHCOACHINGHQ.COM

Summary

I have one of those questions and someone asked me. Would it be a bad idea to be upfront about what I am getting paid in a job interview? They want to know whether they should disclose what their current earnings are.

To be clear, you generally have 2 choices-- not to disclose is the advice many coaches. The issue is that for many salary levels, the issue becomes disclose or if you don't the interview is over. The advice normally is don't disclose, because you get boxed in to a number and the range and their expectations are going to be lower if you. On the other hand, like I said, if you don't disclose, often firms respond by saying, "Tell us or this interview is over." You become stuck. That power differential that firms can exercise becomes heavily weighted on their side.

What I would say is if you do choose to disclose as friendly for most of you I think you should, the response has to be, "Now that I've said that. What is the salary range for this position?" If they choose not to disclose, then you pause for a 2nd and say, "So let me get this straight. I told you I'm earning but you're not prepared to tell me what this position is prepared to pay? I understand that there is a range for the role and I may not be qualified for the top number. What's the issue with disclosing the range for the job?" At that point, be quiet.

Let them squirm. At the end of the day, you learn something about this firm from their behavior. That's really important because individuals make the mistake of not paying attention to signals that employers give. After all, if this person who is probably in HR individual is unwilling to disclose, this suggests the command-and-control culture that you may or may not want to be involved with. Frankly, for me personally, I like being involved with command-and-control cultures. It's top-down management where you are expected to execute a task and you are not expected to think or offer ideas. That's not my idea of a particularly attractive environment. Maybe it's yours. But it's not mine.

If they are willing to disclose, you learn something about them that I think is very human and natural. You met them and you are looking for them to meet you with the answer to this question. That's fair. At the end of the day, like I said, you may be in a situation where you are not qualified for the high-end of the range.

Picking numbers arbitrarily, the range may be $135,000-$150,000 plus bonus. Understand that they could pay you $135,000, they could pay you $150,000, and there are many numbers between these 2 that they could also pay you.

When all is said and done, not disclosing carries risk. Disclosing really doesn't because firms are going to box you in any way. Better to make it easy and trade information with them and, like I said, if they don't want to trade, you have learned something really valuable.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life Jeff Altman, The Big Game Huntercoaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIALTODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY!

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The Five Question Salary Negotiation | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to negotiate your job offer with just five questions.

Summary

Let's talk about negotiating salary. You've got the offer. Everything seems great but you want to do a bit more negotiating. Here is the 1st thing you do: if you feel comfortable about what is been proposed but you just want to increase a little bit, here's the idea.

You'll be asking a few questions but I don't want you doing it right away. I want you to say, "I'm thinking favorably. Can I come back to you in a day or so to have a couple of questions answered. I just want to make sure I do this 1 time so that were not going back and forth. He give me a day here to think about it and circle back to you?"

Think of it from the hiring manager's perspective. He or she thinks right away that you're going to be coming back about money. As a result, when you come back to them, the 1st question that you ask is NOT about money. It should be about anything BUT money.

Consider asking when you get into the 401(k). When you become eligible for benefits. Something softball that will cause them to relax a little bit and think for a 2nd, "Ah! This isn't going to be so tough!" Then, the next question is going to be about reporting relationships. Who are you going to report to? What are they like? If I'm reporting to you, who do you report to? Who do we service? Things along those lines.

The 3rd question is always a big one. You want to go to your most important question 3rd. I prefer you not deal with money here and keep that for a little bit later in the conversation. Here, you might ask about whatever your critical issue is. Maybe, is that you will be taking a trip and it is prescheduled and you want them to know about it in advance. Maybe it is about bonus eligibility... Whatever it is, covered 3rd.

Then, you circle back and asked him another softball question. Do I work on a Windows device or Mac? Isn't that a softball question?

Now, for the money question, you have been building up to this one, see would say something like, "You know, I've been really thinking favorably about this opportunity. Could you do a touch better on the offer?" Normally, they will do 1 of 2 things; they will either increase it by a few dollars. The 2nd thing they might say is, "This really is our top number." You'll be able to tell if it's true by the sincerity of their voice. Whether that is true or not. You'll be able to use your "acute BS detector" to determine if that is the case. The 3rd response is to say, "I will have to get back to you. Is that a deal breaker for you?"

You can say no or yes; that will be your choice. Ultimately, if this is a dealbreaker for you, he or she is going to work that much harder to get the number or or say, "Forget it." It is all over at that point.

Assuming that it is not a dealbreaker, tell them that at the point. You're interested in joining, other firms been talking about more money with you, you have another offer at that price point, could they do a touch better?

That's the theory behind what I call, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." That's 1 of my YouTube videos. Watch it. It is about 10 minutes in length, and I think it is very helpful.

But I wanted to stage salary negotiation for you here. Kudos to my friend Ellis Chase. He did this in a Forbes article very well. If you go to Forbes and search for Ellis Chase, he lays out this formula nicely,

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​​

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake | Job Search Radio

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

Summary

Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​​

%d bloggers like this: