Why Does Every Employer Ask What My Current Salary Is? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 777 I discuss this mistake and offer ways that you can solve it.

Summary

The question I received was, "Why does every employer ask about my current salary during the job interview?" I want to give employers and recruiters a certain benefit of the doubt... And there's a 2nd reason the doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt.

The one that does is that it is a timesaver for everyone. After all (I would use ridiculous numbers), if you say you're looking for hundred $180,000 and the position is paying $130,000, why would they want to continue interviewing you if there is no way for the 2 of you to come together because they are not going to pay as much as you are currently earning?

Another reason is around salary expectations. Every organization likes to get a benchmark for where a person is and what they are looking for. So they might say, "So, what are you making?"

"I am making $130,000."

"What are you looking for?"

"$180,000."

Boing!!!

This is the one word is a lot less about you and more about them. You see, institutions have guidelines (which are really rules but not guidelines , but they call them guidelines) about the percentage increases that they will offer someone. I know there are exceptions with firms in the way they conduct themselves, but most large to mid-sized organizations work with percentage increases.

It makes a certain amount of sense and non-sales roles. After all, if you are a manager level and they are hiring you for a director level, you don't really have any experience in the role , but you want to be paid as a director, so the thinking becomes, "No compromise on salary so that they can get the experience and then we will increase their salary later on." There is that "non-subtle thing."

The real one is the latter one. It is about control. It is about being in a situation where they get a sense of what you are currently earning and what your expectations are realistic and can fit into their guidelines. It is not because of any altruism. It is a control thing that organizations do.

It makes perfect sense except when it affects you when they say, "Well, she's making $130,000. Our guidelines say that we will offer a 4% to 7% increase on top of base salary," but not look at your real value in a market.

That's were ultimately, you have the choice as to whether or not you accept the offer. They may have a 4% to 7% guidelines, your value may be $160,000, hold out. Find an organization that will pay you properly. Your goal is not to sell cheap but to sell value because, trust me, there will come a time where, regardless of whether you cheap or expensive, they will look around the room and go, "Okay. We have to cut some heads. We've got a layoff some people. Okay. Her. Him." What you're being paid will only help you because you've been able to bank some more money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Advice from a Hostage Negotiator (VIDEO)


Have you ever been in the situation where someone you negotiating with suddenly changes their position? Chris Voss has and here I provide you with two tactics to use when you are confronted with this.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast today where Chris Voss was being interviewed. Chris is a former FBI hostage lead negotiator. I can't say he's a tough guy; I never met him but he has certainly stepped into some interesting situations.

He was talking about situations where people wind up dealing with someone who suddenly changes their positions. It is obviously talking about hostage negotiation, but it could be interesting if your job hunter or an employer who changes their position on something. Your employer and a job hunter comes back with something that is a new demand or request. The third circumstance occurs when your business and your selling something; a person who you are selling something to suddenly change their minds or position about it. You're trying to recapture the situation.

Voss came up with a great response to that. Actually, there are two of them that I really liked. The first one requires that you are imagining that your job hunter or an employer who is suddenly talking with you about different money or your employer and now they're countering with more money. Here's is a response:

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." BOING!!! How. Do you respond to that if your employer who is being told that by a job hunter , because your issuing or about to issue a lower job offer after leading them to believe that you are going to get a higher number? If her employer dealing with the job hunter, can you imagine throwing that one into the mix when a job hunters trying to up the offer?

"Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." WOW!

Then, of course, let's say were talking from the employer perspective, you have a job hunter who is suddenly issuing a counter demand and, before you hit the first response, you can always try this one… Ready?

"How am I supposed to do that?" You say it in a kind of flat neutral slow FM radio kind of voice and, lo and behold, it's kind of a shocking moment for them that kind of takes it out of their equilibrium because most of them have summoned up their courage in order to make this demand and what you're trying to do is the equivalent of a pattern interrupt.

The first one I really love – – "Sounds like you trying to teach me that I can't rely on what you're saying." You say in a very neutral way with a flat affect, no pressure, a very simple statement. I think that hit themselves in the head with the impact of that message that you're sending to them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Don’t Let Them Distract You (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you know not to pay attention to employer BS and keep your eye on the prize.

Summary

You got to think of it like the Wizard of Oz-- don't look what's behind the curtain. Just pay attention to the big, powerful voice. Don't worry about what's behind the curtain.

Let me take you behind the curtain for second. One of the classic that employers try to do Is distract you into the job and focusing about the job, rather than the money. The probability is you are not a wealthy person. If you are this is not for you. You can click away now. The fact of the matter is that almost everyone who listens to the show is trying to improve themselves professionally. AND make more money.

When employers try to do is talk with you about how important what you are going to learn is, how important are going to be in the firm and give you a warm fuzzy feeling... And avoid the money conversation except to talk you down from what you really want. I want to remind you that money is incredibly important.

I've made this next point and other videos. If you get $5000 more over the course of 5 years, pretax between salary increases and raises That you will get over 5 years, you will be ahead by about $25,000 and $26,500 more than if you accept a lateral might be offered to you.

However, if what you do is get $10,0000 more, that is going to become $51,000 or $52,000 more.. If you get $15,000 more,, that becomes between $75,000 and $78000 in increased earnings..Change jobs before the 4th year In either of these scenarios you will have catapulted quite a bit more.

As far as I can tell, money should be important to you and shouldn't be lost from your equation of evaluating things. Don't focus on the deflection. You know, I'm I pretend to be the puppetmaster here… Talk to the hand while I completely hypnotize you with what I'm saying here and avoid the money.

Let me take a quick story. Someone came to me for coaching advice. We reviewed some of the decisions he made in the previous job search. I listen to a story and listen to his story and said to them, "You have made some mistakes."

"What kind of mistakes that I make?"

"You fell for the BS. Employers have trick you into focusing on the career opportunity and the same employers of the firms that laid you off when times get a little tough. When that have been better if you had a few thousand dollars more in your pocket then to be out of work for 4 months like you are now?"

Recognize that you have to look out for yourself. You have to look after your family. The employer isn't going to do that. The hiring manager that is telling you all this wonderful stuff may get fired, just like you at the time of the next economic crisis.

Pay attention to the money. I'm not saying to hold out and squeeze them and bleed them dry. Push up a little bit. Don't just accept the 1st offer. Try to do a little negotiating, see if you can up the money. Like I said, $5000 more over the course of 5 years is an extra $25,000 pretax. Let's say you're the highest tax bracket, that's an extra $12,500 or $13,000 In your pocket. Would you rather have that?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

How Much Are You Looking For? Version 2 | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 756 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to respond by asking a question.

Summary

Let's use a "what if" scenario. You are adding networking event, you are at a job fair you're not a formal interview, but you're doing some networking and talking to a recruiter. They talk with you about your background and have a position available, it is clear that you have a background that's interesting to them and they are going to ask you, "How much you making? How much are you looking for?"

Let's say the get the question out 1st. "How much are you making?"

"I'm happy to answer that. But can I ask you a question?"

"Sure."

"Did you tell me about the salary range for this position?" They give an answer.

"Any flexibility with that?"

"Yeah, there is probably a little flexibility with that."

"Good." Then you answer the question about and what you currently earning.

Why? If you answer 1st, most of the time they are not going to tell you the range.

I also want to say that when I have been in those scenarios where someone poses the question of me, the way I respond is to say, "I want you to hear something. " Then I picked to numbers at random. Let's say the job is paying between $100,000 and $110,000. So in the person asks whether there was any flexibility on the salary, "I want you to hear something.. When I talk about the salary range, people only hear the top number. They never hear the bottom number. There is a range of numbers between $100,000 and $110,000. It's possible that you might be offered less than $110,000 that you have in mind. The responsibility that YOU have is to convince the employer that you have that value." This is absolutely true

Your responsibilities to convince them that you have that value. However, in terms of answering the initial question, is really way too early to get pinned down, but that is why employers try to do.

Right off the bat, which were trying to do is push them up just a little bit. So that in that example I gave of $100,000-$110,000, you ask, "Is there any flexibility with that? Could you be a little flexible if you needed to?"

"Sure! We could be a little flexible."

"Great!" Eva ready move them off the pot a little bit and moved them in their thinking to knowing that they might need to come up a little higher.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself (VIDEO)

 

FROM THE ARCHIVES. SKIP ABOUT THE FIRST 25 SECONDS. 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Summary

I want to talk with you today about negotiating compensation because it is probably 1 of the most under talked about aspects of the job search. The reason for that is pretty clear. the big boys, the big girls, when they are negotiating compensation have all sorts of ways to play the game.for the little guy, the small person you may be in a blue-collar job working for a small business where someone is paying them out of their own pocket...there is no negotiating there.the basic form of negotiation there is, "Were making you an offer. You have 2 choices. Leave it or take it."

Then there is the average person, perhaps a professional or white-collar worker, small or big company… It doesn't really matter. when offer comes in someone's trying to improve upon it, again, there are limited strategies for what you can do. again, the big boys and big girls have a pretty easy. they are all going to have big-time agents and they are not covered by the same rules. the average person is really stuck because, if you working for a public corporation, for example, they cannot really do side deals because they are subject to litigation. if they do a side deal with you (I will use myself as an example) for some additional benefit, they can be sued because, after all, why did they give it to this white guy and not give it to this individual who is not a white guy? Why did they give it to the heterosexual guy it not the gay guy? we live in a litigious society and that affects the way the negotiations done.

I want to give you the simplest negotiation strategy that you can use. it doesn't always work but often it does.it requires very little strain or stress on your part. for the average individual, here is the basic negotiating tactic:

If they hit your number, you can go, "YIPPEE! I'M GOING TO TAKE THE OFFER! YAY!!!" If you told them a particular number and they hit it or more, it isn't really right if you ask for more. after all, what does that really say about you. You told him one thing and now you want even more? it kind of makes you look like a pig.

however, if an organization hasn't hit the number that you been negotiating with them for or they know you been looking for because your agent or you have told him about it during the interview, here is the simplest strategy.

(Best listened to)

Step number 1 . "Huh (said as though you are pondering)." you will make it sound too uncomfortable but you want to pause a little bit then give them something.

"I've got to tell you I really love this firm but I think the offer is a touch low. I need to think about this a little bit. Can I get back to you tomorrow?"

Right off the bat, what that does is make them nervous. . You haven't said no. You put them in limbo. you given them the carrot of saying, "I love the job. I love the organization," but you hesitated. They know it's the money.

When you get back to them the next day, I want to be prepared for them with a number of points.

"Other than the money, is there anything that is in question for you?" Then you ask those questions.then you get to the real one… The money. By the way, with the other stuff, you need to know in your own mind what you're ready to walk away from. Not everything should be life and death on the secondary issues. when you get to the money part of the conversation which is what they're really waiting for, and you want to say yes to the firm,now it's just money standing in the way.

Pause.

Look them square in the eye

Whether you doing this in person or over the phone, you have to sound a little introspective and uncomfortable. like you are thinking (even though this is all planned and rehearsed).

You say, "I'm a little disappointed in the money. I know we spoke earlier about it being such and such in this, obviously, is less."

At this point, you pause again and allow them to respond to it. Or, you pause and they don't respond to it and then you say, "Could you do attach better?" Then you stay silent for a little bit. don't break the silence. Wait for them to respond 1st.

They may ask, "How much more?"

"I would really like the money I was talking with you about. I would like more but I would really like the money I was talking with you about."

"We can't go that high."

"Could you do a touch better? Could you meet me in the middle?"

The 1st option obviously is to go to her asking for. option number 2 is to go for the middle ground somewhere. Just get them to improve the offer somewhere above where they extended it.

Obviously, the 3rd option is that you can turn down their offer. Be prepared to do that because if you going to that negotiation with the attitude of being prepared to take whatever they give you, then, obviously, we going to the conversation little bit differently.

If they turn you down on improving the offer, you can always sigh and ask whether they can improve the review policy a little bit.instead of an annual review, can I give you a six-month review so that you have the possibility of getting a raise sooner.

Then, you are quiet again.

"There is no guarantee that you will get an increase but I think we can get your review in 6 months."

"Thank you. That I can say yes to. I can accept the offer."

Or, you say no based upon what you hear from them. if there unwilling to be flexible, there could be business reasons for that. they could be paying one individual less than what they are offering you who they are bringing in from the outside and they are afraid they might lose the other person. in theory, you should be concerned about that, but in practice, you should because it could impact you as well.

again, to do a quick review, step number 1 is to say, "I would like to think about it." step number 2 is covering all the other things you need to cover 1st and then getting "sincere" with them when you talk about the money (follow the advice above). they will often raise it, but if they won't. They may say, "we can't. This is the max in our budget." then, you ask if they can do a different review policy for you. Whatever the right answer is, you need to know going into the conversation what you are prepared to do, including walking away.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Play to Their Emotions, Too | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not only use logic when you get into a negotiation with a potential hire AND he proves it, too.

Summary

This is 1 of the hardest lessons to get but I can prove it to you. There is the lesson: it's not facts that always win the day. It is emotions that do. Let me prove it to you.

For those of you who smoke and those of you who are smokers,, factually, you know smoking isn't healthy for you,, right? You know, at some point that if you continue to smoke, where you going to put yourself in a situation where you will suffer a lot,, your health is going to suffer tremendously and maybe smoking or the impact of smoking will kill you.These are the facts. Yet millions of people, tens of millions of people continue to smoke. Why when that same lesson extend itself to a salary make a salary negotiation?

With a third-party recruiter or corporate recruiter, we spend a lot of time with the factual element of why someone should take a job.. We spend less time with the emotional element and we need to shift that's. Were not committed persuade some of the take $20,000 less by dealing with their emotions. The likelihood of that is very slim. For most middle-management professionals.

However, you can entice them to join if your own offer is close to ideal by talking with them about their relationship with the manager.. This is true, particularly after the interview.. If the manager does things that cause candidates to enjoy them, to have fun with them. If you think this is only stuff that works with startup firms,, let me correct you. This works with any organization.

The hiring manager has a key role in the salary negotiation, not because he or she is negotiating it, but because they are creating an image in the candidate's mind of being someone Who they will want to work for. Because they're fun, upbeat,, they are someone that they can learn a lot from while they are doing this job. You need to impress upon these hiring managers their contribution to the hire. That's because in this way, when you get down to the close, you can spend time on the emotional aspects of this and not just on the factual ones.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Asking for More Money | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

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