The Preferred Application Process | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone about the preferred application process

Summary

There was a question on Quora today., "When applying to jobs, do you prefer filling out forms, one click solutions like on LinkedIn where you can apply using your LinkedIn profile, or a simple career specific email address?"

Let me start by saying that the question has a flaw to it. The flaw is whether you prefer the ease of doing something and you're looking at the question from the job hunter perspective. From the job hunter perspective, everyone wants the one click solution because it involves no effort. But there was a flaw.

The flaw is what gets results? Frankly, one click solutions where they are just sending off your LinkedIn profile, fail more often than not. Because the profile is not tailored to demonstrate what you can do for the organization. It is a generic thing... The same resume sent to job after job. The result is that you are focused on ease of submission; I'm thinking of demonstrating the fit. Employers are thinking of you demonstrating the fit, too.

If your profile happens to do it, great! Unfortunately, most don't. Don't take the lazy way out of here. Submit a resume (or actually contact the hiring manager, finding them using LinkedIn, see if you have a friend who can introduce you) and going in that root, rather than just simply sitting back and saying to yourself, "I would rather just sit back and let someone or something else to all the work... That they don't do.

At the end of the day, the even recruiters want to see something that vaguely looks like what they are trying to find for their clients. Again, don't get lazy about this because you will reap the consequences of that laziness.

Now, you might have the most wonderful skills on the planet but, eventually, it is going to shift and they are not good be quite so dominant. Trust me. There were a lot of Java developers out there who one day ago were heroes and now are ordinary as their skills became commoditized. That is going to happen to you, too,oh, Ruby professional, oh php developer, oh startup maven.. You may be ruling the roost now and hopefully will never need a job again. Your firm may wind up cashing out and you will become a gazillionaire.

However, the question is, what do you prefer? The answer should be, "I prefer a submission that is going to get the best result. One click apply does not do it..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Is It OK To Apply to Multiple Positions at the Same Company (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Is It OK To Apply to Multiple Positions at the Same Company?

There are 3 possible scenarios I address with my answer.

Summary

The question for today is, "Is it okay to apply for multiple positions at the same company?" I have to make the answer textured because there are a lot of variables that aren't offer here.

1st of all, to get this out of the way, why are you applying to jobs? If you are applying to an applicant tracking system, you are in the great black hole, that system is that is not there to help you, yada yada yada. You can watch any number of my videos were I tell people never ever apply to a job to an applicant tracking system.

Since you want to do this, let me talk with you about the variables. Are you doing the application at the same time for these different positions? For example have you seen a group of positions today and want to apply it to them all? That's one variable. Another variable is that you employed from one job and 2 weeks later another position opened up, 3 weeks after that 1/3 position opens up… There is some space involved. Another one has you going in with a shotgun approach and you are applying for everything. You want to be an intern. You want to be chief operating officer. You want to be a lot of different things and you are just applying the heck out of this firm. Those of a few of the variables and will walk through them with you.

You are doing the shotgun approach. Don't do it. You're not qualified for most of positions you are applying for. All you are doing is acting like a spammer. Don't do it. Invariably, is someone I know wrote recently, they will take your resume, deleted, block it, and keep you from ever interviewing with their firm because you will be rejected as a "serial applier." I remember someone I interviewed on "Job Search Radio," said that to me. They worked in a medical facility and found these people a colossal waste of time.

Let's say there's a position open now and one that opens 2 weeks from now and another one, 3 weeks from now. Your background legitimately fits. By all means, apply because you don't know if there are different hiring managers involved who might see different things in your background. Don't apply for the 2nd or 3rd position. If you are ready interviewing for the 1st 1. Managers are not going to compete for you.

I want to repeat that. Managers are not going to compete for you.

All that happens is that HR notices this and asked themselves, "What are they doing? We have them in process now?" You turn people off when you do stuff like that.

I believe the 3rd alternative was that you were just going in and applying for 25 positions that have the open now. I spend a little bit differently the 1st time I presented the option but you get the idea. Pick the ones that you are best suited for. Do not, I repeat, do not apply to 25 different jobs. All you do is waste people's time and people look at you like you are an idiot.

I have given 3 alternatives. If you know of others, let me know.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Why Do Applications Ask You Questions When The Resume Has All the Answers? | Job Search Radio

On this show, I explain what your part in this may be . . .and what their part is, too.

application

Summary

So why do online applications ask you to fill in particular fields?  Why did they ask you questions when your resume has all the answers?

Starts off with the fact that employers, particularly large ones, but actually any employer as government reporting requirements in order to ensure that they don't conduct themselves in a discriminatory manner.  It's not as though there is anything personalized about this, but the statistics show that they interview (I'm just picking numbers at random) 100 people from a diverse population (a non-white male population) and 100 people are rejected. The government has the opportunity to say, "Huh. That's interesting.  Let's explore more deeply."

In the US at least, government requires that firms maintain certain types of data.  Let's go beyond that.

When you upload a resume and the system attempts to parse it, your resume may not be in a format or in a type font that that is easily readable by the system.

Catch that one again.

This is your part of the equation.  It may not be easily readable or in a type font that is parsable by their system.  As a result, you have to fill in certain fields.  Whether it is name or address fields that the system is just not able to read, your email address, the system has a concern.

Some applicant tracking systems asked the county in which you live. I have no idea why they need this information when so many systems are set up so that they can search by a radius of a particular ZIP Code.  Some are ridiculous and will ask for the county.  I think a moron design the form I forgot that people are human and not your sheep.  That one has nothing to do with government reporting.

The real reasons are (#1) your resume was not readable.

2. They may be asking for ridiculous things like the example of the county which isn't going to be anywhere in your resume.  Without that city, state or ZIP Code field

3.  I think this is a valid one.  So many people are not including addresses, so there is no city, state or ZIP Code information on a resume.  They are giving just a name, email address and phone number when they submit the resume.  If a person is doing a search in her applicant tracking system for someone with a particular background, they are never going to find you.  Without that city, state and ZIP Code field, without a phone number or mobile number (Remember that area codes of the phone number don't necessarily correlate to where you live), how did they find you?

It's very possible that your lack of an address is causing the system to request this information so that they can find you again.

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

You Have to Disclose a Conviction | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game  Hunter discusses telling the truth about a conviction on an employment application when you apply for a job.

conviction-sentencing

 

Summary

I want to have a candid conversation with you. If you are someone who has a criminal record, dealt with the rest and talk with you about how to complete applications.  I’m reminded of this by recent story from someone who represented for job who told me about a conviction he had years ago and the recent arrest or he accepted a plea deal even though he said he wasn’t involved with what was done, but got caught up in the events and his attorney advised him to accept the plea and know that within 6 months to be expunged from his record.

Now, he’s up for job and has to complete an application and is asked the question, “Have you been involved with a dishonesty that has not been expunged from your record yet?”  My advice to him was to disclose it.  Write a lengthy explanation for what occurred. Don’t line.

Why?  It’s very simple.  This is a firm that, like many, does background check and, in doing a background check, if they for the inconsistency with what you told that, namely, you have been involved in such an episode, the reality is that America hire you.  If they find that out after you’ve been hired there going to fire you.

I’ve been involved with way too many circumstances where companies have found the outpost employment than a reference, a college degree, a whole host of things are falsified.  The criminal stuff is always the most egregious to employer.

Imagine for 2nd you were hired for job and they find out a few weeks after you join that you were involved with some version of crime.  They let you stay on board and while you are a stockbroker, for example, you still grandma’s life savings or trade them down to nothing.  A lawyer get someone from the firm on the stand and goes, “You knew he was a lawyer and this is what happened!  You tolerated.”  Your insurance company won’t pay. There out the money.  They just can’t accept the fact that someone who lied to them is on board.

In other words, you don’t want to be greeted by security at your desk, holding a box for you have all your stuff and escorted out the door.  How do you explain that to your family?  How do you explain that you kids or the friends or the parents that you got fired because you lied on an application?

Don’t do it.

If they’re not going to hire you, better off not to get fired after 2, 4 or 6 weeks and have the same result that you’re out of work.  Except, that’s worse.  After all, how do you explain that to the next employer.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Applying for Two Different Types of Jobs at the Same Company – Job Search Radio

Does applying to two different kinds of jobs at one company lower your chances of getting either one?

Summary

Does applying to two different jobs at one company significantly lower your chances of getting each one? I am interested in two different areas (and then they outline both of them). Would it be a bad idea to apply to both of them at the same company? How does the process usually work with processing applications?

Without outlining the specific jobs, I’m going to answer the specific questions.

As to whether reduces your chances by applying to more than one position, well, it depends. I interviewed someone for the show not long ago who was a corporate HR recruiter. He commented that his firm’s applicant tracking system was set up to recognize individuals who were, “frequent appliers.” In his firm which was a medical facility in the mid-Atlantic states, his firm would get applications from people for multiple positions that they weren’t qualified for. The system is set up to block them from applying because they are little more than a spammer to them.

“Yes,” you can think, “they may hit on one of them.” These people are not paying attention and don’t really care about the impact on the person reading the resume; they just want to work for the company. What firms look for our someone who can fill individual job. You can see the disconnect there.

Thus, multiple submissions can have an adverse impact unless you’re going to individual hiring managers. So, if you are applying through the applicant tracking system, you’re starting to lower your value to them. After all, even if there are two different recruiters handling the two different jobs, the system is going to recognize that you’ve applied through two different types of position. Even if they look at the resume, there recognize that it’s the same person applying for two different jobs, realize that you probably don’t fit either of these roles and reject your resumes.

Or they may look at them and think to themselves, “Spammer!” Or they may just simply say, “Huh,” and delete your resumes.

So, it can have an adverse impact, it can have a neutral impact, it can have a negative impact, at worst.

Let’s review the scenarios:

“Huh?” (rejected).

“Let’s consider him for this one, but delete the resumes for the other.”

“Spammer!”

There is no situation where they are going to say to themselves, “Fabulous! We received the resume for two different jobs!”

And the probability is that two different recruiters are coordinating two different jobs so there is going to be internal friction so they will have to figure out who is going to be the primary interviewer and who will be the secondary. Remember, corporate recruiters are now being evaluated based upon outcomes, too. Thus, it’s not simply you getting hired (which I know is all you really care about); for them, they have metrics they have to live up to and you will probably be wasting their time they could be better served elsewhere.

Continuing, how does the process work with applications? Would I be talking to the same recruiter? I’ve addressed that already.

The fact that you are submitting your resume to two different positions, involving two separate groups, demonstrates that you’re an amateur to them. As such, you are sending a signal to the employer that you don’t really have a career yet and are trying to sort things out. After all, in their thinking, you can be interested and qualified in one area, not the other. The fact that you’re  leaving it to the winds, to the ether to sort it out for you, sends messages to employers.

Even if the two jobs reflect an old paradigm and a new one, they say are themselves, “Ah! She’s trying to make a career change. She’s not good be happy doing this old work if we hire her for that.” You see, it’s not just as simple as whether it is going to one recruiter or two. It is the impact and that message that the recruiter or recruiters is left to interpret. Left to their own devices, recruiters pause, leave the window open and go on to something else. In their subconscious, they try to process the conflicting messages that you are sending by applying for two very different jobs.

Usually, when they pause, they hesitate for lengthy periods of time. When that happens, they come back and re-review the resume and don’t act on it then. Eventually, they reject the resume.

Can it turn out differently? Absolutely! How will it probably turn out? Not so good for you. You are far better off zeroing in on one thing you want that you are qualified for and going for that.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn going to,

How Do I Find Out Why My Job Application Has Been Rejected?


I have sent out over a hundred job applications to various positions across many fields, and 90% of them had been rejected – the other 10% I never hear from again, even after following-up. For most of those applications, I should be a perfectly viable candidate, but I get no indication whatsoever why I get rejected.

Summary

here’s a question for today: How do I find out why my job application has been rejected? I’m going to paraphrase the next part. I have sent out over100 applications to various positions across my field and 90% of them have been rejected. The other 10%, I never hear from again even if I follow-up. For most of those applications I would be a perfectly viable candidate but I get no indication why I was rejected.

The person then goes back to talk about what career services told him. Career services knows nothing. They have never fill the job in their life, offer pablum advice but I digress.

What’s the issue here? How can this person find out why their application has been rejected? I’m going to answer the question for them because there are really only a few reasons why an application is rejected.

The first one is that they sought better-looking resumes.What made them better looking resumes? Well, when you see a job ad, that position may have already been online for a month and they are deep into the hiring process. You got to it late.

Number two. Let’s say you found that on the first day was posted and they have just been inundated with responses and they’ve chosen better fitting candidates or resumes for these roles.

Number three. You did nothing to tailor your resume to demonstrate how you actually fit for the job.

The most likely alternative is the second one – – they saw better resumes.Here’s what I say that.

For a student resume (I’m going to get to you more experienced people in a little bit to start with students first),

What is your resume say? You have a few internships and went to a particular school, got certain grades and took particular classes.

Man, that’s boring! Unless some of those internships were spectacular (I’m sure some of you had great internships, but most were pretty mundane), some of these people are ahead of you on line, particularly if you went to an average school– – We have no idea of your experience so it’s hard to be particular for you.

For you experienced people, is number three (you did nothing to demonstrate your fit for the job). That’s the most common mistake that experienced people make.

Students are often given a load of crap by career services about how wonderful their school is, how great a job it does preparing people for graduation… And they are lying. Career services knows nothing about how well prepared you are or any of the graduates are. The next time they go out and talk to a business about how their academic program matches up with that businesses needs will be the first time that ever happens.

So, for students, your background isn’t as wonderful as you have been led to believe. For experienced people, you have to tailor your resume to demonstrate a fit for the job that you are applying for; that’s the most common reason why you are being projected; you never made a case for your candidacy and how your experience fits the firm that you are applying to.

Your resume is awful vis-à-vis the job you’re applying for. As I’ve said many times before, your resume is like the broken watch that’s right twice a day. Yes, you will get some interviews. To use the example of the student, he or she gets 10 interviews out of 100.

Why doesn’t he get 100 out of 100? Who knows!

For you, you keep sending that same resume out over and over and, if my inbox is any indicator, a lot of you are sending out little more than spam.

I want to encourage you to tailor your resume to demonstrate your fit. As a student, I want you to go into detail about the program you went to, how wonderful it was, what you learn there, and try to find something in your background that will distinguish it from the other thousand resumes that they are going to be receiving.

By that I don’t only mean the appearance; I mean the content as well.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter going to answer going to

I Hate Applications

One of the most common complaints that jobseekers have is, “Why do I have to fill out a (*#!*!!#$) application? Everything they need to know is in the resume.”
Several years ago, a banking client hired a well-qualified person for a difficult to fill software engineering job. About a week after the person started, they discovered the individual had lied about having a college degree. Security met them at their desk with a shoebox of their personal possessions as they returned to work from lunch on the Friday of their first week of employment.

Employment applications are a legal document; resumes are not. If you look at most applications, the potential employer provides a caution or warning that says something to the effect of, “Lying on an application is grounds for dismissal.” Since most background and reference checks are completed after you have started your new job, an application notifies a potential employee of a risk.

They also provide a simple snapshot of a person’s writing skills (and penmanship for that matter) and attention to detail that a resume cannot.

All applications are somewhat similar, so to create the best impression you can, as well as to save time when filling them out, create your own master employment application. List former jobs, making sure you have the correct addresses, telephone numbers, and the dates of your employment. Use this as your “sample form” when filling out a real application.

If you are unsure about a specific month that you started a job several years ago or a salary that you were paid, DON’T JUST GUESS! Add the phrase “approx” (for approximately) next to the item. This tells the interviewer that you are not sure of the exact month or salary and that you don’t want to lie when filling out the form.

Don’t leave questions blank. Insert a dash or N/A (for not applicable) if it doesn’t pertain to you. Proofread. Proofread. Proofread. One of the advantages of having a master form is that if your spelling is not perfect, you have a place where you have written the word down previously and have spelled it correctly.

Try to write neatly. It’s not that great penmanship will get you the job but poor handwriting is noticed.

Lavender may be a nice scent for the bathtub but a poor choice of ink colors when filling out a form. Stick with blue or black ink when completing them. Some firms scan answers into systems that won’t recognize any other color.

DON’T LIE! In good or bad employment markets, nothing is worth having to explain to your friends and family why, after telling them so much about your job hunting journeys, after telling them you (finally) have a job, after telling people that you were enjoying the new job, after finally feeling comfortable, there is no worse moment than seeing security at your desk.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

What Should You Apply For?

Organizing a job search is not about flipping resumes to job ads like a cook in a fast food restaurant, nor is it only about what you want to do. It also involves careful thought and understanding about how your experience “fits” the job market.

You see, most people begin their job search by saying to themselves, “I’ve had it. I think it’s time to make a change.” They know what they don’t want but haven’t taken the time to figure out what will satisfy them or what will please them.

In addition, you must know who you are and what motivates you as well as what criteria are important enough to be uncompromising about and on which ones you’re willing to be flexible.

For example, you must know if you function better in a large environment – whether or not it’s corporate, or a non-profit environment, a team one, or one in which you’re required to motivate yourself in order to perform. To do this examine your previous jobs — what you liked and didn’t like, what worked or didn’t work, and why.

Once you know what you want, then start reading ads on the job boards, research some search professionals that specialize in your field, network with your co-workers from previous jobs, contact employers at companies in the area that seems right for you.

Working in this way will keep your search focused on what it is you want in your next job and not just on sending out resumes and going on interviews.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

You Have to Disclose a Conviction

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game  Hunter discusses telling the truth about a conviction on an employment application when you apply for a job.

———————————————————————————————————

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: Applying for a Job

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from Quora about the preferred application process

——————–

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me a question via email, chat or phone ? Reach me via PrestoExperts or Clarity.fm

%d bloggers like this: