Interviewing and Over 60? (VIDEO)


Interviewing when you’re over 60 is different than when you’re younger. In this video I make a few suggestions about how to address the interview differently.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Over 60 and Job Hunting: 10 Ideas for You (VIDEO)


Here I offer 10 ideas for the over 60 job hunter that will help you find work more quickly

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Relaunching Your Career

Reinventing Your Career (VIDEO)


Reinventing yourself and your career as an older worker.

 

Summary

This is a video that is designed to talk about reinventing your career that is geared toward older workers. I will start by saying for you as individuals, a lot of you have opinions about how job search is supposed to work and, frankly, things are different now than the way that they were done years ago. I'm not going to review all the particulars; instinctively you know what I'm saying is true plus, you may be dealing with ages. Just accept the fact that things are different now. You don't want to come across as setting your ways, resistance, sluggish, oppositional, doing all the sorts of things that cause less experienced people to think that you are going to be a problem employee. You always want to appear upbeat, enthusiastic, without going to the other extreme.

What I always encourage people to do is to have a look and is appropriate for their age and to work on your weight, if that is an issue. Keep yourself fit and in shape as well as do things that will be helpful to you to keep a high energy level. I use myself as an example of someone who has taken off 30 pounds recently. I feel very different. I have much more energy; the same may become true for you AND it is hard work and something you need to do… And your clothes will fit better.

Update your look. Take off some weight.

Another thing is to inventory your skills. What are your professional skills? What have you done? What are you capable of doing? Look at what you have actually done that is the basis of the inventory. Create a few columns. Jot down the things that you are actually experienced with. Lay it out into columns. Go job by job and jot down what you did and how you went about doing it. Take note of how recently you did it.

Then, as you start to look at opportunities, start to match your skills with the outcomes that you achieved with each employer. For example, if what you did help your firm make $20,000, $200,000 or $2 million, have been jotted down, too. As you start to write your resume, have an eye toward outcomes. Focus on your skills and outcomes that you achieved for your previous employers so that they knew firm has an idea of what you might be able to do for them. So where you go to next is looking at jobs where they need the skills and results that you get.

People will often ask me whether they should use chronological or functional resumes. For those of you who have a consistent work history, stick with the chronological. For those of you making a career change or have a large gap in your employment history or are returning to the workforce, go to functional. I've explained this in the previous video, but this simplifies my thoughts.

You are going to get invitations for interviews and the time to practice is not when you get the invitation because that is going to come in the form of a phone interview. You need to be prepared for phone interviews and regular interviews while you're working on the resume.

Practice. Practice. Practice.

You also want to be out there networking, talking to people who you know about who they know about who might be able to help you find work. Got that? You want to be out there talking to people who you know about who they know, who you don't know who might be able to help you find work.

The reason for doing this is borne out in the statistics. 70% the positions are filled. As a result of networking. 70% of those 70% (49%) are filled as a result of introductions to people who you did not know at the beginning of your job search who helped you with an introduction to result in you being hired. Network.

If you are out of work, start managing your money. You can't spend more than you have. Otherwise you won't have financial staying power to write out a lengthier job-search. You need to get out and about talking to people.

Lastly, if you can find a support group to help you with your search, a networking group to support you with your search, a coach to help you with your search, get support. You don't know what you don't know. The result once a being that you will make tragic mistakes that will cost you opportunities unless you have input from people. Experienced people. People who know what they are doing around job-search.

I always discourage people from asking friends, family, or former managers for advice. Often, these people are well-meaning but as ignorant as you are. They speak with certainty because they got a job once... Or twice… Or 5 times... Or they hired some people in the past. From my experience, hiring managers are often the worst job hunters because they think that everyone does it, and looks for the same things that they do and learn the hard way that things are completely different elsewhere.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Over 50 and Job Hunting

Over 50 and Job Hunting (VIDEO)

I spoke an AARP meeting recently to over 100 people over the age of 50. I left feeling depressed because of how ill-prepared these people were to look for work. I hope that will be your circumstances but, if it is, follow my advice and get some help.

 

Summary

Recently,I did 2 presentations at an AARP conference 2 groups of over 50 job hunters.I had over 100 people between the 2 meetings. One presentation was for about 40 minutes; the other was for about an hour.

For those of you who are over 50 (I don't care if you are hitting this as a current crop of Boomers or as Gen X professionals), I had people from many different professions in the room.

I felt badly for the people there because they given a lot to their organizations for years And now clearly needed help with job hunting.. I want to say, the people who are over 50 that it is not enough to go out there and just apply for jobs. You can get one that way, but the old ways A finding work by answering ads online have gone by the wayside. There are many more ways to do it.

There are skills needed to find a job and they are different than those needed to do a job. As a result, if you just think that you can apply for jobs, you have missed all the networking opportunities that fill positions. You have limited yourself to the few jobs (and I have to say few because once you start looking at a job as you notice how few there are out there) That are advertised. Advertising jobs has gotten expensive.

You have to do things differently than what you may have done previously to find a job. That is especially true as you become a more senior professional.For you senior professionals and those of you in skilled areas, I will say as I said to an executive last night, if you think about the typical organizational structure There is a pyramid structure.. As you move up The pyramid,, there are fewer jobs higher up in the pyramid than the room lower down.

The result is that you have to network and you have to do things to prepare for your interviews that may be different than what you did previously.

I have a 7 day free trial at JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. Join and experiment with the site. See if it makes sense for you and I will also answer job search questions you have. I hope you'll stay with me because there's a lot more That you will need to learn and you have to practice.

Take advantage of the trial and start learning some of the things or reminding yourself of some of the things of some of the things you normally don't need to have in your consciousness on a day-to-day basis because it isn't part of your repertoire professionally.

Get some help. Get some coaching. It will make a difference to you.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

 

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | Job Search Radio

“Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I”m almost 60 and the options are slim?”

 

Summary

Here’s a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

We don’t know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don’t have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here’s the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you’re not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I’ve done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don’t interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don’t have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, “Screw it.  Let’s give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price.

It’s easy to blame the market Again, we don’t know what you do..  Perhaps, you don’t have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That’s possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven’t been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, “Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me.” That’s going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that’s a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview “all in.”

That’s what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don’t cop to the belief that it’s 60 you’re not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don’t use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – “options are slim.

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, “the options are slim.”

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn’t know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don’t surrendering to this,, “oh woe is me,,” attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Your Interview Skills Suck

 

Older job seekers do many things well. One of the obstacles for many of them is presenting well in an interview. The lack of preparation. The lack of research. The application of relevant knowledge. All of those things can impede your chances. Jeff Altman has 40 years experience advising job seekers with interviews and helping them with their challenges.

Why Your Interview Skill Sucks with Jeff Altman

Jeff Altman (@TheBigGameHuntr) has been a recruiter for around 40 years.  He has many resources on his website where more than 1600 videos to help with anyone’. He has a new website, jobsearchcoachinghq.com. His podcast is a useful resource too. On “Job Search Radio” he interviews career coaches, resume writers, and recruiters to get their perspective and advice for job seekers.

    Here are some discussion highlights:
    • The point is always missed with job seekers — skills defining the job are different than the skills to do the job
    • Over 50 job seekers must not buy the notion – “I’m over 50, I’ll be discriminated against
    • One of the frequent causes of a lack of presentation is the lack of preparedness
    • Practice will help you execute at the drop of a hat
    • Converting education to real experience is a barrier if the professors don’t know how to make it transfer to todays real world expectations
    • The preparation is work needing to be done in order to make your capabilities plain to employers
    • Jeff recommends initiating the tone and pace of the interview – shift mindset from expecting to be interrogated. The job candidate positions himself better by having a conversation than a boss/subordinate Q & A
    • Ask more consultative questions defining the problem the employer wants to solve. Find out what matters to them
    • Recognize the stage, the audience, and find ways to make them respond. Make your presentation sound fresh
    • Energy is a key for older job seekers to engage the audience—don’t be the parent telling a younger interview what to do
    • Social media is great for research and to leverage the interview for familiarity and to stand out

 

Should I Hide My Age?

Question. For people over 60 and looking for a job should we consider removing reference to age on websites to better my chances of getting interviews?

I will start this by saying that bigotry of many kinds obviously exists and ageism cuts across all lines.

Let’s also recognize that, accept it and make firms squirm.

That, to me, doesn’t mean removing items from your resume based upon age in terms of relevance.

I’m 65 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college. This could probably be best put on a resume as a summary As you look at your resume, look at relevance rather than age as being the variable.

Would I take off the year of the degree off if I were you– maybe.

But the truth matter is what difference does it make? They’re going to walk in the door to talk to you and and do you think they’re going to say to themselves,”Gee it’s an old guy,” when they see me? Probably.  if they’re going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted; if they’re going to look at you for your skills and experience, evaluate you for them, and that’s the firm you want to work for.

But why put yourself in an awkward situation?

For me, it’s always better to reveal age and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in a position where I’m dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who only will give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they are not going to listen.

I’m going to have to work hard over a  long period of time, knowing there is little chance of getting hired.

Plus, you are probably going to be miserable while working there. Better to get it out of the way.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016       

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Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

The Real Disadvantage Older Workers Have When Job Hunting

I discuss the major way older workers sabotage themselves when job hunting.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

I Was Watching Your Video, “Older Worker? Help Yourself.” AND . . .

Someone asked a great follow up question . . .

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered.

Looking to Supplement Your Income?

I received a message over the weekend from a worried son asking about work for his senior aged parent who cannot be on her feet as a greeter. What is possible for her and for you?

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Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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