Over 50 Job Search and Ageism | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a few rules to follow when you are job hunting and over 50.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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How Do You Find a Job When You Are Over 60? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here I talk about the best technique for finding a job when you are over 60.

Summary

The question I received last week, "Is it possible to find a job when you are over 60," is really the predecessor to this one-- "How do you find the job when you are over 60?"

I really think it comes down to the fact that networking is really the way that most people find work these days. Thus, when you think about networking, LinkedIn is really the ideal tool, but probably not in the way that you are thinking of it.

I want to acknowledge that ageism exists. I know it exists, although maybe not the degree to which people think it does but it certainly exists. It exists both ways but here we are dealing with someone who is over 60.

What do you use LinkedIn for?

Answer. Since networking is probably the way that you are going to find work, what you want to be looking for organizations to hire people who look like you and are your age. You want to identify the organizations that you would like to work for and then look for profiles and backgrounds of the people who work there to see whether there are workers there who are over 60.

Clearly there are going to be people there who are under 60 as well as workers who are in their 20s and 30s. We know this already. What we are looking for are profiles of people who work there currently who are in your age group.

From there, what you want to do is reach out to them and do some networking. Even if they left there a few years ago, they fit a similar profile.

"How did you find it working there?".
"I noticed that you are not 24; you are more my age. What was it like working there? How did you find your position? I see you worked there for 3 years. Who are you reporting to? Your background and mine are pretty similar. How would you suggest I try to gain entry into the organization?"

Obviously, you can do this with current employees, as well. That's really ideal. You do a search for people with your background to work a particular, reach out to them, talk with them, and set up an informational interview just like you have a million times already.

I want to be clear. When I talked to job hunters who want a solution to their situation, they want something that works every time. Sorry, this will work every time. No technique works every time.

Yet this is really the best way because the statistics say that 70% of all jobs are filled as a result of networking. In addition, 70% of the 70% (or almost half) are filled as a result of introductions and relationships to people who you're introduced to and didn't know at the beginning of your search.

You have to get past your comfort zone and start talking to strangers and the ideal stranger is someone like you who is your age or a general contemporary of yours who is working for an organization that you are targeting. Speak with them, ideally if they work there, or at least recently, about who you might try contacting (not in HR. Go to hiring managers directly) and see if you can networking way into a firm. That's really going to be your best bet.

As you interview, you want to proactively raise the subject of age and talk about situations in your past. When you answer questions and tell stories, you talk about working for someone who is less experience than you and were great support person for them. You tell them that you are not trying to take over any place in the what you're looking for is an organization we can put down roots.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

I Retired and Need to Return to Work (VIDEO)


Someone asked for advice about returning to work after having retired and get out of the labor force for the past 15 years.

Summary

Someone messaged me with a question that I thought I would make the basis for this video. They retired at age 55 and have decided age 70 that they need to return to work. They would like advice about looking for a job.

My simple answer is don't waste your time looking for job. You are just going to get frustrated. 1 of the things that has happened in the 15 years since you retired (this is an IT person and the market has certainly changed in the 15 years since they retired). The way work is done, the knowledge that is expected of someone, is different today than I was 15 years ago.

The result is if you really think you can just find the job where you return to a compensation level like you earning 15 years ago, you are mistaken. It just doesn't work that way. After all, who is going to give someone a job that they haven't done for 15 years. It's like saying you have been imprisoned for 15 years and drive a Formula One sports car. You haven't driven for 15 years. Now will drive the race for us. It is not going to happen. It's the same thing in job hunting.

What can this person do? What can you get involved with that can bring you income? I believe there are things that you have been doing for the past 15 years that really get you excited. Whether you write about them or do videos, or help other people with their concerns, there are things you can do from a knowledge perspective and sharing that knowledge that will serve you and help you make money.

Using, myself for example, I wrote a number of e-books years ago, some of which were about job search, there are a number of other things I'm interested in. So I did a few recipe books. I still make money from them on Amazon for the Kindle platform. You have your version of this where you have material that you can create and sell it on different platforms.

What platforms? I can't go into that right now. There are many different places where we can sell knowledge or creativity online and, from there, monetize that knowledge or skill.

Don't think that what you know or what you are excited about is something that no one else will pay for. Lord knows, there's a whole bunch of stuff that people may mock that other people are making money from. I had my recipe e-books. They are are short little things, maybe 30 pages long that I sell for $2.99 I make money from Kazakh recipes . Like from Kazakhstan. I'm not getting rich from it supplements things I'm doing in other places. I did the work one time in revenue comes from. You can do your version of that.

Looking for the things they can get you excited , that occupied you during the last 15 years where you are retired and looking at ways to monetize it will help you a lot. Don't think you need to figure it out by yourself. There are a lot of organizations and a lot of people who will help you.

1 of the reasons that I say that you are not going to find work is is that giving your age and your absence from the workforce, your network is probably dissipated. Your connection with people you have worked with before has diminished or disappeared. Thus, the most important way of you finding a job has been eliminated for you. Your network is retiring. Your network consists of people you have not had contact with in a long time.

. Yes, you can call them up and say that you're looking for a job but the likelihood of that working is very very very small. Instead, focusing on what can work. It's going to involve effort, but I'm going to tell you point-blank, I think you'll be better off focusing in on your knowledge that you have accumulated over the last 15 years then going out and finding a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Is It Possible to Find a Job When You Are Over 60 (VIDEO)


A question from someone who is feeling discouraged about looking for work as someone who is over 60 years of age.

Summary

The question for today is, "Is it possible to get a job 60?"

MAN! I remember when I started recruiting and I wonder what happened to people when they got to be over 40! As time progressed, that became 50. Now the new number is 60.

I will simply say, "Yes. It is possible to get a job at 60." That's in the face of all the stuff that you are hearing about in the way of age discrimination.

Part of what happens is we start to believe (I'm over 60) the BS that is thrown at us as a rationalization for why we are turned down for jobs. Yes, there is discrimination AND What happens most of the time is that people who are older think they can coast away into an interview without adequate preparation and without doing any homework, wing it and think they can get a job. In fact, this is a competitive market and you're competing with people who are equally skilled or as well skilled as you ... This is not about age. This is about your performance on interviews.

Yes, I'm going to repeat it, there is discrimination just like when you were 24 they were choosing the 40-year-olds. I'm sure they were saying, "Hey! This person knows a lot more than the 24-year-old!" People live in interviews with opinions as to who is going to be effective in their organization. There's a way to prepare for this that will help you defeat the bias.

So simply say, "Absolutely! It is possible to get a job as someone who is over 60. It happens frequently these days." People who are over 60 are finding work. That's the fact of it. Get off the self-pity. Start preparing for interviews. Get yourself ready to perform at a high level.

By the way, if you would like me to coach you, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us; I'll be happy to work with you. You can also go to www.JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. Sign up there because there's a lot of great information will get you prepared.

So the 1st thing you need to work on is your preparation and the 2nd variable is whether or not your skills are marketable. If you have ordinary skills, if you have commoditized skills, Skills that 1,000,001 people have, you will probably need to show flexibility about compensation, geography, and a host of other things.

Assuming that you have marketable skills/desirable skills for your market area or are willing to move to one where what you do is marketable as well, you will find the job. There is no question about it. You will find the job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? (VIDEO)


Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I”m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Over 50 and Job Hunting

Older Worker? Help Yourself


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/05/08/older-worker-help-yourself/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides several tips for older workers.

Summary

1 of the things I know is the most older workers are fearful of age discrimination. Some of that you may bring on yourself and I want to address some of those things in order to ensure that we can eliminate some of those things and that you have an opportunity to really shine on your interviews.

The 1st thing is just recognize that if your parents looks like it is from the 1950s or 60s, if your hairstyle is not appropriate for modern times, if your wardrobe suggests that is seen better days because it is 20 years old, it is time to get an update-- to change her hairstyle, change your wardrobe to make it more current. I'm not suggesting that you move to the most modern fashions because there is always something ludicrous about extremely old people like me (I'm in my 60s) dressing as though I am in my 20s.

Just be smart and where timeless things but make sure that they appear "current." Even the things that are, shall we say timeless can appear dated... And you know what I mean.

Just show your most recent positions on your resume. No one cares about what you did in 1968. Focusing on the last 10 or 15 years. If you are hired based upon things that you did while Ronald Reagan was president, it is unlikely that you will escape the bias that will come up.

Education – – keep the dates off. A lot of people attempt to be tricky and put the education the end of the resume. Just think it would you normally would and just remove the dates. By showing the last 10 or 15 years of your experience, you will be able to appear more current.

Cover letter – – a quality cover letter goes a long way. Don't send it as an attachment. Send it as the body of the email in order to ensure that people actually read what you want to communicate to them.

If you're only planning on being around for 2 years and then retiring, they probably want to know this, but I wouldn't volunteer to disclose it.

Attitude – – you are someone who has done it before. Carry yourself as someone who is confident and knows what they are doing. If you're asked that classic question of age discrimination, "how would you feel about working for a younger person," answer them by saying, "I've done it all the time. When you get to be my age. Everyone is younger." You accept the fact. Provide as much input as the hiring manager wants to have and keep the rest yourself. If they don't want to hear stuff from you, you don't share it. It's that simple. I try to be supportive an ally. I don't want to be a new headache for that person. That's a very simple way to handle that.

Lastly, anything in your background that demonstrates stability is always an asset for you. Play it up in the course of your interview.

Again, the 1st thing starts off with your appearance. Don't lose sight of your wardrobe. Don't lose sight of your hair. Carry yourself properly. If you have a few panels that you can afford to take off, do it. You may think that your wardrobe is appropriate, but if you are short is screaming open and your bellybutton can be seen while you are seated, if the button on your blouse is pulling, get another blouse. Dress properly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Middle Aged and Job Hunting

Middle Aged and Job Hunting | Job Search Radio


One thing that is painfully obvious is that the days where someone can join a copy after graduating high school or college and work for that same company until retirement have long disappeared.

Most employees don’t want that and at the time of a economic downturn employers let their staff know that all those messages about how people are their biggest asset were a placebo to encourage them to stay with the firm until they weren’t needed any more.

Roy Richards hosts, “Middle Age is the Best Age’ on WebTalkRadio.net and I discuss what we see about the middle aged worker and how their job search needs to be conducted

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Where Can a 70 Year Old Man Find a Job (VIDEO)


An answer to this question I read got me angry. I answer the question for myself here.

Summary

I was on Quora this morning and saw someone posted a question. The question was, "Where can a 70-year-old man find a job?" The most uploaded answer was the 70-year-old man can find the jobs at a lot of places. Grocery stores. Landscaping offices. Clerks at gas stations. Consultant in the tech field. Tutor. Temp worker. Uber driver. Model for art school. Pizza delivery. Salesman.

There are 20 answers that this person gives and I read this and thought to myself, "Man! They don't have any idea that they are being ageist and have a bias that shows up." We look at these choices, they have no idea what this person's experience is. All that they know is that this is a 70-year-old man is looking for a job.

Why can't they find the job in whatever their field is? That wasn't addressed and wasn't even a consideration in coming up with these answers! It goes back to this notion that older workers are less able and less competent than workers who are not as old or younger workers. It is nonsense.

I just want to say that if you are 70 or above, if you have expertise in a particular field, go for that area of expertise. You know you will have to deal with the issue of bias and you might as well just take it head-on. I have videos and have spoken the individuals who are 60 and above about finding work in questions that they will be asked on interviews. Take a look at those videos. I think the playlist on YouTube talks about "over 50." That's really when the bias starts to come in.

Again, for you as a 70-year-old worker, for any person who is a 70-year-old worker. Yes, you can find jobs doing the kind of work mentioned answer. That assumes that you may only want to do part-time work or work that is less "strenuous." Looking at their answer , I think they are talking about less mentally strenuous, not necessarily physically strenuous.

Working at a Home Depot or a Lowe's or being a security guard. Those are some of the answers that were given! Why can't you do the kind of work you've always done if that is what you want to do? Why can't you consult organizations that want to bring you on and just don't have the hours needed so you work some hours for them and hours for other people?

There are lots of things that you are able to do you just have to learn to sell your ability to a market that may not understand it. It's not that tough. All you have to do is take it straight on , and if they don't believe you, you haven't established the. Credibility with them yet. You have to brand yourself within your field and not simply knocking on doors applying for jobs. Have job seeking you out.

Again, the notion that you are "less man," is ridiculous. Go out there and do whatever you did before and that will be perfectly fine.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Over 50 Career Changer (VIDEO)

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a launching strategy to someone who asked for advice about making a career change who is over 50 years of age.

Summary

Here's the scenario. A person is over 50 and they are in a job that they have done well at but someone that they hired is now their boss. They recognize the handwriting on the wall and are feeling bored and stuck. They want to consider a completely different career related to what they're doing but still different. What do you do?

I recognize that as I was talking with him. This is a guy with the house, the wife, the responsibilities... He is not 20 without a care in the world. He has to recognize and act in a very precise way in order to ensure the financial stability of his family. So what do you do?

You start off by looking at job descriptions to see what firms look for in this related area. Then, from there, you start working on scheduling informational interviews with people who are doing this work for different organizations. It doesn't matter if they are within your immediate area; find people to speak with. When you do that, you are looking for common threads.

For example, on salary, if 4 of them say one thing and 1 of them says something that is an outlier either high or low, go with the foursome. If for them talk with you about one type of background that is needed in one talks about something completely different, don't disregard the one but the probability is going to live with the four. Then, gather information so that in this way, you understand fully what you are getting into.

Recognizing that a lot of veteran people are making career changes because they are bored, the tired, they don't compete anymore, but they are going into new field where they are going to have to compete, you have to make sure you understand what you're stepping into. You have to understand what you're stepping into before you make the leap. This is where the research of the informational interview comes in.

I want to be clear, it's not like you going to ask 2 questions and then go, "So, do you have a job for me?" No, you really get to be going out and asking questions.

Call someone up and asked, "Can I get 15 minutes of your time. I'm thinking of going into your field. Let's have coffee." Or, "Can I schedule 15 minutes of your time by Skype or phone, and I'd like to just chat with you because I'm thinking of making a career change." Just keep it that simple.

That's your starting place on this search. Research as to what firms look for from job ads, then have conversations with people who are doing the work so that you fully understand what you are getting into and not going into it like an amateur.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Older Worker? Help Yourself | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides several tips for older workers.

Summary

1 of the things I know is the most older workers are fearful of age discrimination. Some of that you may bring on yourself and I want to address some of those things in order to ensure that we can eliminate some of those things and that you have an opportunity to really shine on your interviews.

The 1st thing is just recognize that if your parents looks like it is from the 1950s or 60s, if your hairstyle is not appropriate for modern times, if your wardrobe suggests that is seen better days because it is 20 years old, it is time to get an update-- to change her hairstyle, change your wardrobe to make it more current. I'm not suggesting that you move to the most modern fashions because there is always something ludicrous about extremely old people like me (I'm in my 60s) dressing as though I am in my 20s.

Just be smart and where timeless things but make sure that they appear "current." Even the things that are, shall we say timeless can appear dated... And you know what I mean.

Just show your most recent positions on your resume. No one cares about what you did in 1968. Focusing on the last 10 or 15 years. If you are hired based upon things that you did while Ronald Reagan was president, it is unlikely that you will escape the bias that will come up.

Education – – keep the dates off. A lot of people attempt to be tricky and put the education the end of the resume. Just think it would you normally would and just remove the dates. By showing the last 10 or 15 years of your experience, you will be able to appear more current.

Cover letter – – a quality cover letter goes a long way. Don't send it as an attachment. Send it as the body of the email in order to ensure that people actually read what you want to communicate to them.

If you're only planning on being around for 2 years and then retiring, they probably want to know this, but I wouldn't volunteer to disclose it.

Attitude – – you are someone who has done it before. Carry yourself as someone who is confident and knows what they are doing. If you're asked that classic question of age discrimination, "how would you feel about working for a younger person," answer them by saying, "I've done it all the time. When you get to be my age. Everyone is younger." You accept the fact. Provide as much input as the hiring manager wants to have and keep the rest yourself. If they don't want to hear stuff from you, you don't share it. It's that simple. I try to be supportive an ally. I don't want to be a new headache for that person. That's a very simple way to handle that.

Lastly, anything in your background that demonstrates stability is always an asset for you. Play it up in the course of your interview.

Again, the 1st thing starts off with your appearance. Don't lose sight of your wardrobe. Don't lose sight of your hair. Carry yourself properly. If you have a few panels that you can afford to take off, do it. You may think that your wardrobe is appropriate, but if you are short is screaming open and your bellybutton can be seen while you are seated, if the button on your blouse is pulling, get another blouse. Dress properly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

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