Transitioning from School to Work | Job Search Radio


The jubilation of graduation is often replaced with a sinking feeling as a student graduates school and has to figure out how to use their degree and find work.

Dr. Markel Quarles explains what it is like for a student to begin navigating the job hunt, figures out what to do next and how to transition into the workforce.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Why Is It So Hard to Find a Job After Graduation? (VIDEO)


When you are in school, everything is not super hard. You work hard and get straight As, do research and internships. However, after you graduate the real tragedy begins. You applied for jobs hoping at least you can get interviews due to your good academic record, but get rejected all the time.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

In What Ways Has College Prepared You for This Job? | No BS Job Search Advice

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to answer this question easily and effectively.

interview

Summary

Here is another 1 of those tough interview, asked of graduates more than experienced people.  Sometimes it may be asked to junior people because the employer is trying to differentiate between one person and another, they’ve run out of questions, stuff along those lines.  However, it tends to be asked of recent graduates.

In what ways has your college experience prepared you for your career?”

It’s a good question that requires that you think past the surface, but you have to also give them the surface answer.

The obvious answer to me is that it gave me an understanding of the fundamentals that are important in my career. A knowledge of the subject, and knowledge of the history of this.”  Something along these lines where you appear to be contemplative by pausing and thinking, inflecting in certain ways.  So, again, to repeat that part of the answer, “It kind of gave me an understanding of the fundamentals. I don’t want to say give me complete knowledge because it obviously hasn’t. I have a lot to learn. Yet.  However, it gave me an understanding of the fundamentals that we need for this career.”

You continue on by saying, “While I was in school, I carried a pretty heavy workload and learn the importance of prioritizing things.  I worked in teams with people so I learned how to work with others and I had an opportunity to practice leadership skills– how do you motivate people who say they want to do it but just aren’t doing it.  At the same time, at my university (if this isn’t the case for you, don’t say it). They require that I carry 2 extra courses along the way. In my major.  As a result, I am used to carrying a pretty heavy load.

So, start with the fundamentals (prioritizing things, being a team player and/or leadership) and how to carry a pretty heavy workload and prioritize my way through it.

That’s how you would answer that question.  I would encourage you to frame it in your way with your language, but those of the fundamentals I would work with.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Mistakes Recent Grads Make Job Hunting | Job Search Radio

Everyone makes mistakes. I make mistakes. You make mistakes.

Here are a few of the things recent grads often do you wrong when they start job hunting.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about mistakes some of you as recent graduates often make that become costly, that wind up causing you to be in job search mode a lot longer than you want to be and sometimes lose your career through inertia. Let me point to a few things.

1. You overestimate your value. Sometimes career services or your professors will blow smoke up your “derrière.” They tell you you’re worth more than the market really thinks you are. If you want to get a better picture of what your value is, on LinkedIn, there is a drop down on the top that allows you to find alumni from your school. Reach out to a few of them. Ask them how much they were earning when they started their careers.

I’m not asking you to contact people who got their jobs 10 years ago. I’m suggesting you contact people who graduated in the last year or two and land the job. Find out how much they got and what their process of finding a job was like. It will help you a lot. Get clear about your value.

2. You don’t network well. These people that you’re reaching out to are gold. They can introduce you to their boss, people at their firm and are paid for it. Firms pay employee referral bonuses when they hire someone who is referred by a current employee. Become friendly with them. Talk with them about what it’s like working there. Ask them if they know of any openings that they can refer you, as a new grad, can be introduced for.

3. You don’t customize your resume. You send the same resume out to every job over and over and over again because your parents are telling you, “You’ve gotta get a job.” You don’t want to send it out to “stupid jobs” (things that you’re not qualified for or interested in). Don’t just spam your resume to everything. Tell your resume to each individual position that you are applying for so that the fit looks obvious. Certain jobs will emphasize certain points. You want to emphasize those things in your resume.

4. Your online all the time and not talking to people. You’re sending emails. You are texting. You’re doing a lot of things try to connect with folks. That’s fine. However, you have to do the conversion from just shooting the bull with them to “do you know any jobs on my fit?” Especially with people you don’t know very well, talk with them about what you looking for because your goal is to expand your network a lot to talk to more people.… Even if they are friends of your parents. These are people in the “world of work,” and they might know some things that can be valuable to you. They might not be the right person right away, but they might introduce you to someone who can be the right person who can steer you better.

5. You don’t follow-up well.You get a message back from the firm and, because it was sent as an email, you don’t respond quickly because you not checking your email often enough. I want you to think of responding to email as quickly as you to a friend when a company sends a message to you. You have to become crisp with your answers. You have to learn what to say and how to say it properly and promptly. If someone leaves a message for you on your phone, you want to call them back very quickly so, if they want to talk with you about a job, you don’t want to wait a week to get back to them, do you? By that time, 35 people may be interviewing for that role and you are going to be out of luck (you know the one word that proceeds that phrase, don’t you).

6. You are not proactive enough. You’re not reaching out to people and doing informational interviews (setting up time to spend 15 minutes speaking with people to pick their brains by phone, in person or Skype/Facetime) to see how they can steer you in your search. Start to think about what you want in the way of a job in the code of role you’re thinking of. Talk with them about what they think the labor market is like for what you do or want to be doing. This can help you a lot because you’ll be out there talking with people.

There’s a statistic you need to hear. Networking fills 70% of all jobs. 70% of the 70% are filled as a result of introductions to people to people that you did not know at the beginning of your job search and recommend you to opportunities or through whom you hear about opportunities.

As a result, you have to expand through network. You have to talk to people. You have to connect and get involved with them. Otherwise, you may be in mom or dad’s home for a lot longer than you want. That’s no fun because they are just going to nag you to know and.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How Do I Find Out Why My Job Application Has Been Rejected?


I have sent out over a hundred job applications to various positions across many fields, and 90% of them had been rejected – the other 10% I never hear from again, even after following-up. For most of those applications, I should be a perfectly viable candidate, but I get no indication whatsoever why I get rejected.

Summary

here’s a question for today: How do I find out why my job application has been rejected? I’m going to paraphrase the next part. I have sent out over100 applications to various positions across my field and 90% of them have been rejected. The other 10%, I never hear from again even if I follow-up. For most of those applications I would be a perfectly viable candidate but I get no indication why I was rejected.

The person then goes back to talk about what career services told him. Career services knows nothing. They have never fill the job in their life, offer pablum advice but I digress.

What’s the issue here? How can this person find out why their application has been rejected? I’m going to answer the question for them because there are really only a few reasons why an application is rejected.

The first one is that they sought better-looking resumes.What made them better looking resumes? Well, when you see a job ad, that position may have already been online for a month and they are deep into the hiring process. You got to it late.

Number two. Let’s say you found that on the first day was posted and they have just been inundated with responses and they’ve chosen better fitting candidates or resumes for these roles.

Number three. You did nothing to tailor your resume to demonstrate how you actually fit for the job.

The most likely alternative is the second one – – they saw better resumes.Here’s what I say that.

For a student resume (I’m going to get to you more experienced people in a little bit to start with students first),

What is your resume say? You have a few internships and went to a particular school, got certain grades and took particular classes.

Man, that’s boring! Unless some of those internships were spectacular (I’m sure some of you had great internships, but most were pretty mundane), some of these people are ahead of you on line, particularly if you went to an average school– – We have no idea of your experience so it’s hard to be particular for you.

For you experienced people, is number three (you did nothing to demonstrate your fit for the job). That’s the most common mistake that experienced people make.

Students are often given a load of crap by career services about how wonderful their school is, how great a job it does preparing people for graduation… And they are lying. Career services knows nothing about how well prepared you are or any of the graduates are. The next time they go out and talk to a business about how their academic program matches up with that businesses needs will be the first time that ever happens.

So, for students, your background isn’t as wonderful as you have been led to believe. For experienced people, you have to tailor your resume to demonstrate a fit for the job that you are applying for; that’s the most common reason why you are being projected; you never made a case for your candidacy and how your experience fits the firm that you are applying to.

Your resume is awful vis-à-vis the job you’re applying for. As I’ve said many times before, your resume is like the broken watch that’s right twice a day. Yes, you will get some interviews. To use the example of the student, he or she gets 10 interviews out of 100.

Why doesn’t he get 100 out of 100? Who knows!

For you, you keep sending that same resume out over and over and, if my inbox is any indicator, a lot of you are sending out little more than spam.

I want to encourage you to tailor your resume to demonstrate your fit. As a student, I want you to go into detail about the program you went to, how wonderful it was, what you learn there, and try to find something in your background that will distinguish it from the other thousand resumes that they are going to be receiving.

By that I don’t only mean the appearance; I mean the content as well.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter going to answer going to

It Has Been a Year Since Graduation and I Don’t Have A Job


What do I do? Try another field?

Summary

The question for today is, “it’s been over a year since I graduated college and I can’t find a job in my field. What should I do?

The original question was from a graphic designer who has been on 20 interviews so far and is nothing to show for. They are thinking of taking a job as a sheriff or a car salesman (I think you’re being sarcastic here). They are wondering what to do.

Your resume is obviously good enough because you’ve gotten 20 interviews. The problem breaks down to you don’t interview well and need to learn how to answer interview questions effectively.

If you want to give up, that’s your prerogative but you will be learning the habit of giving up, instead of trying to fix the problem.

How do you learn how to interview well? There are lots of ways. I will do a quick commercial for myself and JobSearchCoachingHQ.com where I have curated information from around the web that I and others have created, where you can watch, listen to or read great information that will help you find work.

But, if you want to give up, go ahead!

You can also do Google searches, YouTube searches, look on job boards sites for information and, from they are, practice it. Practice how to answer these questions more effectively.

Have people observe you so that you get their input on how to interview because, at the end of the day when you’re going for a graphic design job or any job, you will have to interview… And you’ve already demonstrated that you don’t know how to do it well.

By the way, let me back up for second. I believe a person can dissect their own job search and where it is breaking down very easily.

If you are not getting interviews, focus on the resume. If you are getting interviews in not being invited back for second interviews, focus on your first interviewing skills. If you are being invited for second interviews but not getting offers are invited back for thirds, focus on your skills for second interviews and where it is breaking down. If the offers are coming in low you are not making them, “fall in love.”

If you are getting job offers but they are coming in low, there are things that you are doing where you’re leaving them with doubts and causing them to say to themselves, “Screw it. If he takes it great. If she accepts, fine.” They’re not in love with you.

That’s the way you dissect your job search.

For you, you are getting interviews so the resume is okay. Get better at it; you will get better results.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

 

Tell Me About a Mistake You Made & What You Learned From It (for Recent Grads)

 

“Tell me about a mistake you’ve made and what you’ve learned from it,” is one of those classic interview questions asked by interviewers.

Here, the answered is tailored for the recent graduate.

 

Summary

This is one of those classic interview questions that people are asked.

“Tell me about the mistake you made and what you learn, from it.”
ir
Now the problem with this for recent grads is the just aren’t a lot of choices, at least ones that you think of sound good to an interviewer.
.
So I wanted to give you a suggestion for answering this question . . . .and it’s an easy one. It may not be truthful but work with me here!

“When I was in school or in high school and I really wanted to get into a particular school, I also wanted to have a lot of friends. So I made choices that weren’t ideal for me to get those grades and boy did it hurt when I didn’t get into (pick the name of the school) that would have really been happy with.

I really want to get you to give them the idea here that you learn from your mistakes and that you are not a whiner. It’s not just enough to talk about the mistake that you made; it’s important to talk about what you learned from it because that’s the thing that they are fishing for are. Are you someone who’s just a whiner and complainer or are you someone who learns from the experiences and takes the lessons in.

So I really wanted to get into the University of Chicago, Penn, Harvard, Stanford whatever and I really wanted to do that but in I was that stage in life is really in that stage of life where I want to have friends.

What I learned from that is to put my best effort in whatever I was doing.

I had this fantasy that I could can get in there without putting in the work and boy was I wrong. I really learned that if I want to get something I can go half effort into it. I have got to go at 100% effort. I have really got to give it my all in order to givemyself the best chance. Itis certainly possible that I might not havegotten to the schools but I will never know because I never really tried hard enough to in.

I didn’t understand that I could lose. What I’ve learned is always, without a doubt, put my best effort into whatever I’m trying to do.

I have another video that talks about how to answer this question when you have more professional experience.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

For College Seniors and Recent Graduates

 

The one thing you need to start doing now in order to be ready for interviews

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

Job Search Radio – You’re Out

All the hard work is over and you’ve graduated. Congratulations. Celebrate and have a wonderful time.

And start to prepare for your life after school and beginning your career.

Beth Kuhel and I speak about several things that are useful for new graduates, early career professionals (and their parents) to hear.

We talk about:

What to do if you haven’t found your passion?

When you have little real world experience?

We provide a window into a hiring manager’s mind

What the most important character trait is for you to develop in order to be successful in your career

And much more.

 

Listen to the Show on the Web

Also in iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn and others

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com opens May 17th with advice for job hunters that will streamline your search, help you avoid making costly mistakes and land your next job faster.

Launching Your Career So It Isn’t Doomed

 

I see it way too often people who are doomed to lower expectations.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube  for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

Do you need more in-depth coaching? Join my Coaching program.

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered

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