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How to Get a Job With Zero Experience | Job Search RadioJobs


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/02/how-to-get-a-job-with-zero-experience/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains several ways to find a job with no experience.

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Right off the bat, I want to encourage you to realize that you are going to be perseverance. This is not an instant strategy. There is no instant strategy for finding work unless mom or dad walks you in the door of the firm and you are hired because of them. That strategy works 100% of the time.
Assuming you are not born with a silver spoon in your mouth, this is the way to really do it.
There are 3 strategies.
1. Try to have someone introduce you to hiring manager. I need the quip about mom and dad, maybe it is an alumni from your school, who provides an introduction. Want to find some of those alumni that you don’t really know? Go to LinkedIn and there are series of drop downs along the top. Locate the one that says, “Find Alumni.” It will connect you with former students from your school and they can provide information about they found work at their organization and introductions.
2. You might try doing something related to what you do. You may not get hired as a teacher, but you might get hired as a teacher’s aide. You may not be hired as an accountant at the firm that you want to join but that could be related position at that big 4 firm that could be a steppingstone to accounting. Maybe you have to temp at that firm before they consider hiring you. If you do temper the firm, make sure there is no noncompete in the temp agencies contract before you commit to joining.
3. This is “the guts one. ” This is the one we are going to need to have some income to pay for this while you are doing it. Find the individual that is a leader an organization that you want to work for in the role that you wanted to do. Reach out to them an offer to do pro bono work. In turn. Be an assistant. Volunteer to do stuff for he or she. In doing that, what you will be doing is building a network of relationships within the firm because you will wind up in situations where you will be there assistant. Obviously, you have to do great work. If your intention is to do half-assed work and expect them to hire you, this is not a strategy for you.
However, if you put your effort and make connections, if you reach out to this person while you’re working there, and ask “Please give me a sense of how I’m doing and what I can be doing better.’ Again, you have to make some money elsewhere. You see were coming from with this? You’re doing free work in order to get attention, a network, which, when you’re coming out of school, you may not really have.
Building that relationship with an individual order two becomes a way that your entrée into an organization where some of you might notice you and poach you to their project or team.
These are 3 great ways in order to find positions (plus of course the 4th 1 which, of course, is, Mommy or Daddy get you the job.)
I hope you have the courage to not download stores and build those relationships because it will make all the difference to you, not just simply in this job search, but in every single one from this point on.

Why You Should Consider Finding an Internship After Graduation | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/13/why-you-should-consider-finding-an-internships-after-graduation/

EP 411 Sometimes an internship after graduation makes sense. Here are a few of the instances where I think they do make sense for you.

Summary

There are many reasons why many of you may be struggling to find work. 1 of them may be your grades just weren't good enough and employers are holding that against you. Maybe the internships that you had while you were in school frankly sucked and now they're being held against you.. Here are a couple of things that you can be doing to try and rectify this.

The most obvious one is getting an internship after you graduate. What of quality internship will do is help strengthen your resume. . What do I mean by strengthening your resume? You never, you are never going to rectify the grades. But when you get to interview you can say, "Look, while I was in school, I need some mistakes. I did not work with, particularly hard. My grades obviously suffered. The internships I had were mediocre at best. What I have tried a lot to do since graduating is step up my game a lot and I think you'll find my references now that I am out of school from the internship that I am at our going to be extremely good.

"So that's one reason why you do it. The second reason (and it relates to the 1st) is you're struggling to find a job. So, what this internship can do is . . . try get one where you're working full time and really bust the gut; be the intern from God that all the hiring managers, all the senior people in this organization, in your department really love. Get an internship in order to compensate for the fact that you're struggling to get a new position and it will just help you build your references.

It will also help build your network so you want to improve upon the network of people that you're connected with and who might be able to help you. So consider getting an internship for that reason. Also, think about it being an opportunity to get your foot in the at and organizations that you would like to work for. So, let's say, you want to target something in investment banking. Your grades worth 3.3 and you went to an average school. What you trying to do is to get your foot in the door. Consider taking an internship for that reason.

Lastly another reason tp take an internship after graduation is you are not really sure about what direction you should take, and, as a result, that's going be a process to help you sort through the beginnings of your career, so you can figure out which path you should go through. Part of the way that you will do that is by meeting people who are already on the path who will give you advice, but don't think of it as being something that's can happen week one. Again, part of building the network is developing relationships with smart people who or further along than you, who will then feel comfortable and be willing to give you advice.


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Should I Get Another Degree?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question on Quora that was directed to him about whether to pursue an additional college degree.

Summary

"I am getting a BS, BA with a specialization in information systems technology with the goal of working in the tech sector. Should I specialize in finance, as well? What it is a great deal of value?" There is a small note between the question. "My goal of work in finance after graduation has changed."

I'm going to assume that the goal of working in finance has disappeared. The person has become more interested in working in tech, much more than working in finance.

What I will simply say is, "No. Don't go for the additional major." It is completely irrelevant for your goals. If finance happens to be something that really interests you, do it. However, I think there is a point where you hit overload and overkill. The idea of getting an education in things that are secondary, tertiary or unimportant to you is unnecessary.

Get to work on preparing yourself for your career after graduation. Work at getting yourself some great internships. Part of that is that the idea of testing out your beliefs about working in technology.

So often, students have fantasy ideas about what is really like to work and particular fields. You're better off using your internship to explore your notions and to see whether this is something that would really make sense for you.

Again, to answer succinctly, if your goal is not to work in finance, don't bother.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Graduating? The One Thing You Need to Practice​ | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you need to practice before your first interview.

Summary

I am talking to you college grads today or students who are about to graduate. There is were those lessons about job hunting when you graduate.

You are being hired on potential. I don't care how much you think you have done, you are really being hired on the basis of your potential. For those of you who have had great internships, the game is going to shift because you're not good be doing the same job or type of job; there is a much higher expectation of you based upon the fact that they seen some things about you and decided to give you another shot. . . Or they didn't give you a shot and there was a message in that for you.

Here is where the rubber hits the road – – when you are interviewing, your basic job is to convince people that your eager, you are smart, and you are ready to do anything... You have a few opinions but you want to learn more.

At the end of the day, your basic job is to smile, looks smart, dressed well and make a connection with the person opposite you. After all, without that connection, you're just another body in the chair. As a result, you are going to have to overcome that shyness that you may have about speaking to a strange 40-year-old, or 35-year-old or 28-year-old who you have never talked to before.

Most of the people who are going to make decisions about you are not your age. Most of them are not going to be my age but more like the ones that I quoted already. As a result, your biggest practice point from this point on is talking to adults of those ages about what you do in ways where you don't come across as being shy or frightened.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Graduating? The One Thing You Need to Practice (VIDEO)

Advice before your first interview.

Summary

I am talking to you college grads today or students who are about to graduate. There is were those lessons about job hunting when you graduate.

You are being hired on potential. I don't care how much you think you have done, you are really being hired on the basis of your potential. For those of you who have had great internships, the game is going to shift because you're not good be doing the same job or type of job; there is a much higher expectation of you based upon the fact that they seen some things about you and decided to give you another shot. . . Or they didn't give you a shot and there was a message in that for you.

Here is where the rubber hits the road – – when you are interviewing, your basic job is to convince people that your eager, you are smart, and you are ready to do anything... You have a few opinions but you want to learn more.

At the end of the day, your basic job is to smile, looks smart, dressed well and make a connection with the person opposite you. After all, without that connection, you're just another body in the chair. As a result, you are going to have to overcome that shyness that you may have about speaking to a strange 40-year-old, or 35-year-old or 28-year-old who you have never talked to before.

Most of the people who are going to make decisions about you are not your age. Most of them are not going to be my age but more like the ones that I quoted already. As a result, your biggest practice point from this point on is talking to adults of those ages about what you do in ways where you don't come across as being shy or frightened.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Mistakes Recent Grads Make Job Hunting | Job Search Radio

Everyone makes mistakes. I make mistakes. You make mistakes.

Here are a few of the things recent grads often do you wrong when they start job hunting.

Summary

I want to talk to you today about mistakes you as a recent graduate often make that prove costly that resulting you being in the job search mode longer than you want to be and sometimes lose your career through inertia. Let me point to a few things.

1. You overestimate your value. Sometimes, career services, sometimes your professors blow smoke up your derrière. They tell you you are worth more than the market really thinks you are. Want to get a clearer picture of what your real value is? On LinkedIn there is a drop-down that allows you take a look for alumni from your school. Reach out to a few of them. Find out how much they were earning at the time they started their career. I'm talking about people from the last year or two. Find out what they got and what their process was like.

2. You don't network particularly well. These folks that you're reaching out to are like gold because they can introduce you to their boss, people at their firm, AND THEY ARE PAID FOR IT. Firms offer employee referral bonuses to their employees and they make money if you join. While you are speaking with them, get friendly with them, talk with them about what it is like working there, and ask them if there any open positions that you as a new grad can be introduced for.

3. You don't customize your resume.You keep sending out the same resume over and over again To every job known to mankind, because your parents are telling you,, "You've got to get a job,"You don't want to send it out to "stupid jobs," (things you are qualified for or interested in). Don't just send it out to everything. Tell your resume to each individual position you are applying for so that the fit looks obvious. Certain jobs are going to emphasize certain points; You will want to emphasize those things in your resume..
4. Your online all the time and not talking to people. You are sending emails, you're texting, You are on Snapchat trying to connect with people. That's fine, but you have to do the conversion from shooting the bull with them and saying, "Do you know of any jobs that might fit?"Especially with people you don't know particularly well, Talk with them about what you're looking for because your goal is to expand your network a lot to talk to more people. , even if these are people who are friends of your parents, they are people who are in "the world of work" And they might know some things that can become valuable to you. They might not be the right person right away, but they might be able to introduce you to someone Who might be the right person who could steer you better.
5. You don't follow up well.You get a message back from the firm because was sent as email, You're not checking your email and not responding quickly. I want to thinking about responding as quickly as you do your friend when a company sends you a message.You have to get crisp with your answers. You have to learn what to say and how to say it properly. If someone leaves a message for you on your phone, you want to call them back very quickly So that, if they want to talk with you about the job, you want to wait a week to get back to them, do you? By that time, 35 other people may be Interviewing for this role and you are going to be out of luck.
6. Not being proactive enough. You are not reaching out to people And doing what are called "informational interviews." Setting up time to pick someone's brain for about 15 minutes By phone, in person or Skype to see how they might be able to steer you on your search. Start to think about what you want new job, the kind of role you want. Talk with them about what they see the labor market is like for what you do or want to be doing. This is going to help you a lot Because you will be out there talking to people.

As a statistic you need to hear. Networking fills 70% of all jobs.70% of the 70% (49%) are filled by introductions the people that you didn't know at the beginning of research who recommend you to opportunities or from whom you hear about opportunities. You've got to expand your network.You can't connect with people. If that talk to people.. Otherwise, You are going to be in mom and/or dad's home a lot longer than you want and that's no fun Because they are going to nag you to no end.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Get a Job With Zero Experience | Job Search Radio


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains several ways to find a job with no experience.

Summary

Right off the bat, I want to encourage you to realize that you are going to be perseverance. This is not an instant strategy. There is no instant strategy for finding work unless mom or dad walks you in the door of the firm and you are hired because of them. That strategy works 100% of the time.

Assuming you are not born with a silver spoon in your mouth, this is the way to really do it.

There are 3 strategies.
1. Try to have someone introduce you to hiring manager. I need the quip about mom and dad, maybe it is an alumni from your school, who provides an introduction. Want to find some of those alumni that you don't really know? Go to LinkedIn and there are series of drop downs along the top. Locate the one that says, "Find Alumni." It will connect you with former students from your school and they can provide information about they found work at their organization and introductions.

2. You might try doing something related to what you do. You may not get hired as a teacher, but you might get hired as a teacher's aide. You may not be hired as an accountant at the firm that you want to join but that could be related position at that big 4 firm that could be a steppingstone to accounting. Maybe you have to temp at that firm before they consider hiring you. If you do temper the firm, make sure there is no noncompete in the temp agencies contract before you commit to joining.

3. This is "the guts one. " This is the one we are going to need to have some income to pay for this while you are doing it. Find the individual that is a leader an organization that you want to work for in the role that you wanted to do. Reach out to them an offer to do pro bono work. In turn. Be an assistant. Volunteer to do stuff for he or she. In doing that, what you will be doing is building a network of relationships within the firm because you will wind up in situations where you will be there assistant. Obviously, you have to do great work. If your intention is to do half-assed work and expect them to hire you, this is not a strategy for you.

However, if you put your effort and make connections, if you reach out to this person while you're working there, and ask "Please give me a sense of how I'm doing and what I can be doing better.' Again, you have to make some money elsewhere. You see were coming from with this? You're doing free work in order to get attention, a network, which, when you're coming out of school, you may not really have.

Building that relationship with an individual order two becomes a way that your entrée into an organization where some of you might notice you and poach you to their project or team.

These are 3 great ways in order to find positions (plus of course the 4th 1 which, of course, is, Mommy or Daddy get you the job.)

I hope you have the courage to not download stores and build those relationships because it will make all the difference to you, not just simply in this job search, but in every single one from this point on.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Will My Own Project Help Me Land a Job? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers this question about whether a person will have an advantage finding a job by doing a special project while they were in school.

Summary

I have a question that someone posed on Quora that I will answer for you. "I'm about to graduate in months. Will my own project help when I'm seeking a job?" Then he or she goes on to describe the nature of the project. There are computer professional or planning on becoming 1 of after graduation , but I think the question could be applied to any field or any situation where someone is graduating and you think about whether or not to do something beyond the coursework.

Will that be helpful in finding a job? Absolutely!

That's true, not simply in IT but in other fields as well. The key to this isn't that you did the project, but how you talk about the project and how you explain the decisions that you have made in the course of doing this work.

In the example of internships, you have some basic work experience. Great. If you need to look for job outside of that particular employer where you interned, they want to know more than just simply what were the tasks that you performed if the role, if they were little more than doing grunt work, unless you are going to be doing that same grunt work, they don't care.

For you who is doing the special project that is a special situation. Again, it's not just simply that you did the project. It's the decisions that you made that delivered the outcome.

So, for example, this is an IT person. Why did you choose that particular database? Why did you do this? Why did you do that? Give them an idea of what you accomplished and why in order to demonstrate that you have a thought process beyond simply the typical rookie who is there to take orders and, you may wind up taking orders if you go to work for them, but they will see that you have potential, two.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​
Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

Should I Indicate My Availability in My Resume | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains whether you should indicate your availability in your resume.

Summary

The question reads, "should I include date of availability in my resume?"

This is something that would apply to both students and consultants as well as temporary workers, so I'm going to texture my answer given the circumstances.

For the student, of course, it depends on when you are writing this or sending a resume. If this is November at the time before graduation, you might, in the resume, indicate your expected degree date and when that would be. Let's say it's made or June of the following year, that sends a clear signal to them as to when you're available. If this is March and you have an expected degree date I had, they have an idea as to when you are available, right?

If you are a consultant in the assignment is going to complete in 3 months, what are you sending a resume now? You are way early in the process. I might start to or 2 1/2 months before TOPS. For a consultant, really just send out the resume earlier than that is just a waste of people's time. It's not like they're going to save it and come back to it and say to themselves, "You know that guy who is going to be available in 3 months? Now is the time!" No, it is just going to go to their system and that little bit of data is not going to be remembered or saved. It's a time waster to send it out to early.

For students, the indication of expected degree date is important. If you have an internship that is going on they might allow you to (wink wink) give people the idea that you are working full time, it really depends on when you can start. If the ideas that you be willing to start within those last few months before graduation, that's one layer and I would indicate that I would explain in the cover email. That's in the body of the email to which your resume is attached.

Beyond that, keep it simple. Leave it in the resume as to what your expected degree date is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Things They Don’t Teach You in School About Job Hunting (VIDEO)


Most colleges don’t offer courses in how to find a job after graduation, even though they should. Here I offer a few pointers to help you avoid missing some points that you may not know.

Summary

I want to talk with you today as a graduating senior . . . It hit the graduation trial; your parents have shown up. Congratulations. You are out of school. You think it is time to look for job.

I'm not going to criticize you for things you did not do in the past. I'm just going to make sure you are doing the best that you can in the current climate, given how much or how little you have done to market yourself and to get yourself out and into the job you want to be starting with. This is going to be about tactics that you can use to help you find work.

The 1st thing is that by now you have your generic resume, however good or bad, that is. If you want me to critique it, send an email to me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us. Among the things I do is critique resumes and will offer you a discount of over what I charge people who have a ready entered the workforce. In the body of the email, but the phrase, "I saw your video." I will charge you $99 (these days, that is 1/3 of what I charge people for resume critiques).

Send me your generic resume so I can review that and, from there, before you submit any organization, tailor your resume to demonstrate the fit. I think the generic resume should be as big and expansive as possible for your online persona. Thus, if you're putting it up on a job board, there is fine for it to be. However, when you're actually applying for jobs, there, you want to demonstrate a fit. My 1st point is about tailing your resume and how important it is.

My 2nd point is about networking. You may not have the biggest network in the world but you do know people who graduated the year before you. If you are not sure where they are right now, LinkedIn has a function that allows you to find alumni from your school.

NOTE: Click on the name of your school from your home page. It was recently changed.

Network with alumni. Network with faculty with whom you have a relationship. Network with everyone you possibly can like family who might be willing to help you. The people you went to high school with who may be out in the work world. Your family. You may not like ask your parents for help, but your parents may know people around the world who might be able to help.

Part of what you want to be doing is what are called "informational interviews." These are meetings where you ask people for advice, but not jobs.

"Hi! I'm a recent grad with a background in such and such. "Reach out to someone who is in that kind of a role already in a particular organization and use LinkedIn for this purpose. You go to LinkedIn and do a search for profiles that fit a particular background or work at a particular organization and message them and say, "hi! I'm out looking for a job. I wanted to see if I could get a few minutes to pick your brain by Skype, in person or some other way. When you think I might be able to speak with you?"

It's a nice strategy where you get advice and put yourself in front of more people, practicing some of the communications that might seem clumsy to so that in this way, you get better. I have videos about informational interviews on YouTube which is at http://blog.thebiggamehunter.us. You can search for them. They are or on YouTube.

3. If you or someone with great grades, don't forget venture capital firms. Don't forget investment banks. There are lots of different organizations that hire people into their ranks for what are called "portfolio companies." These are firms that they own that they might be able to point you to.

Get a website for yourself if you don't already have one. There are lots of different services that will give you a space on the web for free. Don't do stupid stuff and keep you resume there is a way of letting firms find it and recruit you. After all, there are a lot of organizations that don't have LinkedIn premium accounts and don't have access to job boards and are searching on the web for them. Use Squarespace, wix or weebly to get a free site going and make sure that is well searchable by using keywords in the resume to reflect the work that you're doing look at relevant answer on Indeed to make sure that you have them..

On LinkedIn, make sure that the line underneath your name reflects the work that you want to be doing. Think about a headline there that would be attractive to someone.

Keep taking classes, what are you doing it online or as part of the program at your university. Keep training yourself to ensure that you remain on top of your game.

For interviewing purposes, figure out what makes you different. There are hundreds of thousands of people who are graduating from schools all over the United States and whatever country you might be located in. You have to think in terms of what makes you different that you can sell against the tide.

I want to be clear that if you have a 4.0 average and think that is a special quality, It isn't. There are a lot of people who graduate with a 4.0 index.

What makes you different?

A lot of resumes will look at online look pretty flat. Put a little color in your resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

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