How Do I Turn Down a Job Offer With Class When The Money Is Too Low?


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I am going to turn down their offer because they came in too low. How do I turn it down with class?

Summary

I received an interesting question is really geared toward a freelancer by think they can be applied to job hunters, as well. It's basically about turning down an offer. When the money isn't good enough and how do you do it with class. Here's the original note and then I will translate it for job hunters.

This person is a freelance writer and I get cold calls for job opportunities. They are in a position where they can afford to be choosy about which projects they take on. GREAT! This is exactly what everyone should do, whether you are freelancer or job Hunter.

He got a call from someone with an interesting job description but the money was way low for what he normally works on with his clients. He doesn't specify a percentage but just describes it as "way low."

"How do I turn this offer down with class while subtly making the point that they want to hire someone with my capabilities, they need to pay me 8 times what they offered me?"

As a job hunter, you are into problems like this all the time. You get calls from recruiters, you get calls from referrals, that land on your doorstep and the money is way off.

Job hunters often react foolishly by taking it personally. They get indignant. "WHAT!? This job should be paying . . . " They bark and they carry on like a little poodle. They bark at the recruiter. They bark at the manager who has the particular need. They bark at the person who wants to refer them. It's goofy.There is a better way to do it and one demonstrates class

What you simply say is, "I really appreciate you contacting me. It sounds like a great opportunity, but my rate is much higher than what you're prepared to offer for this role. I can recommend people to you and perhaps for the list over to you, but I think you may run into the same problem. For me, this is about 20% of what I normally charge. I will love to help you in the future, but this is way low for me. Here are few people who might be willing to take up on a project like this." Then you refer them to others.

Referring them to others is a classy thing to do. Then, is up to those individuals to decide whether it is good enough for them or whether they should refer the job out to others as well. Doing it in a way with style is to demonstrate that you have people you can point them to is to do it in a way that is not shaming, critical or disturbed in any way by what has been proposed. It is flattering that they reached out to you but, the fact of the matter is, the money isn't right.

Better to do it with style as you requested and just give them a referral to someone else.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

No B. S. Resume Advice: Templates?


In this short video, Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from using resume templates.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about resume templates. 1st of all, there are millions of them all over the web. Frankly, don't use them. I'm going to make it that simple. Don't use them. Here's why.

1. You have to comply with their format. Yes, you can look for lots of different formats. You really want to take that time?

2. The issue is that the template or the format. The issue is the content that you are putting in. You may think is attractive and presents very nicely, but it may cause problems for the reader. All of us, whether a corporation or a recruiting firm, are using applicant tracking systems. We are looking to parse data. We are not manually rekeying things. We don't want to copy your resume and pasted into your system. Whether a corporate recruiter or an agency recruiter, all the software is designed to parse resumes into particular fields. A lot of the templates have embedded headers. That can cause a problem because a lot of applicant tracking systems have trouble reading embedded header. They have to manually rekeying your information. You are now officially a pain in the ass.

3. Some people aren't cognizant of how the resume fits into the template. Sometimes, I see resumes that are cut off midfield or midsentence because a person didn't pay attention the fact that the sentence that they were writing didn't fit into the field correctly for the template that they were using. As a result, the sentence scrolls out of view. As a result, you always have to take a look at it.

4. The real issue is about parsing and ensuring that your resume is parsable by all of us who receive it. For large companies, the issue becomes about government reporting. They may delete your resume if it doesn't parse.

If you're using the template, you may have problems that you will never be conscious of, but are impacted by. If you're sending it to a recruiting firm, you don't want to be a problem resume to them and frankly, most of the template so you can look that good.

It is fine to copy the look of the template, but don't actually use one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

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Evaluating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses and it’s truly important criteria for evaluating a job offer.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

Is It Normal? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/05/31/is-it-normal/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the question as to whether a situation is normal when his employer extends someone and want them to verbally accept a job offer before they put the offer in writing.
 
Summary

Is it normal for a company to refuse sending details of an offer by email before I verbally accept an offer?

This person is orally received an offer, they want to get an offer letter, there wondering why they don't have the letter as of yet. Is it normal for me to say yes and then have the letter sent?

The answer is, "Yes," it is normal. The reason is, why should they go through all the final approvals, have admin type something, send it to you only to find out that you are not going to accept the job offer? Isn't that kind of pointless from your standpoint? I sure know it's pointless from their standpoint.

While the offer letter does is confirm what you have already been told. You are going to be paid a certain amount, that you might be eligible for a bonus, the offer is contingent upon you successfully completed a background check, etc. etc.

If they lied to you, no one is asking you to quit your job until you have the offer letter. All the offer letter does is confirm what you have been told. If you were them, harnessing manpower/woman power or however you want to describe it to process this offer letter and you intend to turn it down, what was the point anyway?

They want to hear the acceptance from you 1st, then do all the mechanics to deliver a letter for you. It is completely normal.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedInFollow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The Counteroffer You Shouldn’t Accept (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter presents the counteroffer you should not except as well as the one you should hope him employer does make.

Summary

You have spent a period of time working for an organization day in and day out. You are frustrated. Frustration is anger that should be directed outside, but you've spent a lot of time internalizing anger. So, you feel like you are in conflict. You finally gotten to a point where you decide to do something about it. That's great news.

You going out on interviews. You have kiss a lot of frogs. Finally, Prince Charming has shown up and there is a firm that wants to hire you... And it looks great! You have an opportunity to make more money, to resolve some of the previous issues, whatever the reason was an you've received an offer that you find this acceptable.

You given the notice and your boss comes over to you while you're sitting there whistling, "I'm getting out! I'm getting out!" They say something to the effect of, "Can I see you in my office for second?" You are there, they are there, maybe HR is there the other going to offer you money to salve the wound. There's been a wound on you for a long time ago. They are going to put a nice lotion called more money there. They're going to promise you that they are going to do things better.

You suddenly go, "WOW! Look! The world is spinning around me! They are going to be good to me now!" It's kind of like a puppy that has been hit a bunch of times and suddenly goes, "(Goofy voice) Okay, there is going to be good food for me here. Okay. " This is supposed to be enough to keep you. Think about it. That's what's really going on here.

Instead, what they should be doing is saying something to the effect of, "You know, we made a mistake. I really wish we could correct things with you but the next firm is really getting someone terrific." In other words, acknowledging the error that they made in how they conducted themselves , which you will notice that when they make the counteroffer about only money, they never do. Even when they do, it goes by so quickly because they really think that all is going to take is more money.

It's kind of like, I think using this analogy, it's something like being abused. You've been hit for a while and the puppy suddenly goes in the puppy suddenly goes, "I'm out of here," and starts running away. The master then says, "Okay doggy I will do better." What happens is that people refer to old patterns; it's not so easy to change, is it? How many times have you tried to lose weight or go to the gym and bulk up? It is not going to be easy for your manager to change.

Yet, that's basically what happens. Will pay you more and we promise to do better it is the offer that they are making to you.

Run when you hear that. Better to have your manager say, "You know, we screwed up. I'm sorry that you found it necessary to leave but if there's anything I can do in the future to help you, I would be happy to write that reference for you. I would be happy to support you in whatever way that I can."

That's the great counteroffer you should be looking for. That's the acknowledgment of their mistake. That's the acknowledgment that you were a top performer and that money is not going to bother you. Money is not the end of will problems that you would've had. It's an acknowledgment that you were a good employee.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Re-Contacting a Company After You’ve Turned Down a Job Offer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about re-contacting a company that they turn down a job offer from.

Summary

Here's the question: Can I asked to be a job candidate again for a company to whom I told I was taking another offer? The language is a little quirky. I'm going to translate it.

Apparently this person received an offer or backed out of an interview cycle with a firm, saying that he is gotten another offer. Apparently, they decide to turn down that offer , and now is wondering whether or not he or she can go back and talk to that firm about a job.

The answer is, "Sure." There is no taboo about this except the awkwardness that you may feel about going back and saying this.

In approaching them again, recognize that on their side they are going to have questions. What happened? Why did it happen? They're going to wonder if you received an offer and turned it down. What was wrong with that offer… Things along those lines. They're going to wonder if they're going to be similarities that might cause you to turn down their offer. They're going to want to see if you are logical. They going to wonder if there is a practical reason why you did this. Whether you are sincere. Whether you can express yourself well about this in a way that is convincing.

Part of your responsibility here is to tie it into their circumstances. "I was really excited about this job. I received an offer and was ready to say yes and then something came to my attention about the firm (or about the hiring manager) that gave me cause for pause. " For example, the offer wasn't what I was led to believe it would be is a reason that would be valid.

"I was led to believe will be for such and such amount. It was for significantly less." You get you get the idea.

"So what is it that you're looking from us in the way of compensation?"

" For this job. I was looking for such and such. They offered me $30,000 less and I thought it was appropriate to turn that down." You get the idea.

They're going to want to explore the circumstances that caused that offer to go away or be turned down and then you're going to be looking to switch the conversation at a particular point in talking about their job, get into an evaluation process with them.

They may continue with you by saying, "Where are you in your job search now?" That's because they may be starting at the beginning with you (again). If you have 3 things are close to an offer, why would they start now?

Here's another variation on answering that question.

I don't know if this happened 4 years ago or 4 weeks ago. If it is 4 years ago, they may have some notes, especially for speaking to the same person as you did, then about the turndown that you gave them, and then go into the explanation for why you chose that firm over there firm. If it is 4 months ago, the 1st answer that I gave applies.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: I Was Lowballed on an Offer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about a tough salary negotiation.

Summary

I'm going to paraphrase the scenario for you, but just follow with me, okay? This person is an offer from a quality organization that he would really like to work for. However, they lowballed him. The hiring manager went the bat, saying that lowballing him was the wrong strategy; he is worth more. Regardless, HR has lowballed him.

With some trepidation, he decided to give notice. It is the middle the month as I am recording this. He is given 2 weeks notice and it would be starting at the beginning of the month with this well-regarded organization in this job that you prefer doing.

He gives his notice, having been a consultant for this 1 firm for a long time. They have been dangling a carrot in front of him and now that he is given notice, suddenly they go, "Wait! No no no no no no no no no! DON'T GO! WE WILL GIVE IT TO YOU NOW!" He has a dilemma. What do you do?

The negotiation is completely botched so let's acknowledge that. It should have been done differently and I will simply say he has some leverage on both sides. This is the way that I would play it.

He's not sure if his current firm will give them a promotion. I also know he really would prefer the other position more (the one with the celebrity firm), but, you know, there are always other fish in the sea.

You start off by determining from the current firm what they are really going to do for him. Let's start off with the position that he really wants and a raise to minimally manage that which he has given notice for. OR, if it is less money than what he is currently making,. He is getting a promotion, and more money should come with a promotion, right?

Even if they don't commit to the promotion and they just commit to a full-time job, ask them to put the offer letter in writing so that he has that as an indication of their good intentions.

Next, with the other firm, once he has this, he can go back to the celebrity firm and say," I gave notice and received a counter offer. I would frankly rather join your firm. However, let's get practical. All along I have said that I am likely to get a counter. You have lowballed me and guess what happened? I got a counter. I would rather join your firm. The hiring manager tells me that he went to you and told you not to do this but you did it anyway. But, regardless, I would like to join. This is the number that will cause me to join."

The 1st thing I would do actually is called the hiring manager before calling HR and tell them that you have another offer as a counter just as you would warned. " You know, I am not independently wealthy.. You won't see my name in the Forbes list of wealthiest Americans. I want to join your firm and I would like to work for you. I can't walk away from so much money and this role which is an interesting role. Can you get me more?"

Have him or her go to bat for you with HR. Have them call the big medium blowup the situation and force HR to do what they should've done all along. Some major organizations do this; they lowball and try to save some money. They act as though it is coming out of their pocket. But, at the end of the day, there are other firms that you can join.

Recognize that! This is a market where you have choices. Don't allow yourself to be bludgeoned based upon the old scenario of a year ago and beyond! Use your leverage well here.

The celebrity firm, the well-known firm, will up the offer or they are going to walk away and then the hiring manager is going to blow a fit. That doesn't help you. The real question is you can only do this if you would really accept the current situation. If you won't or can't, then you are stuck because you have no leverage. You don't really want to walk away.

If you are prepared to walk away, this is the best way to play it. Get the current offer,See if they will up the money a little bit when they do it. Then circle back to the celebrity firm's hiring manager and tell them what's happened and say, "Look, I want to join. You know what I am worth. However, HR has a bug up your butt about lowballing me. I don't know why. Do you?' Have he or she go to bat for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

I’m Getting a Job Offer . . . (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone where they are about to receive a job offer from a firm but prefer another job at that same firm.

Summary

The question is, "Should/can I ask for another position in a company during my final interview process upon a job offer?" The language is in great but it seems to translate into he or she is getting a job offer and it seemed like the not happy with his job and want to find out if they can ask about another job. At the same company.

My 1st reaction is you're kidding, right? How many interviews have you gone through and how many people's time have you wasted interviewing for a job that you're not interested in? Now some people have been coached, particularly very junior ones, into thinking that what they should be doing is get the offer and then they can finagle things.

Now if I were this employer, I would rescind any offer that I have extended for this person because you're obviously not ask interested in this job. If you've gone through 2, 3, 4 or maybe 5 interviews and now you want to talk about another job, why would they make you an offer for THIS JOB? All they would say is, "STOP. Let's evaluate you for this other job. They would bring other people into play for this original job and they're going to have a hard time trusting you because the reality is that you have not been trustworthy.

They been very clear about the job that they are trying to fill, and you haven't been trustworthy about what you are looking for. Now you pull this out last minute.

That's the fact. I hope you get clean about this with yourself and if you're not interested in this, stop the process and say, "Before use extend an offer to me, I would rather interview for another position."

They may respond by saying, "That's great. Have a great day and the good life." That's better than joining the firm and doing the job that you don't want.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. Him him

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL him

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The “I Have Another Offer” Gambit (VIDEO)


My opinion of the “I have another offer” gambit.

Summary

Someone wrote to me asking about the classic scenario where they want to purchase the process along. They want to tell the employer that they have another offer and see if that will really facilitate things and get things going.

Few employers are affected by that anymore. Doing that without another job offer Reminds me of "last century behavior," where a woman would tell a man that they were pregnant and they weren't. You are telling them that you have another offer and don't have one and you are trying to push this along. These days, the tactic doesn't work as often as it used to.

Firms don't care because there are another 50 people just like you, begging for this job. They are not complete with the process so the probability is That it is not going to work.

If it does work, YIPPEE! FABULOUS! Good for you. You pull that off. Usually, firms just continue the process and circle back with they are ready to make a decision.

Let me be clear that if you do have another offer, one that you would feel comfortable accepting, By all means you should tell this firm and push them along.

"I have an offer for such and such with the firm that interested in AND I really like your opportunity. If you can move things along. I have to respond by such and such date. If not I'm going to accept the other offer because the proverbial bird in the hand . . . Yada yada yada."

Don't expect that lying is going to get you anywhere. Do expect that if you have another offer, It doesn't matter to you, because your something that you would say "yes" to.If it's something that you wouldn't say "yes" to, you still have the option of using the strategy.

I just don't like it. under the circumstances where you don't have something because it is like you are pushing your chips all in and don't have a good hand at all. The likelihood is that the bluff in the card game will work is pretty small because they smell it and you just seem more nervous Then you do when you actually do have the offer.

Can I come back and work? You bet it can! Statistically it will work a lot less than it used to.

Can you get into trouble? Of course, not. Is not like there is a database of information employers keep and share with one another About people who do "strange things" to them. What there is are "long memories." Individuals have long memories and,, if they find out that you lied, they remember this kind of stuff..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You’re Willing to Take Less But Are Afraid They’ll Reject You | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 757 You earned more than they are paying for the job. You know they’ll be afraid to hire you fearing that you’ll leave for a higher paying job. How do you handle that in the interview? 

Summary

Today, let's talk about an interview tactic. Let's say you are interviewing for a job that is paying less than what you were previously making. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that employers are reluctant to hire people who were making more than what they are willing to pay now. Their thinking is that is soon as the economy gets better, as soon as you find another job, you are out the door.

How do you counteract that? How do you deal with that? Obviously, you can tell them the truth. "I was making X number of dollars per year; I understand this position is paying less and I am willing to take less." Then you're back in the same boat.

There's an idea of what to do instead. What you can do is respond to the question of, "How much were you earning," by saying, "My last employer was very generous with me, probably too generous as a matter fact. They will probably pay me more than what the market is. My understanding is that this is a position that is paying less than what I was previously earning. I understand I was earning a very generous compensation; I am willing to come to that level."

If they persist, they will ask you, "So how much were you making?"

"I was making X number of dollars per year. Does that make sense to you or does it seem like they were being particularly generous?" Most of the time, they will say something that confirms that they were paying more than what the market is. "We are paying up to such and such."

You can say, "That's what I understand the market is right now; I'm very willing to accept that. I know my employer was paying more than market value; I was happy to take the money but now it is time to come back to the market."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

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