Re-Contacting a Company After You’ve Turned Down a Job Offer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about re-contacting a company that they turn down a job offer from.

Summary

Here's the question: Can I asked to be a job candidate again for a company to whom I told I was taking another offer? The language is a little quirky. I'm going to translate it.

Apparently this person received an offer or backed out of an interview cycle with a firm, saying that he is gotten another offer. Apparently, they decide to turn down that offer , and now is wondering whether or not he or she can go back and talk to that firm about a job.

The answer is, "Sure." There is no taboo about this except the awkwardness that you may feel about going back and saying this.

In approaching them again, recognize that on their side they are going to have questions. What happened? Why did it happen? They're going to wonder if you received an offer and turned it down. What was wrong with that offer… Things along those lines. They're going to wonder if they're going to be similarities that might cause you to turn down their offer. They're going to want to see if you are logical. They going to wonder if there is a practical reason why you did this. Whether you are sincere. Whether you can express yourself well about this in a way that is convincing.

Part of your responsibility here is to tie it into their circumstances. "I was really excited about this job. I received an offer and was ready to say yes and then something came to my attention about the firm (or about the hiring manager) that gave me cause for pause. " For example, the offer wasn't what I was led to believe it would be is a reason that would be valid.

"I was led to believe will be for such and such amount. It was for significantly less." You get you get the idea.

"So what is it that you're looking from us in the way of compensation?"

" For this job. I was looking for such and such. They offered me $30,000 less and I thought it was appropriate to turn that down." You get the idea.

They're going to want to explore the circumstances that caused that offer to go away or be turned down and then you're going to be looking to switch the conversation at a particular point in talking about their job, get into an evaluation process with them.

They may continue with you by saying, "Where are you in your job search now?" That's because they may be starting at the beginning with you (again). If you have 3 things are close to an offer, why would they start now?

Here's another variation on answering that question.

I don't know if this happened 4 years ago or 4 weeks ago. If it is 4 years ago, they may have some notes, especially for speaking to the same person as you did, then about the turndown that you gave them, and then go into the explanation for why you chose that firm over there firm. If it is 4 months ago, the 1st answer that I gave applies.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Ask The Big Game Hunter: I Was Lowballed on an Offer (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about a tough salary negotiation.

Summary

I'm going to paraphrase the scenario for you, but just follow with me, okay? This person is an offer from a quality organization that he would really like to work for. However, they lowballed him. The hiring manager went the bat, saying that lowballing him was the wrong strategy; he is worth more. Regardless, HR has lowballed him.

With some trepidation, he decided to give notice. It is the middle the month as I am recording this. He is given 2 weeks notice and it would be starting at the beginning of the month with this well-regarded organization in this job that you prefer doing.

He gives his notice, having been a consultant for this 1 firm for a long time. They have been dangling a carrot in front of him and now that he is given notice, suddenly they go, "Wait! No no no no no no no no no! DON'T GO! WE WILL GIVE IT TO YOU NOW!" He has a dilemma. What do you do?

The negotiation is completely botched so let's acknowledge that. It should have been done differently and I will simply say he has some leverage on both sides. This is the way that I would play it.

He's not sure if his current firm will give them a promotion. I also know he really would prefer the other position more (the one with the celebrity firm), but, you know, there are always other fish in the sea.

You start off by determining from the current firm what they are really going to do for him. Let's start off with the position that he really wants and a raise to minimally manage that which he has given notice for. OR, if it is less money than what he is currently making,. He is getting a promotion, and more money should come with a promotion, right?

Even if they don't commit to the promotion and they just commit to a full-time job, ask them to put the offer letter in writing so that he has that as an indication of their good intentions.

Next, with the other firm, once he has this, he can go back to the celebrity firm and say," I gave notice and received a counter offer. I would frankly rather join your firm. However, let's get practical. All along I have said that I am likely to get a counter. You have lowballed me and guess what happened? I got a counter. I would rather join your firm. The hiring manager tells me that he went to you and told you not to do this but you did it anyway. But, regardless, I would like to join. This is the number that will cause me to join."

The 1st thing I would do actually is called the hiring manager before calling HR and tell them that you have another offer as a counter just as you would warned. " You know, I am not independently wealthy.. You won't see my name in the Forbes list of wealthiest Americans. I want to join your firm and I would like to work for you. I can't walk away from so much money and this role which is an interesting role. Can you get me more?"

Have him or her go to bat for you with HR. Have them call the big medium blowup the situation and force HR to do what they should've done all along. Some major organizations do this; they lowball and try to save some money. They act as though it is coming out of their pocket. But, at the end of the day, there are other firms that you can join.

Recognize that! This is a market where you have choices. Don't allow yourself to be bludgeoned based upon the old scenario of a year ago and beyond! Use your leverage well here.

The celebrity firm, the well-known firm, will up the offer or they are going to walk away and then the hiring manager is going to blow a fit. That doesn't help you. The real question is you can only do this if you would really accept the current situation. If you won't or can't, then you are stuck because you have no leverage. You don't really want to walk away.

If you are prepared to walk away, this is the best way to play it. Get the current offer,See if they will up the money a little bit when they do it. Then circle back to the celebrity firm's hiring manager and tell them what's happened and say, "Look, I want to join. You know what I am worth. However, HR has a bug up your butt about lowballing me. I don't know why. Do you?' Have he or she go to bat for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

I’m Getting a Job Offer . . . (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone where they are about to receive a job offer from a firm but prefer another job at that same firm.

Summary

The question is, "Should/can I ask for another position in a company during my final interview process upon a job offer?" The language is in great but it seems to translate into he or she is getting a job offer and it seemed like the not happy with his job and want to find out if they can ask about another job. At the same company.

My 1st reaction is you're kidding, right? How many interviews have you gone through and how many people's time have you wasted interviewing for a job that you're not interested in? Now some people have been coached, particularly very junior ones, into thinking that what they should be doing is get the offer and then they can finagle things.

Now if I were this employer, I would rescind any offer that I have extended for this person because you're obviously not ask interested in this job. If you've gone through 2, 3, 4 or maybe 5 interviews and now you want to talk about another job, why would they make you an offer for THIS JOB? All they would say is, "STOP. Let's evaluate you for this other job. They would bring other people into play for this original job and they're going to have a hard time trusting you because the reality is that you have not been trustworthy.

They been very clear about the job that they are trying to fill, and you haven't been trustworthy about what you are looking for. Now you pull this out last minute.

That's the fact. I hope you get clean about this with yourself and if you're not interested in this, stop the process and say, "Before use extend an offer to me, I would rather interview for another position."

They may respond by saying, "That's great. Have a great day and the good life." That's better than joining the firm and doing the job that you don't want.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. Him him

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL him

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The “I Have Another Offer” Gambit (VIDEO)


My opinion of the “I have another offer” gambit.

Summary

Someone wrote to me asking about the classic scenario where they want to purchase the process along. They want to tell the employer that they have another offer and see if that will really facilitate things and get things going.

Few employers are affected by that anymore. Doing that without another job offer Reminds me of "last century behavior," where a woman would tell a man that they were pregnant and they weren't. You are telling them that you have another offer and don't have one and you are trying to push this along. These days, the tactic doesn't work as often as it used to.

Firms don't care because there are another 50 people just like you, begging for this job. They are not complete with the process so the probability is That it is not going to work.

If it does work, YIPPEE! FABULOUS! Good for you. You pull that off. Usually, firms just continue the process and circle back with they are ready to make a decision.

Let me be clear that if you do have another offer, one that you would feel comfortable accepting, By all means you should tell this firm and push them along.

"I have an offer for such and such with the firm that interested in AND I really like your opportunity. If you can move things along. I have to respond by such and such date. If not I'm going to accept the other offer because the proverbial bird in the hand . . . Yada yada yada."

Don't expect that lying is going to get you anywhere. Do expect that if you have another offer, It doesn't matter to you, because your something that you would say "yes" to.If it's something that you wouldn't say "yes" to, you still have the option of using the strategy.

I just don't like it. under the circumstances where you don't have something because it is like you are pushing your chips all in and don't have a good hand at all. The likelihood is that the bluff in the card game will work is pretty small because they smell it and you just seem more nervous Then you do when you actually do have the offer.

Can I come back and work? You bet it can! Statistically it will work a lot less than it used to.

Can you get into trouble? Of course, not. Is not like there is a database of information employers keep and share with one another About people who do "strange things" to them. What there is are "long memories." Individuals have long memories and,, if they find out that you lied, they remember this kind of stuff..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

You’re Willing to Take Less But Are Afraid They’ll Reject You | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 757 You earned more than they are paying for the job. You know they’ll be afraid to hire you fearing that you’ll leave for a higher paying job. How do you handle that in the interview? 

Summary

Today, let's talk about an interview tactic. Let's say you are interviewing for a job that is paying less than what you were previously making. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that employers are reluctant to hire people who were making more than what they are willing to pay now. Their thinking is that is soon as the economy gets better, as soon as you find another job, you are out the door.

How do you counteract that? How do you deal with that? Obviously, you can tell them the truth. "I was making X number of dollars per year; I understand this position is paying less and I am willing to take less." Then you're back in the same boat.

There's an idea of what to do instead. What you can do is respond to the question of, "How much were you earning," by saying, "My last employer was very generous with me, probably too generous as a matter fact. They will probably pay me more than what the market is. My understanding is that this is a position that is paying less than what I was previously earning. I understand I was earning a very generous compensation; I am willing to come to that level."

If they persist, they will ask you, "So how much were you making?"

"I was making X number of dollars per year. Does that make sense to you or does it seem like they were being particularly generous?" Most of the time, they will say something that confirms that they were paying more than what the market is. "We are paying up to such and such."

You can say, "That's what I understand the market is right now; I'm very willing to accept that. I know my employer was paying more than market value; I was happy to take the money but now it is time to come back to the market."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

I Was Low Balled on an Offer! | Job Search Radio

EP 303 him Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about a tough salary negotiation where he was low-balled by a firm he received an offer from and hen received a counteroffer from his current employer.

If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

Summary

I'm going to paraphrase the scenario for you, but just follow with me, okay? This person is an offer from a quality organization that he would really like to work for. However, they lowballed him. The hiring manager went the bat, saying that lowballing him was the wrong strategy; he is worth more. Regardless, HR has lowballed him.

With some trepidation, he decided to give notice. It is the middle the month as I am recording this. He is given 2 weeks notice and it would be starting at the beginning of the month with this well-regarded organization in this job that you prefer doing.

He gives his notice, having been a consultant for this 1 firm for a long time. They have been dangling a carrot in front of him and now that he is given notice, suddenly they go, "Wait! No no no no no no no no no! DON'T GO! WE WILL GIVE IT TO YOU NOW!" He has a dilemma. What do you do?

The negotiation is completely botched so let's acknowledge that. It should have been done differently and I will simply say he has some leverage on both sides. This is the way that I would play it.

He's not sure if his current firm will give them a promotion. I also know he really would prefer the other position more (the one with the celebrity firm), but, you know, there are always other fish in the sea.

You start off by determining from the current firm what they are really going to do for him. Let's start off with the position that he really wants and a raise to minimally manage that which he has given notice for. OR, if it is less money than what he is currently making,. He is getting a promotion, and more money should come with a promotion, right?

Even if they don't commit to the promotion and they just commit to a full-time job, ask them to put the offer letter in writing so that he has that as an indication of their good intentions.

Next, with the other firm, once he has this, he can go back to the celebrity firm and say," I gave notice and received a counter offer. I would frankly rather join your firm. However, let's get practical. All along I have said that I am likely to get a counter. You have lowballed me and guess what happened? I got a counter. I would rather join your firm. The hiring manager tells me that he went to you and told you not to do this but you did it anyway. But, regardless, I would like to join. This is the number that will cause me to join."

The 1st thing I would do actually is called the hiring manager before calling HR and tell them that you have another offer as a counter just as you would warned. " You know, I am not independently wealthy.. You won't see my name in the Forbes list of wealthiest Americans. I want to join your firm and I would like to work for you. I can't walk away from so much money and this role which is an interesting role. Can you get me more?"

Have him or her go to bat for you with HR. Have them call the big medium blowup the situation and force HR to do what they should've done all along. Some major organizations do this; they lowball and try to save some money. They act as though it is coming out of their pocket. But, at the end of the day, there are other firms that you can join.

Recognize that! This is a market where you have choices. Don't allow yourself to be bludgeoned based upon the old scenario of a year ago and beyond! Use your leverage well here.

The celebrity firm, the well-known firm, will up the offer or they are going to walk away and then the hiring manager is going to blow a fit. That doesn't help you. The real question is you can only do this if you would really accept the current situation. If you won't or can't, then you are stuck because you have no leverage. You don't really want to walk away.

If you are prepared to walk away, this is the best way to play it. Get the current offer,See if they will up the money a little bit when they do it. Then circle back to the celebrity firm's hiring manager and tell them what's happened and say, "Look, I want to join. You know what I am worth. However, HR has a bug up your butt about lowballing me. I don't know why. Do you?' Have he or she go to bat for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Non-Offer Offer (VIDEO)


I received a question from someone the painted description of what I can only think of is a non–offer offer. Do you agree with my assessment? Do you disagree?

Summary

I am doing a video today because someone described the situation to me that they wanted some advice about. I think it is something that is pertinent to more than just simply this 1 person. They wrote about doing a presentation to the CEO of a firm that judging by this person's address would require relocation. The CEO love this presentation, loved his alpproach, loved his ideas and decided from the time of his 1st meeting till now that he has a choice to make about the direction of his firm. He has decided to change the model and that requires a different team and strategy and this is completely new information to the job hunter.

The CEO clearly liked him and wants him to be involved with improving the current model which brings in cash, while considering what will be needed for the other model. To that end he asked this person to present a proposal to work for him as a contract employee to improve the current model. At the end of 60 days, he would decide whether to bring them on full time. The question is whether this is a good thing to do. Is this an okay thing for him to do? Is he using a tactic where he can eliminate me after 60 days?

Knowing that this involves relocation, you have an offer to work for him for 60 days.Actually to make a proposal to work for him for 60 days. You have an offer to bid on 2 months of work. You have a full-time situation now and I know from other parts of this note that you are not happy with it. The idea of moving for 60 days of work when you have a house of family and stuff like that while uprooting everyone doesn't seem to be very sensible.

What comes to mind as an appropriate strategy Is to say, "I am interested in being involved. Talk to me about what you think is fair for me to be involved. Please don't lowball me. If the role, you are asking me to uproot myself and my family to move out here. So what do you think is a fair price?"

2. You have to ask them this next question point blank. "After 60 days if you decide to dump this business, sell it or what have you, What happens to me?" I know the answer that question – – You're gone. The CEO has had 2 months of consulting and adios. You want him to say what he believes he will do And then from there, put it in writing. If the goal is for you to get another job, then this isn't a job. It is a non-job job offer. It is an oppirtunity to bid for a consulting assignment.

For now, there is more to find out. The big thing is what happens after 60 days If, through no fault of yours, the CEO decides,, "I'm Going to bail on the sucker. Let's shut it down." You are out of a job.. Are you okay with that? Instead, ask them what happens to you then.. I could be completely wrong (experience tells me I'm not) This to be the most honest guy in the world is not going to fire you after 60 days.

But what if he does? Is that what you want?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

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