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Evaluating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/07/12/evaluating-a-job-offer/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses and it’s truly important criteria for evaluating a job offer.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Respond to a Low Ball Job Offer


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/27/how-to-respond-to-a-low-ball-job-offer/

EP 398 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a simple strategy for responding to a job offer lower than what you are looking for. 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Increasing The Salary Offer | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/26/increasing-the-salary-offer/

Here, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an easy to implement strategy for asking a firm to increase their salary offer to you so that you will accept it.

Summary

We are going to be talking today about a strategy for firmed up the job offer. I want to be clear – – it doesn't always work. Nothing always works. If you want a guarantee in life, I will give you one guarantee – – you are going to die. That is the only guarantee that exists.

This is an opportunity for you to try upping the job offer and do it in a way where, after you come on board, they'll take it out in your hide. You see, I've been in tough negotiations with people because they have insisted that they squeeze every drop of blood out of my client. What invariably happens is, in a tough negotiation, when the person comes on board, it is taken out on them. There are a lot of different ways; I'm not to go through with describing them.

I simply want to talk about how you can do negotiation without them getting angry at you. Here's a scenario I was helping someone with recently.

At various points, he given me an idea of what he would, except for my clients. He is involved with the relocation to accept this job and the client far exceeded any relocation money that the guy was asking for. The candidate was thrilled about that. However, he missed made a mistake in his calculations about the salary part of the job offer. He forgot to take into consideration the tax differences between the 2 states. So, suddenly, what was an acceptable offer has become a few thousand dollars short.

Here's what I suggested to do. Understand, the client extended the offer to him directly. I am the client to represented him to them but they will be dealing with one another now and in the future. So, yes, I could step in, but I thought it would be best if he handled this because they have been dealing with him directly throughout the interview process and I just think they want to have that relationship with him and he has to reciprocate.

What I suggested that he do is make arrangements to speak with my client and approach them in this matter. Before I go any further, let me explain some of the nuances. I said to him, "Before you call up, slow your speech down. When people speak quickly, is associated with people who 'hustle.' Scam artists. Insincerity. Will be slower speech down, and seem like we are kicking their individual words carefully, it sounds sincere. It is important for you to send sincere."

Then I continued by saying, "what you say to him is as follows, 'when I spoke with Jeff about what I would find acceptable, I told him this number. But, I forgot to take into account that there was a tax difference. I haven't told him about this until today and I just thought I would talk with you directly about this. The difference is (and I told him to quote the specific number). Please understand, I want to join very much. It is a great opportunity. I'm ready to say yes today. Could you increase the number by (and that I suggested that he quote the specific number he was looking for)?'"

What this does make this a person-to-person relationship between the parties. They can hear the sincerity, where they can hear your agony over this, where they can hear that you want to join and that you are prepared to commit today if they increase the offer. That goes a long way in employers playbook because 1 of the things that they hate doing (understand, this happens all the time. People say that they will do one thing and then they do something else. They don't want to do all the work to get approvals to get an offer increase and to then have you turn it down). By hearing your voice and sounding sincere. What you are able to do is be personally persuasive, given the carrot of letting them know that you're ready to say yes if they had that number, and then, from their standpoint, once you get that number, you got the job!

Sincerity. Slowing your speech down. Being clear about what you are looking for. These are huge part of how to up the offer.

You can always hardball people and say, "I made a mistake. I know I said I was looking for. This amount, but I really want this." You can do that and be prepared for firms to say, "You know what? Don't let the door hit you in the butt." And, I will do other shows that will talk about how to do a tough negotiation.

When all is said and done, I think that if you are very close and there is a few thousand dollars difference, sincerity goes a long way toward bringing everything together.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

What Do You Say to a Recruiter Who Calls With a Job Offer?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

How do I respond to a recruiter who calls me with a job offer? There is one possibility for cultural difference when answering this question. I answer it and a more traditional answer.

Summary

The question for today is, "What you say to a recruiter calls with a job offer?" It seems like a simple question by one to identify one thing that may have a cultural difference that affects the question.

In some cultures when people refer to a job offer they're not talking about the offer of employment; they're talking about it offer of an opportunity. And as such you listen intently to what is said to describe the job, you ask follow up questions and then ascertain for yourself as to whether or not this is a position that you want to pursue. Now, if this is an actual offer of employment, you listen to the terms and conditions. What's the salary? What are the benefits? What's what sort of bonus policy do they have? Are there restricted stock units that are available? Are there stock options? You listen to all the variables for the position and ask follow up questions.

Has anything changed about that position since the time I interviewed? We also don't know if this is a corporate or third party recruiter. I'm going to deal with this as If this is a corporate recruiter first, and say if it's a corporate recruiter, you indicate that you are thinking very favorably about that position. Can I sleep on it over night? I just want to make sure there's no red flags that surface the next 24 hours but frankly I can't see any that might occur but, in case I have a question would you mind if I gave you a call? Great. I'll have a decision for you tomorrow. The reason I say tomorrow is if there's a problem, you want to start getting into the weeds with them, compile your questions so thato in this way, you can have them resolved and not have them go on for a lengthy period of time.

You also want to watch my video called,"The easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself," because it's there that you will learn 1 of the easiest and most gentle tactics to try and push the money up. Now if you haven't watched it before, you know, most of this is going to work. But what won't work is all the front end stuff. But regardless, you'll find good pieces of advice there. There's another one called "The second easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself." It can also work here.

Now if it's an agency recruiter who called you up, what you might respond by saying it is if they get the money, you sound excited and you do much the same thing. You turn around you indicate, "I'm thinking very favorably about this." But they're not going to really have any information about changes in the position. They may not have the information about career opportunities other than, you know, the B.S. that they tell people about every job.

So rather than put them in the position of lying to you, just stick with the money, the benefits . . . things along those lines. Watch my videos. See if you can up the money a little bit, even if it comes out of their pocket. So this way they have the opportunity to improve your offer and feel happy about it again.

Waiting always works but I'd never encourage the question of when they need the decision by coming back to them then the next day. Because if you're not interested, just say, "no." if you are interested, try to negotiate a little bit to improve the offer because the more money you receive . . . remember, your next raise is going to be predicated upon what your salary is now. Every thousand dollars or five or ten thousand dollars translates into a higher increase with next review.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

I Was Lowballed on a Job Offer

I Was Low Balled on an Offer! | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/18/i-was-low-balled-on-an-offer-2/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about a tough salary negotiation where he was low-balled by a firm he received an offer from and then received a counteroffer from his current employer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​

Evaluating a Job Offer? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses and it’s truly important criteria for evaluating a job offer.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Turn Down a Job Offer With Class When The Money Is Too Low?


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I am going to turn down their offer because they came in too low. How do I turn it down with class?

Summary

I received an interesting question is really geared toward a freelancer by think they can be applied to job hunters, as well. It's basically about turning down an offer. When the money isn't good enough and how do you do it with class. Here's the original note and then I will translate it for job hunters.

This person is a freelance writer and I get cold calls for job opportunities. They are in a position where they can afford to be choosy about which projects they take on. GREAT! This is exactly what everyone should do, whether you are freelancer or job Hunter.

He got a call from someone with an interesting job description but the money was way low for what he normally works on with his clients. He doesn't specify a percentage but just describes it as "way low."

"How do I turn this offer down with class while subtly making the point that they want to hire someone with my capabilities, they need to pay me 8 times what they offered me?"

As a job hunter, you are into problems like this all the time. You get calls from recruiters, you get calls from referrals, that land on your doorstep and the money is way off.

Job hunters often react foolishly by taking it personally. They get indignant. "WHAT!? This job should be paying . . . " They bark and they carry on like a little poodle. They bark at the recruiter. They bark at the manager who has the particular need. They bark at the person who wants to refer them. It's goofy.There is a better way to do it and one demonstrates class

What you simply say is, "I really appreciate you contacting me. It sounds like a great opportunity, but my rate is much higher than what you're prepared to offer for this role. I can recommend people to you and perhaps for the list over to you, but I think you may run into the same problem. For me, this is about 20% of what I normally charge. I will love to help you in the future, but this is way low for me. Here are few people who might be willing to take up on a project like this." Then you refer them to others.

Referring them to others is a classy thing to do. Then, is up to those individuals to decide whether it is good enough for them or whether they should refer the job out to others as well. Doing it in a way with style is to demonstrate that you have people you can point them to is to do it in a way that is not shaming, critical or disturbed in any way by what has been proposed. It is flattering that they reached out to you but, the fact of the matter is, the money isn't right.

Better to do it with style as you requested and just give them a referral to someone else.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

 

No B. S. Resume Advice: Templates?


In this short video, Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from using resume templates.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about resume templates. 1st of all, there are millions of them all over the web. Frankly, don't use them. I'm going to make it that simple. Don't use them. Here's why.

1. You have to comply with their format. Yes, you can look for lots of different formats. You really want to take that time?

2. The issue is that the template or the format. The issue is the content that you are putting in. You may think is attractive and presents very nicely, but it may cause problems for the reader. All of us, whether a corporation or a recruiting firm, are using applicant tracking systems. We are looking to parse data. We are not manually rekeying things. We don't want to copy your resume and pasted into your system. Whether a corporate recruiter or an agency recruiter, all the software is designed to parse resumes into particular fields. A lot of the templates have embedded headers. That can cause a problem because a lot of applicant tracking systems have trouble reading embedded header. They have to manually rekeying your information. You are now officially a pain in the ass.

3. Some people aren't cognizant of how the resume fits into the template. Sometimes, I see resumes that are cut off midfield or midsentence because a person didn't pay attention the fact that the sentence that they were writing didn't fit into the field correctly for the template that they were using. As a result, the sentence scrolls out of view. As a result, you always have to take a look at it.

4. The real issue is about parsing and ensuring that your resume is parsable by all of us who receive it. For large companies, the issue becomes about government reporting. They may delete your resume if it doesn't parse.

If you're using the template, you may have problems that you will never be conscious of, but are impacted by. If you're sending it to a recruiting firm, you don't want to be a problem resume to them and frankly, most of the template so you can look that good.

It is fine to copy the look of the template, but don't actually use one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Evaluating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses and it’s truly important criteria for evaluating a job offer.

Summary

To preface all of this, most people, when they are very young, are exuberant and enthusiastic. Somewhere along the line, it gets beaten out of them. Maybe it's the school system; maybe it's the notion that you should conform with societal expectations. I'm not a play therapist or social worker here. I was just simply say the notion of becoming extreme, of going for the gold of the gusto, going for being exceptional gets drilled out of most of us.

AND, for you, I want to remind you that your greatest success is going to come, not from being another cog in the wheel, not from being another cylinder in the engine, but from really driving things hard and be in an organization that respects those qualities that make you unique.

What do I mean by this?

As a job hunter, you get multiple offers (this is going to be about large firms.. After all, you work in a small group with a large firm) and you have an opportunity to work ... If you're going to be treated as though you're working at the 3rd desk in the 4th cube on the 7th floor in their headquarters building or in a remote outpost, it's very different than being on the line with someone who loves your passion and loves what you bring. Again, that's all about attitude. It's not about big company versus small company. You can have the same issue with a small firm.

For example, someone sent me a message asking whether he has anything to worry about. He is at a startup and they are trying to hire 2 people to work in his group and it hasn't been involved in the interviewing. Why would someone not involve someone on the team in the interviewing when with the small firm? I don't get it.

I will go to my answer. I'll just simply say, "if you are just treated as another object, as just another body that is occupying space that is expected to perform a task, if you are just expected to be a robot executing tasks, that is not a job for you." If you are expected to think and have your ideas really be valued, are you as an individual going to be valued for the creativity that you bring and how you can draw that out from the next employer, that's really the firm you should join.

Again, you just don't want to be another robot in an organization. You want to be seen as someone exceptional and have the opportunity to really thrive and have your ideas heard, respected, not always taken (after all, they won't always be taken), to be someone who is hired for their mind and for their ideas and not just simply because you can execute tasks.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​

Is It Normal? | Job Search Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/05/31/is-it-normal/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the question as to whether a situation is normal when his employer extends someone and want them to verbally accept a job offer before they put the offer in writing.
 
Summary

Is it normal for a company to refuse sending details of an offer by email before I verbally accept an offer?

This person is orally received an offer, they want to get an offer letter, there wondering why they don't have the letter as of yet. Is it normal for me to say yes and then have the letter sent?

The answer is, "Yes," it is normal. The reason is, why should they go through all the final approvals, have admin type something, send it to you only to find out that you are not going to accept the job offer? Isn't that kind of pointless from your standpoint? I sure know it's pointless from their standpoint.

While the offer letter does is confirm what you have already been told. You are going to be paid a certain amount, that you might be eligible for a bonus, the offer is contingent upon you successfully completed a background check, etc. etc.

If they lied to you, no one is asking you to quit your job until you have the offer letter. All the offer letter does is confirm what you have been told. If you were them, harnessing manpower/woman power or however you want to describe it to process this offer letter and you intend to turn it down, what was the point anyway?

They want to hear the acceptance from you 1st, then do all the mechanics to deliver a letter for you. It is completely normal.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedInFollow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

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