What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

Summary

Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made (VIDEO)

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Non-Offer Offer (VIDEO)


I received a question from someone the painted description of what I can only think of is a non–offer offer. Do you agree with my assessment? Do you disagree?

Summary

I am doing a video today because someone described the situation to me that they wanted some advice about. I think it is something that is pertinent to more than just simply this 1 person. They wrote about doing a presentation to the CEO of a firm that judging by this person's address would require relocation. The CEO love this presentation, loved his alpproach, loved his ideas and decided from the time of his 1st meeting till now that he has a choice to make about the direction of his firm. He has decided to change the model and that requires a different team and strategy and this is completely new information to the job hunter.

The CEO clearly liked him and wants him to be involved with improving the current model which brings in cash, while considering what will be needed for the other model. To that end he asked this person to present a proposal to work for him as a contract employee to improve the current model. At the end of 60 days, he would decide whether to bring them on full time. The question is whether this is a good thing to do. Is this an okay thing for him to do? Is he using a tactic where he can eliminate me after 60 days?

Knowing that this involves relocation, you have an offer to work for him for 60 days.Actually to make a proposal to work for him for 60 days. You have an offer to bid on 2 months of work. You have a full-time situation now and I know from other parts of this note that you are not happy with it. The idea of moving for 60 days of work when you have a house of family and stuff like that while uprooting everyone doesn't seem to be very sensible.

What comes to mind as an appropriate strategy Is to say, "I am interested in being involved. Talk to me about what you think is fair for me to be involved. Please don't lowball me. If the role, you are asking me to uproot myself and my family to move out here. So what do you think is a fair price?"

2. You have to ask them this next question point blank. "After 60 days if you decide to dump this business, sell it or what have you, What happens to me?" I know the answer that question – – You're gone. The CEO has had 2 months of consulting and adios. You want him to say what he believes he will do And then from there, put it in writing. If the goal is for you to get another job, then this isn't a job. It is a non-job job offer. It is an oppirtunity to bid for a consulting assignment.

For now, there is more to find out. The big thing is what happens after 60 days If, through no fault of yours, the CEO decides,, "I'm Going to bail on the sucker. Let's shut it down." You are out of a job.. Are you okay with that? Instead, ask them what happens to you then.. I could be completely wrong (experience tells me I'm not) This to be the most honest guy in the world is not going to fire you after 60 days.

But what if he does? Is that what you want?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Accepting-a-Lower-Offer

Should I Take A Lower Offer (VIDEO)


A question from someone about accepting a job offer for less money than you want.

Summary

The question I was asked, "Should I accept less money?" I want to start off by saying that my bias is against doing it. I also want to lay out cases where it makes sense. There aren't many, but there are a few instances where it does make sense. But going back to the conclusion I believe the general you don't do it.

The few circumstances where it makes sense are:

1. The great opportunity. To me, there are relatively few great opportunities but I am not in your seat and don't live your life. You have to decide what a great opportunity is for you that would cause you to accept less. For the person making $100,000 a year, for the person making $200,000 a year, the notion of accepting a few dollars less for the "great opportunity" may not be a big deal. For the person making $50,000 a year, it is a different story. But that person you have to weigh the alternatives and come to your decision about whether it's worth your while.

2. If you been out of work for a long time. For you, you have a job right now and you don't have a career. You been out of work for 6, 8, 9, 12 months… Longer? Someone is making a job offer to you for less money than you earned "back when" you have a job or career right now. It's over. The fact it's that someone is willing to give you a shot after so many people have turned you down… That's a circumstance to consider it.

Understand though that often firms are negotiating.

They will talk about the individual who they've met with who is looking really strong and we are weighing the 2 of you and this person is willing to accept less. That's 1 of the classics and areas the firms dredge up. That's 1 of the classic scenarios that firms used to finesse you into accepting less money.

Frankly, I would turn around and say, "Thanks for bringing that to my attention. The fact is that if you believe this is a better person for this role, you should really choose them. If we are really equal and they are willing to accept less, you should choose them. For me, I look at it as, "I cost more but I bring greater productivity. If I haven't convinced you of that yet, talk with me about the perceived differences between us and let's address that." The fact that they are raising. This is the subject indicates that it is close. They do see a difference between the 2 of you; otherwise they would try to bring you down to that price point. After all, why bother to have this conversation. They could have just chosen the other person.

That's a factor. They are using a negotiating ploy.

Another factor that you need to take into consideration it is not about accepting $5000 or $10,000 less now, it is that accepting less money affects every dollar you ever earn for that firm and every other firm from now on, All because you accepted less money now. They build their raises based on what you are currently earning, right?

Using simple numbers, if you accept $5000 less now or are making $110,000 and accept $100,000, if you get a 5% increase, you are now at $105,000. Had you been at $110,000, the race would have been higher, right? Understand that there is an impact now and when you change jobs from a few years in the future, 2 or 3 years from now. After all, they are formulating their increases based upon what you are currently earning.

For now, in Massachusetts, that will become different next year, when a law goes into effect prohibiting employers from asking about your salary. For most organizations in most parts of the country, they are basing wage increases on current salary. They don't care that you took $10,000 less to join your current firm. They work off the current numbers because that's a fact. Understand there's an impact upon you that you will never recover from.

As you can tell, generally, I am against accepting less money. If it means so much to an organization that you accept $5000 or $10,000 less, there is a bigger problem there in terms of how your marketing yourself that you need to address.

Generally, thumbs down to the notion of accepting less except in the circumstances that I've already outlined..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The Offer and The Interview | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 686 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone who has one job offer and has been invited to head on site interview

Summary

I have another question that someone asked of me. This 1 is a fun one. "Should I delay signing an offer letter? I have an opportunity for an on-site with a better company."

It is what we don't know. We don't know what the better companies interview process is like. Isn't one interview and a job offer? 5 interviews? How long do they plan on taking? Usually, the answer is "We will take as long as we need to in order to come to a good decision for ourselves. We are not going to get bullied into brushing our process."

On the other hand, "burning hand is worth 2 in bush." It's never quite that easy.

What I would do is sign the offer letter and accept it. And here's where it gets obnoxious. You then go continue interviewing with the other firm.

Why do I say that? I know HR people and hiring managers will tell me I am an awful human being. But the fact of the matter is organizations do what is right for them. Job hunters need to start learning that lesson for themselves, too. When times get tough, whichever firm you join, may lay you off. Don't feel this notion of chivalry, of respecting these other firms is a value that they are going to reciprocate.

Again, what I would do is sign the offer letter, continue interviewing, satisfy your curiosity because at the end of the day, you don't want to lose in an acceptable offer. You also don't want to lose an opportunity with a firm that intrigues you. You haven't mentioned anything about comparing the jobs so I'm working with the assumption that the positions are comparable. And they may not be. The only way that you're going to find out if they are comparable or better, with the hiring manager and the people you'll be working for and with our better is by interviewing with them. I know that's really what you want to do so just go out and do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

False Choices

False Choices (VIDEO)


You are constantly being presented bad choices and told to pick between them. And you do. Why do you do it?

 

Summary

I don't care if you're looking for work or examining other places in your life, you are always presented with false choices. Should I choose A or B? Should I accept this job or that job? What about job opportunities and mediocre? Aren't you talking yourself into something

As you start weighing the pros and cons of each position, you say to yourself, "I don't like this. I don't like this other choice either." What he have to take other choice? What do you have to take the false choice j the ustrecruiter says you have to offer is you have to choose one?

I don't think so! And that's the way you are being sold to constantly. You go to the store and take a look at the things on the shelves of the supermarket and you're presented with 7 things and kind of go, "Ehhhhhhhhhhh . . . " And pick one. Why are you settling?

You don't have to settle. Life is more than just choosing between bad options. For those of you who are in the US, you live in the most incredible society imaginable.

You may have a home. A relationship. You may have a wife/partner/husband/kids . . . You have some good juju in the bank with yourself.

Then, someone comes along and says, "Here. You have 2 mediocre choices that you are not completely sold on. Choose between them."

Okay. I'm going to give you a third – – choice. Reject both.

I'm going to encourage you to have the guts to reject both bad choices. Both mediocre choices. You don't have to tolerate.

I want you to feel excited about your decisions, not motivated to make them but excited to make them. I want you to feel excited about making the decision, whether that is in job search, or other places in your life.

For you to start feeling successful in your life, you're going to have to look back and start feeling life was worthwhile, you made good choices that serve you and your family, that leads you to places, and work that you want to be doing, and not settling between mediocre choices.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

For more No BS Coaching Advice & encouragement, visit my website.

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Increasing the Salary Offer | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep. 600 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an easy to implement strategy for asking a firm to increase their salary offer to you so that you will accept it.

Negotiating is one of the skills job hunters need to improve
Summary

We are going to be talking today about a strategy for firmed up the job offer. I want to be clear – – it doesn't always work. Nothing always works. If you want a guarantee in life, I will give you one guarantee – – you are going to die. That is the only guarantee that exists.

This is an opportunity for you to try upping the job offer and do it in a way where, after you come on board, they'll take it out in your hide. You see, I've been in tough negotiations with people because they have insisted that they squeeze every drop of blood out of my client. What invariably happens is, in a tough negotiation, when the person comes on board, it is taken out on them. There are a lot of different ways; I'm not to go through with describing them.

I simply want to talk about how you can do negotiation without them getting angry at you. Here's a scenario I was helping someone with recently.

At various points, he given me an idea of what he would, except for my clients. He is involved with the relocation to accept this job and the client far exceeded any relocation money that the guy was asking for. The candidate was thrilled about that. However, he missed made a mistake in his calculations about the salary part of the job offer. He forgot to take into consideration the tax differences between the 2 states. So, suddenly, what was an acceptable offer has become a few thousand dollars short.

Here's what I suggested to do. Understand, the client extended the offer to him directly. I am the client to represented him to them but they will be dealing with one another now and in the future. So, yes, I could step in, but I thought it would be best if he handled this because they have been dealing with him directly throughout the interview process and I just think they want to have that relationship with him and he has to reciprocate.

What I suggested that he do is make arrangements to speak with my client and approach them in this matter. Before I go any further, let me explain some of the nuances. I said to him, "Before you call up, slow your speech down. When people speak quickly, is associated with people who 'hustle.' Scam artists. Insincerity. Will be slower speech down, and seem like we are kicking their individual words carefully, it sounds sincere. It is important for you to send sincere."

Then I continued by saying, "what you say to him is as follows, 'when I spoke with Jeff about what I would find acceptable, I told him this number. But, I forgot to take into account that there was a tax difference. I haven't told him about this until today and I just thought I would talk with you directly about this. The difference is (and I told him to quote the specific number). Please understand, I want to join very much. It is a great opportunity. I'm ready to say yes today. Could you increase the number by (and that I suggested that he quote the specific number he was looking for)?'"

What this does make this a person-to-person relationship between the parties. They can hear the sincerity, where they can hear your agony over this, where they can hear that you want to join and that you are prepared to commit today if they increase the offer. That goes a long way in employers playbook because 1 of the things that they hate doing (understand, this happens all the time. People say that they will do one thing and then they do something else. They don't want to do all the work to get approvals to get an offer increase and to then have you turn it down). By hearing your voice and sounding sincere. What you are able to do is be personally persuasive, given the carrot of letting them know that you're ready to say yes if they had that number, and then, from their standpoint, once you get that number, you got the job!

Sincerity. Slowing your speech down. Being clear about what you are looking for. These are huge part of how to up the offer.

You can always hardball people and say, "I made a mistake. I know I said I was looking for. This amount, but I really want this." You can do that and be prepared for firms to say, "You know what? Don't let the door hit you in the butt." And, I will do other shows that will talk about how to do a tough negotiation.

When all is said and done, I think that if you are very close and there is a few thousand dollars difference, sincerity goes a long way toward bringing everything together.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

A Bird in the Hand . . . | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

job-offer

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you a cautionary tale to remind you that a bird in the hand is worth more than two in the bush.

 

Summary

I want to tell you a cautionary tale, give you a warning, however you want to think of it they came from her recent experience with the job hunter.  This was a person moving to a new city.  He bought a house with his wife, wanted to move to the new location, contacted me because I have a client there, I had a position he was well-qualified for, all sorts of good stuff. 

The interview with my client and is about to get an offer. The head of the department that he is meeting with his traveling, so. The job offer can’t get signed off on right away.  In the meantime, unbeknownst to me until the last 2nd, he has received an offer from another firm.  I contacted him to let him know that my client is about to extend an offer.  My contact with that firm gets in touch with him to let them know that he’s getting an offer. All they have to do is get one last signature. They expect to have it signed off on imitator to.

Let Me Fast-Forward

The applicant asked me about my client and whether they are reliable.

They took the time to call you to let you know this was going to happen. I don’t know this person to be a liar.  I would say it is going to happen.

I gave him my best judgment.

I also want to say I didn’t know he had another offer until after this.  He emailed me on a Friday evening to say that based upon what you’ve heard from the HR person is going to turn down the offer he has and wait for my client.

The horrible thing that happened is that the head of the department decided not to sign off on the offer.  Now, this person is out of a job and cannot recover that other job offer. He has to find something and he is moved to his new city.  He has no income.

Consider that a lesson.  What you do instead is 1 of several things.  To be clear, I did not ask him to turn down that other offer.

The lesson here is that a bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush.

The way to handle that situation is:

  1. Accept the offer and set the start date a week further out.  In this way, you can install a weeks time for my client to have come back.  If my client hadn’t, he would have gone off to that original job.  Then, if my client came through, he could have made another decision if you thought that made sense.  Not my choice. His choice.
  2. Stall the acceptance of the original offer and try to wait for my client.  If pressured, ultimately accept, delay the start a little bit… You get the idea.

You don’t turn down offers based upon a hope, awaiting in the prayer.

What you do is turn down offers when you actually have something, not necessarily what in writing, but have the oral offer, when you being told that the offer will be put in writing, etc..  Not before then.  Especially in situations like this where he was going to be stranded without a job at the time working really needed to be positioned.

Again, my advice is a bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush.  Stall as long as you can. Delay starting as long as you can if that other offer is the preferred job.

If it isn’t the preferred job, it doesn’t matter!  In this case, it was. The money was going to be significantly better.  The work was going to be significantly better.  You get the idea.

You don’t turn down something for the hope that something will come through because, as happened here, sometimes it doesn’t.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

 You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How to Respond to a Low Ball Job Offer – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Listen to this episode of No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers  a simple strategy for responding to a job offer lower than what you are looking for.

Summary

Today, we’re going to take a salary negotiation scenario out of, “Shark Tank,” the ABC series where entrepreneurs come to pitch product ideas to five potential investors. Here is the classic scenario on the show: one offers to purchase more stock for the same money being asked for by the entrepreneur. So, let’s say,  an entrepreneur walks in and says, “I want $500,000 for a 5% share of my firm,” one of the sharks will counter and propose that they give $500,000 for a 25% share of the firm. In job hunting, a similar scenario occurs when you ask for a particular salary and they offer a lesser amount to you.

You have a number of different ways of responding when you receive a lower offer than what you’re looking for. However, before I start describing how you can respond, I want to remind you of the quote from the old movie, “The Godfather.” The line from the movie is, “It’s business. It isn’t personal.”Don’t respond indignantly to their offer; start by reselling your capabilities to them. After all, for them, it may have been a long job search to find you and they may have forgotten some of your value along the way.

If that doesn’t work, the usual advice people get is to say that you want to think about it. However, like on the show, people often want to “think about it” longer than the firm is willing to allow them to do so. The offer was rescinded. In much the same way as on, “Shark Tank,” even the request can be met with the offer being withdrawn.

Instead of asking to think about it, you can come back with a counteroffer. Let’s say, you are looking for $150,000 and they extended an offer for $140,000. “I think this is a great opportunity in I’m willing to be flexible but I would like you to show some flexibility, as well. I would accept this offer at $147,500.” They may respond by telling you they can go that high and counter propose for $142,000 or $144,000 or something else.Whatever it is, you move them up from their original offer. That’s the game plan – – to move them up from their original offer by expressing and showing your flexibility to them.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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