The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/04/the-easiest-way-to-negotiate-a-higher-salary-for-yourself/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Here, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Summary

I want to talk with you today about negotiating compensation because it is probably 1 of the most under talked about aspects of the job search. The reason for that is pretty clear. the big boys, the big girls, when they are negotiating compensation have all sorts of ways to play the game.for the little guy, the small person you may be in a blue-collar job working for a small business where someone is paying them out of their own pocket...there is no negotiating there.the basic form of negotiation there is, "Were making you an offer. You have 2 choices. Leave it or take it."

Then there is the average person, perhaps a professional or white-collar worker, small or big company… It doesn't really matter. when offer comes in someone's trying to improve upon it, again, there are limited strategies for what you can do. again, the big boys and big girls have a pretty easy. they are all going to have big-time agents and they are not covered by the same rules. the average person is really stuck because, if you working for a public corporation, for example, they cannot really do side deals because they are subject to litigation. if they do a side deal with you (I will use myself as an example) for some additional benefit, they can be sued because, after all, why did they give it to this white guy and not give it to this individual who is not a white guy? Why did they give it to the heterosexual guy it not the gay guy? we live in a litigious society and that affects the way the negotiations done.

I want to give you the simplest negotiation strategy that you can use. it doesn't always work but often it does.it requires very little strain or stress on your part. for the average individual, here is the basic negotiating tactic:

If they hit your number, you can go, "YIPPEE! I'M GOING TO TAKE THE OFFER! YAY!!!" If you told them a particular number and they hit it or more, it isn't really right if you ask for more. after all, what does that really say about you. You told him one thing and now you want even more? it kind of makes you look like a pig.

however, if an organization hasn't hit the number that you been negotiating with them for or they know you been looking for because your agent or you have told him about it during the interview, here is the simplest strategy.

(Best listened to)

Step number 1 . "Huh (said as though you are pondering)." you will make it sound too uncomfortable but you want to pause a little bit then give them something.

"I've got to tell you I really love this firm but I think the offer is a touch low. I need to think about this a little bit. Can I get back to you tomorrow?"

Right off the bat, what that does is make them nervous. . You haven't said no. You put them in limbo. you given them the carrot of saying, "I love the job. I love the organization," but you hesitated. They know it's the money.

When you get back to them the next day, I want to be prepared for them with a number of points.

"Other than the money, is there anything that is in question for you?" Then you ask those questions.then you get to the real one… The money. By the way, with the other stuff, you need to know in your own mind what you're ready to walk away from. Not everything should be life and death on the secondary issues. when you get to the money part of the conversation which is what they're really waiting for, and you want to say yes to the firm,now it's just money standing in the way.

Pause.

Look them square in the eye

Whether you doing this in person or over the phone, you have to sound a little introspective and uncomfortable. like you are thinking (even though this is all planned and rehearsed).

You say, "I'm a little disappointed in the money. I know we spoke earlier about it being such and such in this, obviously, is less."

At this point, you pause again and allow them to respond to it. Or, you pause and they don't respond to it and then you say, "Could you do attach better?" Then you stay silent for a little bit. don't break the silence. Wait for them to respond 1st.

They may ask, "How much more?"

"I would really like the money I was talking with you about. I would like more but I would really like the money I was talking with you about."

"We can't go that high."

"Could you do a touch better? Could you meet me in the middle?"

The 1st option obviously is to go to her asking for. option number 2 is to go for the middle ground somewhere. Just get them to improve the offer somewhere above where they extended it.

Obviously, the 3rd option is that you can turn down their offer. Be prepared to do that because if you going to that negotiation with the attitude of being prepared to take whatever they give you, then, obviously, we going to the conversation little bit differently.

If they turn you down on improving the offer, you can always sigh and ask whether they can improve the review policy a little bit.instead of an annual review, can I give you a six-month review so that you have the possibility of getting a raise sooner.

Then, you are quiet again.

"There is no guarantee that you will get an increase but I think we can get your review in 6 months."

"Thank you. That I can say yes to. I can accept the offer."

Or, you say no based upon what you hear from them. if there unwilling to be flexible, there could be business reasons for that. they could be paying one individual less than what they are offering you who they are bringing in from the outside and they are afraid they might lose the other person. in theory, you should be concerned about that, but in practice, you should because it could impact you as well.

again, to do a quick review, step number 1 is to say, "I would like to think about it." step number 2 is covering all the other things you need to cover 1st and then getting "sincere" with them when you talk about the money (follow the advice above). they will often raise it, but if they won't. They may say, "we can't. This is the max in our budget." then, you ask if they can do a different review policy for you. Whatever the right answer is, you need to know going into the conversation what you are prepared to do, including walking away.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Starting a Negotiation with Yes (VIDEO)


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
.
It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Your Worth (VIDEO)

Establishing your worth is more the most Important things that you can do in business and in job search. In this video, I walk through a simple technique that anyone can do.

Summary

This video is entitled, "Your Worth." Your worth is consistently 1 of the things that people undervalue and they do so for one very simple reason – – they don't understand their value. They go into the job market and decide they are looking for a certain percentage increase over what they currently earn without making any comparisons.

Comparisons have value and I understand that employers attempt to value you based upon previous salary. After all, they are not going to take a $65,000 per your person and pay them $135,000, or are they? Not unless they go into consulting 1st and establish themselves as earning $65-$90 per hour . In which case, at $65, they are earning $130,000 per year and at $90 per hour they are earning $180,000 per year. Then, they will try to drop you down.

What can you do to establish your value?

The 1st thing you need to do is to establish it in your own mind. You need to understand how you compare with others. You are not going to find that out online. You're going to find out by talking to hiring managers and other organizations to get a sense of how they would value you and your skills without telling them necessarily that you are looking for job but you just want to try get a sense of how they would evaluate you. For example, don't tell them what you are currently earning; just asked him to give you a sense of what your capabilities are and how they would assess you. That's a more valuable benchmark for any online survey you might ever read.

After all, the surveys are very limited. They may offer a job title; they may offer skill set. There is no depth in that. For example, if you are in IT and it says, "Java developer," what does that really say? There are tons of different tools to go along with that.

How do you get that sense? The 1st place is internally so that in this way, you are persuasive with someone else. Then, from there, I think the 2nd places during the waiting. A lot of job hunters do things that devalue themselves and often that occurs during the waiting process. They become anxious they REALLY want it. Their desperation comes across and kind of like the guy or girl in a dating situation who is waiting by the phone pining for that person to call them to the point where they turn into a stalker who called for 5 different times in a short period of time to try to flush out that person they were out with, you don't want to come across as being desperate. Desperation doesn't work, does it?

You will like it. After all, if you walked into a car dealership and the salesperson tried to push you into buying a car or they were selling life insurance and they try to push you into a policy, employers don't like it and hiring managers don't like it. So why do you act desperate?

You have to control yourself and the best way to do that is to go out on more "dates." By dates, I'm referring to interviews. By doing this, you get a sense of your value. You get a sense of how others perceive you and how that engenders more interesting you. The more interest you get, the better you will feel, the more value you will have and the more persuasiveness you will deliver when talking about your value to others.

You see, it's not just enough that you know your value. That's the starting place. You need to convince other people of your value in the 1st way to do it is with YOUR attitude. Your attitude says a lot to the employer. It says, "Hey, look, I would love to work for you, but there are other fish in the sea, too." That's the same as what they communicate to you, right? "Hey, we'd love to hire you, but were to talk to 25 more people before we circle back and maybe, ask you out again." You have to have your equivalent as well.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Play to Their Emotions, Too | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not only use logic when you get into a negotiation with a potential hire AND he proves it, too.

Summary

This is 1 of the hardest lessons to get but I can prove it to you. There is the lesson: it's not facts that always win the day. It is emotions that do. Let me prove it to you.

For those of you who smoke and those of you who are smokers,, factually, you know smoking isn't healthy for you,, right? You know, at some point that if you continue to smoke, where you going to put yourself in a situation where you will suffer a lot,, your health is going to suffer tremendously and maybe smoking or the impact of smoking will kill you.These are the facts. Yet millions of people, tens of millions of people continue to smoke. Why when that same lesson extend itself to a salary make a salary negotiation?

With a third-party recruiter or corporate recruiter, we spend a lot of time with the factual element of why someone should take a job.. We spend less time with the emotional element and we need to shift that's. Were not committed persuade some of the take $20,000 less by dealing with their emotions. The likelihood of that is very slim. For most middle-management professionals.

However, you can entice them to join if your own offer is close to ideal by talking with them about their relationship with the manager.. This is true, particularly after the interview.. If the manager does things that cause candidates to enjoy them, to have fun with them. If you think this is only stuff that works with startup firms,, let me correct you. This works with any organization.

The hiring manager has a key role in the salary negotiation, not because he or she is negotiating it, but because they are creating an image in the candidate's mind of being someone Who they will want to work for. Because they're fun, upbeat,, they are someone that they can learn a lot from while they are doing this job. You need to impress upon these hiring managers their contribution to the hire. That's because in this way, when you get down to the close, you can spend time on the emotional aspects of this and not just on the factual ones.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

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You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Another Salary Negotiation Tactic | Job Search Radio

There are easy ways and hard ways to negotiate . . . and ones in the middle. This one is a mid-to easy way.

 

Summary

I am here today to give you another tactic for salary negotiation. I have published a lot of them as videos; the reason I publish a lot, is because each of you has a different ability to tolerate the stress of the negotiation. Some of you want what I call the easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself; some are open to the 2nd easiest way; some people really want to get in there and fight. There are also lots of different gradients between those extremes.

Here is 1 of those midrange options that I think is very helpful.

The 1st thing is that if the firm wants you to fill out an application, leave the salary area blank. If you need to scribble something, do so but generally leave it blank. When they verbally ask you, "I noticed this was blank in your application (they know what you're doing), How much are you making now/how much you looking for?" You basically respond by saying, "I'm much more interested in the nature of the work. I will be doing for your firm than I am a specific number. So, no, I'm not going to take $14,000 per year, but I would expect you to be reasonable with your job offer."

From they are, some firms are going to go and take a 2nd stab at this. They will say something along the lines of, "you know… I need a number here." You can respond by saying, "I will consider any reasonable offer."

What this does is stall. If they go at it again, "I don't know how I could be more clear. I would consider any reasonable offer."

Once they have made the offer, assuming that this worked ... By the way, I forgot to mention one thing. If it doesn't work, you've learned something about the firm. You've learned that they just have to "break you shoes. Open I didn't want to use a male anatomical part there)." They are there to break you down so that you can form.

Particularly if you are in sales and marketing, never ever conceded this point. What are you saying about yourself as a salesperson? As a matter of fact, after you have given the answer the 1st time (What's really important to me is the nature of the work in the product and service) what you want to be doing if they come at you again is to say something along the lines of, "hey, look, if I made it easy for you, you would question my ability as a salesperson, right. What my job here is to give you a sense of who I am and what I'm capable of, what my achievements of been and what I can do for you. I asked that I be treated fairly and let's move on here."

Again, if they push you, it tells you something. They really want you to operate. "In a square box." You don't want to work for a firm that you can find you in such a way (in my opinion).

Here's the fun thing to do once you get the offer. Ready? This 1 I love.

I want you to pause for a second, "were going to be making you an offer. We really want you to come on board. The seller part of the offers a base of $120,000. " Then they start laying out the additional percentages.

I want you to turn around and go (Particularly if you are the sales), "120. Hmmm. " What that does is let them know that the number isn't quite right, and opens up the conversation for negotiation. From there, you can follow up with data that you have gotten from various sources about what someone with your background should be earning in a role like this.

You can always except the 120 and all the other stuff And after you've done the salary, you cannot go at all the other conditions and benefits, too. Whatever the percentages are on top of the base, start trying to negotiate those as well. Start at the salary number just by repeating it back because with that does is give them the idea that you are comfortable saying yes and that is a subject for negotiation that they want to enter into with you.

So, again, another approach, another way of doing a negotiation that I hope you can execute

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Advice from “The Godfather” About Negotiating Salary | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses a memorable quote from “The Godfather” to offer advice about salary negotiation.

the-godfather

Summary

I’m back today with more advice from The Godfather about job hunting.  In the movie, it isn’t done a better job hunting. Marlon Brando plays The Godfather, James, Caan plays Place his older son, Sonny. Sonny is a hot tempered guy, very quick. There is a point where Sonny says something about what he is thinking and The Godfather says these words:

“Never tell anyone outside the family what you are thinking again.”

The idea behind this is often, in negotiations, people are asking you, “What do you think about the job?

I think it’s okay to answer them.  With regard to compensation,, you are always best served if you hold back a little bit.  You can say something like, “I’m thinking pretty favorably about this.  I’m hoping this is a high offer.

Avoid giving them a number in the negotiation phase.  Why? Because as soon as you give them a number, that’s the one that they are focused on.  No higher. No lower.  That’s it.

If you have 2 or 3 firms on the hook, then they will start bidding against one another.  You can start playing one off against the other

Recruiters may say something to you like, “Tell me what you are thinking.  What is it going to take to close the deal?”  In all candor, I do this all the time.  What serves you best is if you hold out what that number is problem is going to cause you to say yes.  Sometimes, the character strategy is that the recruiter will come back and lowball you.

You will respond by saying, “What! That is ridiculous!  I would never take an offer like that!”

“What would you take?”

At that point, you start talking about the number and then they’ve got you.

Hold off on talking about specific numbers that will cause you to say yes.  Like The Godfather says,, “Never tell anyone outside the family. What you are thinking.”  What will happen is that’s the only number they are going to be concerned about.  You’re better off if you have multiple situations going and tell them what the other firms are thinking, not what you are thinking.

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

A Cute Salary Negotiation Tip | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a cute tactic he uses when negotiating salary for someone.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about a little salary negotiation tip that came to me a while back. I use it from time to time when working with clients when the candidate is about to get an offer and I am negotiating salary on behalf of the client.

I found an interesting thing.  Every once in a while, instead of using an expected round number that ends in zero or $5000 like $80,000 or $85,000, I pick a different kind of number.

I might say something like, $87,500 or $112,200.

Things that are a little irregular.

Why?

Because it is not a number that they are used to hearing so it gives them reason to think, instead of instantly responding with EA or née.  In those cases, it’s May because firms always try to push down the amount. It is very rare that someone increases the amount.

He gives them reason to hesitate. And, as a result, we get into an actual conversation, rather than knee-jerk reactions.

Try.

That you are asked what salary you are looking for, try saying something like $122,200.

“How did you come up with that number?”

“Well, I did some research on the web.  I took a look at the value for what I do and found that this was the mean for the range that you are looking.”

“What was the range?”

Of course you can come back and say, “$117,000-$125,000 per year.”

When all is said and done, making them hear an unusual number causes them to deal with you differently than everyone else..

Don’t fall into the predictable pattern.  Try doing something a little bit different.

When I’m asked to submit a consultant, I’m asked what rate I charge for the person.  I don’t say, for example, “$100 per hour.”  I will say $”$101.75 per hour for this person.”  He gives me a little room to negotiate, of course.  Again, it is a different kind of valuation then just say $100.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation?


There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

 

Summary

I was asked, “How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?”

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn’t been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

  1. As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
  2. This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
  3. You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, “What’s the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?”
  4. They just don’t care.  There’s no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it’s not like you’re the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.

Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, “Are you okay?”  The message may read something along the lines of, “I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven’t heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right.”

That will usually “guilt them” into surfacing.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Keep Your Wits About You

Have you ever lost it? I have it wasn’t a pretty picture. In this video, I talk about the importance of talking yourself down from the cliff and how you should never split the difference.

 

Summary

I wanted to talk with you today about the importance of keeping your wits about you, especially as you go into a negotiation.

I’m sure you realize that there have been times where you’ve lost your cool, gotten into arguments with people, and just felt like destroying them.  Maybe you’ve done it with your wife, husband or partner, maybe with a coworker or friend, and you started dredging up things from your collective past and started throwing it in their face. You start making threats.

How did that work for you? Did you really think that you would get what you wanted?

The result that you’ve gotten is that you thrown a tantrum.  You were a big baby in an adult body but you are still a baby.

If you’re trying to get your way in a negotiation with someone, if someone has said or done something that takes you off and you just lose it, I want to encourage you to just pull back a little bit and say, “I’m sorry. Something that you just said activated an old memory for me.  Can we start this from scratch? I apologize.”

The reason is you’re just not going to win.  All you’re going to do Is cause hatred and resentment.  You’re not going to get your way.

That’s why it’s important to keep your wits about you and pulling back the reins at times.

You can even try to remember whose voice that is. Whose voices that that set you off?  What’s the memory you have of the similar situation back in time?

If this is a negotiation where money is involved, unless you concede the point there, you will concede money in the negotiation. And if they throw their hands up in the air and say, “Okay.  Let’s split the difference,” never ever split the difference because the person who is offering that is getting their way. They are trying to make you think that it is “fair,” And, frankly, it isn’t.

Again, pull yourself back from the abyss, that crazy moment, when you lose it. Get a hold of yourself. Never ever split the difference when you are negotiating.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice and encouragement, visit my website.

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